Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This article presents the results of a quantitative and qualitative analysis of adolescent selfpresentations in Fotolog. The images which these adolescents create and share through the Net focus on the construction of the Self. Here gender and sexuality become the main structuring factors of representation. Results point to the fact adolescents selfpresentations mirror some of the categories defined by Goffman in his study of gender hyperritualization in advertising. Moreover, other gender expressions are found in the sample, such as the lesbian pose or the erotization of bodies which Gill also detects in advertising. Despite the fact that the images that adolescents upload in Social Networking Sites reproduce gender stereotypes and patriarchal patterns based in advertising, it must be said that they also elaborate a relatively varied repertoire of pictures and are able to conceive original creations. These creative selfrepresentations are the outcome of a process of negotiation of gender and sexual identity which occurs in these settings, as well as in other adolescent media practices. To avoid a thoughtless reproduction of gender stereotypes and contribute to a critical negotiation of these representations, media education is needed. This media education should take into account the way in which adolescent practices are shaped by other media consumption.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

In a survey by the Pfizer Foundation (2009), it was found that 92.6 percent of young people aged 11-20 participate in social networking sites (SNS). Tuenti, Facebook and Fotolog were the first, second and third sites most used by the interviewees. From other studies we get very similar figures, except for Catalonia, where Fotolog is the second SNS with the most users, with Facebook as third choice (Sánchez & Fernández, 2010). For Sánchez and Fernández (2010), SNS use is highly intensive: 66 percent of those surveyed use such sites on a daily basis, while 18 percent do so more than once per week. Genderwise, 42.9 percent of girls and 34.5 percent of boys log on to these networking sites several times a day. Given the pervasiveness of SNS in teenagers' lives, it is worth looking into some of the practices in which adolescents (Spanish adolescents in this case) engage in such spaces, and more specifically, into those more closely connected to their own self-presentation.

Insofar as, in social networking sites, identities are largely created as display identities, it makes sense that we focus an analysis of such spaces on the ritualization that takes place in self-presentation processes. In a sense, teenagers end up engaging in a kind of praxis not dissimilar to that of advertisers, who, according to Goffman (1979), ritualize what is already ritualized. This means they take gender manifestations that we all share socially and reshape them while exaggerating some of their traits. In their self-presentations, these youngsters seek to strike flashy, attention-seeking poses, and to that end, the gendered depictions they make of themselves tend to be modeled on those they find in advertising and in other audiovisual formats, whose gender stereotypes they often adapt and reproduce.

Our study focused on a specific social networking site, Fotolog, and analyzed the kinds of self-presentations and interactions we found in it. We performed a quantitative content analysis on a sample of 400 Spanish teenagers' photoblogs to determine what types of images are shared on this site in particular, as well as a critical and qualitative analysis (an in-depth study of the albums posted on 18 photoblogs) to understand how adolescents make sense of the pictures they post on these virtual spaces – that is how they negotiate both their gender identities and the meaning of attractiveness (to themselves and to others). The analysis shows how these teens engage in hyper-ritualization, what resources they use for self-presentations, what similarities these share with gender representations in advertising, and how adolescents' gender identities are shaped through their interactions in these spaces.

2. Theoretical background

2.1. Social networking sites, image and gender identity

In recent years, several studies have sustained that both personal web pages and SNS provide a significant environment for identity exploration (Stern, 2004; Manago & al., 2008), for teenagers' self-presentation (Stern, 2004), and for the social comparison and expression of idealized aspects of what one is and would like to be (Manago & al., 2008); some of such works have also suggested that social networking sites have a remarkable bearing on socialization and, more specifically, on the construction of gender identity (García-Gómez, 2010; Huffaker & Calvert, 2005; Sevick-Bortree, 2005; Sveningsson, 2008; Thelwall, 2008).

For Livingstone (2009), identity and on-line relations are jointly determined by the technical possibilities of SNS and by teenage peer culture (both on- and off-line). Other authors have also demonstrated a reciprocal influence among different spaces in which adolescents take part (Sevick-Bortree, 2005) and have pointed out the existence of a series of conventions that make these teens' web pages look much alike (Stern, 2002).

The sites young users create acquire meaning from the connections they establish in them as they create them, update them and post comments in them. Teenagers are keener on sharing their privacy, so to speak –that is, on creating spaces for intimacy that, building on the links they establish to their peers, allow them to be themselves– than on protecting that privacy per se. They thus redefine privacy, as it is no longer about what information one reveals, but about controlling who gets to know what and what one tells about oneself (Livingstone, 2009).

Girls create their personal pages intentionally and strategically and make decisions regarding what they want those pages to look like and what they wish their audience to know about them (Stern, 2002). Likewise, boys pay considerable attention to the images of themselves they pick for their own profiles on social sites (Siibak, 2010). In spaces such as those provided by Facebook, users seem to prefer showing rather than saying, yet, at the same time, they tend to favor implicit and mediated poses over explicit identity statements. In a sense, they build their own hoped-for possible selves – these are socially desirable selves that cybernauts present to others and are related to identities that are not fully established in off-line environments yet (Zhao, Grasmuck & Martin, 2008). What a teenager reveals about herself (or himself) can help her achieve greater social control; this is therefore a strategic act she performs in order to induce those socially desired results she is trying to obtain, to manage the impression she makes on other people, and to earn social approval (Stern, 2004).

Personal web pages allow their publishers to signal who they are and how they want to be seen by others (Stern, 2004). Nicknames usually become a major vehicle for the sharing of identity information (Subrahmanyam, Smahel & Greenfield, 2006), although the two features that page owners are especially intent on controlling are their profile pictures and their status tags. In fact, photographs are the only thing that users update regularly in their personal pages (Young, 2009). Pictures are mostly significant as a tool to manage impressions and, as such, they are very much consciously used for identity exposition purposes on social networking sites (Siiback, 2010). According to Young (2009), seven factors explain why these users choose a particular photograph; foremost among them is their wish to look good (or as good as possible) and to project a desired image of themselves. These findings agree with Sevick-Bortree's (2005): adolescents tend to represent themselves in a way they think others may like them more – in a way (that is) that they become more desirable would-be sexual/love partners.

Our study approached teenage media practice by examining how adolescents use Fotolog. This photoblogging service allows them to create a means of self-expression revolving around images – the very images teenagers are using to represent themselves and to share their own affective experiences.

2.2. Gender displays in advertising

Goffman (1979) studied gender displays, that is, the ways gender is conventionally described in advertising. Such displays (that is the ways in which male and/or female human subjects are shown) tend to be both cast and received as natural. As people in general (not only as men or as women in particular) we all have the ability to learn to project (and interpret) representations of masculinity and femininity. Rather than gender identities, people's behavior choreographs portraits of relationships and society devotes a considerable amount of its own substance to that kind of staging.

Goffman (1979; 1991) took an interest in the connection between advertising and society's need to fill social situations with ceremonial (with such ceremonies acting as a way for mutual orientation among their participants) and he found that both in advertising and in life at large we long to strike colorful poses. Something that is already a ritual can in turn become ritualized; this results in hyper-ritualization. To find an example of hyper-ritualized messages, we need to look no further than to the way advertisers use poses and attributes in their ads and commercials yielding extreme forms/levels of standardization, exaggeration and simplification. «If anything, advertisers conventionalize our conventions, stylize what is already a stylization, make frivolous use of what is already something considerably cut off from contextual controls. Their hype is hyper-ritualization» (Goffman, 1979: 84).

From such a focus on expressions of femininity and masculinity in advertising displays, Goffman infers a series of categories –corresponding to different patterns of gender representation: relative size, the feminine touch, function ranking, the family, the ritualization of subordination and licensed withdrawal– whose relevance has been highlighted in later studies by Kang (1997), and Döring & Pöschl (2006). Relative size refers to a particular advertisement/commercial set design in which women appear to be smaller and shorter than men. Similarly, we see the feminine touch when women are displayed more often than men in scenes in which they «touch» things (or themselves) with no apparently functional end – simply caressing them (or themselves) with their own hands or with other parts of their bodies as if both those hands and their owners were something particularly precious. By function ranking, Goffman meant those situations in which men are portrayed as playing the main executive role to the detriment of female co-workers, who are then displayed as merely supporting agents. In such tableaux, men tend to be shown teaching women, and women are more frequently portrayed as getting help from men. Similarly, advertising favors the ritualization of subordination, especially as women are often displayed in lying positions (on the floor or on a bed), with their knees folded or their heads more markedly bent than men's. In advertising, female figures also smile more frequently and more openly than male ones. They also tend to show themselves with their feet crossed or in childlike body positions, even clowning or playing around. We also see them more often taking men by their hands, while men tend to put their arms around women's shoulders. Finally, the licensed withdrawal is what we witness when we see women absorbed in their own thoughts, disoriented and/or in need of protection. These women's minds appear to be somewhere else as they take a look at their own hands or touch some object to which they seem to pay no attention. Women are displayed more often than men in a sort of protected participation, whether shielded by something that covers them partially or curled up – or, in more openly protective displays, being hugged for consolation. They are also shown with their hands covering their mouth or their face, or introducing one finger between their lips.

Other authors have developed new concepts to define other types of figures that show up in ads and commercials. Gill (2009) identified a series of newer representational practices in advertising –consolidated over the last ten years or so– including eroticized male bodies, heterosexual women's explicit displays of sexual desire, and sexually attractive (hot) lesbians. There has also been an increasing objectification of men's bodies in the media (Murnen & al., 2003; Siibak, 2010). The erotic male is a growingly pervasive figure in standard advertising representations, where men show more and more signs of sight- and touch-related objectification similar to those previously defined by Goffman for women (Rohlinger, 2002). This so-called «sixpack advertising» –or the representation of men as sex objects more generally– poses no real threat to male dominance because the female gaze at those bodies does not subvert society's preexisting gaze (Gill, 2009). Neither hegemonic masculinity nor heterosexuality as an institution are challenged by such an objectification, as several resources (e.g., the kinds of activities men carry out in those representations, the gazes they give back, or the independence they proudly display in those ads/commercials) check and balance any potential doubt that might have arisen from it. Therefore, male dominance does not seem to be incompatible with the sexualized representation of men's bodies (Gill, 2009).

Men's images may have been transformed but so have the sexualized representations of women (Gill, 2009). One of such new figures regarding the display of women as sexual subjects is the so-called midriff, a self-presentational resource used by female posers who, in fact, aim to display themselves as sex objects. Always ready for sex and trying deliberately to deploy their sexual powers, the stated intention of women represented in that way is not to seek men's approval, but their own pleasure. That is why the discourse attached to such images emphasizes choice and empowerment.

However, such representations smoothly fit an older, classical pattern of attractiveness (extolling young, pretty and heterosexual women) and highlight specific body parts (breasts, backside, hair, lips and eyes). Another one of those changes recently identified in these female sexual displays is a new figure in the representation of relations between women that might be termed as the hot lesbian (Gill, 2007; 2009). These are women who are never shown alone but in the company of some other female partner(s): all of them are attractive, all look very much alike, and we get to see them kissing, hugging or caressing each other. However, this representation seems to work much more effectively as a (rather trite) heterosexual male fantasy than as a truly homosexual female one. We have seen this figure widely reproduced in adolescent self-representations on Fotolog, and we have categorized it elsewhere as the lesbian pose (Tortajada & al., 2012). In these young users' photoblogs, such pictures usually depict girls kissing each others' lips or hugging; they seem to be trying to lead potential viewers on, but not necessarily female ones: from their statements and from other pictures in their albums one can tell that the girls posing in those photographs are plainly heterosexual.

Historically, men's and women's kinds of attractiveness have been valued differently. For Gómez (2004), patriarchal societies favor a pattern of affective and sexual relations stressing power as the utmost appealing factor men can wield, and beauty as the most valuable such resource in the case of women. As Berger says (1972), a man's social presence stands on the solidity of the promise of power it embodies (an outwardly projected power that is, as it is to be exerted on others), whereas a woman's presence expresses an external attitude towards herself – it defines what can and cannot be done to her. Both Berger (1972) and Mulvey (1975) think the sight of the female body captured by the camera (or on a canvas) has been historically aimed at a male viewer that will presumably take pleasure in such a vision. What is more, according to Mulvey (1975), women have internalized that male gaze and apply it to their own self-representations and self-assessments – this condition is what Mulvey calls to-be-looked-at-ness. Berger agrees: «Her own sense of being in herself is supplanted by a sense of being appreciated as herself by another» (Berger, 1972: 46). For Dyer (1982), this idea of gazing as a sign of power and of being gazed at as a sign of powerlessness overlaps with the dichotomy activeness-passiveness at large. He thinks one should not oversimplify looking as a concept by saying that the act of looking is active and the state of being looked at is passive. Yet even when they are not apparently active, many of these men's pictures still tend to promise some kind of activity from the way they pose—their physiques may look relaxed, but the model(s) posing tense their bodies and muscles, thus drawing attention to the body's action potential. The normalcy with which we assume such a display of brawn legitimates male power and domination. Such gender differences are also apparent when models do not look potential viewers in the eyes. Thus, while female posers normally appear in such cases to be looking somewhere else, averting the viewer's gaze while showing modesty, patience or lack of interest, male models' eyes are more generally set somewhere in the distance or aimed upwards (suggesting spirituality, rather than coyness or modesty). At the same time, when models return a viewer's gaze, female posers do so with an inviting smile of one sort or another, whereas male ones tend to give more intent looks or still stares.

3. Methodology

Our research used a non-probability sampling technique known as snowball sampling to select 400 Fotolog pages from young users who utilized this service for self-presentation (among other purposes). Since 45 accounts were closed while the analysis was being carried out, the final sample contained 355 profiles. Pages researched belonged to Spanish users (28 percent male; 72 percent female) comprising 11 different friend networks; all of them were aged 13 to 18. Although on a photoblog one can find text features, such as nicknames, captions and visitors' comments, in this case, we only took pictures (photographs) into account, as they provide the representational strategies that allow us to study hyper-ritualization – these strategies are centered on poses and we studied such poses and the way they reflect and shape gender displays identified in the abovementioned scholarly work on advertising. Eighteen profiles (six boys and twelve girls) were chosen for qualitative analysis as well. Each of these 18 users' albums contained over one hundred pictures. Our qualitative analysis looked deeply into the full content of these teens' photoblogs. Virtual albums studied had differing sizes – in the case of girls, the album with the most photographs had gathered up to 1,400 of them, and the one with the least had 229 pictures in all; the boys' longest album had 747 photographs, while the shortest was 150 pictures long. Some of these albums had been updated by their owners for more than three years. Therefore, they cover a significant time in these users' teenage years.

In line with the goals of our study and the research's theoretical framework, we tried to answer the following research questions:

• What kind of self-presentation do Spanish adolescents engage in through the pictures they take and edit for Fotolog?

• What types of hyper-ritualization and what advertising figures do we find in these Spanish teenagers' self-presentations from the photographs they prepare for and post on Fotolog?

In the quantitative analysis, the following two categories were considered: to-be-looked-at-ness and hyper-ritualization (which, in turn, was subcategorized into the ritualization of subordination and licensed withdrawal). In the qualitative analysis, on top of the former, the following categories/elements were thrown into the analytical mix: the feminine touch, sixpack displaying, sexual subjecthood, and the lesbian pose. Following Goffman's (1979) and Gill's (2007, 2009) studies on advertising, we applied a technique that combines deduction (from those concepts we defined above, in the «theoretical background' section) and inference (searching for new trends or categories). Finally, and considering media's ambivalent potential (Habermas, 1987; Kellner, 1995), we paid attention to both the ideology that structures gender displays and the forms of resistance present in Fotolog representations.

4. Results

4.1. To-be-looked-at-ness (gaze and nudity)

Although just above half of self-portraits and photographs in which these young users display themselves show them in clothing devoid of sexual overtones (53 percent of boys' pictures and 57 percent of girls'), about 42 percent of boys and 40 percent of girls take shots of themselves scantily clad, or in tight-fitting or sheer clothes. No-one shows himself/herself fully naked in their photoblogs' pictures, and they hardly ever appear in their underclothes (only 5 percent of pictures posted by boys and 2 percent of those uploaded by girls).

Both boys and girls tend to eroticize their self-presentations with similar perseverance. However, girls usually appear in décolleté outfits showing the upper part of their breasts (15 percent of them), or in very short ones, baring their legs (6 percent). Boys, though, opt more often for flexing/showing their muscles or for displaying other signs of physical strength (28 percent). In many of these eroticized boys' self-shots we can see them looking in the mirror, showing off their brawn; girls, though, tend to be shown looking at themselves, displaying or even admiring their own bodies. Twelve percent of these teenagers (male and female) take pictures of themselves showing some kind of teasing look or attitude.

This confirms similar patterns found in other studies on social networking sites. Thus, Siibak (2007; 2010) found that, even if boys prefer to pose clothed, 34.2 percent let viewers see their athletic bodies. Girls play on stereotyped sex roles and 42 percent of their photographs can be classified under a demand/seduction category. And while female posers are more prone to be smiling in their own pictures (65 percent), male ones tend more often to portray themselves with a rather serious air (46 percent).


Draft Content 622425805-26799-en072.jpg

Boys highlight their muscles –their sixpacks (Gill, 2009)– and their body's potential for action, thus stressing their power (Dyer, 1982), whereas girls seem to be making a show of themselves to pleasure the male gaze (Berger, 1972; Mulvey, 1975) or to pleasure themselves (Gill, 2007). This means that, in their self-presentations on social networking sites, they are reproducing classical representation patterns where women try to emphasize their attractiveness and men try to show themselves as strong and powerful subjects (Manago & al., 2008).

4.2. The ritualization of subordination

Even if adolescents tend to take pictures of themselves alone (70 percent of times in the case of boys, and 50 percent for girls), when they appear with people from the opposite sex, 7 percent of girls do so in a position of inferiority, compared to 1 percent of boys. Postural differences are not very significant overall, but girls tend to be kneeling down or bending over more often than boys do (25 percent to 14 percent).

Girls do more frequently take photographs of themselves displaying happiness (19 percent of them, compared to 9 percent of boys), though boys show themselves in more playful and affinity-seeking attitudes than girls do (26 percent of times compared to 19 percent). Many sexualized images are photographed in private domestic spaces, such as a bathroom or a bedroom. In such shots, girls usually appear sitting down or lying on a bed (and, at times, even on the floor). They are more frequently seen in childish poses, taking on a Lolita appearance or simply crossing their legs. Boys never pose that way. Sometimes, fragmented body takes in girls' photographs suggest infantilization and/or self-offering.


Draft Content 622425805-26799-en073.jpg

4.3. License withdrawal

Although subjects tend to look in the camera when they take photographs of themselves (58 percent of times in the case of girls; 45 percent in the case of boys), they also appear to be gazing into space in quite a few pictures (14 percent of times and 16 percent respectively). However, girls tend to fit a pattern already described by Goffman (1979), as in many such pictures they seem physically present yet mentally absent, whereas boys fit more closely Dyer's (1982) model, as they show resolve, strength or solemnity even while looking upwards, intently or at some indefinite point beyond the viewer.


Draft Content 622425805-26799-en074.jpg

Concern, engrossment in one's thoughts, and sadness are other emotions significantly displayed by adolescents in their pictures. Together with surprise and confusion, these are noticeable in 15 percent of girls' photographs and 16 percent of boys'.

Commonly, close-up shots are less sexualized, yet they tend to imitate the hyper-ritualization of licensed withdrawals – posers gazing into space or into the floor, or focusing their look somewhere in a far distance, or even smoking. Other representations directly related to this type of gender display are those we find in photographs where we se a girl looking out of a window apparently engrossed in her own thoughts, or lying on a bed while she covers her face with her hands.

4.4. The feminine touch

Such poses as those in which girls caress objects or their own bodies (either with their hands or with other limbs or parts of their anatomy) are not very frequent in general, though they are more so in female full-body portraits or close-up shots.


Draft Content 622425805-26799-en075.jpg

4.5. The lesbian pose

There is a small yet significant number of images where girls take on (or play with) the so-called lesbian pose. In over half of the photoblogs we analyzed, we found this type of photographs. In them, female teenagers show themselves kissing other girls or suggesting erotic dares or situations with their girlfriends, even though these are not accompanied by any explicit statement of homosexuality and, from context, one can see these are girls currently engaged in heterosexual relationships. Such lesbian poses seem to target a heterosexual male gaze (rather than a homosexual female one) or to be struck for mere self-pleasuring purposes; they are far from being a defining statement of those girls' sexuality and sexual orientation. However, the intent of these poses and displays among girls can be rather ambiguous at times, as they might even be conceived as a challenge of sorts to society's male dominant culture – as, for instance, when in one of those picture captions, one of the girls says «we don't need men to be happy or satisfied». In another example taken from one of those posts, we see three girlfriends kissing each other's lips. This photograph is then captioned as follows: «With the utmost indifference to you guys, signaling their utter rejection of boys» behavior (as, in this case, one of the girls had just broken up with her boyfriend because she had seen him kissing with another girl and he was not treating her right after the break-up). In any case, without knowing the girls' intentions and the consequences of this kind of practices, it is difficult to appraise to what extent such representations aim at reproducing or at transforming those patterns already present in the dominant culture. All we can say is that these girls' appearance is not that of the hot lesbian described by Gill (2009) and that they do not seem to be merely exposing themselves to men or trying to satisfy male fantasies by imitating pornographic models and clichés.


Draft Content 622425805-26799-en076.jpg

In some cases, pictures of girlfriends kissing each other are posted right after their posers have gotten into a heterosexual relationship, while others seem to be displayed as a challenge to a model of masculinity that challengers perceive as aggressive to them. Comments by other female friends add to photoblog owner's photos and texts to underscore such a message, such as when they define this type of boys as «monsters' or state that falling in love with «the first jerk' you find in your way is «so» out of fashion.

To address their girlfriends, these girls use at times forms of address such as «my lesbo, «wifie» or «lover». Girls play with these words, although this seems to be more of a pose or a boundary-testing exercise than a transgression proper. A few examples: «lesbos 4 life,' «hey there people, well, today this one's for my lesbo and I, luv u lesbooo, bride».

5. Final debate and conclusions

What images and contents teenagers decide to post and share in their own self-generated media outlets is a conscious decision (Livingstone, 2009; Stern, 2002, 2004; Siibak, 2010), which shows in the reflexivity we can clearly read in captions and other texts accompanying many such pictures. As other authors have pointed out (García, 2010; Huffaker & Calvert, 2005; Sevick-Bortree, 2005; Sveningsson, 2008; Thelwall, 2008), both in the intensive (on-line) and the extensive (off-line) uses and spillover effects of Fotolog one can see the importance social networking sites have for these youngsters' socialization processes.

Oftentimes, boys and girls produce highly sexualized self-presentations, both through their nicknames (in 20 percent of them) and through the pictures they post (in 40 percent of them). Quite a few nicknames reflect a gendered sexual role pattern: female passivity vs. male activeness. Boys tend to signal in their names what they can do (to girls), whereas girls emphasize what others (boys) can do to them, thus reproducing traditional models of attraction (Gómez, 2004). The same thing happens with photographs. Thus, insofar as both boys' and girls' bodies appear eroticized, male posers tend to show themselves in active poses and post images focused on physical strength (muscled abdomens and/or torsos), whereas female ones devote a much larger amount of attention to beauty and intimacy, showing low necklines, close-up takes of their lips, or bare legs, back or shoulders. Girls are also more often shown lying down, kneeling down or offering themselves to a potential viewer—that is, as exposed, passive, subordinated bodies, ready to be admired. Our data indicate that there is an internalization of socially constructed representations of masculinity and femininity, very similar to those easily available in advertising, where they become hyper-ritualized. Teenagers' self-presentations reproduce some of those patterns about gazes, gender displays and body sexualization already described by authors such as Goffman (1979), Berger (1972), Mulvey (1975), Dyer (1982) and Gill (2009). These categories –originally defined in the analysis of advertising messages– are equally useful to explain some adolescent practices on Fotolog, which not only shows that self-presentations on SNS fit longer-standing gender stereotypes (Sveningsson, 2007), but also demonstrates that many such poses draw on tendencies already witnessed in advertising (Siibak, 2010). Goffman's concept of hyper-ritualization also seems appropriate to describe such a mise en scène. Such reproduction of hegemonic models of masculinity and femininity in teenage self-representations might very well reflect the importance of social networking sites as spaces for the displaying of an aspirational or idealized identity – a «hoped-for possible self» (Manago & al., 2008; Zhao, Grasmuck & Martin, 2008; Young, 2009).

After all, and contrary to those approaches that view audiences as passive entities being on the receiving end of media's influence, teenagers appropriate narratives about attraction and attractiveness and express and share their own understanding of it – and Fotolog and other SNS allow us to observe these appropriation processes. In fact, our analysis has identified other forms of representation that we may read as the combined result of: (1) some specific codes and templates generated on Fotolog, (2) a creative appropriation of gendered media representations, and (3) an individually chosen self-exposition.

Our qualitative analysis showed that girls mainly resort to three major representation strategies – they may try to portray themselves after what Willem & al. (2012) have termed supermodels, languid romantics or trash chic girls. Convergence of so manifold images from different teenage girls into those three groups bears witness to the strength of reciprocal peer influence and to the establishment of patterns (Sevick-Bortree, 2005; Stern, 2002). In the case of boys, photographed portraits of themselves flexing muscles seem to be a predominant feature, but in their pictures they also attach a great deal of importance to friends and to their own subculture traits, as well as to other characteristically male hobbies and interests—sports, cars, motorcycles, girls. Within these general patterns, there is plenty of individual creativity. Our findings suggest that teenagers engage in rather complex media practices resulting from the reproduction of gender stereotypes and patriarchal patterns—partly through an imitation of models seen in advertising, partly through an appropriation and reshaping of those models, that may even result in an opposition of sorts to some patterns of attractiveness that are considered to be hegemonic. To test and confirm these research results a reception study would be in order. Such a study would allow us to identify how teenagers interpret their own practices and what consequences these have for their own affective socialization.

As Ringrose and Eriksson (2011) say, social networking sites are spaces of risk and opportunity deeply affected by gender, and are becoming arenas for negotiation in an increasingly sexualized media environment. As our study shows, self-presentations in SNS resort to the kinds of representational strategies already seen in those media environments and even contribute to spread, popularize and normalize them. To prevent these young SNS users from unthinkingly reproducing stereotypes gender patterns and to bring them to contribute to a critical negotiation of such representations, media education should take into account the way adolescent practices in social networking sites are being fueled by the consumption of other media products, such as advertising (as pervasive a presence as it gets), and how this bears on what adolescents express in those networks and on their own identity definitions. SNS are spaces where teenagers have a conversation on gender, love, desire and attraction, and therefore they can be used to turn socialization from reproductive into alternative by promoting other models of femininity and masculinity based on the kind of reflexivity those very adolescents' media practices already reflect.

Notes

1. Fotolog (www.fotolog.com) is an open-access social networking site. This allows researchers to have full access to all content posted on its pages. Fotolog is made from photographic posts uploaded by its users on a daily basis and accompanied by captions or other texts attached by them. People belonging to a user's network can add comments to his/her posts, although a user can always block that function.

Acknowledgments

This study was carried out within the framework of a basic research project sponsored by Spain's Ministry of Science and Innovation, starting in 2009 and ending in 2012, titled «Medios de comunicación y violencia de género: ¿catalizadores o elementos de prevención?» (Media and Gender Violence: Catalysts or Prevention Elements?) (CSO2008-02006).

References

Berger, J. (2004). Modos de ver. Barcelona: Gustavo Gili.

Dyer, R. (1982). Don’t Look Now. Screen, 23, 3/4, 61-73. (DOI:10.1093/screen/23.3-4.61).

Döring, N. & Pöschl, S. (2006). Images of Men and Women in Mobile Phone Advertise-ments: A Content Analysis of Advertisements for Mobile Communication Systems in Selected Popular Magazines. Sex Roles, 55, 3/4, 173–185. (DOI:10.1007/s11199-006-9071-6).

Fundación Pfizer (Ed.) (2009). La juventud y las redes sociales en Internet. Madrid: Fundación Pfizer.

García-Gómez, A. (2010). Disembodiment and Cyberspace: Gendered Discourses in Female Adolescents’ Personal Information Disclosure. Discourse and Society, 21, 2, 135-160. (DOI:10.1177/0957926509353844).

Gill, R. (2007). Gender and the Media. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Gill, R. (2009). Beyond the «Sexualization of Culture». Thesis: An Intersectional Analysis of «Sixpacks», «Midriffs» and «Hot Lesbians» in Advertising. Sexualities, 12, 2, 137-160. (DOI: 10.1177/1363460708100916)

Goffman, E. (1979). Gender Advertisements. New York: Harper and Row.

Goffman, E. (1991). Los momentos y sus hombres. Barcelona: Paidós.

Gómez, J. (2004). El amor en la sociedad del riesgo. Una tentativa educativa. Bar-celona: El Roure.

Habermas, J. (1987). Teoría de la acción comunicativa II. Crítica de la razón funcionalista. Madrid: Taurus.

Huffaker, D.A. & Calvert, S.L. (2005). Gender, identity, and language use in teenage blogs. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 10, 2. (http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol10/issue2/huffaker.html) (31-08-2012).

Kang, M.E. (1997). The Portrayal of Women's Images in Magazine Advertisements. Goffman's Gender Analysis Revisited. Sex Roles, 37, 11/12, 979-996. (DOI:10.1007/-BF02936350).

Kellner, D. (1995). Media Culture. Cultural Studies, Identity and Politics. Between the Modern and the Postmodern. London: Routledge.

Livingstone, S. (2009). Las redes sociales online, una oportunidad con riesgo para los adolescentes. In M. Grané & C. Willem (Eds.), Web 2.0: Nuevas formas de aprender y participar (pp. 87-106). Barcelona: Laertes.

Manago, A.M., Graham, M.B. & al. (2008). Selfpresentation and Gender on MySpace. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 29, 6, 446-458. (DOI:10.1016/j.appdev.-2008.07.001).

Mulvey, L. (1975). Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema. Screen, 16, 3, 6-18. (DOI:10.1093/screen/16.3.6).

Murnen, S.K., Smolak, L. & al. (2003). Thin, Sexy Women and Strong, Muscular Men: Grade-School Children’s Responses to Objectified Images of Women and Men. Sex Roles, 49, 9/10, 427-437. (DOI:10.1023/A:1025868320206).

Ringrose, J. & Eriksson, K. (2011). Gendered Risks and Opportunities? Exploring Teen Girls’ Digitized Sexual Identities in Postfeminist Media Contexts. International Journal of Media and Cultural Politics, 7, 2, 121-138. (DOI:10.1386/macp.7.2.121_1).

Rohlinger, D.A. (2002). Eroticizing Men: Cultural Influences on Advertising and Male Objectification. Sex Roles, 46, 3/4, 61-74. (DOI:10.1023/A:1016575909173).

Sánchez, A. & Fernández M.P. (2010). Generación 2.0, 2010. Hábitos de los adolescentes en el uso de las redes sociales. (www.slideshare.net/ucjc/generacin-20-hbitos-de-los-ad) (31-08-2012).

Sevick Bortree, D. (2005). Presentation of Self on the Web: An Ethnographic Study of Teenage Girls’ Weblogs. Education, Communication and Information, 5, 1, 25-39. (DOI:10.1080/14636310500061102).

Siibak, A. (2007). Reflections of RL in the virtual World. Cyberpsychology: Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, 1, 1. (http://cyberpsychology.eu/view.php?-cisloclanku=2007072301) (31-08-2012).

Siibak, A. (2010). Constructing Masculinity on a Social Networking site. The Case-study of Visual Self-presentations of Young Men on the Profile Images of SNS Rate. Young. Nordic Journal of Youth Research, 18, 4, 403-425. (DOI:10.1177/110330881001800403).

Stern, S.R. (2002). Sexual Selves on the World Wide Web: Adolescent Girls’ Home Pages as Sides for Sexual Self-Expression. In J.D. Brown, J.R. Steele & K. Walsh-Childers (Eds.), Sexual Teens, Sexual Media. Investigating Media’s Influence on Adolescent Sexuality (pp. 265-285). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Stern, S.R. (2004). Expressions of Identity Online: Prominent Features and Gender Differences in Adolescents' World Wide Web Home Pages. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 48, 2, 218-243. (DOI:10.1207/s15506878jobem4802_4).

Subrahmanyam, K., Smahel, D. & Greenfield, P. (2006). Connecting Developmental Constructions to the Internet: Identity Presentation and Sexual Exploration in Online Teen Chat Rooms. Developmental Psychology , 42, 3, 395-406. (DOI:10.1037/0012-1649.42.3.395).

Sveningsson, M. (2008). Young People's Gender and Identity Work in a Swedish Internet Community. In S. Fischer-Hübner, P. Duquenoy & al. (Eds.), The Future of Identity in the Information Society (pp. 113-128). New York: Springer.

Thelwall, M. (2008). Social Networks, Gender and Friending: An Analysis of MySpace Member Profiles. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 59, 8, 1321-1330. (DOI:10.1002/asi.20835).

Tortajada, I., Willem, C. & al. (2012). Fotologs and Love Socialisation Processes. A Conventional or a Transformative Model of Sexuality and Relationships?. In M. Walrave, W. Heirman & al. (Eds.), eYouth. Balancing between Opportunities and Risks (pp. 215-232). Bruxelles: Peter Lang.

Willem, C., Araüna, N. & al. (2012). Girls on Fotolog: Reproduction of Gender Ste-reotypes or Identity play? Interactions: Studies in Communication and Culture, 2, 3, 225-242. (DOI: 10.1386/iscc.2.3.225_1).

Young, K. (2009). Online Social Networking: An Australian Perspective. International Journal of Emerging Technologies and Society, 7, 1, 39-57. (http://uts.academia.edu/-KirstyYoung/Papers/958157/Online_social_networking_an_Australian_perspective) (31-08-2012).

Zhao, S., Grasmuck, S. & Martin, J. (2008). Identity Construction on Facebook: Digital Empowerment in Anchored Relationships. Computers in Human Behavior, 24, 1816-1836. (DOI:10.1016/j.chb.2008.02.012).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Este artículo presenta los resultados del análisis cuantitativo y cualitativo de las autopresentaciones que los y las adolescentes elaboran para Fotolog. Las imágenes que dichos adolescentes crean y comparten a través de la red están centradas en el sí mismo, y el género y la sexualidad constituyen el eje principal de la representación. Los resultados obtenidos apuntan a que algunas de las categorías que estableció Goffman en su estudio sobre la hiperritualización de la feminidad en la publicidad están presentes en las autopresentaciones analizadas. Además, aparecen otras expresiones de género como la pose lésbica o la erotización de los cuerpos que ya han sido detectadas también en los análisis de la publicidad desarrollados por autoras como Gill. Si bien estas imágenes reproducen estereotipos de género y patrones patriarcales, hay que destacar la presencia de un repertorio variado y algunas creaciones originales, resultado de la negociación identitaria que, respecto al género y a la sexualidad, tiene lugar en estos espacios y otras prácticas mediáticas adolescentes. Para evitar una reproducción irreflexiva de patrones de género estereotipados y contribuir a una negociación crítica de estas representaciones sería importante que la educación mediática tuviera en cuenta la manera en que las prácticas adolescentes en las redes sociales se están nutriendo de otros consumos mediáticos y cómo esto afecta a lo que los y las adolescentes expresan en las redes.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Según datos de la Fundación Pfizer (2009), un 92,6% de los jóvenes entre 11 y 20 años participan en redes sociales. Por este orden, Tuenti, Facebook y Fotolog son las tres redes más usadas por los entrevistados. Si atendemos a cifras de otros estudios, este ranking se confirma excepto para Cataluña donde Fotolog es la segunda red más utilizada, por delante de Facebook (Sánchez & Fernández, 2010). Según Sánchez y Fernández (2010), el uso de las redes es muy intensivo: un 66% de los encuestados lo hace a diario y un 18% varias veces por semana y, en concreto, el 42,9% de las chicas y el 34,5% de los chicos utilizan las redes varias veces al día. Debido a esta fuerte presencia, creemos que es pertinente indagar en algunas de las prácticas que los y las adolescentes españoles llevan a cabo en estos espacios y, en concreto, las que tienen que ver con su propia presentación.

Si asumimos que en las redes sociales las identidades se configuran, en numerosos casos, como identidades de escaparate, es pertinente basar el análisis de estos espacios en la ritualización que se produce en las autopresentaciones. En cierto modo, los y las adolescentes, acaban haciendo un trabajo parecido al de los publicistas que, según Goffman (1979), ritualizan lo que ya está ritualizado, es decir, que toman las manifestaciones de género que compartimos socialmente y las reconfiguran, exagerándolas. En sus autopresentaciones buscan poses brillantes y, para ello, toman como referente la publicidad y las representaciones de hombres y mujeres de otros formatos audiovisuales, reproduciendo y remodelando algunos estereotipos de género.

Este estudio se ha centrado en una red social concreta, Fotolog, y ha analizado las autopresentaciones y las interacciones que se producen en ella. A partir de una muestra de 400 fotologs de adolescentes españoles, se ha llevado a cabo un análisis de contenido cuantitativo para establecer qué tipo de imágenes se comparten en esta red social y un análisis crítico y cualitativo –estudiando en profundidad los álbumes de 18 fotologs–, para interpretar cómo los adolescentes dan sentido a las imágenes que cuelgan en los espacios virtuales, negociando tanto sus identidades de género como lo que significa ser atractivo para uno mismo y para los demás. El análisis desarrollado evidencia cómo se pone en marcha la hiperritualización, qué recursos visuales utilizan los y las adolescentes para sus autopresentaciones, qué similitudes existen con las representaciones publicitarias de género y cómo se configuran, a través de las interacciones en estos espacios, sus identidades de género.

2. Marco teórico

2.1. Redes sociales, imagen e identidad de género

En los últimos años, se han desarrollado diversos estudios que sostienen que tanto las páginas web personales como las redes sociales son un entorno importante para la exploración identitaria (Stern, 2004; Manago & al., 2008), la autopresentación de los y las adolescentes (Stern, 2004), la comparación social y la expresión de aspectos idealizados del sí mismo que se querría ser (Manago & al., 2008) y que las redes sociales tienen un gran peso en la socialización y, específicamente, en la construcción de la identidad de género (García-Gómez, 2010; Huffaker & Calvert, 2005; Sevick-Bortree, 2005; Sveningsson, 2008; Thelwall, 2008).

Según Livingstone (2009), la identidad y las relaciones online están determinadas por una combinación entre las posibilidades técnicas que ofrecen las redes sociales y la cultura entre iguales. Otras autoras ponen también en evidencia que existe una influencia mutua entre los espacios creados por los y las adolescentes (Sevick-Bortree, 2005) y que parece existir una serie de convenciones que hacen que la estructura de las páginas sea similar (Stern, 2002).

Los sitios creados cobran significado debido a las conexiones que se establecen y al tiempo que los jóvenes dedican a actualizarlos y a colgar comentarios. Los y las adolescentes no buscan tanto proteger su privacidad como compartir sus experiencias y crear espacios de intimidad que les permitan ser ellos mismos (o ellas mismas) en y a través de las conexiones con sus amistades. Así pues, la privacidad se redefine porque ya no está ligada a la información que se revela sino al control de a quién se le hace saber qué y qué se decide explicar sobre uno mismo (Livingstone, 2009).

Las chicas crean sus páginas personales de forma intencional y estratégica y toman decisiones sobre cómo quieren que sea su página y qué quieren que su audiencia aprenda sobre ellas (Stern, 2002). También los chicos prestan mucha atención a las imágenes que escogen para su perfil en las redes sociales (Siibak, 2010). En espacios como Facebook, existe una preferencia de los usuarios por el mostrar antes que por el decir, por las poses implícitas y mediadas antes que por las afirmaciones explícitas de identidad. Las personas construyen sus «yoes posibles ansiados» que son un tipo de sí mismo socialmente deseable que pueden presentar a los demás y que tiene que ver con identidades que todavía no están totalmente establecidas en los entornos offline (Zhao, Grasmuck & Martin, 2008). Lo que un adolescente revela de sí mismo puede ayudarle a conseguir control social y esta acción se lleva a cabo estratégicamente, para provocar resultados sociales deseados, gestionar las impresiones de los demás y ganar aprobación social (Stern, 2004).

Las páginas web personales permiten a sus autores y autoras señalar quiénes son y cómo desean que los demás les vean (Stern, 2004). Los alias son un vehículo importante para compartir información identitaria (Subrahmanyam, Smahel & Greenfield, 2006), aunque, para crear una determinada impresión, las dos áreas que las personas controlan específicamente son la elección de la fotografía de perfil y el estatus y, de hecho, el único elemento que los usuarios y las usuarias actualizan de forma regular son las fotografías (Young, 2009). Las fotos cobran una gran importancia como herramienta para el manejo de las impresiones y existe un uso muy consciente de ellas para la exhibición identitaria en las redes sociales (Siiback, 2010). Según Young (2009), existen siete factores que explican la elección de una determinada fotografía, entre ellos, aparecer bien (lo mejor posible) y proyectar una imagen deseada de uno mismo. Estas conclusiones coinciden con las de Sevick-Bortree (2005): los y las adolescentes van a representarse de modo que gusten a los demás, que devengan deseables para las relaciones.

Por ello, este estudio se acerca a las prácticas mediáticas adolescentes y, en concreto, al uso de Fotolog. Este espacio permite crear un medio de expresión propio, centrado, como su nombre indica, en la imagen que los adolescentes están utilizando para auto(re)presentarse y compartir sus experiencias afectivas.

2.2. Expresiones de género en la publicidad

Goffman (1979) estudió las expresiones de género, es decir, las descripciones convencionalizadas del género en la publicidad. Estas expresiones (que son, por sí mismas, una manera de mostrarse) tienden a ser recibidas y transmitidas como si fueran algo natural. Como personas (no como machos o como hembras) tenemos la capacidad de aprender a proporcionar –y a interpretar– representaciones de masculinidad y feminidad. Más que una identidad de género, coreografiamos conductualmente retratos de relaciones y la sociedad dedica una cantidad considerable de su sustancia a este tipo de escenificación.

Goffman (1979; 1991) se interesó por la conexión del trabajo publicitario con la tarea social de llenar sus situaciones de ceremonial para la orientación mutua de los participantes, llegando a afirmar que tanto en la publicidad como en la vida queremos adoptar «poses brillantes». Lo que ya es de por sí un ritual, puede ritualizarse también, y esta hiperritualización se produce, por ejemplo, cuando los y las publicistas usan poses y atributos en sus anuncios para hacer gala de una normalización, exageración y simplificación extremas: «no hacen sino convencionalizar nuestras convenciones, estilizar lo que ya está estilizado, dar un empleo frívolo a imágenes fuera de contexto. En resumen, su chapuza, si se nos permite, es la hiperritualización» (Goffman, 1991: 168).

A partir de este interés por las expresiones de la feminidad y la masculinidad en las imágenes publicitarias, Goffman infiere varias categorías, es decir, varios patrones de representación a través de los cuales se muestra el género: «tamaño relativo», «tacto femenino», «ordenamiento de funciones», «la familia», «ritualización de la subordinación» y «retirada permitida», cuya pertinencia y relevancia han sido subrayadas posteriormente en los estudios desarrollados por Kang (1997) y Döring y Pöschl (2006). El «tamaño relativo» tiene que ver con una escenificación en la que las mujeres aparecen más pequeñas y más bajas que los hombres. El «tacto femenino» hace referencia a que ellas aparecen, con más frecuencia que ellos, tocando objetos de manera no utilitaria y tocándose a sí mismas de forma delicada, como si fueran algo precioso (ya sea usando las manos u otras partes del cuerpo). El «ordenamiento de funciones» nos remite a situaciones en las que ellos tienen el papel ejecutivo cuando cooperan con mujeres, retratadas en papeles asistenciales. Ellos instruyen más a las mujeres y a ellas las vemos fotografiadas, con mayor frecuencia, recibiendo ayuda de los hombres. En cuanto a la «ritualización de la subordinación», tiene que ver con que ellas son mostradas frecuentemente en el suelo o en la cama, con la rodilla doblada o con la cabeza inclinada más que ellos; sonríen más y de manera más expansiva que los hombres, se muestran cruzando los pies o en posturas infantiles, haciendo el payaso o de forma juguetona. También las vemos más a menudo cogidas del brazo de los hombres y a ellos cogiéndolas por los hombros. Finalmente, la «retirada permitida» trata de las situaciones en las que vemos a las mujeres abstraídas psicológicamente, desorientadas y/o necesitadas de protección. Ellas aparecen como si, mentalmente, estuvieran en otro sitio (mirándose las manos o tocando algún objeto, por ejemplo). Las mujeres tienen, más que los hombres, una participación protegida, escondidas detrás de algo que las tapa parcialmente, acurrucadas o recibiendo un abrazo de consuelo. También se nos muestran con la boca o la cara tapadas por las manos o poniéndose un dedo en la boca.

Más adelante, otros autores y otras autoras han desarrollado nuevos conceptos para definir otro tipo de figuras que aparecen en los anuncios y spots. Según Gill (2009), existen una serie de prácticas representacionales en publicidad, consolidadas en la última década, y que hacen referencia a figuras fácilmente reconocibles como, por ejemplo, los cuerpos masculinos erotizados, la representación de las mujeres que evidencian un activo deseo heterosexual y las lesbianas sexualmente atractivas.

La cosificación de los hombres en los medios ha aumentado (Murnen & al., 2003; Siibak, 2010). El macho erótico es una concepción cada vez más dominante en las representaciones convencionales de publicidad y, de manera creciente, el hombre enseña más signos de cosificación en lo relacionado con la mirada y el tacto según fueron definidos por Goffman para las mujeres (Rohlinger, 2002). La «publicidad de abdominales» consigue superar las posibles amenazas de la representación de los hombres como objetos sexuales, entre otros motivos, porque la mirada femenina que se ejerce sobre estos cuerpos no invierte la política de la mirada preexistente (Gill, 2009). Ni la masculinidad hegemónica ni la institución de la heterosexualidad se ven cuestionadas por esta cosificación ya que se ponen en marcha varios recursos que permiten contrapesar cualquier posible duda al respecto (por ejemplo, el tipo de actividad que realizan los hombres, las miradas que devuelven y la independencia que muestran en los anuncios) y, por tanto, no parece que pueda probarse ninguna incompatibilidad entre el dominio masculino y la representación sexualizada del cuerpo masculino (Gill, 2009).

Pero no solo se han transformado las imágenes de los hombres sino que también se han reinventado las representaciones sexualizadas de las mujeres (Gill, 2009). Una de ellas es la de «midriff» que tiene que ver con la representación de las mujeres como sujetos sexuales. Esta figura hace referencia a las mujeres que escogen presentarse a sí mismas como objetos sexuales. Dispuestas siempre para el sexo y usando deliberadamente su poder sexual, estas mujeres representadas no están buscando la aprobación de los hombres sino su propio placer. Por ello, el discurso que acompaña a estas imágenes es de elección y empoderamiento aunque las representaciones responden a un patrón clásico de atractivo (mujeres jóvenes, guapas y heterosexuales) y se destacan partes concretas del cuerpo (pechos, nalgas, pelo, labios y ojos). Otro de los cambios detectados es una práctica representacional de las relaciones entre mujeres que podríamos llamar «lesbiana maciza» (Gill, 2007; 2009). En este caso, ellas no aparecen solas sino que lo hacen con otra mujer, ambas son atractivas, acostumbran a parecerse físicamente, y se muestran besándose, abrazándose o acariciándose. Esta representación parece derivar de las fantasías sexuales masculinas y está construida en relación a la heterosexualidad. Esta última figura tiene su equivalencia en las autorepresentaciones adolescentes en Fotolog y se ha categorizado como «pose lésbica» (Tortajada & al., 2012). En este caso, las chicas aparecen besándose en los labios o abrazándose; a menudo, provocando al espectador aunque, por declaraciones y otras fotografías del álbum, se puede deducir que son heterosexuales.

Históricamente, se han adscrito distintos valores al atractivo de hombres y mujeres. Según Gómez (2004), la sociedad patriarcal potencia un modelo de relaciones afectivas y sexuales que promueve la atracción hacia el poder en el caso de los hombres y hacia la belleza cuando se trata de las mujeres. Como apunta Berger (2004), la presencia social de un hombre depende de la promesa de poder que encarna y que se orienta a ejercer sobre los otros, mientras que la presencia de una mujer expresa una actitud hacia sí misma y define lo que se le puede o no hacer. Tanto para Berger (2004) como para Mulvey (1975), el cuerpo de la mujer se exhibe ante la cámara (o el lienzo) dirigido hacia una mirada masculina a la que se quiere dar placer. Es más, según Mulvey (1975), las mujeres interiorizarían esta mirada masculina y la utilizarían en sus autorepresentaciones y valoraciones, lo que la autora llama una condición de «to-be-looked-at-ness». En este punto, coincide también con Berger: «Su propio sentido de ser ella misma es suplantado por el sentido de ser apreciada como tal por otro» (Berger, 2004: 54). Dyer (1982) afirma que la idea de mirar fijamente como poder o de ser mirado como falta de poder se solapa con las ideas de actividad-pasividad. Para este autor, no se puede simplificar la mirada en la idea de que mirar sea activo y ser mirado sea pasivo. Aunque no estén activos, la imagen de los hombres aún promete actividad por la pose del cuerpo. Aunque ellos aparezcan relajados, el modelo tensa su cuerpo y los músculos, llamando así la atención sobre el potencial de acción del cuerpo. La naturalidad con la que son vistos los músculos legitima el poder y la dominación masculinos. En el caso en que no estén mirando (al espectador), mientras que la mujer evita sus ojos, expresando modestia, paciencia o falta de interés, el hombre mira a lo lejos o hacia arriba (sugiriendo espiritualidad). Y cuando los modelos devuelven la mirada al espectador, ellas lo hacen con una especie de sonrisa, invitando, mientras que ellos lo miran fijamente.

3. Metodología

Esta investigación ha empleado un tipo de muestreo no probabilístico conocido como bola de nieve para seleccionar 400 páginas de Fotolog cuyos usuarios utilizaran el servicio para autopresentarse. Debido a que durante el tiempo en el que se realizó el análisis se cerraron 45 cuentas, la muestra final es de 355 perfiles. Las páginas estudiadas pertenecen a usuarios y usuarias españoles (un 28% y un 72%, respectivamente), de 11 redes de amigos diferentes y de edades comprendidas entre 13 y 18 años. Aunque en un fotolog podemos encontrar, además de las fotografías, algunos elementos escritos como el alias, el texto o textos que acompañan a la fotografía y los comentarios dejados por los visitantes, en este caso, y para el estudio de la hiperritualización y de otras figuras publicitarias, solo se han tenido en cuenta las fotografías ya que dichas estrategias representacionales, como hemos visto en el marco teórico, se centran en las poses y en la manera en la que estos posados recogen y configuran las expresiones de género detectadas en los estudios sobre publicidad presentados en el marco teórico. Para el análisis cualitativo, se han escogido 18 perfiles (6 chicos y 12 chicas) cuyos álbumes contuvieran más de 100 fotos y se ha profundizado en todo el contenido del fotolog. El tamaño de los álbumes estudiados es diferente (en el caso de las chicas, el que más fotos contiene es de 1.400 imágenes y el más pequeño de 229 y, en el caso de los chicos, el mayor es de 747 fotos y el menor de 150). Las actualizaciones de estos álbumes, en algunos casos, se han llevado a cabo durante más de tres años por lo que cubren una etapa significativa de la adolescencia de los usuarios.

En consonancia con los objetivos del estudio, y el marco teórico de la investigación, hemos tratado de responder a las siguientes preguntas de investigación:

• ¿Qué tipo de autopresentación realizan los y las adolescentes españoles a través de las fotografías que elaboran para Fotolog?

• ¿Qué hiperritualizaciones y figuras publicitarias están presentes en las autopresentaciones que realizan los y las adolescentes españoles a través de las fotografías que elaboran para Fotolog?

Para el análisis cuantitativo, hemos considerado las siguientes categorías y subcategorías: «to-be-looked-at-ness», «hiperritualización» (subcategorías: «ritualización de la subordinación» y «retirada permitida»). Y, para el análisis cualitativo, además de las categorías expuestas, se han añadido aspectos de los siguientes elementos: «tacto femenino», «abdominales», «representación como sujetos sexuales» y «pose lésbica». Siguiendo los análisis publicitarios de Goffman (1979) y Gill (2007, 2009), hemos usado un método que combina la deducción (a partir de los conceptos definidos más arriba) y la inferencia (buscando nuevas tendencias o categorías). Considerando también el carácter ambivalente de los medios (Habermas, 1987; Kellner, 1995), hemos tenido en cuenta tanto la ideología que estructura las expresiones de género como las formas de resistencia presentes en las representaciones de Fotolog.

4. Resultados

4.1. To-be-at-looked-at-ness (mirada y desnudo)

Aunque lo más frecuente es fotografiarse con ropa que no tiene connotaciones sexuales (53% ellos y 57% ellas), un 42% de los chicos y un 40% de las chicas se fotografía con poca ropa, ropa ajustada o transparencias. Nunca lo hacen totalmente desnudos y apenas en ropa interior (5% de los chicos y 2% de las chicas).

La erotización en las autopresentaciones se da con la misma constancia pero ellas acostumbran a mostrar el escote (15%) o las piernas (6%) y ellos los músculos u otros signos de fuerza física (28%). Los chicos miran al espejo mostrando los músculos mientras que ellas se miran a sí mismas, exhibiéndose o contemplando sus cuerpos. Además, el 12% de las adolescentes se fotografía mostrando una expresión provocativa o burlona.

Siibak (2007; 2010), en sus estudios sobre redes sociales, también encontró que, aunque los chicos prefieren posar con ropa, un 34,2% de ellos hace visible su cuerpo atlético. Ellas juegan con los roles sexuales estereotipados y un 42% de sus fotos pueden ser clasificadas como demanda/seducción. Y mientras que ellas acostumbran a sonreír (65%), ellos prefieren mostrase serios (46%).


Draft Content 622425805-26799 ov-es072.jpg

Ellos resaltan la musculatura y el potencial de actividad de su cuerpo, destacando su poder (Dyer, 1982) y los abdominales (Gill, 2009), mientras que ellas parecen exhibirse, sobretodo, para dar placer a la mirada masculina (Berger, 2004; Mulvey, 1975) o para darse autoplacer (Gill, 2007), reproduciendo así los patrones de representación clásicos que también encontramos en las autopresentaciones en las redes sociales cuando ellas se muestran atractivas y ellos fuertes y poderosos (Manago & al., 2008).

4.2. Ritualización de la subordinación

Aunque los y las adolescentes acostumbran a fotografiarse solos (70% en el caso de los chicos y 50% en el caso de las chicas), cuando aparecen con otras personas el 7% de ellas lo hace en una posición inferior frente al 1% de los chicos. Las diferencias posturales que adoptan, en general, no son muy significativas pero ellas aparecen arrodilladas o inclinadas más que ellos (el 25% frente al 14%).

Las chicas acostumbran a fotografiarse expresando felicidad más que los chicos (el 19% frente al 9% de los casos) aunque ellos se muestran más juguetones y cómplices que ellas (el 26% frente al 19%). Muchas de las imágenes sexualizadas están tomadas en espacios íntimos de la casa, ya sea el baño o la habitación. En estas imágenes es habitual que las chicas aparezcan sentadas o estiradas en la cama y, a veces, en el suelo. También es más frecuente que ellas posen infantilizándose, ya sea porque adoptan un «look de lolitas» o porque cruzan las piernas. Ellos no posan así nunca. En algunos casos, la fragmentación del cuerpo en las fotografías de chicas muestra infantilización y/o auto-ofrecimiento.


Draft Content 622425805-26799 ov-es073.jpg

4.3. Retirada permitida

Aunque los sujetos acostumbran a mirar a la cámara cuando se fotografían (58% en el caso de las chicas, 45% en el caso de los chicos), también es bastante frecuente que unas y otros miren al vacío (14% y 16% respectivamente). Sin embargo, ellas siguen el patrón conceptualizado por Goffman (1979) porque las vemos presentes físicamente pero ausentes mentalmente y ellos el modelo definido por Dyer (1982) ya que muestran determinación, fuerza o solemnidad mientras miran hacia arriba, fijamente o más allá del espectador.


Draft Content 622425805-26799 ov-es074.jpg

La preocupación, la abstracción o la tristeza son otras de las emociones que, de forma significativa, muestran los y las adolescentes en sus fotos. Junto a la sorpresa y la confusión, suponen un 15% de las imágenes de las chicas y un 16% de las de los chicos.

Los primeros planos acostumbran a ser menos sexualizados pero tienden a imitar la hiperritualización de la «retirada permitida»: mirando hacia el vacío, hacia el suelo o a lo lejos y, en algunos casos, fumando. Otras representaciones relacionadas con este tipo de expresión de género se dan cuando las chicas se fotografían mirando, de manera ausente, por la ventana o estiradas en la cama cubriéndose la cara.

4.4. Tacto femenino

Las poses en las que las chicas acarician objetos o su propio cuerpo –ya sea con las manos o con otras partes del cuerpo– no son demasiado frecuentes pero sí comunes tanto en los retratos de cuerpo entero como en los primeros planos.


Draft Content 622425805-26799 ov-es075.jpg

4.5. Pose lésbica

Se ha encontrado un número pequeño pero significativo de imágenes en las que las chicas adoptan (o juegan con) la «pose lésbica». En más de la mitad de los fotologs analizados cualitativamente, hallamos este tipo de fotos en el álbum. En ellas, las adolescentes aparecen besándose con otras chicas o sugiriendo situaciones eróticas con las amigas, aunque no hay declaraciones de homosexualidad y, por el contexto, vemos que, incluso, mantienen relaciones heterosexuales. Esta «pose lésbica» parece satisfacer la mirada masculina y el autoplacer más que definir la propia sexualidad, pero estas expresiones entre chicas son bastante ambiguas porque, en ocasiones, también parecen ser un cuestionamiento de la cultura masculina dominante cuando, por ejemplo, en uno de los pies de foto, una de las chicas afirma: «no necesitamos a los hombres para ser felices o estar satisfechas». En otra de las entradas, vemos que tres amigas se están besando en la boca. El texto que acompaña a la foto dice: «indiferencia total hacia ti», describiendo el rechazo de las chicas hacia el comportamiento de los chicos (su exnovio besó a otra chica y no la trató bien después de la ruptura). Sin embargo, sin conocer las intenciones de las chicas y las consecuencias de este tipo de prácticas, es difícil saber hasta qué punto estas representaciones son reproductoras o transformadoras aunque, por lo menos, su apariencia no es la de «lesbiana maciza» descrita por Gill (2009) y no parece que el objetivo sea únicamente exhibirse ante los hombres tomando un modelo pornográfico para satisfacer las fantasías masculinas.


Draft Content 622425805-26799 ov-es076.jpg

En algún caso, las fotos de besos con amigas aparecen después de empezar una relación heterosexual y, en otros, parece haber un cuestionamiento de un modelo de masculinidad que se percibe como agresivo. Los comentarios realizados por las amigas, además de las fotos y los textos, refuerzan también esta idea cuando definen a este tipo de chicos como «monstruos» o comentan que ya no se lleva enamorarse «del primer idiota» con el que te tropiezas.

Para dirigirse a las amigas, en ocasiones, se utilizan conceptos como «mi lesvi», «esposa» o «amante». Las chicas juegan con estas palabras aunque parece más una pose o un juego con los límites que no una transgresión. Por ejemplo: «lesviiis 4 liifeee», «uenaas gentee pos oi x mii lesvii ii io», «lesviii tQQ», «nobiahh».

5. Debate y conclusiones

Las decisiones que los y las adolescentes toman en los medios autogenerados acerca de las imágenes y los contenidos que comparten son decisiones pensadas (Livingstone, 2009; Stern 2002, 2004; Siiback, 2010), lo que se evidencia en la reflexividad del texto que acompaña muchas de las imágenes observadas. Como otros autores han puesto de manifiesto (García, 2010; Huffaker & Calvert, 2005; Sevick-Bortree, 2005; Sveningsson, 2008; Thelwall, 2008), el uso intensivo y extensivo de Fotolog (tanto en las actividades online como en la conexión que existe entre las relaciones offline y los contactos online), da cuenta de la importancia que las redes sociales tienen para sus procesos de socialización.

Los chicos y las chicas, generalmente, producen autopresentaciones altamente sexualizadas, tanto a través de los alias (20%) como a través de las imágenes (40%). Los alias reflejan un patrón de roles sexuales activos/pasivos en función del género. Ellos acostumbran a indicar lo que pueden hacerte mientras que ellas inciden en lo que puedes hacerles, reproduciendo los modelos tradicionales de atracción (Gómez, 2004). Lo mismo sucede con las fotos: aunque los cuerpos de unos y de otras están erotizados, los adolescentes tienden a retratarse en poses activas y cuelgan imágenes centradas en la fuerza (músculos, torso), mientras que ellas centran la atención en la belleza y la intimidad, mostrando el escote, las piernas, los labios, la espalda o los hombros. Además, también son ellas las que más a menudo se muestran postradas, arrodilladas u ofreciéndose, es decir, como cuerpos exhibidos, pasivos, subordinados, preparados para ser admirados. Los datos muestran que, en este sentido, se produce una interiorización de las representaciones socialmente construidas de la masculinidad y la feminidad, aquellas que la publicidad permite observar fácilmente por su hiperritualización. Por lo tanto, los y las adolescentes reproducen en sus autopresentaciones algunos patrones en cuanto a la mirada, las expresiones de género y la sexualización de los cuerpos que han sido definidas por autores como Goffman (1979), Berger (2004), Mulvey (1975), Dyer (1982) o Gill (2009) y estas categorías, definidas para el análisis de la publicidad, sirven también para explicar una parte de las prácticas adolescentes mediáticas en Fotolog, lo que no solo pone en evidencia que las presentaciones en las redes sociales siguen los estereotipos de género (Sveningsson, 2007) sino que las poses están inspiradas en las tendencias de la publicidad (Siibak, 2010). Además, parece adecuado utilizar el concepto goffmaniano de hiperritualización para referirnos a esta puesta en escena. En este sentido, la reproducción de modelos hegemónicos de masculinidad y feminidad en las autorepresentaciones adolescentes puede dar cuenta de la importancia de las redes sociales como espacio para presentar una identidad aspiracional o idealizada, el «yo posible ansiado» (Manago & al., 2008; Zhao, Grasmuck & Martin, 2008; Young, 2009).

De todas formas, y contrariamente a lo que sugieren los enfoques en los que las audiencias solo son vistas como algo que recibe y sufre la influencia de los medios, Fotolog y otras redes sociales permiten observar cómo los y las adolescentes se apropian de narrativas acerca del atractivo y expresan y comparten su propia concepción acerca de ello. De hecho, en el análisis se han detectado otras formas de representación que podemos interpretar como una combinación de los códigos y las plantillas que se han generado en fotolog, una apropiación creativa de las representaciones de género mediáticas, y una autoexposición fruto de la decisión personal.

El análisis cualitativo muestra que las chicas recurren fundamentalmente a tres grandes estrategias de representación: «la supermodelo», «la romántica lánguida» y «la poligonera chic» (Willem & al. 2012). La confluencias de las múltiples imágenes de distintas adolescentes en estos tres grupos de imágenes indica la influencia recíproca entre iguales y el establecimiento de patrones (Sevick-Bortree, 2005; Stern, 2002). En lo que respecta a los chicos, priman imágenes de uno mismo marcando músculos pero tienen mucha importancia los amigos y los rasgos subculturales, además de aficiones tradicionalmente masculinas (deportes, coches, motos o chicas). Dentro de estos patrones, hay cierta creatividad. Los resultados nos muestran unas prácticas mediáticas adolescentes complejas, fruto de la reproducción de estereotipos de género y patrones patriarcales, en parte imitación de modelos publicitarios y, en parte, apropiación y reconfiguración de estos, al tiempo que se da una cierta contestación a lo que se considera hegemónicamente atractivo. Para contrastar y afianzar estos resultados sería necesario llevar a cabo un estudio de recepción que permitiera recoger las interpretaciones que de sus propias prácticas realizan los y las adolescentes, así como las consecuencias de estas para su socialización afectiva.

Como sostienen Ringrose y Eriksson (2011), las redes sociales son espacios de riesgos y oportunidades fuertemente marcadas por el género y se convierten en espacios de negociación de un entorno mediático cada vez más sexualizado. Como muestra este estudio, las autopresentaciones en las redes sociales usan las estrategias representacionales de estos contextos mediáticos, contribuyendo a extenderlas, popularizarlas y normalizarlas. Para evitar una reproducción irreflexiva de patrones de género estereotipados y contribuir a una negociación crítica de estas representaciones sería importante que la educación mediática tuviera en cuenta la manera en que las prácticas adolescentes en las redes sociales se están nutriendo de otros consumos mediáticos como la omnipresente publicidad, y cómo esto afecta a lo que los y las adolescentes expresan en las redes y a sus definiciones identitarias. Las redes sociales son un espacio en el que se dialoga acerca del género, el amor, el deseo y el atractivo, y por lo tanto pueden usarse para transformar una socialización reproductora y fomentar en su lugar modelos alternativos de feminidad y masculinidad basados en las prácticas mediáticas (reflexivas) de los propios adolescentes.

Notas

1. Fotolog (www.fotolog.com) es una red social abierta que permite a los investigadores e investigadoras acceder a todo el contenido de las páginas. Fotolog está basada en entradas fotográficas diarias que están acompañadas por un pie de foto o por un texto colgado por el usuario. Existe la posibilidad de que las personas que pertenecen a la red puedan realizar comentarios, aunque a veces el usuario no lo permite.

Apoyos y agradecimientos

Este estudio se enmarca en un proyecto de investigación básica, financiado por el MICINN, que se inició en 2009 y finaliza en 2012, titulado «Medios de comunicación y violencia de género: ¿catalizadores o elementos de prevención» (CSO2008-02006).

Referencias

Berger, J. (2004). Modos de ver. Barcelona: Gustavo Gili.

Dyer, R. (1982). Don’t Look Now. Screen, 23, 3/4, 61-73. (DOI:10.1093/screen/23.3-4.61).

Döring, N. & Pöschl, S. (2006). Images of Men and Women in Mobile Phone Advertise-ments: A Content Analysis of Advertisements for Mobile Communication Systems in Selected Popular Magazines. Sex Roles, 55, 3/4, 173–185. (DOI:10.1007/s11199-006-9071-6).

Fundación Pfizer (Ed.) (2009). La juventud y las redes sociales en Internet. Madrid: Fundación Pfizer.

García-Gómez, A. (2010). Disembodiment and Cyberspace: Gendered Discourses in Female Adolescents’ Personal Information Disclosure. Discourse and Society, 21, 2, 135-160. (DOI:10.1177/0957926509353844).

Gill, R. (2007). Gender and the Media. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Gill, R. (2009). Beyond the «Sexualization of Culture». Thesis: An Intersectional Analysis of «Sixpacks», «Midriffs» and «Hot Lesbians» in Advertising. Sexualities, 12, 2, 137-160. (DOI: 10.1177/1363460708100916)

Goffman, E. (1979). Gender Advertisements. New York: Harper and Row.

Goffman, E. (1991). Los momentos y sus hombres. Barcelona: Paidós.

Gómez, J. (2004). El amor en la sociedad del riesgo. Una tentativa educativa. Bar-celona: El Roure.

Habermas, J. (1987). Teoría de la acción comunicativa II. Crítica de la razón funcionalista. Madrid: Taurus.

Huffaker, D.A. & Calvert, S.L. (2005). Gender, identity, and language use in teenage blogs. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 10, 2. (http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol10/issue2/huffaker.html) (31-08-2012).

Kang, M.E. (1997). The Portrayal of Women's Images in Magazine Advertisements. Goffman's Gender Analysis Revisited. Sex Roles, 37, 11/12, 979-996. (DOI:10.1007/-BF02936350).

Kellner, D. (1995). Media Culture. Cultural Studies, Identity and Politics. Between the Modern and the Postmodern. London: Routledge.

Livingstone, S. (2009). Las redes sociales online, una oportunidad con riesgo para los adolescentes. In M. Grané & C. Willem (Eds.), Web 2.0: Nuevas formas de aprender y participar (pp. 87-106). Barcelona: Laertes.

Manago, A.M., Graham, M.B. & al. (2008). Selfpresentation and Gender on MySpace. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 29, 6, 446-458. (DOI:10.1016/j.appdev.-2008.07.001).

Mulvey, L. (1975). Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema. Screen, 16, 3, 6-18. (DOI:10.1093/screen/16.3.6).

Murnen, S.K., Smolak, L. & al. (2003). Thin, Sexy Women and Strong, Muscular Men: Grade-School Children’s Responses to Objectified Images of Women and Men. Sex Roles, 49, 9/10, 427-437. (DOI:10.1023/A:1025868320206).

Ringrose, J. & Eriksson, K. (2011). Gendered Risks and Opportunities? Exploring Teen Girls’ Digitized Sexual Identities in Postfeminist Media Contexts. International Journal of Media and Cultural Politics, 7, 2, 121-138. (DOI:10.1386/macp.7.2.121_1).

Rohlinger, D.A. (2002). Eroticizing Men: Cultural Influences on Advertising and Male Objectification. Sex Roles, 46, 3/4, 61-74. (DOI:10.1023/A:1016575909173).

Sánchez, A. & Fernández M.P. (2010). Generación 2.0, 2010. Hábitos de los adolescentes en el uso de las redes sociales. (www.slideshare.net/ucjc/generacin-20-hbitos-de-los-ad) (31-08-2012).

Sevick Bortree, D. (2005). Presentation of Self on the Web: An Ethnographic Study of Teenage Girls’ Weblogs. Education, Communication and Information, 5, 1, 25-39. (DOI:10.1080/14636310500061102).

Siibak, A. (2007). Reflections of RL in the virtual World. Cyberpsychology: Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, 1, 1. (http://cyberpsychology.eu/view.php?-cisloclanku=2007072301) (31-08-2012).

Siibak, A. (2010). Constructing Masculinity on a Social Networking site. The Case-study of Visual Self-presentations of Young Men on the Profile Images of SNS Rate. Young. Nordic Journal of Youth Research, 18, 4, 403-425. (DOI:10.1177/110330881001800403).

Stern, S.R. (2002). Sexual Selves on the World Wide Web: Adolescent Girls’ Home Pages as Sides for Sexual Self-Expression. In J.D. Brown, J.R. Steele & K. Walsh-Childers (Eds.), Sexual Teens, Sexual Media. Investigating Media’s Influence on Adolescent Sexuality (pp. 265-285). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Stern, S.R. (2004). Expressions of Identity Online: Prominent Features and Gender Differences in Adolescents' World Wide Web Home Pages. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 48, 2, 218-243. (DOI:10.1207/s15506878jobem4802_4).

Subrahmanyam, K., Smahel, D. & Greenfield, P. (2006). Connecting Developmental Constructions to the Internet: Identity Presentation and Sexual Exploration in Online Teen Chat Rooms. Developmental Psychology , 42, 3, 395-406. (DOI:10.1037/0012-1649.42.3.395).

Sveningsson, M. (2008). Young People's Gender and Identity Work in a Swedish Internet Community. In S. Fischer-Hübner, P. Duquenoy & al. (Eds.), The Future of Identity in the Information Society (pp. 113-128). New York: Springer.

Thelwall, M. (2008). Social Networks, Gender and Friending: An Analysis of MySpace Member Profiles. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 59, 8, 1321-1330. (DOI:10.1002/asi.20835).

Tortajada, I., Willem, C. & al. (2012). Fotologs and Love Socialisation Processes. A Conventional or a Transformative Model of Sexuality and Relationships?. In M. Walrave, W. Heirman & al. (Eds.), eYouth. Balancing between Opportunities and Risks (pp. 215-232). Bruxelles: Peter Lang.

Willem, C., Araüna, N. & al. (2012). Girls on Fotolog: Reproduction of Gender Ste-reotypes or Identity play? Interactions: Studies in Communication and Culture, 2, 3, 225-242. (DOI: 10.1386/iscc.2.3.225_1).

Young, K. (2009). Online Social Networking: An Australian Perspective. International Journal of Emerging Technologies and Society, 7, 1, 39-57. (http://uts.academia.edu/-KirstyYoung/Papers/958157/Online_social_networking_an_Australian_perspective) (31-08-2012).

Zhao, S., Grasmuck, S. & Martin, J. (2008). Identity Construction on Facebook: Digital Empowerment in Anchored Relationships. Computers in Human Behavior, 24, 1816-1836. (DOI:10.1016/j.chb.2008.02.012).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/05/13
Accepted on 31/05/13
Submitted on 31/05/13

Volume 21, Issue 1, 2013
DOI: 10.3916/C41-2013-17
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 25
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?