Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Although social networking websites (SNSs, especially Facebook) have become highly popular with youths, some university students do not want to participate in such sites. This study explores the underlying reasons for hightech university students’ non-use of social networking websites. The study group (n=20) consisted of 18 to 25yearold undergraduate students, who were selected by the purposive sampling method. Data were collected from two large state universities in Turkey. Facebook, as one of the most popular social networking websites, was selected as a study context. Qualitative research methods were used in the data collection and analysis processes. The primary reasons for not using social networking websites were that they were perceived to be a waste of time, or an unnecessary tool; that they might lead to an addiction; that they might violate privacy concerns or share unnecessary information; and that they might invoke family concerns. Additionally, the findings indicated that most of the students did not trust virtual friendships, and did not like sharing photographs and political views online. This identification of non-user students’ attitudes about SNSs will help us to better understand individual perceptions and experiences relating to these social services.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

The Internet is now very popular, and it has powerfully affected almost every aspect of our world, from commerce to education. It has even changed many people’s daily lifestyles (Martin, Diaz, Sancristobal, Gil, Castro & Peire, 2011; Ceyhan, 2008). Some of the biggest Internet effects involve communications among people. Social networking websites (SNSs) offer a new way to understand, connect with, and learn information about other people (Carpenter, Green & LaFlam, 2011). SNSs are now often used for communications, to build relationships and to make new friends (Pew, 2009; Raacke & Bonds-Raacke, 2008).

Social networking on the Internet has increased rapidly in both prevalence and popularity in recent years, especially among university students (Pempek, Yermolayeva & Calvert, 2009; Vrocharidou & Efthymiou, 2012). The current generation of young people has grown up with access to computers and the Internet, and thus, many appear to have a natural ability and high skill levels when using new technologies. This is actually because a large portion of their daily lives is spent using the Internet, SNSs, digital tools, computer games, e-mail, mobile phones and instant messaging (Prensky, 2001). They frequently have computer and Internet access in their houses, dormitories and schools (Ahn, 2011). Hargittai (2008) reported that when students have access to the Internet at a friend’s or family member’s house, this increases the likelihood of their use of both Facebook and MySpace. However, an interesting fact is that, among high-tech students who can easily access and use technological devices – and who are very interested in computers and the Internet generally, a considerable number of students do not use SNSs (Harper, 2006). This study employs the term «non-user» to refer to people who do not use any social networking sites or to those who do not use a specific site.

The social networking website Facebook was selected for use in this study, because it is the most popular and most frequently visited social networking website among university students (eBizMBA, 2012). Facebook’s statistics (March, 2012) report that there are 901 million monthly active users who create profiles, interact with Facebook objects, leave comments for friends, upload photos, and/or connect to community pages, groups, and events. These figures also attest to the popularity of Facebook. Recent studies have reported that a large proportion of students claimed they spent between 10 and 60 minutes on Facebook per day (Ross, Orr, Sisic & Arsen, 2009; Stern & Taylor, 2007). However, despite the widespread use of Facebook among young people, there are many deliberate non-users of Facebook in this age category.

Given the prevalence of SNSs and their importance in young people's lives, it is important to understand the factors which influence SNS use. The popularity of Facebook among young people has attracted the attention of many researchers, and several studies have examined the use of Facebook from different perspectives (Cheung, Chiu & Lee, 2011; Hew, 2011; Green & Bailey, 2010; Pempek, Yermolayeva & Calvert, 2009). Among the discovered reasons for student participation in Facebook are communicating with friends, looking at or posting photos, entertainment, finding out about or planning events, sending or receiving messages, creating or reading wall posts, getting to know people better, getting contact information and presenting oneself to others through the content in one's profile (Pempek, Yermolayeva & Calvert, 2009; Cheung, Chiu & Lee, 2011). These reasons might explain why social networking sites are being rapidly integrated to people’s daily lives (Ajjan & Hartshorne, 2008). Similarly, educational uses of SNSs (Cheung, Chiu & Lee, 2011; Green & Bailey, 2010; Roblyer, McDaniel, Webb, Herman & Witty, 2010; Teclehaimanot & Hickman, 2011) and individual differences in using SNSs (Carpenter, Green & LaFlam, 2011; Ross & al., 2009) are currently popular subjects in research. Although these areas of inquiry are all important and worthy of exploration, a significant question has been largely ignored. Why do some university students deliberately not use SNSs? One study by Baker and White (2011), which examined the reasons offered by 9-10 year-old students at an Australian secondary school for their non-use of SNSs, reported that the primary reasons were lack of motivation, that it was a poor use of time, and that the students preferred other forms of communication. Secondary reasons were limited access, parental concerns, and the influence of friends.

This study will examine the reasons for non-use of SNSs (specifically Facebook) among high-tech university students, and their attitudes about SNS usage. To provide a specific methodological contribution, this study will focus on identifying variations in the reasons that high-tech students provide for not using Facebook. The study will be useful to different groups, including schools, governments, parents, corporations, and webmasters (Baker & White, 2011). With the increasing number of SNSs, many academicians are now considering their use as an effective way to reach students (Kabilan, Ahmad, & Abidin, 2010). Thus, this study will be helpful to those who want to develop educational tools to employ in SNSs. The research questions examined were:

1) What are the underlying reasons for the non-use of Facebook among high-tech university students?

2) What are the non-user high-tech university students’ perceptions about the use of SNSs more generally?

3) What are the non-user high-tech university students’ perceptions about online friendships and sharing ideas in virtual environments?

2. Methods

2.1. Overview

This is a descriptive case study, which focuses on why high-tech university students do not use social networking sites, even though they have access to the Internet and related technologies. A qualitative method was used during the data collection, to obtain in-depth information. The study focused on twenty university students, who were all deliberate non-users of Facebook.

2.2. Participants

The data were collected from 20 undergraduate students from Computer Education and Instructional Technology (CEIT) departments in two different universities in Turkey. One of the universities is in eastern Turkey, and the other is in northeastern Turkey. All of the students participated in the research voluntarily and received a CD-Pen for their participation. The participants were selected by the purposive sampling method, which is widespread in qualitative research (Patton, 1990). As table 1 shows, this study group was aged 18 to 25, and consisted of 11 female and 9 male students.


Draft Content 137705665-26791-en060.jpg

2.3. Data Collection Tools and Procedure

The data were collected by means of semi-structured interviews, using a method developed by the researchers. In order to ensure the validity of the data collection tool, two expert reviews and four peer reviews were consulted. According to their feedback, the interview schedule was modified and finalized. The interviews typically lasted 15-20 minutes and were conducted by the one of the researchers.

2.4. Data analyses

The interviews were transcribed and coded. Then, the transcriptions were analyzed by means of content analysis. Initially, the researchers conducted an analysis of single transcriptions to create a set of categories and subcategories related to the research questions. Themes derived from each participant’s responses were shared and discussed among the rsearchers.

3. Results

3.1. The underlying reasons stated by non-users of Facebook

None of the participants (n=20) were using Facebook during the data collection. The students were asked which factors caused them to be non-users of this SNS. The findings are presented in table 2. The participants were coded as P-numbers (P1, P2… P20). The frequency distribution of responses to this question is also presented in table 2.


Draft Content 137705665-26791-en061.jpg

Spending excessive time on Facebook was the most common factor which kept the students from using the site (n=12; 6 females, 6 males). They stated that the use of Facebook was too time-consuming and distracting. Examples of the responses included, «Firstly, time is very important for me, and I don't want to lose it» (P1, Female). «I conclude that, too much of my time passes on Facebook, so I have suspended my account» (P6, Male).

The second-most reported reason for their non-use was «Lack of interest» (n=10; 9 females, 1 male). Some students stated that they had no interest or motivation to use Facebook, and they thought it was meaningless and unnecessary. For example, one student said, «I see Facebook as an unnecessary tool. I think I can do whatever I might want to do on Facebook anywhere else» (P13, Female).

Six students (n=6; 6 females) said that if they want to communicate with other people, there are a lot of other tools with similar applications, such as MSN messenger, which allow calling and messaging via a mobile phone. In short, they prefer other communication tools for communicating with people. One student reported, «I am using a mobile phone for speaking and short messages for contacting» (P8, Female). Similarly, another student reported, «Obviously, I don’t need to use SNSs. I can contact people with whom I want to communicate by mobile phone. Frankly, I have never felt a need to use Facebook» (P19, Female).

One of the reasons for not using Facebook is the addiction factor. Some students (n=4; 2 females, 2 males) were afraid of developing a SNS addiction. For example, one student said, «I got a Facebook account for playing games. My intent was only to play a game, Poker. I was playing Poker, and later I became a Poker addict» (P14, Male).

The non-user students also did not like the idea of self-presentation on this site. One reported, «Since I believed I shared too much of my private life, I suspended my account» (P12, Male). Another complained that, «Eventually, people do not engage in beneficial activities for society. Everyone is sharing their private lives, and I am not interested in their lives. Since I don’t want to present myself, I don’t find it necessary» (P4, Female).

Some students (n=3, 2 female, 1 male) reported that they started to use Facebook to contact and communicate with people, but later this purpose changed to a useless time-consuming activity. One student said, «I stopped using Facebook, because I noticed that I used it outside of my intentions. In my opinion, the purpose of Facebook is to keep in touch with people that are far away. I realized that on Facebook I was talking nonsense with people who are sitting next to my computer» (P7, Female). Similarly, another student said, «I think Facebook started as a good site, but later it developed very bad points. For example: Originally, it was put forward as a social network, but afterwards, games appeared. How should I know? Hundreds of comments were made on many of the articles. So I decided not to use Facebook» (P3, Male).

Another reason for not using this SNS was being unsociable (n=2, 2 females). One of the female students reported, «I don’t think I will use Facebook again, because it decreases the quality of my communication with my friends» (P7, Female).

Academic failure was stated as another reason for not using Facebook. Two of the students remarked that they failed their exams when they used Facebook. One student reported, «Last year I had final exams, and I played Facebook games until morning. I went to my exams with two hours of sleep, and I regretted that very much. Since then I have not been using Facebook» (P14, Male). One female student also reported that she liked to use Facebook, but was scared of experiencing failures. She said, «I was afraid to use my Facebook account during my courses» (P10, Female).

Two of the students expressed that they had a prejudice against SNSs, due to encountering unpleasant experiences on Facebook or another SNS. They said that, if they were to use an SNS again, they might have the same unpleasant experiences. One female student had such an experience on MSN. She reported, «Use of MSN changed all of my habits. Particularly, it affected my grades in school when I was fifteen years old. After eliminating it, I cut completely off from the computer» (P9, Female). One student also reported that he already had a game addiction, and Facebook games could create another avenue for that addiction. He said, «I think that Facebook distracts me a lot, because I am addicted to games, and it has lots of games» (P16, Male).

One male student said that SNSs threatened his security and the confidentiality of his personal information. When one of the participants was asked why he thinks that his confidentiality was at risk on Facebook, he answered, «I didn’t experience any unpleasant event, I just heard them from the news… So I have suspended my account» (P11, Male).

One of the female students expressed that her family prohibited her use of Facebook. She wanted to use SNSs, but her family’s prohibition prevented her. She said, «My parents reacted and asked me to shut down my account. I want to re-activate it, but my parents will not allow me to do that now» (P10, Female).

The three least commonly reported reasons for not using Facebook were preference for using other SNSs, friends’ influence, and cyber-bullying. One student stated, «The reason for deactivating my Facebook account is tending to use Twitter more than Facebook» (P6, Male). Another student said, «I suspended my account, because nonsense messages are coming consistently. I felt depressed. I am very comfortable right now» (P8, Female).

3.2. Perceptions of the non-users about the use of SNSs generally

The students were asked what they think about the use of SNSs. The majority of the participants (n=14) reported that they use MSN messenger. Additionally, five of them reported that Twitter is better than Facebook, because Twitter doesn’t have many tools as like Facebook which makes it easier to use. Five reported that they use Formspring, which «asks people original questions in anticipation of their entertaining or revealing responses...» (Formspring.me, 2012). But six students reported that they do not use any SNS. Two of these reported that they only use e-mail. Only one female student said that Facebook is the best among the SNSs. She stated, «Facebook is the best among the social networking sites. Twitter… No… I don’t have an account on it. But most of my friends use it. But I don’t know. I think it is very senseless. They only share words. Facebook is much more beautiful than other SNSs» (P2, Female).

3.3. Students’ thoughts on virtual friendships

Table 3 presents a frequency distribution of the students' thoughts about virtual friendships. The themes which emerged were Dangerous, Fake, Meaningless, and Partial safety. A majority of the participants (n=17) reported that they do not believe in or rely on virtual friendships, and they think virtual friendships are dangerous. One student reported, «I think virtual friendships aren’t a real friendship. Because you can easily send a friendship request. Obviously I don’t endorse virtual friendships» (P11, Male). Another student said, «I think, if I talking with a friend who was known before in real life, it is a communication. But some people build friendships in virtual environments with people who aren’t known in real life. Who is she/he? How old is she/he? You never know whether she/he is real person. I think, it is an environment which is extremely unsafe and open to lots of dangers» (P15, Female).

Eleven of the students said that virtual friendships are fake. For example, one student stated, «It is not suitable for me. I think too many things in there are incorrect» (P2, Female). Another student said, «It is normal, if people knew each other before. But I didn’t find any suitable other friendships. Most of users’ alleged friendships are fake…» (P14, Male).

Four participants reported that virtual friendships are nonsense and meaningless. For example, one student stated, «Virtual friendships are nonsense. When you don’t know people who are around you, the effort to know people who are in the virtual world is very abnormal» (P18, Female).


Draft Content 137705665-26791-en062.jpg

3.4. The students’ thoughts on sharing ideas in virtual environments

The two most popular student responses regarding their thoughts on sharing ideas, personal information, and photographs were negative concerning «photo sharing» (n=8) and positive concerning «personal information sharing» (n=8). Other commonly reported opinions were negative concerning «sharing political views» (n=7), and that the site either «reflects [their] partially real personality» (n=8) or it «reflects [their] real personality» (n=3). The frequency distribution of the responses to this question is presented in table 4. One student said, «I think photograph sharing is a normal situation... But political opinions shouldn’t be discussed on this site» (P16, Male). Conversely, another student said, «I don’t see any problem sharing political thoughts, but sharing personal information can injure other people» (P7, Female).


Draft Content 137705665-26791-en063.jpg

3.5. Underlying factors that encourage SNS use

When asked to predict what factors encourage people to use an SNS, the two most popular responses were «Spending time» (n=10) and «Communication» (n=10). The frequency distribution of responses to this question is presented in table 5. One student reported, «I think Facebook users use [the site] to increase enjoyable time with friends and to have a good time in their free time» (P16, Male). Another student said, «Curiosity and entertainment… I think they use [the site] for them» (P13, Female).


Draft Content 137705665-26791-en064.jpg

3.6. The underlying reasons for SNS invitations

When asked to predict why people invite students to use Facebook, the two most popular responses were «to keep in touch with friends (n=12)» and «information sharing (n=6)». Table 6 shows the frequency distribution of invitation reasons.


Draft Content 137705665-26791-en065.jpg

4. Conclusion and discussion

This study investigated the underlying reasons that explain why high-tech university students chose not to use Facebook, as an example of a social networking site, and analyses are presented regarding the non-users’ perceptions about SNSs generally. Although high-tech students use the Internet frequently, the main findings indicate that the top reason for non-use of Facebook was excessive time spent online. This may be because students are very busy with their academic/professional development, and so have little time to engage in an online SNS (Kirschner & Karpinski, 2010). Alternatively, online social networking may not be a priority for students (Kirschner & Karpinski, 2010). Similarly, in the study that examined the reasons for non-use of SNSs among Australian secondary school students (n=69), Baker and White (2011) found that students also considered SNS use to be too-time consuming and distracting.

Lack of interest was also one of the prominent reasons for the non-use of Facebook. This is likewise similar to the perspective proposed by both Baker and White (2011) and Tufekci (2008), that non-users are less interested in the activities on SNSs, which can be conceptualized as social grooming. Despite the popularity of SNSs all over the world, these findings indicate dilemmas regarding the use of SNSs for a certain subset of people. Because the non-users are neither socially isolated nor fearful of Internet (Tufekci, 2008), we might instead surmise that this technology failed to capture the curiosity and attention of these students.

The results further indicate that the students in this study prefer other communication tools. Some even stated that SNSs are not good communication tools. This finding is consistent with the Baker and White’s (2011) study, which found that students prefer other forms of communication, like the telephone, e-mail, and MSN, to SNSs. While these are the resulting reasons for non-use of Facebook in this case, other studies have described the same factors as the purpose of using SNSs. Cheung, Chiu, and Lee (2011), Roblyer & al. (2010), and Bosch (2009) all reported that students use SNSs for communicating with people and friends, for making new friends, and for maintaining relationships. This difference could be related the fact that certain students encounter problematic events, such as cyber-bullying, or are affected by bad news about SNSs in the media. Another interesting item which the students reported was that they did not use Facebook, because they have several concerns about online self-presentation, such as photographs and sharing political views. Tufekci (2008) also reported that non-users disliked self-presentation on these websites. In contrast to the literature, this reason was usually reported by male students in this study. Conversely, Mazman and Usluel (2011) found that females tended to hide their identities and personal information to keep their privacy in the Internet environment.

These students were also afraid of becoming an Internet addict if they used Facebook, and they believed that Facebook had moved away from its original main purpose. Other than keeping in touch with friends or establishing friendships on Facebook, the participants notified that they would spend too much time with playing games on Facebook or using other Facebook applications (Joinson, 2008; Pempek & al., 2009; Sheldon, 2008a; Stern & Taylor, 2007). In particular, this study also found that the non-user students believe Facebook usage is damaging to their social skills, especially to their relationships with their friends. In line with this finding, Rosen (2011) reported that people who use Facebook frequently show more narcissistic tendencies and higher than average signs of other psychological disorders, including antisocial behaviors, mania, and aggressive tendencies.

Kirschner & Karpinski (2010) pointed at the significant distinction between the academic achievement of users and non-users, and reported that users' GPAs were lower than those of the non-users. Karpinski & Duberstein (2009) also reported a negative relationship between Facebook use and academic achievement. Similarly, in this study, the findings showed that some students feared academic failure if they used Facebook. Therefore, if the educators want to integrate Facebook into their instructional activities, they should overcome their students’ concerns initially.

Among the reasons for non-use of Facebook, prejudice against the use of SNSs generally or preference for using other SNSs, concerns about privacy and parents, friends’ influence, and cyber-bullying were reported less often by these students. Baker and White (2011) suggested that parents’ concerns and friends’ influence are less declared than other reasons, and concluded that personal rather than socially-based reasons were more influential in the decision not to use SNSs. Privacy concerns and cyber-bullying may lead to the perception that SNSs are dangerous environments. These findings must be considered, perhaps especially by academics, to better understand university students, so as to develop more appropriate materials and environments for them.

The majority of these students believed that virtual friendships are either dangerous or fake. Further, they sometimes stated that virtual friendships are meaningless and only partially safe. Similarly, Tufekci (2008) found that non-users generally think that keeping in touch with existing friends on SNSs is nonsensical and meaningless. Researchers have found that some teens prefer interacting directly through the telephone or with face-to-face encounters rather than by online communication (McCown, Fischer, Page, & Homant, 2001; Wolak, Mitchell, & Finkelhor, 2002). This is important when considering uses of SNSs for making new friends and expanding one’s social environment. Therefore, it can be concluded that, for these students, SNSs are not only an unimportant resource for friendships, but also a meaningless and dangerous medium for such interactions.

When the non-user students offered possible factors that encourage people to use SNSs, the top suggestions were spending time and communication with others. Similarly, many studies have concluded that people use social networking sites mostly to stay in touch with friends or to make new friends (Joinson, 2008; Lampe, Ellison, & Steinfield, 2006; 2008; Lenhart, 2009; Lewis & West, 2009; Pempek & al., 2009; Sheldon, 2008a; Stern & Taylor, 2007; Young & Quan-Haase, 2009). This finding revealed that the non-user students perceived SNSs as social environments, but interestingly, they chose not to rely on virtual friendships or on Facebook for communicating with people. Loneliness, entertainment, games, education, and meeting new people were all middling popular responses. It can be concluded that non-user students do not think that SNSs are a suitable educational environment.

In conclusion, this study presents a variety of reasons for the non-use of SNSs by a group of selected high-tech university students, and their perceptions about the use of SNSs generally. The main reasons for their non-use of SNSs are «excessive time spent online», «lack of interest», «preference for other communication tools», «fear of addiction», and «dislike of self-presentation». Additionally, non-users think virtual friendships are unreliable and dangerous. And, they have several anxieties about Facebook. Therefore, these disadvantages must be considered by designers and developers of SNSs in order to reach a wider user group. Application developers and website developers should pay attention to saving time, and should develop more reliable systems to address cyber-safety concerns and to minimize cyber-bullying problems. Educational institutions, academics, and teachers should also pay attention to these student-expressed reasons for their non-use of SNSs. Non-user students’ concerns must not be ignored when educational systems are developed for use in SNSs.

Limitations of current study include small sample of students examined and being a qualitative study. Qualitative studies often investigate the research problem in-depth. Therefore, small samples (less than 20) facilitate the researcher’s job that to establish close contact with the participants (Crouch & McKenzie, 2006). Also considering the small number of nonusers of social networking, this should be no problem. Thus, the results may not be generalizable to students at other universities or all people. Based on these findings, future research should investigate the reasons for non-use of SNSs with the different samples and age groups.

References

Ahn, J. (2011). The Effect of Social Network Sites on Adolescents’ Social and Aca-demic Development?: Current Theories. Journal of the American Society for Information Science, 62(8), 1435-1445.

Ajjan, H. & Hartshorne, R. (2008). Investigating Faculty Decisions to Adopt Web 2.0 Technologies: Theory and Empirical Tests. The Internet and Higher Education, 11(2), 71-80.

Baker, K.R. & White, K.M. (2011). In their Own Words: Why Teenagers don’t Use Social Networking Sites. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 14(6), 395-398.

Bosch, T.E. (2009). Using Online Social Networking for Teaching and Learning: FB Use at the University of Cape Town. Communicato, 32(2), 185-200.

Carpenter, J.M., Green, M.C. & LaFlam, J. (2011). People or Profiles: Individual Differences in Online Social Networking Use. Personality and Individual Differences, 50(5), 538-541.

Ceyhan, A.A. (2008). Predictors of Problematic Internet Use on Turkish University Students. Cyberpsychology Behavior and Social Networking, 11(3), 363-366.

Cheung, C.M.K., Chiu, P.Y., & Lee, M.K.O. (2011). Online Social Networks: Why do Students Use Facebook? Computers in Human Behavior, 27(4), 1337-1343.

Crouch, M. & McKenzie, H. (2006). The Logic of Small Samples in Interview-based Qualitative Research. Social Science Information, 45(4), 483-499.

eBizMBA (2012). Top 15 Most Popular Social Networking Sites. (www.ebizmba.com/ar-ticles/social-networking-websites) (21-05-2012).

Facebook, (2012). Company Newsroom. (http://newsroom.fb.com) (21-05-2012).

Formspring (Ed.) (2012). About Formspring. (www.formspring.me/about/index) (21-05-2012).

Green, B.T. & Bailey, B. (2010). Academic Uses of Facebook: Endless Possibilities or Endless Perils? TechTrends, 54(3), 20-22.

Hargittai, E. (2008). Whose Space? Differences among Users and Non-users of Social Network Sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 13, 276-297.

Harper, M.G. (2006). High Tech Cheating. Nurse Education in Practice, 6(6), 364-71.

Hew, K.F. (2011). Students’ and Teachers’ Use of Facebook. Computers in Human Behavior, 27, 662-676.

Joinson, A.N. (2008). ‘Looking at’, ‘Looking up’ or ‘Keeping up with’ People? Motives and Uses of Facebook. In Proceedings of the 26th Annual SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 1027-1036). New York: ACM.

Kabilan, M.K., Ahmad N. & Abidin, M.J.Z. (2010). Facebook: An Online Environment for Learning of English in Institutions of Higher Education? The Internet and Higher Education, 13, 4, 179-187.

Karpinski, A.C. & Duberstein, A. (2009). A Description of Facebook Use and Academic Performance among Undergraduate and Graduate Students. In Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Diego, CA.

Kirschner, P.A. & Karpinski, A.C. (2010). Facebook and Academic Performance. Computers in Human Behavior, 26(6), 1237-1245.

Lampe, C., Ellison, N. & Steinfield, C. (2006). A Face(book) in the Crowd: Social Searching vs. Social Browsing. In 20th Anniversary Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work (pp. 167-170). New York: ACM.

Lampe, C., Ellison, N. & Steinfield, C. (2008). Changes in Use and Perception of Face-book. In Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative work (pp. 721-730). New York: ACM.

Lenhart, M. (2009). Adults and Social Network Websites. Pew Internet & American life Project Report. (www.pewinternet.org/~/media/Files/Reports/2007/PIP_-Teens_Privacy_SNS_Report_Final.pdf.pdf) (22-05-2012).

Lewis, J. & West, A. (2009). ‘Friending’: London-based Undergraduates’ Experience of Facebook. New Media & Society, 11(7), 1209-1229.

Martin, S., Diaz, G., Sancristobal, E., Gil, R., Castro, M. & Peire, J. (2011). New Technology Trends in Education: Seven Years of Forecasts and Convergence. Computers & Education, 57(3), 1893-1906.

Mazman, S.G. & Usluel, Y.K. (2011). Gender Differences in Using Social Networks. TOJET: The Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology, 10(2), 133-139.

McCown, J.A., Fischer, D., Page, R. & Homant, M. (2001). Internet Relationships: People who Meet People. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 4(5), 593-596.

Patton, M.Q. (1990). Qualitative Evaluation and Research Methods. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

Pempek, T., Yermolayeva, A.Y., & Calvert, L.S. (2009). College Students' Social Networking Experiences on Facebook. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 30. 227-238.

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. On the Horizon, 9(5), 1-6.

Raacke, J. & Bonds-Raacke, J. (2008). MySpace and Facebook: Applying the Uses and Gratifications Theory to Exploring Friend-networking Sites. Cyberpsychology & Behavior, 11, 2, 169-174.

Roblyer, M.D., McDaniel, M., Webb, M., Herman, J. & Witty, J.V. (2010). Findings on Facebook in Higher Education: A Comparison of College Faculty and Student Uses and Perceptions of Social Networking Sites. The Internet and Higher Education, 13(3), 134-140.

Rosen, L.D. (2011). Social Networking’s Good and Bad Impacts on Kids. (www.apa.-org/news/press/releases/2011/08/social-kids.aspx) (22-05-2012).

Ross, C., Orr, E.S., Sisic, M., Arseneault, J.M., Simmering, M.G. & Orr, R.R. (2009). Personality and Motivations Associated with Facebook Use. Computers in Human Behavior, 25(2), 578-586.

Sheldon, P. (2008a). Student Favourite: Facebook and Motives for its Use. Southwestern Mass Communication Journal, 23(2), 39-53.

Stern, L.A. & Taylor, K. (2007). Social Networking on Facebook. Journal of the Communication, Speech & Theatre Association of North Dakota, 20, 9-20.

Teclehaimanot, B.B. & Hickman, T. (2011). Student-teacher Interaction on Facebook: What Students Find Appropriate. TechTrends, 55(3), 19-30.

Tufekci, Z. (2008). Can you See me Now? Audience and Disclosure Regulation in Online Social Network sites. Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society, 28(1), 20-36.

Vrocharidou, A. & Efthymiou, I. (2012). Computer Mediated Communication for Social and Academic Purposes: Profiles of Use and University Students’ Gratifications. Computers & Education, 58(1), 609-616.

Wolak, J., Mitchell, K.J. & Finkelhor, D. (2002). Close Online Relationship in a National Sample of Adolescents. Adolescence, 37(147), 441-455.

Young, A.L. & Quan-Haase, A. (2009). Information Revelation and Internet Privacy Concerns on Social Network Sites: A Case Study of Facebook. In IV International Conference on Communities and Technologies (pp. 265-274). New York: ACM.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Aunque las redes sociales (los SRS, especialmente Facebook) se han popularizado entre la juventud, hay algunos alumnos universitarios que no desean participar en ellas. Esta investigación explora las razones subyacentes por las cuales los alumnos universitarios no utilizan las redes sociales. El grupo experimental (n=20) estuvo formado por alumnos de licenciatura de entre 18 y 25 años, seleccionados mediante muestreo intencional. Se recogieron los datos en dos grandes universidades estatales de Turquía. Facebook fue seleccionado para contextualizar esta investigación, por ser una de las redes sociales más populares. Los métodos de investigación cualitativa se emplearon en la recogida y análisis de los datos. Entre las razones principales por las que no utilizan las redes sociales se encuentran su percepción como una pérdida de tiempo, o una herramienta innecesaria; las posibilidades de poder conllevar una adicción; violar las normas de privacidad, compartir información excesiva; e invocar la preocupación parental. Adicionalmente, los resultados indicaron que la mayoría de los alumnos no confió en sus amistades virtuales y que no les gustaba compartir fotografías ni opiniones políticas en línea. El haber identificado las actitudes hacia los SRS de los alumnos nousuarios nos ayudará a entender mejor las percepciones y experiencias individuales relacionadas con estos servicios sociales.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Hoy en día Internet es muy popular y ha afectado poderosamente casi cada aspecto de nuestro mundo, desde el comercio a la educación. Su influencia ha cambiado el estilo de vida diaria de mucha gente (Martin, Díaz, Sancristobal, Gil, Castro & Peire, 2011; Ceyhan, 2008). Uno de los mayores efectos de Internet es permitir las comunicaciones entre individuos. Las redes sociales (los SRS) ofrecen una manera nueva de entender, conectarse con, y aprender más información de otros (Carpenter, Green & LaFlam, 2011). Ahora los SRS se utilizan para realizar comunicaciones, edificar relaciones, y brindar nuevas amistades (Pew, 2009; Raacke & Bonds-Raacke, 2008).

El uso de las redes sociales en Internet se ha incrementado rápidamente en predomino y popularidad en los últimos años, especialmente entre los alumnos universitarios (Pempek, Yermolayeva & Calvert, 2009; Vrocharidou & Efthymiou, 2012). La juventud de esta última generación ha crecido con acceso a los ordenadores y a Internet y por eso muchos parecen poseer una capacidad natural y unas habilidades de alto nivel en cuanto a manejar las nuevas tecnologías. En la actualidad esto se debe a que estos jóvenes dedican una gran parte de su vida diaria al uso de Internet, los SRS, las herramientas digitales, los juegos en línea, el correo electrónico, los teléfonos móviles, y la mensajería instantánea (Prensky, 2001). Frecuentemente tienen acceso al ordenador y a Internet en sus casas, residencias, y escuelas (Ahn, 2011). Hargittai (2008) reportó que cuando los alumnos tienen acceso a Internet en la casa de un amigo o de un familiar; esto aumenta la probabilidad del uso de Facebook y MySpace. Sin embargo, un dato interesante es que, a pesar de que entre los alumnos que tienen las posibilidades de acceder y de utilizar los aparatos tecnológicos fácilmente –y que están muy interesados en los ordenadores y en Internet– hay un número considerable de ellos que no utilizan los SRS (Harper, 2006). Esta investigación emplea el término «no-usuario» para referirse a los individuos que no utilizan ningún sitio de redes sociales o a los que no utilizan ningún sitio específico.

Facebook fue seleccionado de entre las redes sociales para usar en esta investigación porque es el sitio más popular y el más visitado entre los alumnos universitarios (eBizMBA, 2012). Las estadísticas de Facebook (Marzo, 2012) reportan que hay 901 millones de usuarios activos mensualmente que crean perfiles, interactúan con objetos de Facebook, dejan comentarios para sus amigos, suben fotos, y/o se conectan a las páginas comunitarias, grupos, y eventos. Estas cifras respaldan la popularidad de Facebook. Algunas investigaciones nuevas han reportado que una gran proporción de alumnos afirman que pasan entre 10 y 60 minutos en Facebook a diario (Ross, Orr, Sisic & Arsen, 2009; Stern & Taylor, 2007). Sin embargo, a pesar del uso extenso de Facebook entre los jóvenes, hay muchos que deliberadamente se consideran no-usuarios dentro de esta categoría de edad.

Dado el predominio de los SRS y su importancia en la vida de los jóvenes, es importante comprender los factores que influyen en la utilización de los SRS. La popularidad de Facebook entre los jóvenes ha atraído la atención de muchos investigadores, y varias investigaciones han examinado el uso de Facebook desde diferentes perspectivas (Cheung, Chiu & Lee, 2011; Hew, 2011; Green & Bailey, 2010; Pempek, Yermolayeva & Calvert, 2009). Entre las razones descubiertas empujando la participación de los alumnos en Facebook son: comunicarse con amigos, mirar o subir fotos, el entretenimiento, averiguar sobre o planear eventos, enviar o recibir mensajes, crear o leer mensajes en el muro, conocer mejor a otros, obtener la información de contacto y representarse a otros por medio del contenido del perfil (Pempek, Yermolayeva & Calvert, 2009; Cheung, Chiu & Lee, 2011). Estas razones pueden explicar por qué las redes sociales se están integrando rápidamente en la vida diaria de la gente (Ajjan & Hartshorne, 2008). Del mismo modo, los usos educativos de los SRS (Cheung, Chiu & Lee, 2011; Green & Bailey, 2010; Roblyer, McDaniel, Webb, Herman & Witty, 2010; Teclehaimanot & Hickman, 2011) y las diferencias individuales en utilizarlos (Carpenter, Green & LaFlam, 2011; Ross & al., 2009), son temas populares de investigación en estos tiempos. Mientras todas estas áreas de investigación son importantes y dignas de explorar, una pregunta significativa se ha pasado por alto. ¿Por qué algunos alumnos universitarios no utilizan los SRS por su propia decisión? Una investigación desarrollada por Baker y White (2011) examinó las razones ofrecidas por los alumnos de entre 9 y 10 años por su no uso de los SRS en una escuela secundaria en Australia, y reportó que las razones principales fueron una falta de motivación, que se consideraba un mal uso del tiempo, y que los alumnos preferían otras formas de comunicación. Las razones secundarias fueron el acceso limitado, la preocupación parental, y la influencia de los amigos.

Esta investigación examinará las razones por las que no se utilizan los SRS (específicamente Facebook) entre los alumnos universitarios, y sus actitudes acerca de su uso. Para proveer una contribución metodológica original, esta investigación se enfocará en identificar las variaciones entre las razones que los alumnos argumentan para no usar Facebook. El estudio les será útil a varios grupos, incluyendo las escuelas, los gobiernos, los padres, las corporaciones, y los webmasters (Baker & White, 2011). Teniendo en cuenta el creciente número de los SRS, muchos académicos los están empezando a considerar como un medio eficaz para alcanzar a sus alumnos (Kabilan, Ahmad, & Abidin, 2010). Por consiguiente, esta investigación les servirá a los que quieran desarrollar herramientas educativas para emplear en los SRS. Las preguntas que se utilizaron en la investigación fueron las siguientes:

1) ¿Cuáles son las razones subyacentes para que no se utilice Facebook entre los alumnos universitarios?

2) ¿Cuáles son las percepciones de los alumnos universitarios que son ‘no-usuarios’ con respecto a los SRS?

3) ¿Cuáles son las percepciones de los alumnos universitarios que son ‘no-usuarios’ con respecto a las amistades en línea y el compartir ideas en ambientes virtuales?

2. Métodos

2.1. Sinopsis

Esta es una investigación de caso descriptivo que se enfoca en el por qué los alumnos universitarios no utilizan las redes sociales a pesar de tener acceso a Internet y a las tecnologías relacionadas. Una metodología de investigación cualitativa se realizó durante la recogida de datos para obtener información a fondo. La investigación se enfocó en veinte alumnos universitarios que eran no-usuarios de Facebook por decisión propia.

2.2. Participantes

Se recogieron los datos de 20 alumnos de licenciatura, de entre 18 y 25 años, de las facultades de Informática Educativa y Tecnología Instructiva (CEIT), en dos universidades distintas de Turquía. Una de la universidades está localizada en la región este del país y la otra en la noreste. Todos los alumnos que participaron en esta investigación lo hicieron voluntariamente y recibieron un rotulador de CD por su participación. Los participantes fueron seleccionados por muestreo intencional, que es un método conocido en el campo de investigación cualitativa (Patton, 1990). Como indica la tabla 1, el grupo estuvo formado por un total de 11 mujeres y 9 hombres.


Draft Content 137705665-26791 ov-es060.jpg

2.3. Instrumentos para la recogida de datos y procedimiento

Los datos fueron recogidos por medio de unas entrevistas semiestructuradas, usando una técnica propia desarrollada por los investigadores. Para asegurar la validez de la herramienta de recogida de datos, se llevaron a cabo dos revisiones expertas y cuatro por pares. Según los comentarios, el guion de las entrevistas fue modificado y finalizado. Las entrevistas duraron de 15 a 20 minutos y fueron dirigidas por uno de los investigadores.

2.4. Análisis de datos

Las entrevistas se transcribieron y se codificaron. Luego se analizaron las transcripciones a través de un análisis del contenido. Por fin los investigadores participaron en un estudio de transcripciones individuales para generar una lista de categorías y subcategorías relacionadas con las preguntas de la investigación. Los temas se derivaron de las respuestas de cada participante y se compartieron y se analizaron entre los investigadores.

3. Resultados

3.1. Las razones subyacentes especificadas por los no-usuarios de Facebook

Ninguno de los participantes (n=20) estaba usando Facebook durante la recogida de los datos. Se les preguntó a los alumnos cuáles fueron los factores que les llevaron a ser no-usuarios de este SRS. Los resultados se presentan en la tabla 2.


Draft Content 137705665-26791 ov-es061.jpg

Pasar tiempo excesivo en Facebook fue el factor más común que les detuvo a los alumnos de utilizar esta red (n=12; 6 mujeres, 6 hombres). Afirmaron que el uso de Facebook consumía demasiado tiempo y que era una distracción. Algunos ejemplos de sus respuestas fueron: «En primer lugar, el tiempo es muy importante para mí y no lo quiero perder» (P1, mujer). «Concluyo que gran parte de mi tiempo se pierde en Facebook, así que he suspendido mi cuenta» (P6, hombre).

La segunda razón más importante para no usarlo fue: «Falta de interés» (n=10; 9 mujeres, 1 hombre). Algunos alumnos afirmaron que no tenían ningún interés ni motivo para usar Facebook y pensaron que no tenía sentido y era innecesario. Por ejemplo, un alumno dijo «Veo Facebook como una herramienta innecesaria. Creo que puedo hacer cualquier cosa que yo pudiera hacer en Facebook en cualquier otro sitio» (P13, mujer).

Seis alumnos (n=6; 6 mujeres) dijeron que si quieren comunicarse con otros hay muchas otras herramientas con aplicaciones similares, como el servicio de mansajería MSN, que permite llamar y enviar mensajes por teléfono móvil. En definitiva, prefieren otras herramientas comunicativas para comunicarse con otros. Una alumna reportó: «Estoy usando un teléfono móvil para hablar y para comunicar mensajes cortos» (P8, mujer). De manera parecida, otra alumna reportó: «Obviamente, no necesito usar los SRS. Puedo ponerme en contacto con la gente con quien quiero comunicarme por teléfono móvil. Francamente nunca me he sentido con la necesidad de usar Facebook» (P19, mujer).

Una de las razones para no usar Facebook es el asunto de la adicción. Algunos alumnos (n=4; 2 mujeres, 2 hombres) tenían miedo a desarrollar una adicción a los SRS. Por ejemplo, un alumno dijo: «Abrí una cuenta en Facebook para jugar a juegos. Mi idea era solamente jugar a un solo juego, al póker. Jugaba y luego me hice adicto al póker» (P14, hombre).

A los alumnos no-usuarios tampoco les gustaba la idea de representarse a ellos mismos en este sitio. Uno reportó: «Cayendo en la cuenta de que yo compartía demasiado de mi vida privada suspendí mi cuenta.» (P12, hombre). Otro se quejó de que: «Al final, la gente no toma parte en actividades beneficiosas para la sociedad. Todo el mundo está compartiendo sus vidas privadas y no me interesan sus vidas. Ya que no quiero darme a conocer a otros, no lo encuentro necesario» (P4, mujer).

Algunos alumnos (n=3, 2 mujeres, 1 hombre) reportaron que empezaron a usar Facebook para ponerse en contacto y comunicarse con otros, pero luego este propósito se convirtió en una actividad inútil que consumía su tiempo. Una alumna dijo: «Yo dejé de usar Facebook porque noté que lo usaba fuera de mis intenciones. En mi opinión, el propósito de Facebook es mantenerse en contacto con personas que están lejos. Me di cuenta de que en Facebook yo estaba diciendo disparates a personas sentadas al otro lado de mi ordenador» (P7, mujer). Igualmente otro alumno comentó: «Creo que Facebook comenzó como un buen sitio pero luego adquirió algunos puntos malos». Por ejemplo: «Originalmente se promocionó como una red social, pero después aparecieron los juegos. ¿Qué sé yo? Miles de comentarios se hicieron en muchos artículos. Así que tomé la decisión de no usar Facebook» (P3, hombre).

Otra razón para no usar este SRS fue la de ser insociable (n=2, 2 mujeres). Una de las alumnas reportó: «No creo que vuelva a usar Facebook jamás porque disminuye la calidad de mi comunicación con mis amigos» (P7, mujer).

El fracaso académico se señaló como otro motivo para no usar Facebook. Dos alumnos respondieron que suspendieron sus exámenes a causa de usar Facebook. Un alumno reportó: «El año pasado mientras preparaba mis exámenes finales yo jugaba en Facebook hasta la madrugada. Cuando llegué a mis exámenes habiendo dormido dos horas me arrepentí mucho. Desde entonces no he usado Facebook» (P14, hombre). Una alumna también respondió que le gustaba usar Facebook pero tenía miedo a experimentar fracasos. Dijo: «Yo tenía miedo a usar mi cuenta de Facebook durante mis cursos» (P10, mujer).

Dos alumnos expresaron que tenían prejuicios contra los SRS debido a previos encuentros desagradables en Facebook u otro SNS. Comentaron que si utilizaran un SRS nuevamente, podrían atravesar por las mismas experiencias desagradables. Una alumna tuvo una experiencia similar en MSN. Ella comentó: «Usar MSN cambió todos mis hábitos. En particular afectó mis calificaciones escolares cuando tenía quince años. Después de eliminarlo me desconecté completamente del ordenador» (P9, mujer). Otro alumno también comentó que anteriormente había padecido de una adicción a los juegos y que los juegos en Facebook pudieron abrir otra vía a la adicción. Él respondió: «Creo que Facebook me distrae mucho porque soy adicto a los juegos y tiene muchos juegos» (P16, hombre).

Un alumno dijo que los SRS amenazaron su seguridad y la confidencialidad de sus datos personales. Cuando uno de los participantes le preguntó por qué siente que su confidencialidad estaba en riesgo por Facebook, él le contestó: «Personalmente nunca he experimentado ningún evento adverso, solo he llegado a saber de eso por medio de las noticias. Así que he suspendido mi cuenta» (P11, hombre).

Una de las alumnas expresó que su familia le prohibió usar Facebook. Ella quería usar los SRS pero la prohibición de su familiar no lo permitió. Dijo: «Mis padres reaccionaron y me pidieron que yo cerrara mi cuenta. Quiero reactivarla pero mis padres no me permitirán hacerlo ahora» (P10, mujer).

Las últimas tres razones más frecuentemente reportadas para no utilizar Facebook fueron la preferencia por usar otros SRS, la influencia de amigos, y el acoso-cibernético. Un alumno comentó: «El motivo para desactivar mi cuenta de Facebook es que suelo usar Twitter más que Facebook» (P6, hombre). Otra alumna comentó: «Suspendí mi cuenta por los mensajes absurdos que te llegan constantemente. Me sentí deprimida. Ahora me siento muy cómoda» (P8, mujer).

3.2. Percepciones generales de los no-usuarios acerca del uso de los SRS

Se les solicitó a los alumnos sus opiniones sobre el uso de los SRS. La mayoría de los participantes (n= 14) reportó que usaba MSN. Además, cinco de ellos reportaron que Twitter es mejor que Facebook porque Twitter no tiene tantas herramientas como Facebook, lo cual lo hace más fácil de usar. Cinco de ellos también reportaron que usan Formspring, el cual «les hace preguntas originales a los usuarios anticipando sus respuestas divertidas o reveladoras...» (Formspring.me, 2012). Sin embargo, seis alumnos indicaron que no utilizan ningún SRS. Dos de ellos reportaron que solamente usan el correo electrónico. Únicamente una alumna creyó que Facebook es el mejor de los SRS. Ella dijo: «Facebook es el mejor de los SRS. Twitter… No… no tengo cuenta. Pero la mayoría de mis amigos lo usan. Pero no sé. Ellos solo se intercambian palabras. Facebook es mucho mejor que los otros SRS» (P2, mujer).

3.3. Percepciones de los alumnos sobre las amistades virtuales

La tabla 3 representa una distribución de frecuencias de las percepciones de los alumnos sobre las amistades virtuales. Los temas que surgieron fueron peligrosas, falsas, y seguridad parcial. La mayoría de los participantes (n=17) indicó que no cree en las amistades virtuales ni se depende de ellas, e incluso, las cree peligrosas. Un alumno reportó: «No creo que las amistades virtuales sean amistades verdaderas porque fácilmente puedes mandar una invitación de amistad. Obviamente no apoyo las amistades virtuales» (P11, hombre). Otro alumno comentó: «Creo que si estuviera hablando con un amigo que yo hubiera conocido antes en la vida real, habría una verdadera comunicación. Pero algunas personas entablan amistades en ambientes virtuales con personas que no conocen en la vida real. ¿Quién es él o ella? ¿Cuántos años tiene él o ella? Uno nunca sabe si él o ella es una persona verdadera. Creo que es un ambiente extremadamente inseguro y expuesto a muchos peligros» (P15, mujer).

Once de los alumnos indicaron que las amistades virtuales son falsas. Por ejemplo, una dijo: «No es apropiado para mí. Creo que hay demasiado extraño en eso» (P2, mujer). Otro alumno dijo, «Es normal si las personas se conocieron antes, pero yo no encontré ninguna otra amistad adecuada. La mayoría de las supuestas amistades de los usuarios son falsas…» (P14, hombre).

Cuatro participantes reportaron que las amistades virtuales son vanas y sin sentido. Por ejemplo, una alumna afirmó que «las amistades virtuales son absurdas. Cuando uno no conoce a los que le rodean, hacer un esfuerzo para conocer a los que están en el mundo virtual es muy anormal» (P18, mujer).


Draft Content 137705665-26791 ov-es062.jpg

3.4. Opiniones de los alumnos sobre compartir ideas en ambientes virtuales

Las dos respuestas más comunes entre los alumnos con respecto a sus opiniones sobre compartir ideas, datos personales, y fotografías fueron negativas en cuanto a «Compartir fotos» (n=8) y positivas en cuanto a «Compartir datos personales» (n=8). Otras opiniones reportadas por lo común fueron negativas referente a «Compartir puntos de vista políticos» (n=7), y que el sitio o «Refleja [su] personalidad real parcialmente» (n=8) o «Refleja [su] personalidad real» (n=3). La distribución de la frecuencia de las respuestas a esa pregunta se presenta en la tabla 4. Un alumno dijo: «Creo que compartir fotos es la situación normal… pero los puntos de vista políticos no se deberían mencionar en este sitio» (P16, hombre). Al contrario, otra alumna respondió: «No veo ningún problema en compartir los puntos de vista políticos, aunque compartir los datos personales puede lastimar a los demás» (P7, mujer).


Draft Content 137705665-26791 ov-es063.jpg

3.5. Los factores subyacentes que impulsan el uso de los SRS

Cuando se les preguntó por los factores que impulsan a la gente a usar los SRS, las dos respuestas más populares fueron «Pasar el tiempo» (n=10) y «Comunicarse» (n=10). La distribución de frecuencia de las respuestas a esta pregunta se representa en la tabla 5. Un alumno indicó: «Creo que los usuarios de Facebook usan [el sitio] para aumentar el tiempo de ocio con sus amigos y pasar un buen rato» (P16, hombre). Otra alumno dijo: «Curiosidad y Entretenimiento… Creo que usan [el sitio] por eso» (P13, mujer).


Draft Content 137705665-26791 ov-es064.jpg

3.6. Razones subyacentes para invitar a alguien a usar los SNS

Cuando se les preguntó por qué hay personas que invitan a otras a usar Facebook, las dos respuestas más populares fueron «Mantenerse en contacto con amigos (n=12)» y «Compartir información (n=6)». La tabla 6 muestra las razones subyacentes para las invitaciones a SNS.


Draft Content 137705665-26791 ov-es065.jpg

4. Conclusión y discusión

Esta investigación examinó las razones que explican por qué los alumnos universitarios deciden no usar Facebook. En el análisis se exponen las percepciones de los no-usuarios sobre los SRS. Aunque los alumnos usan Internet a menudo, los resultados principales indican que la razón básica para no usar Facebook fue el tiempo excesivo pasado en línea. Puede ser que los alumnos están sumamente ocupados con su desarrollo académico y profesional y por ende tienen poco tiempo para participar en un SRS en línea (Kirschner & Karpinski, 2010).

Al mismo tiempo, tal vez las redes sociales en línea no son una prioridad para los alumnos (Kirschner & Karpinski, 2010). De modo semejante, en la investigación que examinó las razones para no usar los SRS entre los alumnos de secundaria en Australia (n=69), Baker y White (2011) averiguaron que los alumnos también consideraron que los SRS consumen demasiado tiempo y que son una distracción. La falta de interés fue otra razón prominente para no usar Facebook. Esto también se refleja en la perspectiva propuesta por Baker y White (2011) y Tufekci (2008), ya que a los no-usuarios no les interesan las actividades en los SRS, las cuáles se basan en el concepto de la preparación social. A pesar de la popularidad de los SRS en todo el mundo, estos resultados indican los dilemas relacionados con el uso de los SRS por un grupo selectivo de personas. Puesto que los no-usuarios no son ni aislados socialmente ni tienen miedo a Internet (Tufekci, 2008), podemos conjeturar que esta tecnología no pudo captar su curiosidad, ni su atención.

Los resultados también demuestran que los alumnos en esta investigación prefieren otras herramientas comunicativas. Algunos aún afirmaron que los SRS no son buenas herramientas comunicativas. Este descubrimiento coincide con la investigación de Baker y White (2011), que encontraron que los alumnos prefieren otros medios de comunicación como el teléfono, el correo electrónico y MSN, a los SRS. Mientras estas son las razones resultantes para no usar Facebook en este caso, otras investigaciones han descrito los mismos factores como el propósito para no usar los SRS. Cheung, Chiu, y Lee (2011), Roblyer y otros (2010), y Bosch (2009) reportaron que los alumnos usan los SRS para comunicarse con otra gente y con amigos, para hacer nuevos amigos, y para mantener sus relaciones. Esta diferencia puede ser relacionada con el hecho de que ciertos alumnos se encuentran con acontecimientos problemáticos como el acoso-cibernético, o son afectados por la mala prensa de los SRS. Otro asunto interesante que reportaron los alumnos fue que no usaron Facebook porque poseían varias preocupaciones sobre la representación de uno mismo en línea, como compartir las fotografías y sus puntos de vistas políticos. Tufekci (2008) también relató que a los no-usuarios no les gustaba representarse en estos sitios web. En contraste a la literatura, esta razón normalmente fue reportada por los participantes hombres en esta investigación. Al contrario, Mazman y Usluel (2011) encontraron que las mujeres suelen esconder sus identidades y sus datos personales para guardar su privacidad en Internet.

Estos alumnos también temían convertirse en adictos a Internet si usaban Facebook y creyeron que esta red se había desviado de su propósito original. Aparte de mantenerse en contacto con los amigos o brindar las amistades en Facebook, los participantes notaron que pasaban demasiado tiempo jugando en la red o usando otras aplicaciones de la misma (Joinson, 2008; Pempek & al., 2009; Sheldon, 2008a; Stern & Taylor, 2007). En particular, esta investigación reveló que los alumnos no-usuarios creen que el uso de Facebook destruye sus habilidades sociales, especialmente con respecto a sus relaciones con sus amigos. De acuerdo con este descubrimiento Rosen (2011) reportó que la gente que usa Facebook manifiesta tendencias narcisistas con mayor frecuencia junto con la sintomatología de otros desordenes psicológicos, incluyendo los comportamientos antisociales, la manía, y la agresividad.

Kirschner y Karpinski (2010) señalaron una distinción significante entre el éxito académico de los usuarios y los no-usuarios e indicaron que el promedio de calificaciones para los usuarios era más bajo que para los no-usuarios. Karpinski y Duberstein (2009) también reportaron una relación negativa entre el uso de Facebook y el éxito académico. Del mismo modo los resultados de esta investigación mostraron que algunos alumnos temieron el fracaso académico si usaban Facebook. Por consiguiente, si los educadores quieren integrar Facebook en sus actividades instructivas deberían de sobrellevar las preocupaciones de sus alumnos dese un principio.

Entre las razones para no usar Facebook, el perjuicio contra el uso de los SRS en general, o la preferencia por usar otros SRS, las preocupaciones por la privacidad y por los padres, la influencia de los amigos, y el acoso-cibernético fueron señaladas con menor frecuencia por estos alumnos. Baker y White (2011) sugirieron que las preocupaciones parentales y la influencia de los amigos son menos confesadas que otras razones, llegando a la conclusión que las razones personales, en vez de las sociales, tuvieron más influencia en la decisión de no usar los SRS. Las preocupaciones por la privacidad y el acoso cibernético pueden fomentar la percepción de los SRS como ambientes peligrosos. Se necesita considerar estos resultados especialmente por los académicos para entender mejor a los alumnos universitarios y poder desarrollar materiales y ambientes adecuados para ellos.

La mayoría de estos alumnos creyeron que las amistades virtuales son o peligrosas o falsas. Además, a veces afirmaron que las amistades virtuales son insignificantes y solamente seguras en parte. De modo parecido, Tufekci (2008) descubrió que los no-usuarios generalmente piensan que mantenerse en contacto con sus amigos por medio de los SRS es absurdo y no tiene sentido. Los investigadores han encontrado que algunos adolescentes prefieren interactuar directamente por teléfono o por encuentros dirigidos cara-a-cara en vez de por la comunicación en línea (McCown, Fischer, Page, & Homant, 2001; Wolak, Mitchell, & Finkelhor, 2002). Esto es importante cuando se consideran los usos de los SRS para entablar nuevas amistades y expandir el ambiente social propio. Por lo tanto se puede concluir que, para estos alumnos, los SRS no solo son un recurso insignificante para entablar amistades sino también un medio vano y peligroso para tales intercambios.

Cuando los alumnos no-usuarios ofrecieron los factores potenciales que puedan impulsar a otros a usar los SRS, entre las sugerencias más comunes se encontraron las de pasar tiempo y comunicarse con otros. De una forma parecida, muchas investigaciones han sacado la conclusión de que la gente usa las redes sociales, sobre todo, para mantenerse en contacto con amigos, o para entablar nuevas amistades (Joinson, 2008; Lampe, Ellison, & Steinfield, 2006, 2008; Lenhart, 2009; Lewis & West, 2009; Pempek & al., 2009; Sheldon, 2008a; Stern & Taylor, 2007; Young & Quan-Haase, 2009). Este resultado reveló que los alumnos no-usuarios percibieron los SRS como ambientes sociales, pero eligieron no depender de las amistades virtuales ni de Facebook para comunicarse con otros. La soledad, el entretenimiento, los juegos, la educación, y conocer a nuevas personas fueron respuestas menos comunes. Los alumnos no-usuarios no creen que los SRS sean un ambiente adecuado para la educación.

En conclusión, esta investigación expone una variedad de razones para no usar los SRS por un grupo de alumnos universitarios y sus percepciones sobre el uso de los SRS. Las razones primarias para no usarlos son: «el tiempo excesivo pasado en línea», «la falta de interés», «la preferencia por otras herramientas comunicativas», «el miedo a la adicción», y «el disgusto por representarse». Además, los no-usuarios piensan que las amistades virtuales son de poca confianza y peligrosas. También sufren bastante ansiedad relacionada con Facebook. Por lo tanto, estas desventajas precisan ser consideradas por los diseñadores y los desarrolladores de los SRS para poder alcanzar un grupo más amplio de usuarios. Los diseñadores de aplicaciones y de sitios web deben poner su atención en ahorrar tiempo y en desarrollar unos sistemas que garanticen la seguridad cibernética y minimicen los problemas de acoso-cibernético. Las instituciones educativas, los académicos, y los profesores también deben de prestar atención a estas razones expresadas por los alumnos para no usar los SRS. Las preocupaciones de los alumnos no-usuarios no pueden ser ignoradas cuando se desarrollan los sistemas educativos para usarlos dentro de los SRS.

Las limitaciones de esta investigación incluyen una muestra pequeña de alumnos encuestados y el hecho de ser una investigación cualitativa. Las investigaciones cualitativas típicamente investigan el problema de investigación a fondo. Por ende, las muestras pequeñas (menos de 20) les facilitan a los investigadores el trabajo de establecer la comunicación directa con los participantes (Crouch & McKenzie, 2006). Teniendo en cuenta el pequeño número de no-usuarios de las redes sociales, esto no se debe considerar como un problema. Por eso los resultados tal vez no puedan ser generalizables a los alumnos de otras universidades ni a toda la población. Basándonos en estos resultados, las investigaciones venideras deben investigar las razones por las que no se usan los SRS con diferentes muestras y diferentes categorías de edad.

Referencias

Ahn, J. (2011). The Effect of Social Network Sites on Adolescents’ Social and Aca-demic Development?: Current Theories. Journal of the American Society for Information Science, 62(8), 1435-1445.

Ajjan, H. & Hartshorne, R. (2008). Investigating Faculty Decisions to Adopt Web 2.0 Technologies: Theory and Empirical Tests. The Internet and Higher Education, 11(2), 71-80.

Baker, K.R. & White, K.M. (2011). In their Own Words: Why Teenagers don’t Use Social Networking Sites. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 14(6), 395-398.

Bosch, T.E. (2009). Using Online Social Networking for Teaching and Learning: FB Use at the University of Cape Town. Communicato, 32(2), 185-200.

Carpenter, J.M., Green, M.C. & LaFlam, J. (2011). People or Profiles: Individual Differences in Online Social Networking Use. Personality and Individual Differences, 50(5), 538-541.

Ceyhan, A.A. (2008). Predictors of Problematic Internet Use on Turkish University Students. Cyberpsychology Behavior and Social Networking, 11(3), 363-366.

Cheung, C.M.K., Chiu, P.Y., & Lee, M.K.O. (2011). Online Social Networks: Why do Students Use Facebook? Computers in Human Behavior, 27(4), 1337-1343.

Crouch, M. & McKenzie, H. (2006). The Logic of Small Samples in Interview-based Qualitative Research. Social Science Information, 45(4), 483-499.

eBizMBA (2012). Top 15 Most Popular Social Networking Sites. (www.ebizmba.com/ar-ticles/social-networking-websites) (21-05-2012).

Facebook, (2012). Company Newsroom. (http://newsroom.fb.com) (21-05-2012).

Formspring (Ed.) (2012). About Formspring. (www.formspring.me/about/index) (21-05-2012).

Green, B.T. & Bailey, B. (2010). Academic Uses of Facebook: Endless Possibilities or Endless Perils? TechTrends, 54(3), 20-22.

Hargittai, E. (2008). Whose Space? Differences among Users and Non-users of Social Network Sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 13, 276-297.

Harper, M.G. (2006). High Tech Cheating. Nurse Education in Practice, 6(6), 364-71.

Hew, K.F. (2011). Students’ and Teachers’ Use of Facebook. Computers in Human Behavior, 27, 662-676.

Joinson, A.N. (2008). ‘Looking at’, ‘Looking up’ or ‘Keeping up with’ People? Motives and Uses of Facebook. In Proceedings of the 26th Annual SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 1027-1036). New York: ACM.

Kabilan, M.K., Ahmad N. & Abidin, M.J.Z. (2010). Facebook: An Online Environment for Learning of English in Institutions of Higher Education? The Internet and Higher Education, 13, 4, 179-187.

Karpinski, A.C. & Duberstein, A. (2009). A Description of Facebook Use and Academic Performance among Undergraduate and Graduate Students. In Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Diego, CA.

Kirschner, P.A. & Karpinski, A.C. (2010). Facebook and Academic Performance. Computers in Human Behavior, 26(6), 1237-1245.

Lampe, C., Ellison, N. & Steinfield, C. (2006). A Face(book) in the Crowd: Social Searching vs. Social Browsing. In 20th Anniversary Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work (pp. 167-170). New York: ACM.

Lampe, C., Ellison, N. & Steinfield, C. (2008). Changes in Use and Perception of Face-book. In Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative work (pp. 721-730). New York: ACM.

Lenhart, M. (2009). Adults and Social Network Websites. Pew Internet & American life Project Report. (www.pewinternet.org/~/media/Files/Reports/2007/PIP_-Teens_Privacy_SNS_Report_Final.pdf.pdf) (22-05-2012).

Lewis, J. & West, A. (2009). ‘Friending’: London-based Undergraduates’ Experience of Facebook. New Media & Society, 11(7), 1209-1229.

Martin, S., Diaz, G., Sancristobal, E., Gil, R., Castro, M. & Peire, J. (2011). New Technology Trends in Education: Seven Years of Forecasts and Convergence. Computers & Education, 57(3), 1893-1906.

Mazman, S.G. & Usluel, Y.K. (2011). Gender Differences in Using Social Networks. TOJET: The Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology, 10(2), 133-139.

McCown, J.A., Fischer, D., Page, R. & Homant, M. (2001). Internet Relationships: People who Meet People. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 4(5), 593-596.

Patton, M.Q. (1990). Qualitative Evaluation and Research Methods. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

Pempek, T., Yermolayeva, A.Y., & Calvert, L.S. (2009). College Students' Social Networking Experiences on Facebook. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 30. 227-238.

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. On the Horizon, 9(5), 1-6.

Raacke, J. & Bonds-Raacke, J. (2008). MySpace and Facebook: Applying the Uses and Gratifications Theory to Exploring Friend-networking Sites. Cyberpsychology & Behavior, 11, 2, 169-174.

Roblyer, M.D., McDaniel, M., Webb, M., Herman, J. & Witty, J.V. (2010). Findings on Facebook in Higher Education: A Comparison of College Faculty and Student Uses and Perceptions of Social Networking Sites. The Internet and Higher Education, 13(3), 134-140.

Rosen, L.D. (2011). Social Networking’s Good and Bad Impacts on Kids. (www.apa.-org/news/press/releases/2011/08/social-kids.aspx) (22-05-2012).

Ross, C., Orr, E.S., Sisic, M., Arseneault, J.M., Simmering, M.G. & Orr, R.R. (2009). Personality and Motivations Associated with Facebook Use. Computers in Human Behavior, 25(2), 578-586.

Sheldon, P. (2008a). Student Favourite: Facebook and Motives for its Use. Southwestern Mass Communication Journal, 23(2), 39-53.

Stern, L.A. & Taylor, K. (2007). Social Networking on Facebook. Journal of the Communication, Speech & Theatre Association of North Dakota, 20, 9-20.

Teclehaimanot, B.B. & Hickman, T. (2011). Student-teacher Interaction on Facebook: What Students Find Appropriate. TechTrends, 55(3), 19-30.

Tufekci, Z. (2008). Can you See me Now? Audience and Disclosure Regulation in Online Social Network sites. Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society, 28(1), 20-36.

Vrocharidou, A. & Efthymiou, I. (2012). Computer Mediated Communication for Social and Academic Purposes: Profiles of Use and University Students’ Gratifications. Computers & Education, 58(1), 609-616.

Wolak, J., Mitchell, K.J. & Finkelhor, D. (2002). Close Online Relationship in a National Sample of Adolescents. Adolescence, 37(147), 441-455.

Young, A.L. & Quan-Haase, A. (2009). Information Revelation and Internet Privacy Concerns on Social Network Sites: A Case Study of Facebook. In IV International Conference on Communities and Technologies (pp. 265-274). New York: ACM.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/05/13
Accepted on 31/05/13
Submitted on 31/05/13

Volume 21, Issue 1, 2013
DOI: 10.3916/C41-2013-13
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 11
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?