Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

In this paper we review the socalled altmetrics or alternative metrics. This concept raises from the development of new indicators based on Web 2.0, for the evaluation of the research and academic activity. The basic assumption is that variables such as mentions in blogs, number of twits or of researchers bookmarking a research paper for instance, may be legitimate indicators for measuring the use and impact of scientific publications. In this sense, these indicators are currently the focus of the bibliometric community and are being discussed and debated. We describe the main platforms and indicators and we analyze as a sample the Spanish research output in Communication Studies. Comparing traditional indicators such as citations with these new indicators. The results show that the most cited papers are also the ones with a highest impact according to the altmetrics. We conclude pointing out the main shortcomings these metrics present and the role they may play when measuring the research impact through 2.0 platforms.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Altmetrics is a very new term, and can be defined as the creation and study of new indicators for the analysis of academic activity based on Web 2.0 (Priem & al., 2010). The underlying premise is that, for example, mentions in blogs, number of re-tweets or saves of articles in reference management systems, may be a valid measure of the use of scientific publications. However, measuring the visibility of science on the Internet is not a new phenomenon. The origin of altmetrics arose in the nineties with webometrics, the quantitative study of the characteristics of the web (Thelwall & al., 2005). This was derived from the application of bibliometric methods to online sites, and encompasses various disciplines including communication. Despite the web playing an increasingly important role in social and economic relations, this discipline has not been able to overcome certain limitations inherent in the methodologies, methods and information sources used. However, it has contributed a complementary perspective to the traditional analysis of citations by means of the study of links, mailing list communications or analysis of the structure of the academic web. Shortly afterwards, the consolidation of scientific communication by journals and electronic media such as repositories opened the door to new indicators.

The so-called «bibliometrics usage» (Kurtz & Bollen, 2010), based on downloads of scientific materials, reveals that indicators of use of publications measure a different dimension to that of bibliometric indicators (Bollen & al., 2009), and demonstrate different behaviour patterns to citation (Schloegl & Gorraiz, 2010). With a view to measuring scientific impact, these indicators offer complementary information. Without doubt, the idea that traditional bibliometric measures and the sources on which they base their calculations are insufficient permeates throughout the scientific community. This leads to the emergence of new indicators, such as SJR (González-Pereira & al., 2010) or the Eigenfactor (Bergstrom, West & Wiseman 2008), which are based on the idea of Google’s PageRank algorithm. There is a clear symbiotic relationship between web based and bibliometric methods. This move is motivated by the dissatisfaction of many scientists with bibliometric methods, in particular the highly criticised Impact Factor (Seglen, 1997; Rossner, Van Epps & Hill., 2007), exacerbated by the appearance of new databases such as Scopus and Google Scholar. This search engine’s power and coverage, but also its normalisation problems, illustrate both the wealth of academic information on the web, and the difficulty of adequately understanding and analysing this information (Torres-Salinas, Ruíz-Pérez & Delgado, 2009; Delgado & Cabezas-Clavijo, 2012).

It is in this context, with the arrival of Web 2.0 and scientists’ gradual use of said platforms as tools for the diffusion and receipt of scientific information (Cabezas-Clavijo, Torres-Salinas & Delgado, 2009) and with part of the scientific community relatively receptive, that scientometrics 2.0 (Priem & Hemminger, 2010), or altmetrics (Priem & al., 2010), began to be discussed. Although, in a wider sense, any unconventional measure for the evaluation of science can be considered an alternative indicator, sensu stricto it would be more accurate to speak of indicators derived from 2.0 tools; that is to say, measures generated from the interactions of social web users (primarily but not exclusively scientists) with researcher produced material. One of the principal strengths of altmetrics lies in its provision of information at article level (Neylon & Wu, 2009), which enables assessment of the impact of papers beyond the bounds of publication sources. Various studies have stated that altmetrics can be used for measuring other levels of aggregation, such as journals (Nielsen, 2007) or universities (Orduña & Ontalba, 2012). Additionally, altmetrics offer a new perspective, considering the almost real time information provided on research impact. This monitoring, in the form of revision by peer collectives or peer revision following publication (Mandavilli, 2011), is undoubtedly an element that introduces new forms of scrutiny by the scientific community.

Taking into account the impact of Web 2.0 and its now central position within communication research, this paper undertakes a review of altmetrics, focusing on quantative studies of the same. Firstly, an explanation is given of the main platforms and indicators, followed by the comparative evaluation of a selection of communication papers showing the number of citations received and their 2.0 indicators. Next, a review of the principal empirical studies is undertaken, centering on the correlations between bibliometric and alternative indicators. To conclude, the main limitations of altmetrics are highlighted alongside a reflective consideration of the role altmetrics may play when it comes to understanding the impact of research in Web 2.0 platforms.

2. Principal platforms and altmetric indicators

The placing on-line of bibliographic reference management systems and favourites, where personal libraries and researchers’ references are regularly managed, has generated a series of original indicators. For example, the number of times a study has been marked as favourite (bookmarking) or the number of times it has been added to a bibliographic collection. Such indicators point to the reader interest aroused by scientific papers and the use made of them (Haustein & Siebenlist, 2011). On the other hand, some authors such as Taraborelli (2008), note that these indicators represent a form of quick review, by reflecting the degree to which papers are accepted by the scientific community. Among the most usual platforms for extracting these types of indicators are CiteUlike, Connotea or Mendeley (Li, Thelwall & Giustini, 2011). Of these, Mendeley currently arouses the most interest. According to its web page statistics, more than 2 million users have uploaded a total of 350 million documents, figures that mean an article’s number of Mendeley readers has become one of the most accepted metrics for evaluating an articles impact within altmetrics.


Draft Content 659588718-26773-en027.jpg

Other usual measurements are the mentions papers can receive in the multiple social networks in existence, these being a reflection of the diffusion and dissemination of publications (Torres-Salinas & Delgado, 2009). Normally, general social networks are used to calculate indicators, as in the case of Facebook or Twitter, by analysing the number of «likes», the number of times an article is shared or the tweets and retweets received. Alternative metrics also include the blog citations received by scientific articles, especially in scientific blogs such as those included in the Nature Blogs or Research Blogging networks (Fausto & al., 2012). This is also true for the citations received by articles, journals and authors in the popular Wikipedia (Nielsen, 2007). These measurements are quantitative approximations of the measure of interest aroused within the scientific community, and also amongst a general public, which transcend or compliment the impact of traditional citation indexes. Finally, it is worth mentioning that news promotion systems such as Menéame or Reddit, or platforms with subject specialisation such as Documenea, can also offer indicators of research impact amongst a non-specialised public (Torres-Salinas & Guallar, 2009).

As can be seen in table 1, there exists a large number of indicators of distinct nature, origin and degree of normalisation. This means that the first difficulty faced when compiling information for a specific publication, and the subsequent altmetric calculation, is the high cost in time and effort. To solve this problem, a series of tools have emerged to help monitor impact. Generally, these types of platforms, once one or more documents are included, use a unique identification number such as the DOI or the PUBMEID to return the grouped metrics. Some of these tools are altmetric.com, Plum Analytics, Science Card, Citedin or Impact Story. For scientific papers, statistics are normally presented from Facebook (Clicks, Shares, Likes or Comments), Mendeley (Readers, Number of Groups), Delicious, Connotea and Citeulike (Bookmarks) and Twitter (Tweets and Influential Tweets). In their favour, it has to be said that these tools enable the easy recuperation of statistics of collections of papers. However, they are limited by the presentation of contradictory results and only partially recover the statistics.

3. Altmetrics versus bibliometrics: examples in the field of communication

In order to illustrate the tools and their derived indicators, data has been compiled from the 30 journal papers from the field of communication most cited in Web of Science for the years 2010, 2011 and 2012 (the ten most cited for each year). This sample has been compared with a random control group of another 30 papers, comprised of uncited articles from the same journals and years. In this way, the objective is to verify if a connection exists between the most cited articles and those that show superior data from alternative indicators. Once both samples of articles were downloaded from Web of Science (n=60; date: 04/02/2013), the altmetrics information was compiled using ImpactStory and Altmetric.com as sources. The following indicators were calculated for each article: mentions of the paper on Twitter, readers who have saved it in Mendeley and number of times it has been marked as favourite in Citeulike (table 2). The high occurrence of zeros among the most cited articles can be confirmed, in particular with regard to the indicators of Citeulike. This demonstrates one of the limitations of these statistics, as does the scant representation of some of these tools for reflecting scientific activity.


Draft Content 659588718-26773-en028.jpg

The frequently cited articles were tweeted on more occasions than studies from the control sample (table 3). According to the first source (Impact Story), the cited articles were tweeted on average once more than the control sample, which did not receive any tweets. These figures increase to 2.5 and to 0.8 respectively, according to Altmetric.com. Although, due to the large number of papers not tweeted, the median in all cases is zero. Turning to Citeulike, the social bookmarking tool for scientists, the articles most cited between 2010 and 2012 were saved an average of 1.5 times (1.3 according to Altmetric.com), against 0.1 for the control sample; although only between 23% and 30% of the studies show values different to zero. However, the most representative data is that from Mendeley, where the most cited studies have been saved by an average of 18.6 readers (15.2 according to Altmetric.com), whilst the control sample shows an average of 4.6 readers (2.4 according to Altmetric.com). That is, the most cited papers are also saved more times by academics than uncited papers from the same journals. This indicator is the most representative of the amount by which between 57% and 62% of the articles, depending on the source consulted, present indicators different to zero.


Draft Content 659588718-26773-en029.jpg

4. Relationships between bibliometric indicators and altmetrics

An interesting underlying theme, in view of the data presented and the different studies that have been undertaken, is the relationship that exists between classic bibliometric indicators and the new metrics. These studies are of interest because they reveal whether the altmetrics correlate with papers’ citations or if the opposite situation is produced, that is to say they reflect a new impact dimension. Clearly, in the sample of 60 communication studies, the correlation coefficients between citation in Web of Science and the altmetrics is low and of little significance (table 4). The highest achieved is between Pearson’s correlation coefficient between citations and the number of readers of Mendeley, but it barely reaches 0.52.


Draft Content 659588718-26773-en030.jpg

These results are in accordance with those obtained in other scientific papers (table 4). Cabezas-Clavijo & Torres-Salinas (2010) demonstrate that, for articles published in the journal PloS One, there is no connection between citation and comments and blog links received. A similar situation occurs if the Impact Factor or the EigenScore are used instead of citations (Fausto, 2012). With regard to the correlation between citation and Twitter, Eysenbanch (2011) observes very poor correlations in a global sample of 286 articles. The highest correlations between bibliometric indicators and altmetrics are produced, above all, when the former are compared with the number of readers in Mendeley; this is demonstrated by Li, Thelwall & Giuistini (2011) using the citations received in Google Scholar as an indicator. The correlation with Mendeley reaches 0.60 for a collection of papers published in «Science» and «Nature». If more specific fields of knowledge such as bibliometrics are taken into account, the correlation between readers in Mendeley and citations in Scopus rises to 0.45 (Bar-Ilan & al., 2012), a figure similar to that arrived at in this paper.

Therefore, in scientific literature to date, the correlation between any of the altmetrics and the number of citations remains to be convincingly demonstrated. However, evidence does exist of a certain association between highly cited or frequently downloaded and highly tweeted articles. For example Eysenbanch (2011), on isolating 55 highly cited articles from his sample, showed that in 75% of cases they were also highly tweeted, reaching a correlation coefficient of 0.69, the highest calculated to date. In addition, Shuai, Pepe & Bollen (2012), working with a sample of pre-prints deposited in ArXiv, observed greater download levels for papers promptly disseminated on Twitter. In the present case the most cited sample (table 3) also had higher rates of activity in social networks.

The results presented in table 4 suggest that altmetrics measure a dimension of scientific impact that is still to be determined. As stated by Priem, Piwowar & Hemminger (2012), there is a need for additional research into the validity and precise significance of these metrics, as, for example, in the case of the readers of Mendeley (Bar-Ilan, 2012). It seems apparent that altmetrics capture a different dimension, which could be entirely complementary to citation, given that the different platforms have audiences more diverse than the merely academic. If, for example, the phenomenon is observed from the other perspective, that of papers with greater altmetric impact, the studies most widely diffused across social networks in 2012 were not always related to strictly scientific interests, but to cross curricular subjects that better reflected the interests of the general public. For example, some of the scientific articles arousing the greatest interest in social networks in 2012 were related to very topical issues such as the Fukushima nuclear accident; cross curricular subjects, such as the effect of coffee consumption on health; or interests closely linked to the profile of a social network user, such as an analysis of classic Nintendo games (Noorden, 2012). Therefore, it is not strange that altmetrics are starting to equate with the social impact of research.

5. By way of conclusion: current problems for altmetrics

Without doubt, altmetrics offers a different outlook when it comes to measuring the visibility, in the widest sense, of scientific and academic papers. These new indicators should be welcomed as being complementary to traditional metrics. However, due to being very new, and only recently applied in scientific contexts, the use of altmetrics still has certain limitations that have to be taken into account. Among these is its place within the so-called liquid culture, as opposed to solid culture (Area & Ribeiro, 2012). This situation is clearly shown by the evanescent nature of its sources; whereas citation indexes such as Web of Science are stable and have trajectories of decades, the same cannot be said of the 2.0 world (Torres-Salinas & Cabezas-Clavijo, 2013). In general, platforms which archive papers, and ultimately generate indicators, usually have very exiguous life cycles and can disappear, as happened with the recent disappearance of Connotea in March 2013. Platforms can also eliminate certain functions, as occurred with Yahoo’s removal of the command Search by Site, which shook the foundations of all cybermetrics (Aguillo, 2012). This means that it is currently difficult to choose a reference tool which guarantees medium term continuity. Many uncertainties still exist as to the reproducibility and final significance of results, especially concerning the scientific relevance of the same. This in turn makes it difficult for these tools to be incorporated into the list of evaluative tools.


Draft Content 659588718-26773-en031.jpg

Additionally, the proliferation of sources and users indexing articles aggravates traditional bibliometric problems of normalisation (Haustein & Siebenlist, 2011). In the 2.0 environment, an article can be found indexed or mentioned in multiple ways: by a normalised number, by a URL copied from a web, by part of the title, etc. This causes the compilation of direct mentions, and not indirect article reviews, to be a laborious matter. For example, if an article has been reviewed in a blog, should the diffusion of this entry or its comments be added to the article’s original impact? Finally, it has to be mentioned that the empirical study undertaken has also enabled confirmation of the scant concordance of ImpactStory or Almetric.com, which provide different statistics, related only to normalised numbers (DOIs or other type of identifier). Not only is compilation difficult, but also, in most instances, data gathered from many platforms produces very low numbers. Added to this has to be the global difficulty faced by these tools in making data from some of the 2.0 services freely available (Howard, 2012). Despite Adie & Roe (2013) having calculated that more than 2.8 million articles since 2011 have at least one altmetric indicator calculated, the magnitudes provided remain lower than those of citation, even in the majority of cases (see for example the numbers provided in the case studies of Bar-Ilan & al., 2012 or Priem, Piwowar & Hemminger, 2012).

If these indicators are indeed wanted, beyond mere experiments and academic studies, for use in the evaluation of scientific activity, there is no doubt that the many theoretical (significance), methodological (valid sources) and technical (normalisation) problems should still be resolved. These indicators should clearly be used for measuring the social impact of science and, above all, for measuring the impact or immediate visibility of publications, an impossibility for citation. The new metrics have a very short journey, with an initial burst of activity capturing the visibility of papers at the very moment of publication (Priem & Hemmiger, 2010). This facet complements the classic indicators and even expert reviews, which altmetrics should not aspire to substitute, a situation and a function noted by most scientists (Nature Materials, 2012). Additionally, an identifiable role can be played in fields were bibliometrics is most lacking, as may be the case in humanities (Sula, 2012). It can be stated that new forms of scientific communication require new forms of measurement. For the moment, the only definite conclusion seems to be that altmetrics is here to stay, to enrich the possibilities and dimensions of impact analysis, in all fields of scientific research, and to illuminate from a new perspective the relationship between science and society.

References

Adie, E. & Roe, W. (2013). Altmetric: Enriching Scholarly Content with Article-level Discussion and Metrics. Learned Publishing, 26(1), 11-17. (DOI:10.1087/20130103).

Aguillo, I. (2012). La necesaria evolución de la cibermetría. Anuario ThinkEPI, 6, 119-122. (www.thinkepi.net/la-necesaria-evolucion-de-la-cibermetria) (02-03-2013).

Area-Moreira, M. & Ribeiro-Pessoa, M.T. (2012). De lo sólido a lo líquido: Las nuevas alfabetizaciones ante los cambios culturales de la Web 2.0. Comunicar, 38, 13-20. (DOI:10.3916/C38-2012-02-01).

Bar-Ilan, J. (2012). JASIST@Mendeley. ACM Web Science Conference 2012 Workshop. (JASIST@Mendeley. ACM Web Science Conference) (03-02-2013).

Bar-Ilan, J., Haustein, S. & al. (2012). Beyond Citations: Scholars’ Visibility on the Social Web 1. (http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1205/1205.5611.pdf) (03-02-2013).

Bergstrom, C.T., West, J.D. & Wisemanp, M.A. (2008). The Eigenfactor Metrics. The Journal of Neuroscience, 28(45), 11433–11434. (DOI:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0003-08.2008).

Bollen, J., Van de Sompel, H., Hagberg, A. & Chute, R. (2009). A Principal Component Analysis of 39 Scientific Impact Measures. PLoS ONE, 4(6), e6022. (DOI:10.1371/-journal.pone.0006022).

Cabezas-Clavijo, A. & Torres-Salinas, D. (2010). Indicadores de uso y participación en las revistas científicas 2.0: el caso de PLoS One. El Profesional de la Información, 19(4), 431-434. (DOI:10.3145/epi.2010.jul.14).

Cabezas-Clavijo, A.; Torres-Salinas, D. & Delgado López-Cózar, E. (2009). Ciencia 2.0: Catálogo de herramientas e implicaciones para la actividad investigadora. El Profesional de la Información, 18 (1), 72-79. (DOI: 10.3145/epi.2009.ene.10).

Delgado-López-Cózar, E. & Cabezas-Clavijo, Á. (2012). Google Scholar Metrics: an unreliable tool for assessing scientific journals. El Profesional de la Información, 21(4), 419-427. (DOI:10.3145/epi.2012.jul.15).

Eysenbach, G. (2011). Can Tweets Predict Citations? Metrics of Social Impact Based on Twitter and Correlation with Traditional Metrics of Scientific Impact. Journal of Medical Internet Reseach, 13(4), 123. (DOI: 10.2196/jmir.2012).

Fausto, S., Machado, F. & al. (2012). Research blogging: indexing and registering the change in science 2.0. PloS one, 7(12), e50109. (DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0050109).

González-Pereira, B., Guerrero-Bote, V. P. & Moya-Anegón, F. (2010). A new approach to the metric of journals’ scientific prestige: The SJR indicator. Journal of Informetrics, 4(3), 379–391. (DOI:10.1016/j.joi.2010.03.002).

Haustein, S. & Siebenlist, T. (2011). Applying Social Bookmarking Data to Evaluate Journal Usage. Journal of Informetrics, 5(3), 446-457. (DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.10-16/j.joi.2011.04.002).

Howard, J. (2012). Scholars Seek Better Ways to Track Impact Online. Chronicle of Higher Education (http://chronicle.com/article/As-Scholarship-Goes-Digital/130482/) (02-03-2013).

Kurtz, M.J. & Bollen, J. (2010). Usage bibliometrics. Annual Review of Information Science and Technology, 44 (1), 1-64. (DOI: 10.1002/aris.2010.1440440108).

Li, X., Thelwall, M. & Giustini, D. (2011). Validating Online Reference Managers for Scholarly Impact Measurement. Scientometrics, 91(2), 461-471. (DOI:10.1007/s11192-011-0580-x).

Mandavilli, A. (2011). Trial by Twitter. Nature, 469, 286-287.

Nature Materials. (2012). Alternative Metrics. Nature Materials, 11, 907-908.

Neylon, C. & Wu, S. (2009). Article-level Metrics and the Evolution of Scientific Impact. PLoS biology, 7(11), e1000242. (DOI:10.1371/journal.pbio.1000242).

Nielsen, F. (2007). Scientific citations in Wikipedia. First Monday, 12(8-6) (http://-firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/1997/1872) (03-02-2013)

Noorden, R.V. (2012). What Were the Top Papers of 2012 on Social Media. Nature News Blosg (http://blogs.nature.com/news/2012/12/what-were-the-top-papers-of-2012-on-social-media.html) (03-02-2013).

Orduña-Malea, E. & Ontalba-Ruipérez, J.A. (2012). Selective Linking from Social Plat-forms to University Websites: A Case Study of the Spanish Academic System. Scientometrics. (DOI:10.1007/s11192-012-0851-1).

Priem, J. & Hemminger, B.M. (2010). Scientometrics 2.0: Toward New Metrics of Scholarly Impact on the Social Web. First Monday, 15(7-5). http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/ fm/article/view/2874/2570. (03-02-2013).

Priem, J., Parra, C., Piwowar, H., Groth, P. & Waagmeester, A. (2012). Uncovering Impacts: A Case Study in Using Altmetrics Tools. Workshop on the Semantic Publishing SePublica 2012 at the 9th Extended Semantic Web Conference. (http://sepublica.mywikipaper.org/sepublica2012.pdf#page=46) (07-02-2013).

Priem, J., Piwowar, H. & Hemminger, B.M. (2012). Altmetrics in the Wild: Using Social Media to Explore Scholarly Impact. ACM Web Science Conference 2012 Workshop (http://arxiv.org/abs/1203.4745) (03-02-2013).

Priem, J., Taraborelli, D., Groth, P. & Neylon, C. (2013). Altmetrics: A Manifesto. (http://altmetrics.org/manifesto/) (02-03-2013).

Rossner, M., Van Epps, H. & Hill, E. (2007). Show me the Data. Journal of Cell Biology, 179(6), 1091-1092.

Schloegl, C. & Gorraiz, J. (2010). Comparison of Citation and Usage Indicators: The Case of Oncology Journals. Scientometrics, 82(3), 567-580. (DOI: 10.1007/s11192-010-0172-1).

Seglen, P. (1997). Why the Impact Factor of Journals Should not be Used for Evaluating Research. British Medical Journal, 314(7079), 498–502.

Shuai, X., Pepe, A. & Bollen, J. (2012). How the Scientific Community Reacts to Newly Submitted Preprints: Article Downloads, Twitter Mentions, and Citations. PloS one, 7(11), e47523. (DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0047523).

Sula, C.A. (2012). Visualizing Social Connections in the Humanities: Beyond Bibliometrics. Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technol-ogy, 38(4), 31-35. (DOI:10.1002/bult.2012.1720380409).

Taraborelli, D. (2008). Soft Peer Review: Social Software and Distributed Scientific Evaluation. Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on the Design of Cooperative Systems (COOP ’08) (http://eprints.ucl.ac.uk/8279/) (03-02-2013).

Thelwall, M., Vaughan, L. & Björneborn, L. (2005). Webometrics. Annual Review of Information Science and Technology, 39(1), 81-135. (DOI: 10.1002/aris.1440390110).

Torres-Salinas, D. & Cabezas-Clavijo, J. (2012). Altmetrics: no todo lo que se puede contar, cuenta. Anuario Thinkepi, 7. (www.thinkepi.net/altmetrics-no-todo-lo-que-se-puede-contar-cuenta) (03-02-2013).

Torres-Salinas, D. & Delgado-López-Cózar, E. (2009). Estrategia para mejorar la difusión de los resultados de investigación con la Web 2.0. El Profesional de la Información, 18(5), 534-539. (DOI:10.3145/epi.2009.sep.07).

Torres-Salinas, D. & Guallar, J. (2009). Evaluación de DocuMenea, sistema de promoción social de noticias de biblioteconomía y documentación. El Profesional de la Información, 18(2), 171-179. (DOI:10.3145/epi.2009.mar.07).

Torres-Salinas, D., Ruiz-Pérez, R. & Delgado-López-Cózar, E. (2009). Google Scholar como herramienta para la evaluación científica. El Profesional de la Información, 18(5), 501–510. (DOI:10.3145/epi.2009.sep.03).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

En el presente trabajo se realiza una revisión de las altmetrics o indicadores alternativos. Este concepto se define como la creación y estudio de nuevos indicadores, basados en la web 2.0, para el análisis de la actividad científica y académica. La idea que subyace es que, por ejemplo, las menciones en blogs, el número de tuits o el de personas que guardan un artículo en su gestor de referencias puede ser una medida válida del uso y repercusión de las publicaciones científicas. En este sentido, estas medidas se han situado en el centro del debate de los estudios bibliométricos cobrando especial relevancia. En el artículo se ilustran en primer lugar las plataformas e indicadores principales de este tipo de medidas, para posteriormente estudiar un conjunto de trabajos del ámbito de la comunicación, comparando el número de citas recibidas con sus indicadores 2.0. Los resultados señalan que los artículos más citados de la disciplina en los últimos años también presentan indicadores significativamente más elevados de altmetrics. Seguidamente se realiza un repaso por los principales estudios empíricos realizados, deteniéndonos en las correlaciones entre indicadores bibliométricos y alternativos. Se finaliza, a modo de reflexión, señalando las principales limitaciones y el papel que las altmetrics pueden desempeñar a la hora de captar la repercusión de la investigación en las plataformas de la web 2.0.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

El término altmetrics es muy reciente, y se puede definir como la creación y estudio de nuevos indicadores, basados en la Web 2.0, para el análisis de la actividad académica (Priem & al., 2010). La idea que subyace es que, por ejemplo, las menciones en blogs, el número de retwits o el de personas que guardan un artículo en su gestor de referencias puede ser una medida válida del uso de las publicaciones científicas. Sin embargo, la medición de la visibilidad de la ciencia en Internet no es un nuevo fenómeno. El origen de las altmetrics se remonta a los años 90 con la webmetría, el estudio cuantitativo de las características de la web (Thelwall & al., 2005), que nace de la aplicación de las técnicas bibliométricas a los sitios online, y engloba diversas disciplinas, entre ellas, la comunicación. Pese a que la web juega cada vez un papel más importante en las relaciones sociales y económicas, esta disciplina no ha sido capaz de superar ciertas limitaciones inherentes a las metodologías, técnicas y fuentes de información empleadas. Sin embargo, sí ha aportado una visión complementaria a los tradicionales análisis de citas mediante el estudio de links, de la comunicación en listas de correo o del análisis de la estructura de la web académica. Poco más tarde la consolidación de la comunicación científica por medio de revistas y medios electrónicos como los repositorios abrieron la puerta a nuevos indicadores.

La denominada «usage bibliometrics» (Kurtz & Bollen, 2010), basada en las descargas de los materiales científicos, encuentra que los indicadores de uso de las publicaciones miden una dimensión distinta a la que proporcionan los indicadores bibliométricos (Bollen & al, 2009), y que muestran patrones de comportamiento diferentes a los de la citación (Schloegl & Gorraiz, 2010), ofreciendo de este modo información complementaria de cara a la medición de la repercusión científica. Sin duda la idea de que las medidas bibliométricas tradicionales y las fuentes que se usan para su cálculo son insuficientes va calando en la comunidad científica, y surgen nuevos indicadores, como el SJR (González-Pereira & al., 2010) o el Eigenfactor (Bergstrom, West & Wiseman 2008) que se basan en la idea del algoritmo PageRank de Google. Esto es, las técnicas basadas en la web y las técnicas bibliométricas experimentan una clara simbiosis. Este movimiento está impulsado por la insatisfacción de una buena parte de los científicos con las medidas bibliométricas, y en particular con el muy criticado Factor de Impacto (Seglen, 1997; Rossner, Van Epps & Hill, 2007) y se ve exacerbado con la aparición de nuevas bases de datos como Scopus y Google Scholar. La potencia y cobertura de este buscador, pero también sus problemas de normalización ilustran la riqueza de la información académica en la web así como la dificultad de aprehenderla y analizarla de forma adecuada (Torres-Salinas, Ruíz-Pérez & Delgado, 2009; Delgado & Cabezas-Clavijo, 2012).

Es en este contexto, con la llegada de la Web 2.0 y el paulatino uso de los científicos de dichas plataformas como herramienta de difusión y recepción de información científica (Cabezas-Clavijo, Torres-Salinas & Delgado, 2009) y con una parte de la comunidad científica relativamente receptiva comienza a hablarse de scientometrics 2.0 (Priem & Hemminger, 2010) o altmetrics (Priem & al., 2010). Si bien en sentido amplio se podría considerar como indicador alternativo a cualquier medida no convencional en la evaluación de la ciencia, sensu stricto sería más conveniente hablar de indicadores derivados de las herramientas 2.0; es decir, medidas que se generan a partir de las interacciones de los usuarios en la web social (principalmente científicos pero no exclusivamente) con los materiales generados por los investigadores. Una de las principales fortalezas de las altmetrics es que proporcionan datos a nivel de artículo (Neylon & Wu, 2009) lo que permite valorar la repercusión de los trabajos, más allá de la fuente de publicación del mismo. Diversos estudios han puesto de manifiesto que pueden usarse para medir otros niveles de agregación, como revistas (Nielsen, 2007), o universidades (Orduña & Ontalba, 2012). Asimismo ofrecen una perspectiva nueva ya que proporcionan datos casi en tiempo real de la repercusión de la investigación. Esta monitorización es sin duda un elemento que introduce nuevas formas de escrutinio por parte de la comunidad científica, en una especie de revisión por pares colectiva, o revisión por pares posterior a la publicación (Mandavilli, 2011).

Teniendo en cuenta la repercusión de la Web 2.0 y su posición central en la actualidad dentro de la investigación en comunicación, en este trabajo realizamos una revisión de las altmetrics, fijando el foco en los estudios cuantitativos sobre dicha temática. En primer lugar se ilustran las plataformas e indicadores principales, para estudiar después un conjunto de trabajos de comunicación comparando el número de citas recibidas con sus indicadores 2.0. Seguidamente se realiza un repaso por los principales estudios empíricos realizados, deteniéndonos en las correlaciones entre los indicadores bibliométricos y los alternativos para finalizar, a modo de reflexión, señalando las principales limitaciones y el papel que éstas pueden desempeñar a la hora de captar la repercusión de la investigación en las plataformas de la Web 2.0.

2. Principales plataformas e indicadores de las altmetrics

La puesta on-line de los gestores de referencias bibliográficas y de favoritos donde habitualmente se gestionaban las bibliotecas personales y las referencias de los investigadores, han generado una serie de indicadores novedosos, como, por ejemplo, las veces que un trabajo ha sido marcado como favorito (bookmarking) o las veces que ha sido añadido a una colección bibliográfica. Dichos indicadores apuntan el interés que despiertan los trabajos científicos en los lectores y el uso que de éstos se hace (Haustein & Siebenlist, 2011); por otro lado algunos autores como Taraborelli (2008) señalan que estos indicadores representan una especie de revisión ligera por cuanto reflejan la aceptación de los trabajos en la comunidad científica. Entre las plataformas más habituales donde podemos extraer este tipo de indicadores encontramos CiteUlike, Connotea o Mendeley (Li, Thelwall & Giustini, 2011). De éstas, la que más atención despierta actualmente es Mendeley donde sus más de dos millones de usuarios han subido un total de 350 millones de documentos según las estadísticas de su página web, unas cifras que hacen que el número de lectores que un artículo tiene en Mendeley se haya convertido en una de las métricas de uso más aceptadas para evaluar la repercusión de un artículo dentro de las altmetrics.


Draft Content 659588718-26773 ov-es027.jpg

Otras de las medidas habituales son las menciones que pueden recibir los trabajos en las múltiples redes sociales que existen, y que son un reflejo de la difusión y diseminación de las publicaciones (Torres-Salinas & Delgado, 2009). Habitualmente para calcular los indicadores se emplean redes sociales generalistas, como es el caso de Facebook o Twitter, analizándose el número de «me gusta», las veces que se comparte un artículo o los tuits y retwits que éstos reciben. También son métricas alternativas las citas que reciben los artículos científicos en los blogs, especialmente en los científicos como los incluidos en las redes Nature Blogs o Research Blogging (Fausto & al., 2012), o las que reciben los artículos, revistas y autores en la popular Wikipedia (Nielsen, 2007). Estas medidas son aproximaciones cuantitativas a la medición del interés que despiertan entre la comunidad científica y también entre un público generalista, que transciende o complementa el impacto de los índices de citas tradicionales. Por último cabe mencionar que los sistemas de promoción de noticias como Menéame o Reddit, o plataformas con especialización temática como Documenea también pueden ofrecernos indicadores del impacto de la investigación entre un público no especializado (Torres-Salinas & Guallar, 2009).

Como se puede observar en la tabla 1, existe un gran número de indicadores de distinta naturaleza, origen y grado de normalización, lo que provoca que la recopilación de datos para una publicación concreta y el posterior cálculo de altmetrics tenga como primera dificultad un alto coste en tiempo y esfuerzo. Como solución a este problema han surgido una serie de herramientas para ayudar a monitorizar el impacto. Normalmente este tipo de plataformas una vez incluido uno o varios documentos, a través de un número identificativo único como el DOI o el PUBMEID devuelven las métricas agrupadas. Algunas de estas herramientas son altmetric.com, Plum Analytics, Science Card, Citedin o Impact Story. Habitualmente para los trabajos científicos ofrecen estadísticas de Facebook (Clicks, Share, Likes o Comments), Mendeley (Readers, Number of Groups), Delicious, Connotea y Citeulike (Bookmarks) y Twitter (Tweets e Influential Tweets). A favor de ellas hemos de mencionar que son herramientas que nos permiten recuperar cómodamente estadísticas de conjuntos de trabajos, sin embargo como limitación presentan resultados contradictorios y recuperan solo de forma parcial las estadísticas.

3. Altmetrics versus bibliometrics: ejemplos en el área de comunicación

Para ilustrar las herramientas y los indicadores que se derivan de ellas, hemos recopilado los datos de los 30 trabajos más citados en revistas del área de comunicación en la Web of Science en los años 2010 y 2011 y 2012 (los diez más citados de cada año). Esta muestra se ha comparado con un grupo de control aleatorio de otros 30 trabajos, conformado por artículos procedentes de las mismas revistas y años, pero que no habían sido citados. De esta forma el objetivo es comprobar si existe una correspondencia entre los artículos más citados y los que presentan mejores datos de indicadores alternativos. Una vez descargadas ambas muestras de artículos desde Web of Science (n=60; fecha: 04/02/2013) se recopilaron los datos de altmetrics usando como fuentes las webs ImpactStory y Altmetric.com. Los indicadores que se calcularon para cada artículo fueron los siguientes: menciones del trabajo en Twitter, lectores que los han guardado en Mendeley y número de veces que se han marcado como favoritos en Citeulike (tabla 2). En la misma se puede comprobar la alta presencia de ceros entre los artículos más citados, en especial en lo que respecta a los indicadores de Citeulike. Esto muestra una de las limitaciones de estas estadísticas como es la escasa representatividad de algunas de estas herramientas para reflejar la actividad científica.


Draft Content 659588718-26773 ov-es028.jpg

Los artículos muy citados fueron twiteados en más ocasiones que los trabajos de la muestra control (tabla 3). Según la primera de las fuentes (Impact Story), los artículos citados se twitearon de media una vez frente a la muestra control, que no recibió tuits. Estos datos se incrementan a 2,5 y a 0,8 respectivamente según Altmetric.com, si bien en todos los casos la mediana es cero, debido al gran número de trabajos que no son twiteados. Por su parte, si atendemos a la herramienta de bookmarking social para científicos Citeulike, los artículos más citados entre 2010 y 2012 fueron guardados de media 1,5 veces (1,3 según Altmetric.com), frente a 0,1 en la muestra control, si bien solo entre un 23% y un 30% de los trabajos presentan valores distintos a cero. Pero el dato más representativo es el de Mendeley, los trabajos muy citados habían sido guardados por una media de 18,6 lectores (15,2 según Altmetric.com) mientras que la muestra control presenta una media de 4,6 lectores (2,4 según Altmetric.com). Esto es, los trabajos más citados también son guardados más veces por los académicos que los trabajos de las mismas revistas que no cosecharon cita alguna. Este indicador es el más representativo por cuanto entre el 57% y el 62% de los artículos, según la fuente consultada presenta indicadores distintos a cero.


Draft Content 659588718-26773 ov-es029.jpg

4. Relaciones entre los indicadores bibliométricos y altmetrics

Un tema interesante que subyace ante los datos presentados y los diferentes estudios que se han realizado es la relación que existe entre los indicadores bibliométricos clásicos y las nuevas métricas. Estos estudios son de interés ya que revelan si las altmetrics correlacionan con la citación de los trabajos o, bien si se produce la situación contraria, es decir reflejan una nueva dimensión del impacto. Claramente en la muestra de los 60 trabajos de comunicación los coeficientes de correlación entre la citación en Web of Science y la altmetrics es baja y poco significativa (tabla 4). La más alta que se alcanza es entre el coeficiente de correlación de Pearson entre citas y el número de lectores de Mendeley, pero apenas se llega al 0,52.


Draft Content 659588718-26773 ov-es030.jpg

Estos resultados están en consonancia con los que se han alcanzado en otros trabajos científicos (tabla 4). Así Cabezas-Clavijo & Torres-Salinas (2010) muestran que no hay relación entre la citación y los comentarios y enlaces de blogs que recibían los artículos publicados en la revista PloS One, una situación similar a la que presentan si en lugar de citas utilizamos el Factor de Impacto o el EigenScore (Fausto, 2012). En relación a la correlación entre la citación y Twitter, Eysenbanch (2011) observa correlaciones muy pobres con una muestra global de 286 artículos. Las correlaciones más altas entre indicadores bibliométricos y altmetrics se producen sobre todo cuando los primeros se comparan con el número de lectores en Mendeley; así lo muestra Li, Thelwall & Giuistini (2011) empleando como indicador las citas recibidas en Google Scholar. La correlación con Mendeley alcanza el 0,60 para una colección de trabajos publicados en «Science» y «Nature». Si atendemos a ámbitos de conocimiento más específicos como la bibliometría, la correlación entre lectores en Mendeley y citas en Scopus asciende a 0,45 (Bar-Ilan & al., 2012), una cifra similar a la alcanzada en este trabajo.

Por tanto, hasta el momento en la literatura científica no queda demostrado convincentemente que ninguna de la altmetrics correlacione con el número de citas, aunque sí existen evidencias de cierta asociación entre artículos altamente citados o descargados y altamente twiteados. Por ejemplo Eysenbanch (2011) al aislar de su muestra 55 artículos altamente citados reveló que en el 75% de los casos eran también altamente twiteados, llegando a alcanzar un coeficiente de correlación de 0,69, el más alto calculado hasta el momento. También Shuai, Pepe & Bollen (2012), al trabajar con una muestra de pre-prints depositados en ArXiv observaron que los trabajos que son tempranamente difundidos a través de Twitter tienen unos niveles de descargas más intensos. En nuestro caso la muestra de los más citados (tabla 3) era también la que tenía mayores tasas de actividad en las redes sociales.

Los resultados presentados en la tabla 4 nos llevan a pensar que las altmetrics miden una dimensión del impacto científico que aún está por determinar, ya que como manifiesta Priem, Piwowar & Hemminger (2012) son necesarias investigaciones adicionales que exploren la validez y el significado exacto de estas métricas, como por ejemplo el caso de los lectores de Mendeley (Bar-Ilan, 2012). Parece evidente que las altmetrics captan una dimensión diferente que puede ser totalmente complementaria de la citación, ya que las distintas plataformas tienen audiencias más diversificadas que las meramente académicas. Así por ejemplo, si observamos el fenómeno desde la otra perspectiva, es decir desde la de los trabajos con más impacto en las altmetrics, los trabajos con mayor difusión en las redes sociales en 2012 no siempre tienen que ver con los intereses estrictamente científicos, sino con temas transversales que reflejan más los intereses del público general. Por ejemplo algunos de los artículos científicos que mayor interés despertaron en 2012 en las redes sociales están relacionados con temas de gran actualidad como el accidente nuclear en la central de Fukushima, con temas transversales, como el consumo de café y la incidencia en la salud, o con intereses muy apegados al perfil del usuario de las redes sociales, como un análisis de los juegos clásicos de Nintendo (Noorden, 2012). No es por tanto extraño, que las altmetrics se estén empezando a equiparar con el impacto social de la investigación.

5. A modo de conclusión: problemas actuales de las altmetrics

Sin duda las altmetrics ofrecen un panorama diferente a la hora de medir la visibilidad, en su sentido más amplio, de los trabajos científicos y académicos, y debemos saludar a estos nuevos indicadores por lo que tienen de complementarios con las métricas tradicionales. Sin embargo, debido a su juventud y reciente aplicación a contextos científicos, aún adolecen de ciertas limitaciones que hay que tener en cuenta a la hora de su uso. Entre ellas se encuentra la pertenencia a la denominada cultura líquida frente a la cultura sólida (Area & Ribeiro, 2012). Esta situación se manifiesta claramente en el carácter evanescente de sus fuentes; si los índices de citas como Web of Science están asentados y tienen trayectorias de décadas no podemos decir lo mismo del mundo 2.0 (Torres-Salinas & Cabezas-Clavijo, 2013). Habitualmente las plataformas donde se almacenan los trabajos y que a la postre generan los indicadores suelen tener ciclos de vida muy exiguos y pueden desaparecer, como ha ocurrido con la reciente desaparición de Connotea en marzo de 2013, o pueden eliminar algunas de sus funciones como ocurrió con Yahoo al eliminar el comando Search by Site que hizo temblar los cimientos de toda la cibermetría (Aguillo, 2012). Esto implica que ahora mismo sea difícil escoger una herramienta de referencia con garantías de continuidad a medio plazo y existen todavía muchas incertidumbres acerca de la reproducibilidad de los resultados y su significado final, especialmente en lo que concierne a la relevancia científica de los mismos, que a su vez dificulta su incorporación al elenco de las herramientas evaluativas.


Draft Content 659588718-26773 ov-es031.jpg

Asimismo la proliferación de fuentes y de usuarios que referencian los artículos agravan los tradicionales problemas bibliométricos de normalización (Haustein & Siebenlist, 2011). En el entorno 2.0 podemos encontrarnos un artículo referenciado o mencionado de múltiples formas: por algún número normalizado, por una URL recortada de una web, por una parte de su título… Esto provoca que recopilar las menciones exactas sea una cuestión laboriosa por no mencionar las reseñas indirectas a artículos; por ejemplo si ha reseñado en un blog ¿deberíamos sumarle la difusión de esa entrada o sus comentarios al impacto original del artículo? Por último hay que mencionar cómo el estudio empírico realizado también ha permitido constatar la escasa concordancia de ImpactStory o altmetric.com que ofrecen estadísticas diferentes, y solo vinculadas a números normalizados (DOIs u otro tipo de identificador). No solo es difícil la recopilación sino que en la mayor parte de las ocasiones los datos recogidos de muchas plataformas presentan cifras muy bajas, a esto hay que añadir la dificultad global que tienen estas herramientas para que algunos de los servicios 2.0 pongan a libre disposición sus datos (Howard, 2012). Pese a que Adie & Roe (2013) han calculado que más de 2,8 millones de artículos desde 2011 tienen al menos un indicador de altmetrics calculado, las magnitudes que ofrecen son, incluso en la mayor parte de los casos, todavía menores que las de citación (Bar-Ilan & al., 2012; Priem, Piwowar & Hemminger, 2012).

Si realmente queremos que estos indicadores, más allá de las meras experimentaciones y estudios académicos, se empleen para la evaluación de la actividad científica, sin duda, deben resolverse aún muchos problemas teóricos (significado), metodológicos (validez de fuentes) y técnicos (normalización). Claramente deberían ser empleados para medir el impacto social de la ciencia y sobre todo, para medir el impacto o visibilidad inmediata de las publicaciones, algo que para la citación es imposible. Las nuevas métricas tienen un recorrido muy corto, con una gran explosión inicial que captan la visibilidad de los trabajos justo en el momento de su publicación (Priem & Hemmiger, 2010). Esta faceta complementa a los indicadores clásicos e incluso a la revisión por expertos, a los que la altmetrics no debe aspirar a sustituir, una situación y una función a la que apuntan la mayor parte de los científicos (Nature Materials, 2012). Asimismo es reseñable el rol que puede jugar en áreas donde la bibliometría es más deficitaria como puede ser el caso de las humanidades (Sula, 2012). Podemos afirmar que las nuevas formas de comunicación científica requieren de nuevas formas de medición. La única conclusión segura parece ser, de momento, que las altmetrics han llegado para quedarse y enriquecer las posibilidades y dimensiones del análisis del impacto de la investigación científica en todos sus ámbitos e iluminar desde una perspectiva nueva las relaciones entre la ciencia y la sociedad.

Referencias

Adie, E. & Roe, W. (2013). Altmetric: Enriching Scholarly Content with Article-level Discussion and Metrics. Learned Publishing, 26(1), 11-17. (DOI:10.1087/20130103).

Aguillo, I. (2012). La necesaria evolución de la cibermetría. Anuario ThinkEPI, 6, 119-122. (www.thinkepi.net/la-necesaria-evolucion-de-la-cibermetria) (02-03-2013).

Area-Moreira, M. & Ribeiro-Pessoa, M.T. (2012). De lo sólido a lo líquido: Las nuevas alfabetizaciones ante los cambios culturales de la Web 2.0. Comunicar, 38, 13-20. (DOI:10.3916/C38-2012-02-01).

Bar-Ilan, J. (2012). JASIST@Mendeley. ACM Web Science Conference 2012 Workshop. (JASIST@Mendeley. ACM Web Science Conference) (03-02-2013).

Bar-Ilan, J., Haustein, S. & al. (2012). Beyond Citations: Scholars’ Visibility on the Social Web 1. (http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1205/1205.5611.pdf) (03-02-2013).

Bergstrom, C.T., West, J.D. & Wisemanp, M.A. (2008). The Eigenfactor Metrics. The Journal of Neuroscience, 28(45), 11433–11434. (DOI:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0003-08.2008).

Bollen, J., Van de Sompel, H., Hagberg, A. & Chute, R. (2009). A Principal Component Analysis of 39 Scientific Impact Measures. PLoS ONE, 4(6), e6022. (DOI:10.1371/-journal.pone.0006022).

Cabezas-Clavijo, A. & Torres-Salinas, D. (2010). Indicadores de uso y participación en las revistas científicas 2.0: el caso de PLoS One. El Profesional de la Información, 19(4), 431-434. (DOI:10.3145/epi.2010.jul.14).

Cabezas-Clavijo, A.; Torres-Salinas, D. & Delgado López-Cózar, E. (2009). Ciencia 2.0: Catálogo de herramientas e implicaciones para la actividad investigadora. El Profesional de la Información, 18 (1), 72-79. (DOI: 10.3145/epi.2009.ene.10).

Delgado-López-Cózar, E. & Cabezas-Clavijo, Á. (2012). Google Scholar Metrics: an unreliable tool for assessing scientific journals. El Profesional de la Información, 21(4), 419-427. (DOI:10.3145/epi.2012.jul.15).

Eysenbach, G. (2011). Can Tweets Predict Citations? Metrics of Social Impact Based on Twitter and Correlation with Traditional Metrics of Scientific Impact. Journal of Medical Internet Reseach, 13(4), 123. (DOI: 10.2196/jmir.2012).

Fausto, S., Machado, F. & al. (2012). Research blogging: indexing and registering the change in science 2.0. PloS one, 7(12), e50109. (DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0050109).

González-Pereira, B., Guerrero-Bote, V. P. & Moya-Anegón, F. (2010). A new approach to the metric of journals’ scientific prestige: The SJR indicator. Journal of Informetrics, 4(3), 379–391. (DOI:10.1016/j.joi.2010.03.002).

Haustein, S. & Siebenlist, T. (2011). Applying Social Bookmarking Data to Evaluate Journal Usage. Journal of Informetrics, 5(3), 446-457. (DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.10-16/j.joi.2011.04.002).

Howard, J. (2012). Scholars Seek Better Ways to Track Impact Online. Chronicle of Higher Education (http://chronicle.com/article/As-Scholarship-Goes-Digital/130482/) (02-03-2013).

Kurtz, M.J. & Bollen, J. (2010). Usage bibliometrics. Annual Review of Information Science and Technology, 44 (1), 1-64. (DOI: 10.1002/aris.2010.1440440108).

Li, X., Thelwall, M. & Giustini, D. (2011). Validating Online Reference Managers for Scholarly Impact Measurement. Scientometrics, 91(2), 461-471. (DOI:10.1007/s11192-011-0580-x).

Mandavilli, A. (2011). Trial by Twitter. Nature, 469, 286-287.

Nature Materials. (2012). Alternative Metrics. Nature Materials, 11, 907-908.

Neylon, C. & Wu, S. (2009). Article-level Metrics and the Evolution of Scientific Impact. PLoS biology, 7(11), e1000242. (DOI:10.1371/journal.pbio.1000242).

Nielsen, F. (2007). Scientific citations in Wikipedia. First Monday, 12(8-6) (http://-firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/1997/1872) (03-02-2013)

Noorden, R.V. (2012). What Were the Top Papers of 2012 on Social Media. Nature News Blosg (http://blogs.nature.com/news/2012/12/what-were-the-top-papers-of-2012-on-social-media.html) (03-02-2013).

Orduña-Malea, E. & Ontalba-Ruipérez, J.A. (2012). Selective Linking from Social Plat-forms to University Websites: A Case Study of the Spanish Academic System. Scientometrics. (DOI:10.1007/s11192-012-0851-1).

Priem, J. & Hemminger, B.M. (2010). Scientometrics 2.0: Toward New Metrics of Scholarly Impact on the Social Web. First Monday, 15(7-5). http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/ fm/article/view/2874/2570. (03-02-2013).

Priem, J., Parra, C., Piwowar, H., Groth, P. & Waagmeester, A. (2012). Uncovering Impacts: A Case Study in Using Altmetrics Tools. Workshop on the Semantic Publishing SePublica 2012 at the 9th Extended Semantic Web Conference. (http://sepublica.mywikipaper.org/sepublica2012.pdf#page=46) (07-02-2013).

Priem, J., Piwowar, H. & Hemminger, B.M. (2012). Altmetrics in the Wild: Using Social Media to Explore Scholarly Impact. ACM Web Science Conference 2012 Workshop (http://arxiv.org/abs/1203.4745) (03-02-2013).

Priem, J., Taraborelli, D., Groth, P. & Neylon, C. (2013). Altmetrics: A Manifesto. (http://altmetrics.org/manifesto/) (02-03-2013).

Rossner, M., Van Epps, H. & Hill, E. (2007). Show me the Data. Journal of Cell Biology, 179(6), 1091-1092.

Schloegl, C. & Gorraiz, J. (2010). Comparison of Citation and Usage Indicators: The Case of Oncology Journals. Scientometrics, 82(3), 567-580. (DOI: 10.1007/s11192-010-0172-1).

Seglen, P. (1997). Why the Impact Factor of Journals Should not be Used for Evaluating Research. British Medical Journal, 314(7079), 498–502.

Shuai, X., Pepe, A. & Bollen, J. (2012). How the Scientific Community Reacts to Newly Submitted Preprints: Article Downloads, Twitter Mentions, and Citations. PloS one, 7(11), e47523. (DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0047523).

Sula, C.A. (2012). Visualizing Social Connections in the Humanities: Beyond Bibliometrics. Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technol-ogy, 38(4), 31-35. (DOI:10.1002/bult.2012.1720380409).

Taraborelli, D. (2008). Soft Peer Review: Social Software and Distributed Scientific Evaluation. Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on the Design of Cooperative Systems (COOP ’08) (http://eprints.ucl.ac.uk/8279/) (03-02-2013).

Thelwall, M., Vaughan, L. & Björneborn, L. (2005). Webometrics. Annual Review of Information Science and Technology, 39(1), 81-135. (DOI: 10.1002/aris.1440390110).

Torres-Salinas, D. & Cabezas-Clavijo, J. (2012). Altmetrics: no todo lo que se puede contar, cuenta. Anuario Thinkepi, 7. (www.thinkepi.net/altmetrics-no-todo-lo-que-se-puede-contar-cuenta) (03-02-2013).

Torres-Salinas, D. & Delgado-López-Cózar, E. (2009). Estrategia para mejorar la difusión de los resultados de investigación con la Web 2.0. El Profesional de la Información, 18(5), 534-539. (DOI:10.3145/epi.2009.sep.07).

Torres-Salinas, D. & Guallar, J. (2009). Evaluación de DocuMenea, sistema de promoción social de noticias de biblioteconomía y documentación. El Profesional de la Información, 18(2), 171-179. (DOI:10.3145/epi.2009.mar.07).

Torres-Salinas, D., Ruiz-Pérez, R. & Delgado-López-Cózar, E. (2009). Google Scholar como herramienta para la evaluación científica. El Profesional de la Información, 18(5), 501–510. (DOI:10.3145/epi.2009.sep.03).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/05/13
Accepted on 31/05/13
Submitted on 31/05/13

Volume 21, Issue 1, 2013
DOI: 10.3916/C41-2013-05
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 61
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?