Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Various research works and practitioners conclude that media pedagogy should be integrated in teacher education in order to enable future teachers to use media for their lessons effectively and successfully. However, this realization is not necessarily reflected in actual university curricula, as preservice teachers at some places can still finish their studies without ever dealing with media pedagogical issues. To understand, assess and eventually improve the status of media pedagogical teacher education, comprehensive research is required. Against this background, the following article seeks to present a theory-based and empirical overview of the status quo of preservice teachers’ pedagogical media competencies focusing Germany and the USA exemplarily. To form a basis, different models of pedagogical media competencies from both countries will be introduced and the extent to which these competencies have become part of teacher education programs and related studies will be summarised. Afterwards, method and selected results of a study will be described where the skills in question were measured with students from both countries, based on a comprehensive model of pedagogical media competencies that connects German and international research in this field. The international comparative perspective will help broaden the viewpoint and understand differences, but also similarities. These data serve to identify different ways of integrating media pedagogy into teacher training and draw conclusions on the consequences these processes entail for preservice teachers and their pedagogical media competencies.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

1.1. The relevance of pedagogical media competencies in teacher education

Given the omnipresence of media like TV, internet and mobile phones and their wide influence on the daily lives of young people (MPFS, 2014; Lenhart, 2015; EU Kids Online, 2014), the relevance of these so-called “new media” for school and teaching has developed and increased over the last decades as well. On the one hand, they can be utilized as an appropriate means to support successful learning processes and to facilitate effective teaching; on the other hand, they have become a subject themselves since students need to learn about media education issues, like responsible behavior in online environments or ethical aspects of internet use, at school (KMK, 2012; ISTE, 2008). Hence, scholars and practitioners all over the world agree that teachers need specific knowledge and skills in order to integrate new media into their lessons successfully. While most works of research have focused on teachers’ and preservice teachers’ own media literacy skills or technological knowledge (Fry & Seely, 2011; Oh & French, 2004), further competencies are required for a professional inclusion of media into school. Teaching with media and teaching about media / media education are generally considered the two core areas in this context. However, there are varying concepts of the specific competencies and skills, which will be summarized under the term “pedagogical media competencies” here.

A well-known and established framework for defining these competencies in question was developed in the USA by Mishra and Koehler (2006) as TPACK (Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge), which is based on Shulman’s work (1986). Shulman defined pedagogical content knowledge, content knowledge, and pedagogical knowledge as the core areas of competencies that teachers should be skilled in. Mishra and Koehler (2006) added the aspects of technological knowledge, technological content knowledge, technological pedagogical knowledge and technological pedagogical content knowledge and thus developed a comprehensive model of the skills needed to teach with media successfully.

Despite the existence of frameworks like TPACK, there is no common consensus about the precise shape of pedagogical media competencies, neither worldwide nor even within countries. Furthermore, their integration into university teacher education is also subject to discourse and has not been realized consistently, even though teacher training has been acknowledged to be a suitable and mandatory place for the acquirement of media pedagogical skills (Blömeke, 2003). Hence, there are no binding curricula yet which could ensure a basic media pedagogical education for every preservice teacher, but there are non-binding standards and guidelines that make suggestions for such processes, as for example the UNESCO Media and Information Literacy Curriculum for Teachers (Wilson, Grizzle, Tuazon, Akyempong, & Cheung, 2011).

This inhomogeneous situation, where efforts and ways to integrate media pedagogy into teacher education can be assumed to vary between countries and institutions, forms the background of this paper. This exploratory study aims to further explore the pedagogical media competencies of preservice teachers in Germany and the USA. Comparing two countries serves to overcome cultural boundaries, to countervail the danger of a narrowed perspective and to benefit from the background, research and knowledge of different viewpoints. Both countries share a rich culture of pedagogical discourse and research on teacher education, which provides a common background to build upon (Grafe, 2011). Both countries share generally similar approaches to educational policy and structure, as strong state and local control of education is paired with high levels of federal influence on educational issues (Blömeke & Paine, 2008; Tiede, Grafe & Hobbs, 2015). In the following, different models of pedagogical media competencies from both countries will be introduced and the extent to which these competencies have become part of teacher education programs and related studies will be summarized. Afterwards, methods and selected results of a study will be described where the skills in question were measured with students from both countries, based on a comprehensive model of pedagogical media competencies that connects German and international research in this field. The international comparative perspective will help broaden the viewpoint and understand similarities and differences. These data serve to identify different ways of integrating media pedagogy into teacher training and point to conclusions about the consequences these processes entail for preservice teachers and their pedagogical media competencies.

1.2. Pedagogical media competencies in German and U.S. teacher education

The issue of teacher competencies is a key factor in advancing the future of education both in the United States and in Germany (see for a detailed overview of the development and current state of media education in both countries for example Tulodziecki & Grafe, 2012; Hobbs, 2010; Tiede & al., 2015).

The Standing Conference of the Ministers of Education and Cultural Affairs of the Länder in the Federal Republic of Germany has realized the need to include pedagogical media competencies into teacher training, as their according declaration on media education at school reveals (KMK, 2012). Accordingly, there have been various attempts for such an integration over the last decades (Bentlage & Hamm, 2001; Imort & Niesyto, 2014). Nonetheless, there are no binding national obligations for institutions of teacher education as, due to the federal system in Germany, the responsibility for higher education institutions lies entirely with the individual federal states. Recently it can be recognized that in different federal states new educational policy guidelines and recommendations for media literacy have been published (for example in Bavaria: Stmbw, 2016). As a result of these efforts, most German preservice teachers can but do not have to engage with media pedagogy in the course of their education. About 17% of all eligible German institutions of teacher education offer M.A. studies with an explicit focus on media pedagogy. The preservice teachers at these institutions can accomplish such studies in addition to their regular M.Ed. degree. With regard to contents, the focus of these media pedagogical studies varies. The field of teaching with media is addressed explicitly by most study programs (92%), followed by media-related school reform (33%) and media education (25%) (Tiede & al., 2015).

In the USA, the new 2016 National Education Technology Plan lately issued by the U.S. Department of Education reinforced the call for a media pedagogical education of all preservice teachers, which is still not obligatory, and emphasized the responsibility of the institutions involved (p. 32-33). This plan refers also to the ISTE standards for teachers, issued by the International Society for Technology in Education, as a background. These standards describe a framework for the skills teachers should have regarding the educational use of media; they primarily address the field of teaching with media but also include media educational issues and professional development (ISTE, 2008). Another important U.S. framework was developed by the National Association for Media Literacy Education, named the Core Principles of Media Literacy Education. These principles mainly focus on media educational aspects (NAMLE, 2008). Like the ISTE standards, the NAMLE principles do not have to be adhered to mandatorily.

U.S. preservice teachers generally have few elective courses; hence, there is a larger number of mandatory courses with media pedagogical contents. Additionally, 52% of all eligible U.S. institutions of teacher education offer master’s programs with an explicit focus on media pedagogy. These focus on teaching with media (76%), media-related school reform (23%) and media education (2%) (Tiede & al., 2015). Unlike in Germany, preservice teachers can decide for such master’s studies as part of their initial teacher certification, depending on individual regulations for each state.

As these observations from Germany and the USA indicate, the circumstances of the two countries are comparable to some extent. Both of them generally support and promote the integration of media pedagogy into teacher training and yet lack according national binding obligations. Consequently, preservice teachers in both countries can but usually do not have to study media pedagogical topics in the course of their education. Media pedagogy is included into teacher training either as elective courses as part of the basic education, as additional courses and certificates or as specific graduate studies (Tiede & al., 2015).

Obviously, there are also differences between the two countries from a systemic point of view. To substantiate this observation, first results of a study will be presented in the following which sought to measure the pedagogical media competencies of preservice teachers from Germany and the USA. The development of a test instrument will be outlined with particular regard to the special requirements of cross-national research. Then, initial data will be introduced and analyzed.

2. Material and methods

2.1. The M³K model of pedagogical media competencies

A recent approach to defining pedagogical media competencies was made in the course of the German research project “M³K – Modeling and Measuring Pedagogical Media Competencies”, funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research. This M³K model of pedagogical media competencies serves as a basis for the following study. As a starting point for its development, a broad range of primarily German, but also international literature was reviewed, particularly the works of Tulodziecki and Blömeke (1997; see also Blömeke, 2000; Tulodziecki, 2012) and their follow-ups (Siller, 2007; Gysbers, 2008). A first model was deductively derived from this theoretical basis, structured in dimensions and facets of competencies. In order to assess this structure and to further differentiate the facets, media pedagogical requirements for preservice teachers were surveyed empirically and inductively by means of qualitative semi-structured interviews with national and international subject matter experts (n=14) based on the critical incident method (Flanagan, 1954; Schaper, 2009). All interviews were recorded and transcribed. Based on qualitative methods of content analysis (Mayring, 2000), the relevant aspects of pedagogical media competences were extracted and paraphrased. The next step emphasized the link between the identified elements of the paraphrased texts to the competencies dimensions previously identified deductively from literature research (Herzig & al., 2015).


Draft Content 932955560-52762-en004.jpg

The model which was created this way defines pedagogical media competencies as an interplay of three main areas. The first one is media didactics, which means teaching with media or the design and use of media content for educational purposes. The second area is media education and addresses media-related educational and teaching tasks, such as ensuring the students’ responsible behavior in online environments or teaching about ethical aspects of internet use. The third field is media-related school development; this refers to professional development and integrating media on a systemic level (Tulodziecki, Herzig, & Grafe, 2010; Herzig & al., 2015; Tiede & al., 2015).

The M³K model is designed as a matrix with the three main areas: media didactics, media education and school reform on the first axis. Five competency aspects form the second axis. These competency aspects are (a) understanding and assessing conditions, (b) describing and evaluating theoretical approaches, (c) analyzing and evaluating examples, (d) developing one’s own theory-based suggestions, and (e) implementing and evaluating theory-based examples. Each field between the two axes is filled with two standards, as table 1 demonstrates.

The field between “Media Education” and “Describing and evaluating theoretical approaches” for example contains the following two standards: “Standard ME2.1: Student teachers are able to describe concepts of media education and related empirical ?ndings appropriately” and “Standard ME2.2: Student teachers are able to assess concepts from an empirical, normative, or practical perspective” (Tiede & al., 2015).

2.2. Developing a measuring instrument of pedagogical media competencies

Following the development of the model, a test instrument was designed to measure the competencies as defined before. The first items were developed based on theory and on findings from the expert interviews (n=14) as operalizations of the model facets and then tested for performance criteria (Herzig & al., 2015).

Further factors are understood to influence a successful educational use of media even if they are not defined as immediate constituents. This is true primarily for beliefs with regard to teaching with media, teaching about media and school development, perceived media related self-efficiency, and technological media knowledge (Blömeke, 2005; Grafe & Breiter, 2014). Test instruments were developed for these factors, too.

For the validation of the instruments, data were collected from students in teacher training programs at 11 different Germany universities. There were three major surveys with n1=591 test persons, n2=434 test persons and n3=919 test persons; after the first and second survey, the results were analyzed in detail and the instrument was revised thoroughly. Additionally, extensive pretestings, expert interviews and minor studies helped improve and validate the items.

The final version contains 16 items on media didactics / teaching with media, 14 items on media education, 10 items on school reform and 26 items on technological knowledge. These items are amended by 6 items on beliefs for each of the three main areas, 6 items for each of the three main areas that assess the perceived self-efficiency and some demographic data.

The validation of these items is still work in progress, and further work on the test instrument will be required to achieve entirely resilient results. According to the reliabilities determined in the final survey, 11 out of the 16 items on media didactics are suitable for further improvements and should be retained (?=.56), and the same is true for 12 out of 14 media education items (?=.60), 8 out of 10 school reform items (?=.46) and 19 out of 26 items on technological knowledge (?=.81). The reliabilities of the beliefs were ?=.64 and the reliabilities of technological knowledge were ?=.81 (19 out of 26 items) and of self-efficiency ?=.87.

2.3. Adoption of the German M³K questionnaire to a US-American version

In order to use the M³K test instrument in an international context, a complex adoption process was necessary. As international sources were included in the process of developing model and instrument, the international connectivity was generally given; still, a number of steps had to be taken to guarantee comparable results. Their main goal was to ensure the same conditions for students of both countries. Therefore, a five-step approach was applied which mainly builds upon the Guidelines for Best Practice in Cross-Cultural Surveys (Survey Research Center, 2011) and on Harkness and Schoua-Glusberg (1998): 1) Translation: two independent peer-reviewed translations were prepared by professional translators and a third advance translation was made by a competent member of staff; 2) Review: a preliminary translation was developed from the first drafts; 3) Adjudication I: an international expert was consulted, and decisions were made on issues which had been identified as controversial before; 4) Pretestings: an elaborate cognitive pretesting with another expert was made to ensure the cognitive validity of the translation, resulting improvements were applied to the translation and a first small test group of n=2 participants filled in an online version of the test; 5) Adjudication II: the translation was reviewed and discussed once more, changes were reconsidered and the adapted version was finally accepted as appropriate for the upcoming explorative international survey.

2.4. The German and US surveys: samples and method

For the international survey the following content areas were included: media didactics / teaching with media, media education, technological knowledge, beliefs and self-efficiency, and demographical data. It was decided to exclude school reform due to reasons of efficiency and manageability and to avoid potential difficulties with the cultural fit of this field which depends significantly on systemic aspects.

The study was designed as an “ex-post-facto” study since it was not possible to manipulate variables or randomize participants or treatments. Therefore, a descriptive, comparative and non-experimental, quantitative questionnaire-based approach was applied.

The US sample consisted of n=109 test persons who were aged 22 on average (SD=2.16). 11.21% were male. All of them were preservice teachers or students of related studies from one college and five public US universities. As for the procedure, the questionnaire was distributed both as a paper version and as an online survey between April and May 2015.

For the comparison, the data from the third major survey were included. This sample consisted of n=914 test persons aged 23 on average (SD=4.24). 35.52% were male. All test persons were preservice teachers from six different universities. The survey was conducted as a paper version in summer term 2014.

The international survey was one aspect of a greater project, so it was designed as an exploratory study. It served to open up a new comparative view but was not intended to reach the same range as the German main study, which is why the German and US test groups differed in size.

3. Results

For the descriptive comparative analysis, simple T-tests were used to calculate the means for all items separately for both samples. These means were then summarized as one mean value for each field and sample. The confidence interval was defined as 95%. In the following, the results will be introduced descriptively. An interpretation will be provided in chapter 4.

As table 2 illustrates, the German means for all three fields (media didactics, media education and technological knowledge) are significantly higher than the US means. The highest difference can be found in the field of media education.


Draft Content 932955560-52762-en005.jpg

In the field of media didactics, German students achieved higher results with items related to the following topics: films at school, the constructivist use of media in lessons, media didactic concepts, practice programs, computer simulations, computer learning programs, learning through films, behaviorism, and methods of empirical/quantitative research. Three items are opposed to this tendency, as US students achieved higher scores here. The first one requires skills in identifying and processing media influence (Tulodziecki, 1997), the second one knowledge about using computer games for learning and the third one knowledge about the use of online forums for homework.

With regards to media education, German students had more success in answering a majority of the topics covered by the questionnaire. These topics are role models in the media, conservative pedagogical attitudes, age-specific media activities, consumption of violent media content, media use for the satisfaction of needs, developing media competencies and conditions of media production. One item contradicts the tendency described. US students were 29.5% more accurate than their German counterparts, which is a remarkably high difference. This item describes a scenario which requires expertise in the area of understanding and assessing conditions of media production and media dissemination (Tulodziecki, 1997).

Also in the field of technical knowledge, German students answered a majority of questions with higher success. These items were about general functions of social networks, types of data, Google functions, internet browser, hot spots, meta search engines, computer hardware and software. Given this tendency, five items do not correlate because the US test group achieved higher results here. The two that show the highest differences between the test groups (20.7% and 65.4%) are concerned with knowing and using different social media.

With regards to beliefs, the results show that the German means are significantly higher than US means both in the fields of media didactics and media education. This indicates that the attitudes German students expressed concerning using media for these purposes were more positive; for example, they indicated to be more convinced of the usefulness of a media integration which allows students to independently approach lesson content, or they agreed less with the statement that students are already aware of manipulations inherent in media, which therefore need not be further addressed in the classroom.

The difference in self-efficiency is not significant, meaning that the German and the US study participants showed comparable confidence to be able to teach with and about media successfully; for example, both groups estimated their abilities to evaluate the quality of digital learning programs approximately equally.

4. Discussion and conclusion

For the interpretation of these data, it has to be considered that the reliabilities of the test instrument still require further improvement. Moreover, the numbers of participants in the two groups compared are rather disproportionate. The results must not be understood as sound proofs of pedagogical media competencies but rather as tendencies that pave the way for further research.


Draft Content 932955560-52762-en006.jpg

4.1. Media didactics / teaching with media

All in all, the data show that the sample of German students had higher competencies in the field of media didactics / teaching with media than the students in the US sample. A possible explanation could be more relevant learning opportunities during their studies, but the students’ self-reports do not support this thesis: comparable shares of German and US students claimed to have learned about teaching with media during the course of their studies (78.8% of German students vs. 77.8% of US students). Assuming that no confounding factors like different perceptions of the item text came into effect, another interpretation is that the quality and topical focus of the studies both test groups experienced were heterogenous and led to different shapes of competencies. Consequently asking for more details about the learning opportunities in future studies would be helpful for the interpretation of the differences in results.

With regards to an analysis on the level of items, some items oppose this trend of higher media didactical competencies on the part of the German participants, for example two of these items required competencies in using computer games for learning and in the use of online forums for homework. The results showed that the US sample achieved better scores with regard to these items, as they might have had more opportunities to gather experiences with computer games in class and forums for homework during their own schooldays. Empirical data on students’ computer use support this assumption: in 2009, when a majority of the study participants was still at school, 88% of all US students were reported to use computers during instructional time in the classroom rarely, sometimes or often (Gray, Thomas, & Lewis, 2010), while the percentage of German students who used the computer at school was as low as 64.6% (OECD, 2015).

4.2. Media education

64.2% of all German participants indicated having had learning opportunities in the field of media education while the share of US students was 78.9%. Yet, German students had significantly more success in answering a majority of the media educational topics covered by the questionnaire. This observation substantiates the assumption made based on the findings in media didactics that the study content both test groups faced differs.

Noticeably, the two items with the largest difference in the answering pattern (with the means of German participants being 28.2% and 33% higher) contain the term media competencies. Despite the complex adoption process, terminology problems have to be regarded a possible explanation for these discrepancies: there are several ways to translate the German term “Medienkompetenz”, and their precise definition differs according to their context. One team of translators decided on a direct translation and chose media competencies, which was accepted for the final version. Other terms are also frequently used, as for example media literacy (as suggested by the second team of translators), digital competence, digital literacy, or computer literacy (Røkenes & Krumsvik, 2014). As the remarkably high discrepancies suggest, terminological differences of key terms in the field of pedagogical media competencies are a great challenge for the development of instruments that could work internationally.

4.3. Technological knowledge

Also in the field of technical knowledge, the German students answered a majority of questions with higher success. It has to be considered that technical knowledge depends on everyday knowledge to a higher degree than the fields of teaching with media and media education, given the omnipresence of media and their being part of our everyday life. Acquiring media literacy and technical knowledge may be part of teacher training, but it also takes place in informal learning processes. Hence, the interpretation seems likely that German students interact with media in other ways than US students do. This thesis of varying media use is substantiated by empirical data, for example with respect to socialmedia : in the US, 76% of young people aged 13 to 17 reported using social media in 2014/15 (Lenhart, 2015), while in Germany only 68.5% of young people aged 14 to 17 reported using social media in the same period of time, and 57% if the age group from 12 to 17 is considered (MPFS, 2014). Consequently a great challenge when evaluating the success of teacher education programs on the development of pedagogical media competences and its dependent variables is to measure the informal learning processes. For this study it can be concluded that the integration of further items on informal media use would be helpful for the interpretation of results.

4.4. Beliefs and self-efficiency

According to Redman (2012), the perceptions of the affordances of new technologies are also shaped by students’ experiences with these technologies: it was found out that, once the students in this study became acquainted with certain media, their perceptions shifted towards a more positive assessment. However, the German students in our study did not describe more learning opportunities than the US study participants but still showed higher means in the according beliefs. Hence, the correlation of experience and beliefs as argued by Redman (2012) could not be confirmed here.

Differences in the perceived self-efficiency of both groups are not significant. This observation is noteworthy since there is evidence that TPACK knowledge may be predictive of self-efficiency beliefs about technology integration (Abbitt, 2011). Due to overlaps of TPACK and the M³K model, comparable results could be expected here, meaning that according to Abbitt’s results (2011), German students should show higher self-efficiency beliefs because of their higher pedagogical media competencies which were measured in the study. Hence, further research will be necessary here with regard to potential confounding factors and other influences that may have led to this contrary outcome.

4.5. Conclusion

One important goal of this study was the adaptation of a nationally developed instrument for further use in other national contexts taking Germany and the USA as examples. Results show that the international comparative approach adds a number of challenges: while an elaborate adoption process sought to ensure comparability of the German and the US version, the basis was still developed by German scholars and influenced by a German background in terms of fundamental terminology and literature. The possibility that this background has an impact on the results cannot be ruled out and is a great challenge for cross-national studies in the field of media pedagogy.

With respect to these limitations, the overall results of the study suggest that the selected sample of German preservice teachers has slightly higher pedagogical media competencies than the sample of US students. According to their self-reports, German students did not have significantly more learning opportunities; as the differences in the competencies measured are still significant, the learning opportunities both groups had must have differed to some degree and led to more or different competencies. Supposedly, the topics within the field of media pedagogy that are covered in both countries vary. It has been previously established that, considering media pedagogy as an interplay of the three fields teaching with media, teaching about media (media education) and school reform, a majority of US study programs with explicit reference to media pedagogy focus on teaching with media and neglect the other two areas, while the respective German study programs show the same tendency but put more emphasis on media education and school reform (Tiede & al., 2015). A transfer of these conclusions to the results of the study described in this paper leads to the assumption that the media pedagogical contents within teacher education of both countries could also differ and include a larger variety of topics within Germany. Therefore further research on a core curriculum of media pedagogical topics in teacher education would greatly assist further cross-national research in this field.

Further research will be necessary to consolidate these assumptions and exploratory findings. Although a cross-national comparison inevitably holds a number of challenges (e.g., culture, history, focus, language, and background), it also has distinctive affordances, allowing for valuable insights by increasing the variety of viewpoints and providing a broadened, globally interconnected perspective. It opens up a variety of options for subsequent studies; elaborating on the differences between media pedagogy in German and US teacher training on the basis of the findings introduced here will bring about valuable insight into potential improvements of both systems. With regard to the varying focus of media pedagogy within teacher education, curriculum analyses and a comparative evaluation will help draw conclusions on the status quo. Based on the results introduced here, it can be assumed that there are in fact differences in the pedagogical media competencies of German and US preservice teachers, resulting from differences in the role, shape and focus of media pedagogy in the respective teacher education programs. However, taking into account that media pedagogy is not a mandatory part of teacher education in either country, both the USA and Germany are facing similar challenges and potentials for systemic improvement.

Sources of funding

The model of pedagogical media competencies and the surveys introduced in this paper were part of the project “M³K – Modeling and Measuring of Pedagogical Media Competencies”. This 3-year project was funded by the German Federal Ministry of Research and Education in the context of the line of funding “Modeling and Measuring Competencies in Higher Education”.

References

Abbit, J.T. (2011). An Investigation of the Relationship between Self-Efficacy Beliefs about Technology Integration and Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) among Preservice Teachers. Journal of Digital Learning in Teacher Education, 27(4), 134-143. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21532974.2011.10784670. (http://goo.gl/8e8AVF) (2016-05-23).

Bentlage, U., & Hamm, I. (Eds.) (2001). Lehrerausbildung und neue Medien. Erfahrungen und Ergebnisse eines Hochschulnetzwerks. Gütersloh, Germany: Verlag Bertelsmann Stiftung.

Blömeke, S. (2000). Medienpädagogische Kompetenz. Theoretische und empirische Fundierung eines zentralen Elements der Lehrerausbildung. München, Germany: Kopaed.

Blömeke, S. (2003). Neue Medien in der Lehrerausbildung. Zu angemessenen (und unangemessenen) Zielen und Inhalten des Lehramtsstudiums. In Medienpädagogik. (http://goo.gl/rrGdPC) (2016-05-23).

Blömeke, S. (2005). Medienpädagogische Kompetenz. Theoretische Grundlagen und erste empirische Befunde. In A. Frey, R.S. Jäger, & U. Renold (Eds.), Kompetenzdiagnostik-Theorien und Methoden zur Erfassung und Bewertung von beru?ichen Kompetenzen. (pp. 76-97). Landau, Germany: Empirische Pädagogik (=Berufspädagogik; 5).

Blömeke, S., & Paine, L. (2008). Getting the Fish out of the Water: Considering Bene?ts and Problems of Doing Research on Teacher Education at an International Level. Teaching and Teacher Education, 24(4), 2027–2037. doi: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2008.05.006

EU Kids Online (2014). EU Kids Online: Findings, Methods, Recommendations (deliverable D1.6). London: EU Kids Online, LSE. (http://goo.gl/Vyefxf) (2016-05-23).

Flanagan, J.C. (1954). The Critical Incident Technique. Psychological Bulletin, 54(4), July.

Fry, S., & Seely, S. (2011). Enhancing Preservice Elementary Teachers’ 21st Century Information and Media Literacy Skills. Action in Teacher Education, 33(2), 206-218. doi: http://doi.org/10.1080/01626620.2011.569468. (http://goo.gl/wmLiVn) (2016-05-23).

Grafe, S. (2011). «Media Literacy» und «Media (Literacy) Education» in den USA: Ein Brückenschlag über den Atlantik. In H. Moser, P. Grell, & H. Niesyto (Eds.), Medienbildung und Medienkompetenz (pp. 59-80). München, Germany: Kopaed. (http://goo.gl/t7C55L) (2016-05-23).

Grafe, S., & Breiter, A. (2014). Modeling and Measuring Pedagogical Media Competencies of Preservice Teachers (M3K). In C. Kuhn, T. Miriam, & O. Zlatkin-Troitschanskaia (Eds.), Current international state and Future Perspectives on Competence Assessment in Higher Education (KoKoHs Working Papers 6, pp. 76-80). Mainz/Berlin, Germany: Humboldt University of Berlin, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz. (http://goo.gl/cl5X6y) (2016-05-23).

Gray, L., Thomas, N., & Lewis, L. (2010). Teachers’ Use of Educational Technology in U.S. Public Schools: 2009 (NCES 2010-040). National Center for Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC. (http://goo.gl/rPkkm1) (2016-05-23).

Gysbers, A. (2008). Lehrer-Medien-Kompetenz. Eine empirische Untersuchung zur medienpädagogischer Kompetenz und Performanz niedersächsischer Lehrkräfte. Berlin, Germany: Vistas.

Harkness, J.A., & Schoua-Glusberg, A. (1998). Questionnaires in Translation. ZUMA-Nachrichten Spezial, 7, 87-125. (http://goo.gl/gzQj8V) (2016-05-23).

Herzig, B., Martin, A., Schaper, N., & Ossenschmidt, D. (2015). Modellierung und Messung medienpa¨dagogischer Kompetenz. Grundlagen und erste Ergebnisse. In B. Koch-Priewe, A. Ko¨ker, J. Seifried & E. Wuttke (Eds.), Kompetenzerwerb an Hochschulen: Modellierung und Messung. Zur Professionalisierung angehender Lehrerinnen und Lehrer sowie fru¨hpa¨dagogischer Fachkra¨fte (pp. 153-176). Bad Heilbrunn: Verlag Julius Klinkhardt. (http://goo.gl/bKMWQp) (2016-05-23).

Hobbs, R. (2010). Digital and Media Literacy: A Plan of Action (White Paper on the Digital and Media Literacy Recommendations of the Knight Commission on the Information Needs of Communities in a Democracy). Washington, DC: The Aspen Institute. (http://goo.gl/Q1pbRv) (2016-05-23).

Imort, P., & Niesyto, H. (2014). Grundbildung Medien in pädagogischen Studiengängen. Reihe medienpädagogik interdisziplinär, Vol. 10. München. (http://goo.gl/dtrzvf) (2016-05-23).

International Society for Technology in Education [ISTE] (2008). ISTE Standards for Teachers. (https://goo.gl/AVPtnS) (2016-05-23).

Kultusministerkonferenz [KMK] (2012). Medienbildung in der Schule. Beschluss der Kultusministerkonferenz vom 8.3.2012. Kultusministerkonferenz. (http://goo.gl/WxTwQm) (2016-05-23).

Lenhart, A. (2015). Teens, Social Media & Technology Overview 2015. Pew Research Center. (http://goo.gl/BTAvE5) (2016-05-23).

Mayring, P. (2000). Qualitative Content Analysis. Forum: Qualitative Social Research, 1(2). (http://goo.gl/Wg9Hm6) (2016-05-23).

Mishra, P., & Koehler, M. J. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A Framework for Teacher Knowledge. Teachers College Record, 108(6), 1,017-1,054. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9620.2006.00684.x

MPFS (Southwest Media Education Research Association) (Ed.) (2014). JIM 2014. Jugend, Information, (Multi-) Media. Stuttgart, Germany: MPFS. (http://goo.gl/d8atIX) (2016-05-23).

NAMLE (National Association for Media Literacy Education). (2008). The Core Principles of Media Literacy Education. (http://goo.gl/Xq6Ywp) (2016-05-23).

OECD (2015). Students, Computers and Learning: Making the Connection. PISA, OECD Publishing. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264239555-en. (http://goo.gl/xsm03i) (2016-05-23).

Oh, E., & French, R. (2004). Preservice Teachers’ Perceptions of an Introductory Instructional Technology Course. Electronic Journal for the Integration of Technology in Education, 3(1), 1-18. (http://goo.gl/JXaQSi) (2016-05-23).

Redman, C. (2012). Experiencing New Technology: Exploring Pre-service Teachers' Perceptions and Reflections Upon the Affordances of Social Media. AARE APERA International Conference, Sydney 2012. (http://goo.gl/67rQzE) (2016-05-23).

Røkenes, F.M., & Krumsvik, R.J. (2014). Development of Student Teachers’ Digital Competence in Teacher Education. A Literature Review. Nordic Journal of Digital Literacy, 9(4), 250-280. (https://goo.gl/YU5xdQ) (2016-05-23).

Schaper, N. (2009). Aufgabenfelder und Perspektiven bei der Kompetenzmodellierung und -messung in der Lehrerbildung. Lehrerbildung auf dem Prüfstand, 2(1), 166-199.

Shulman, L.S. (1986). Those who Understand: Knowledge Growth in Teaching. Educational Researcher, 15(2), 4-31. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3102/0013189X015002004

Siller, F. (2007). Medienpädagogische Handlungskompetenzen. Problemorientierung und Kompetenzerwerb beim Lernen mit neuen Medien. Mainz, Germany: Johannes Gutenberg-Universität. (http://goo.gl/s8bwUR) (2016-05-23).

Stmbw [Bayerische Staatsministerium für Bildung und Kultur, Wissenschaft und Kunst] (2016). Digitale Bildung in Schule, Hochschule und Kultur. Die Zukunftsstrategie der Bayerischen Staatsregierung. München: stmbw. (http://goo.gl/qaCztN) (2016-05-23).

Survey Research Center (2010). Guidelines for Best Practice in Cross-Cultural Surveys. Ann Arbor, MI: Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan. (http://goo.gl/60kGuo) (2016-05-23).

Tiede, J., Grafe, S., & Hobbs, R. (2015). Pedagogical Media Competencies of Preservice Teachers in Germany and the United States: A Comparative Analysis of Theory and Practice. Peabody Journal of Education, 90(4), 533-545. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0161956X.2015.1068083. (http://goo.gl/9CNHzW) (2016-05-23).

Tulodziecki, G. (1997). Medien in Erziehung und Bildung. Grundlagen und Beispiele einer handlungs- und entwicklungsorientierten Medienpädagogik (3rd edition). Bad Heilbrunn: Klinkhardt.

Tulodziecki, G. (2012). Medienpädagogische Kompetenz und Standards in der Lehrerbildung. In R. Schulz-Zander, B. Eickelmann, H. Moser, H. Niesyto, & P. Grell (Eds.), Jahrbuch Medienpädagogik 9 (pp. 271-297). Wiesbaden, Germany: Springer VS. (http://goo.gl/re1wgy) (2016-05-23).

Tulodziecki, G., & Blömeke, S. (1997). Zusammenfassung: Neue Medien-neue Aufgaben für die Lehrerausbildung. In G. Tulodziecki & S. Blömeke (Eds.), Neue Medien-neue Aufgaben für die Lehrerausbildung. (pp. 155-160). Gütersloh, Germany: Verlag Bertelsmann Stiftung.

Tulodziecki, G., & Grafe, S. (2012). Approaches to Learning with Media and Media Literacy Education –Trends and Current Situation in Germany. Journal of Media Literacy Education, 4(1), 44-60. (http://goo.gl/B4nTDE) (2016-05-19).

Tulodziecki, G., Herzig, B., & Grafe, S. (2010). Medienbildung in Schule und Unterricht. Grundlagen und Beispiele. Bad Heilbrunn, Germany: Julius Klinkhardt. (http://goo.gl/HufDWA) (2016-05-23).

U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Technology (2016). Future Ready Learning: Reimagining the Role of Technology in Education. Washington, D.C. (http://goo.gl/MAEGzv) (2016-05-23).

Wilson, C., Grizzle, A., Tuazon, R., Akyempong, K., & Cheung, C.-K. (2011). Media and Information Literacy Curriculum for Teachers. Paris: UNESCO. (http://goo.gl/HWtH5i) (2016-05-23).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Varios estudios de investigación y de práctica llegan a la conclusión de que la pedagogía de los medios debe integrarse en la formación de profesores para que estos futuros docentes puedan utilizar los medios de comunicación en sus clases con eficacia y éxito. Sin embargo, estos resultados no se reflejan en los programas universitarios vigentes, de manera que en algunas instituciones los profesores en formación pueden llegar al término de sus estudios sin haber abordado cuestiones de educación en medios. Para comprender, evaluar y más adelante mejorar la situación actual de la formación del profesorado en el ámbito de la pedagogía de los medios se necesitan extensas investigaciones. Teniendo en cuenta esta situación, el siguiente artículo presenta un resumen del «statu quo» de las competencias en pedagogía de los medios de los futuros profesores, centrándose en los ejemplos de Alemania y EEUU. Para crear una base presentamos diferentes modelos de competencias pedagógicas mediáticas de ambos países e intentaremos responder a la pregunta si estas competencias son promovidas por los programas de formación del profesorado. Después, se describirán el método y resultados seleccionados de un estudio que midió las competencias en pedagogía de los medios de estudiantes de ambos países, estudio basado en un modelo generalizador de competencias pedagógicas mediáticas que conectan la investigación alemana e internacional en este campo. La perspectiva internacional comparada ayuda a extender perspectivas y comprender diferencias y similitudes. Los datos de este estudio sirven para identificar diferentes formas de integrar la pedagogía de los medios de comunicación en la formación del profesorado. Además, se pueden sacar conclusiones sobre las consecuencias que implican estos procesos para profesores en formación y sus competencias mediáticas.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

1.1. Relevancia de la competencia pedagógica de los medios en la formación de profesores

Dada la omnipresencia de medios como la televisión, Internet y los teléfonos móviles y su influencia en la vida diaria de los jóvenes (MPFS, 2014; Lenhart, 2015; EU Kids Online, 2014), la relevancia de los llamados «nuevos medios» para la escuela y la enseñanza también se ha desarrollado y ha aumentado. Por un lado, pueden ser utilizados como vía de apoyo para un proceso de aprendizaje exitoso y para facilitar una enseñanza efectiva; por otro lado, pueden llegar a ser una asignatura en sí mismos, ya que los estudiantes necesitan aprender sobre temas relacionados con la educación en los medios, como comportamiento responsable en entornos online o los aspectos éticos del uso de Internet en la escuela (KMK, 2012; ISTE, 2008). Es por eso que expertos y profesionales de todo el mundo están de acuerdo en que los profesores necesitan conocimientos y habilidades específicas para integrar exitosamente los nuevos medios en sus clases. Si bien la mayoría de trabajos de investigación han puesto el foco en las habilidades de alfabetización mediática o conocimientos tecnológicos de los profesores (Fry & Seely, 2011; Oh & French, 2004), se requieren otras competencias para lograr una inclusión profesional de los medios en la escuela. Enseñar con y sobre los medios de comunicación y la educación mediática suelen considerarse las dos áreas centrales en este contexto. Sin embargo, hay diversas concepciones de las competencias y habilidades específicas, que aquí serán englobadas en el término «competencias pedagógicas mediáticas».

Un marco conocido y establecido para definir estas competencias en cuestión fue desarrollado en los EEUU por Mishra y Koehler (2006) como TPACK (Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge, es decir, Conocimiento de Contenidos Tecnológicos Pedagógicos), basándose en el trabajo de Shulman (1986). Shulman definió el conocimiento de contenidos pedagógicos y el conocimiento pedagógico como las áreas centrales de competencias que debían adquirir los profesores. Mishra Koehler (2006) añadieron los aspectos de conocimiento tecnológico, conocimiento de contenidos tecnológicos, conocimiento tecnológico pedagógico y conocimiento de contenidos tecnológicos pedagógicos, y de este modo desarrollaron un modelo integral de las habilidades necesarias para enseñar exitosamente con medios de comunicación.

A pesar de la existencia de marcos como el TPACK, no hay un consenso sobre la forma precisa de las competencias pedagógicas mediáticas, ni a nivel mundial ni tampoco a nivel nacional. Asimismo, su integración en la educación de profesores universitarios también está sujeta a discusión y no ha sido realizada de forma consistente, a pesar de que la formación de profesores ya ha sido reconocida como el lugar adecuado para la adquisición de habilidades mediáticas pedagógicas (Blömeke, 2003). Por lo tanto, aún no hay un currículo vinculante que pueda garantizar una educación mediática pedagógica básica para todos los profesores en formación, aunque sí hay estándares y directrices no vinculantes que hacen sugerencias para esos procesos, como por ejemplo el Currículo de Alfabetización Mediática e Informacional para Profesores de la UNESCO (Wilson, Grizzle, Tuazon, Akyempong, & Cheung, 2011).

Esta situación heterogénea, en la que los esfuerzos y las formas de integrar la pedagogía mediática en la educación de profesores pueden variar entre países e instituciones, constituye el trasfondo de este trabajo. Este estudio exploratorio investiga las competencias pedagógicas mediáticas de los profesores en formación en Alemania y los EEUU. Comparar dos países sirve para superar barreras culturales, para contrarrestar el peligro de una perspectiva estrecha y para beneficiarse del trasfondo, investigaciones y conocimientos desde puntos de vista diferentes. Ambos países comparten una cultura rica del discurso pedagógico y de investigación en la educación de los profesores, lo que da un marco común sobre el que construir (Grafe, 2011). Ambos países comparten enfoques similares sobre las políticas y estructuras educativas, así como un fuerte control estatal y local de la educación, acompañado de altos niveles de influencia federal sobre temas educativos (Blömeke & Paine, 2008; Tiede, Grafe & Hobbs, 2015). A continuación se presentarán distintos modelos de competencias pedagógicas mediáticas de ambos países y se verá en qué medida estas competencias son parte de los programas de formación de profesores y estudios relacionados. Luego se describirán métodos y resultados seleccionados de un estudio en que las habilidades en cuestión fueron medidas con estudiantes de ambos países, en base a un modelo integral de competencias pedagógicas mediáticas que conecta las investigaciones alemanas e internacionales en este campo. La perspectiva comparativa internacional ayudará a ampliar el punto de vista y a comprender parecidos y diferencias. Estos datos sirven para identificar distintas formas de integrar la pedagogía mediática en la formación de profesores y sacar conclusiones sobre las consecuencias que tienen estos procesos para los profesores en formación y sus competencias pedagógicas mediáticas.

1.2. Competencias pedagógicas mediáticas en la educación de profesores alemanes y norteamericanos

El tema de las competencias docentes es un factor clave a la hora de anticipar el futuro de la educación tanto en los Estados Unidos como en Alemania (para conocer un resumen detallado del desarrollo y estado actual de la educación mediática en ambos países, ver por ejemplo Tulodziecki & Grafe, 2012; Hobbs, 2010; Tiede & al., 2015).

La Conferencia Permanente de Ministros de Educación y Asuntos Culturales de los Länder en la República Federal Alemana ha visto la necesidad de incluir competencias pedagógicas mediáticas en la formación de profesores, como revela su declaración sobre educación mediática en la escuela (KMK, 2012). En consecuencia, existen varios intentos de lograr esa integración en las últimas décadas (Bentlage & Hamm, 2001; Imort & Niesyto, 2014). No obstante, no hay obligaciones nacionales vinculantes para las instituciones de formación de profesores de acuerdo con el sistema federal de Alemania. La responsabilidad por las instituciones de educación superior es de cada estado federal individual. Podemos reconocer que recientemente en diferentes estados federales se han publicado nuevas directrices y recomendaciones de políticas educativas de alfabetización mediática (por ejemplo en Bavaria: Stmbw, 2016). Como resultado de estos esfuerzos, casi todos los profesores en formación de Alemania pueden, aunque no están obligados, tener contacto con la pedagogía mediática en el transcurso de su educación. En torno al 17% de todas las instituciones alemanas cualificadas de formación de profesores ofrecen estudios de máster (M.A.) con un foco específico en la pedagogía mediática. Los profesores en formación de estas instituciones pueden realizar estos estudios además de sus estudios de Máster en Educación (M. Ed. Degree). En cuanto a los contenidos, el foco de estos estudios de pedagogía mediática varía. El campo de la enseñanza con medios es tratado en forma explícita por casi todos los programas de estudios (92%), seguidos por la reforma escolar relacionada con los medios (33%) y la educación mediática (25%) (Tiede & al., 2015).

En los EEUU, el nuevo Plan Nacional de Educación Tecnológica 2016 emitido por el Departamento de Educación reforzó la petición de una educación mediática pedagógica de todos los profesores en formación, lo que aún no es obligatorio, y enfatizó la responsabilidad de las instituciones involucradas. Este plan también hace referencia a los estándares ISTE para profesores emitidos por la Sociedad Internacional de Tecnología en la Educación, como trasfondo. Estos estándares describen un marco para las habilidades que los profesores deberían tener en relación al uso educativo de los medios, pero también incluyen temas de educación mediática y desarrollo profesional (ISTE, 2008). Otro marco importante de los EEUU fue desarrollado por la Asociación Nacional de Alfabetización Mediática, llamado los Principios Centrales de Alfabetización Mediática. Estos principios se enfocan principalmente en los aspectos educativos de los medios (NAMLE, 2008). Como los estándares ISTE, los principios NAMLE no tienen por qué ser mandatorios.

Los profesores en formación de los EEUU suelen tener pocos cursos optativos, por lo que hay un mayor número de cursos obligatorios con contenidos mediáticos pedagógicos. Además, el 52% de todas las instituciones cualificadas de educación de profesores en los EEUU ofrecen programas de máster con un foco explícito en la pedagogía mediática. Estos se enfocan en la enseñanza con medios (76%), reformas escolares relacionadas con los medios (23%) y educación mediática (2%) (Tiede & al., 2015). A diferencia de Alemania, los profesores en formación pueden decidir seguir esos estudios de máster como parte de su certificación docente inicial, dependiendo de las normas individuales de cada estado.

Como indican estas observaciones de Alemania y los EEUU, las circunstancias de los dos países son comparables en cierta medida. Ambos suelen apoyar y promover la integración de la pedagogía mediática en la formación de profesores, pero carecen de obligaciones vinculantes a nivel nacional al respecto. En consecuencia, los profesores en formación de ambos países pueden pero normalmente no deben estudiar temas de pedagogía mediática en el transcurso de su educación. La pedagogía mediática se incluye en la formación de profesores ya en forma de asignaturas optativas como parte de la educación básica, como asignaturas adicionales y certificaciones, o como estudios de grado específicos (Tiede & al., 2015).

Obviamente, también hay diferencias entre los dos países desde un punto de vista sistémico. Para corroborar esta observación, a continuación se presentarán los primeros resultados de un estudio que buscaba medir las competencias en pedagogía mediática de profesores en formación de Alemania y los EEUU. Se describirá el desarrollo de un instrumento de prueba con atención particular a los requisitos especiales de la investigación transnacional. Luego se presentarán y analizarán los primeros datos.

2. Materiales y métodos

2.1. El modelo M³K de competencias de pedagogía mediática

Un intento reciente de definir las competencias de la pedagogía mediática tuvo lugar en el transcurso del proyecto de investigación alemán «M³K – Modelando y Midiendo las Competencias Pedagógicas Mediáticas», fundado por el Ministerio Federal de Educación e Investigación. Este modelo M3K de competencias pedagógicas mediáticas sirve como base para el siguiente estudio. Como punto de partida para su desarrollo se repasó un amplio abanico de literatura, principalmente alemana pero también internacional, en particular los trabajos de Tulodziecki y Blömeke (1997) (Blömeke, 2000; Tulodziecki, 2012) y sus continuaciones (Siller, 2007; Gysbers, 2008). Un primer modelo se dedujo de su base teórica, estructurada en dimensiones y facetas de competencias. Para evaluar esta estructura y diferenciar mejor las facetas, los requisitos de pedagogía mediática para los profesores en formación fueron analizados empírica e inductivamente por expertos en la materia (n=14) basándose en el método del incidente crítico (Flanagan, 1954; Schaper, 2009). Todas las entrevistas fueron grabadas y transcritas. Con base en los métodos cualitativos de análisis de contenidos (Mayring, 2000), los aspectos relevantes de las competencias pedagógicas mediáticas fueron extraídos y parafraseados. El siguiente paso enfatizaba el vínculo entre los elementos identificados de los textos parafraseados y las dimensiones de competencia previamente identificadas de forma deductiva en la investigación (Herzig & al., 2015).


Draft Content 932955560-52762 ov-es004.jpg

El modelo así creado define las competencias pedagógicas mediáticas como una interacción de tres áreas principales. La primera es la didáctica mediática, que significa enseñar con medios o el diseño y uso de contenido mediático con fines educativos. La segunda área es la educación mediática y trata tareas de enseñanza y educativas relacionadas con los medios, como asegurar el comportamiento responsable de los alumnos en entornos on-line o enseñar los aspectos éticos del uso de Internet. El tercer campo es el desarrollo escolar relacionado con los medios; esto hace referencia al desarrollo profesional y la integración de los medios a nivel sistémico (Tulodziecki, Herzig, & Grafe, 2010; Herzig & al., 2015; Tiede & al., 2015).

El modelo M³K está diseñado como una matriz con las tres áreas principales de didáctica mediática, educación mediática y reforma escolar en el primer eje. Cinco aspectos de la competencia forman el segundo eje. Estos aspectos son (a) comprender y evaluar las condiciones, (b) describir y evaluar enfoques teóricos, (c) analizar y evaluar ejemplos, (d) desarrollar sugerencias propias basadas en la teoría, y (e) implementar y evaluar ejemplos basados en la teoría. Cada campo entre los dos ejes se rellena con dos estándares, como se muestra en el ejemplo de la tabla 1.

El campo entre «Educación Mediática» y «Describir y evaluar enfoques teóricos» contiene, por ejemplo, los siguientes dos estándares: «Estándar ME2.1: Los profesores en formación pueden describir conceptos de educación mediática y hallazgos empíricos relacionados» y «Estándar ME2.2: Los profesores en formación pueden evaluar conceptos desde una perspectiva empírica, normativa o práctica» (Tiede & al., 2015).

2.2. Desarrollando un instrumento de medida de las competencias pedagógicas mediáticas

Siguiendo al desarrollo del modelo se diseñó un instrumento de prueba para medir las competencias antes definidas. Los primeros ítems fueron desarrollados en base a la teoría y a hallazgos en las entrevistas con expertos (n=14) como operacionalizaciones de las facetas modelo, y luego probados por criterios de rendimiento (Herzig & al., 2015).

Hay otros factores que se cree que influyen en el uso educativo exitoso de los medios, incluso aunque no estén definidos como constituyentes inmediatos. Esto es cierto en primer lugar por las creencias sobre la enseñanza con medios, la enseñanza sobre medios y el desarrollo escolar, la autoeficiencia percibida en relación a los medios, y el conocimiento mediático tecnológico (Blömeke, 2005; Grafe & Breiter, 2014). También se desarrollaron instrumentos de prueba para estos factores.

Para la validación de los instrumentos se recogió información de los estudiantes en programas de formación de profesores en 11 universidades alemanas distintas. Hubo tres encuestas principales con n1=591 sujetos, n2=434 sujetos y n3=919 sujetos. A partir de la primera y la segunda encuesta, se analizaron en detalle los resultados y se revisó cuidadosamente el instrumento. Además, las pruebas extensivas, entrevistas con expertos y estudios menores ayudaron a mejorar y validar los ítems.

La versión final contiene 16 ítems sobre didáctica mediática y enseñanza con medios, 14 ítems sobre educación mediática, 10 ítems sobre reforma escolar y 26 ítems sobre conocimientos tecnológicos. Estos ítems están enmendados por seis ítems sobre creencias para cada una de las tres áreas principales, seis ítems para cualquiera de las tres áreas principales que evalúen la autoeficiencia percibida y algunos datos demográficos.

La validación de estos ítems aún es un trabajo en curso, y se requerirá más trabajo con el sujeto de prueba para lograr resultados consistentes. De acuerdo con la confiabilidad determinada en la encuesta final, 11 de los 16 ítems sobre didáctica mediática sirven para seguir mejorando y deberían ser retenidos (?=,56), y lo mismo ocurre para 12 de los 14 ítems de educación mediática (?=,60), 8 de los 10 ítems de reforma escolar (?=,46), y 19 de los 26 ítems de conocimientos tecnológicos (?=,81). La fiabilidad de las creencias era de ?=,64 y la fiabilidad de los conocimientos tecnológicos era de ?=,81 (19 de 26 ítems) y la de autoeficiencia de ?=,87.

2.3. Adopción del cuestionario alemán M³K a una versión para EEUU

Para usar el instrumento M³K en un contexto internacional fue necesario un complejo proceso de adaptación. Al haber fuentes internacionales incluidas en el proceso de desarrollo de modelo e instrumento, la conectividad internacional estaba dada a grandes rasgos; aun así, debieron tomarse algunas medidas para garantizar resultados comparables. Su meta principal fue asegurar las mismas condiciones para los estudiantes de ambos países. Por lo tanto, se aplicó un enfoque en cinco pasos tomado principalmente de las Normas de Buenas Prácticas en Encuestas Transculturales (Centro de Investigación de Sondeos, 2011) y de Harkness y Schoua-Glusberg (1998): 1) Traducción: dos traducciones revisadas en forma independiente fueron preparadas por traductores profesionales y una tercera traducción avanzada fue llevada a cabo por un miembro competente del personal; 2) Revisión: se desarrolló una traducción preliminar a partir de los primeros borradores; 3) Adjudicación I: se consultó a un experto internacional, y se tomaron decisiones sobre temas antes identificados como controvertidos; 4) Pruebas: se realizó una prueba cognitiva elaborada con otro experto para asegurar la validez cognitiva de la traducción, tras lo que se aplicaron mejoras a la traducción y un pequeño grupo de n=2 participantes rellenó una versión online del test; y 5) Adjudicación II: la traducción fue revisada y debatida una vez más, se reconsideraron los cambios y la versión adaptada fue finalmente aceptada como buena para la encuesta internacional exploratoria.

2.4. Las encuestas alemanas y norteamericanas: ejemplos y método

Para el estudio internacional se incluyeron las siguientes áreas de contenidos: didáctica mediática/enseñanza con medios, educación mediática, conocimientos tecnológicos, creencias y eficiencia individual, y datos demográficos. Se decidió excluir la reforma escolar por motivos de eficiencia y gestión y para evitar problemas potenciales con el encaje cultural de este campo, que depende significativamente de aspectos sistémicos.

El estudio se diseñó como un estudio «ex-post-facto», al no ser posible manipular variables o fijar participantes o tratamientos aleatorios. Por lo tanto se aplicó un cuestionario cuantitativo descriptivo, comparativo y no experimental.

La muestra de EEUU consistió en n=109 sujetos cuya edad media era de 22 años (SD=2,16). El 11,21% eran hombres. Todos ellos eran profesores en formación o cursaban estudios relacionados en una universidad privada y cinco públicas. En cuanto al procedimiento, el cuestionario fue distribuido tanto en papel como en formato online entre abril y mayo de 2015.

Para la comparación se incluyeron los datos del tercer estudio principal. Esta muestra consistió de n=914 sujetos cuya edad media era de 23 años (SD= 4,24). El 35,52% eran hombres. Todos ellos eran profesores en formación de seis universidades diferentes. El cuestionario se aplicó en papel en el verano de 2014.

El estudio internacional era solo un aspecto de un proyecto mayor, por lo que fue diseñado como estudio exploratorio. Sirvió para abrir una nueva visión comparativa, pero no pretendía alcanzar el mismo rango que el principal estudio alemán, y es por eso que los grupos de ensayo de Alemania y EEUU tenían distinto tamaño.

3. Resultados

Para el análisis comparativo descriptivo, se usaron pruebas T simples para calcular las medias de todos los ítems por separado para ambas muestras. Estas medias fueron luego contadas como un valor medio para cada campo y muestra. El intervalo de confianza se definió en 95%. A continuación se presentarán los resultados en forma descriptiva; se dará una interpretación en el capítulo 4.

Como ilustra la tabla 2, las medias alemanas para los tres campos (didáctica mediática, educación mediática y conocimientos tecnológicos) son significativamente mayores que las medias norteamericanas. La mayor diferencia se encuentra en el campo de educación mediática.


Draft Content 932955560-52762 ov-es005.jpg

En el campo de didáctica mediática, los estudiantes alemanes obtuvieron mejores resultados para los ítems relacionados con los temas siguientes: películas en la escuela, uso constructivista de los medios en las lecciones, conceptos didácticos de los medios, programas de prácticas, simulaciones por computador, programas de aprendizaje por computador, aprendizaje con películas, conductismo y métodos de investigación empírica/cuantitativa. Tres ítems van en contra de esta tendencia, pues los estudiantes de EEUU obtuvieron mejores calificaciones en ellos. El primero requiere la destreza de identificar y procesar la influencia mediática (Tulodziecki, 1997), el segundo conocimiento sobre el uso de videojuegos para aprender, y el tercer conocimiento sobre el uso de foros on-line para resolver la tarea.

En cuanto a la educación mediática, los estudiantes alemanes tuvieron más éxito al responder a la mayoría de temas cubiertos por el cuestionario. Estos temas son los modelos de conducta en los medios, actitudes pedagógicas conservadoras, actividades mediáticas enfocadas a edades específicas, consumo de contenidos mediáticos violentos, el uso de los medios para la satisfacción de necesidades, el desarrollo de competencias mediáticas y las condiciones de producción mediática. Un ítem es contradictorio para la tendencia descrita. Los estudiantes de EEUU lo respondieron un 29,5% más correctamente, lo que supone una diferencia notable. Este ítem describe un escenario que requiere conocimientos en el área de comprensión y evaluación de condiciones de producción y difusión mediática (Tulodziecki, 1997).

También en el campo del conocimiento técnico, los estudiantes alemanes respondieron una mayoría de preguntas con mayor éxito. Estos temas trataban sobre funciones generales de las redes sociales, tipos de datos, funciones de Google, explorador de Internet, puntos conflictivos, metabuscadores, hardware y software. Dada esta tendencia, cinco ítems resultan contradictorios porque el grupo de pruebas de EEUU obtuvo mejores resultados aquí. Los dos que muestran la mayor diferencia entre los grupos de prueba (20,7% y 65,4%) tienen que ver con el conocimiento y uso de diferentes redes sociales.

En cuanto a las creencias, los resultados muestran que las medias alemanas son bastante más altas que las medias de EEUU tanto en el campo de didáctica mediática como en educación mediática. Esto significa que las actitudes expresadas por los estudiantes alemanes en relación con los medios para estos fines fueron más positivas; por ejemplo, señalaron estar más convencidos de la utilidad de una integración mediática, lo que permite a los estudiantes afrontar el contenido de las lecciones de forma independiente, o estuvieron menos de acuerdo con la afirmación de que los estudiantes ya están al tanto de la manipulación inherente a los medios, que por lo tanto no necesita ser tratada en clase.

La diferencia en eficiencia individual no es significativa, lo que nos dice que los participantes alemanes y norteamericanos del estudio mostraron una confianza similar en su capacidad de enseñar con y sobre medios de forma exitosa; por ejemplo, ambos grupos estimaron sus habilidades para evaluar la calidad de los programas de aprendizaje digital de forma parecida.

4. Discusión y conclusión

Para la interpretación de estos datos debe considerarse que la fiabilidad del instrumento de prueba aún requiere mejoras. Además, el número de participantes en ambos grupos es bastante desproporcionado. Por lo tanto, los resultados no deben tomarse como pruebas sólidas de las competencias mediáticas pedagógicas, sino más bien como tendencias que marcan el camino para investigaciones futuras.


Draft Content 932955560-52762 ov-es006.jpg

4.1. Didáctica mediática y enseñanza con medios

Resumiendo, los datos nos dicen que la muestra de estudiantes alemanes tenía mayores competencias en el campo de la didáctica mediática / enseñanza con medios que los estudiantes de la muestra norteamericana. Una posible explicación podría ser que tuvieran oportunidades de aprendizaje más relevantes durante sus estudios, pero los informes de los estudiantes no apoyan esta tesis: muestras comparables de estudiantes de Alemania y EEUU aseguraron haber aprendido sobre la enseñanza con medios durante el transcurso de sus estudios (78,8% de estudiantes alemanes frente a 77,8% de estudiantes norteamericanos). Asumiendo que no hubiera factores de confusión como distintas percepciones de un ítem textual, otra interpretación es que el foco temático y cualitativo de los estudios experimentados por ambos grupos fuera heterogéneo y llevara a distintas formas de competencias. En consecuencia, pedir más detalles sobre las oportunidades de aprendizaje en estudios futuros sería de ayuda para interpretar la diferencia en los resultados.

En cuanto al análisis del nivel de los ítems, algunos temas contrarían esta tendencia de mayores competencias didácticas mediáticas por parte de los participantes alemanes, por ejemplo dos de estos ítems requerían competencias en el uso de videojuegos para aprender y en el uso de foros online para hacer la tarea. Los resultados reflejaron que la muestra de EEUU obtuvo mejores calificaciones para estos ítems, por lo que pueden haber tenido más ocasiones de reunir experiencia con videojuegos en clase y foros para hacer la tarea durante su época escolar. Los datos empíricos sobre el uso de computadoras por parte de los alumnos apoya esta suposición: en 2009, cuando la mayoría de participantes del estudio aún iba al colegio, el 88% de los estudiantes de EEUU usaban computadoras durante el tiempo de clase raramente, a veces, o a menudo (Gray, Thomas, & Lewis, 2010), mientras que el porcentaje de estudiantes alemanes que usaban computadora en la escuela era de solo el 64,6% (OECD, 2015).

4.2. Educación mediática

El 64,2% de todos los participantes alemanes indicaron haber tenido oportunidades de aprendizaje en el campo de la educación mediática, mientras que el porcentaje de estudiantes norteamericanos fue del 78,9%. Aun así, los estudiantes alemanes tuvieron mucho más éxito al responder la mayoría de temas de educación mediática cubiertos por el cuestionario. Esta observación respalda la suposición basada en los hallazgos en didáctica mediática de que los contenidos de estudio abordados por ambos grupos de prueba difieren.

Notablemente, los dos ítems con mayor diferencia en el patrón de respuesta contienen el término competencias mediáticas, siendo las medias de participantes alemanas un 28,2% y un 33% mayores. A pesar del complejo proceso de adopción, debemos considerar una posible explicación para estas discrepancias en los problemas terminológicos: hay distintas formas de traducir el término alemán «Medienkompetenz», y su definición precisa difiere en función del contexto. Un equipo de traductores decidió usar una traducción directa como competencias mediáticas, que se aceptó para la versión final. Otros términos se usan con frecuencia, como por ejemplo alfabetización mediática (como sugirió el segundo equipo de traductores), competencia digital, alfabetización digital o alfabetización informática (Røkenes & Krumsvik, 2014). Como sugieren las discrepancias, las diferencias terminológicas de términos clave en el campo de las competencias pedagógicas mediáticas son un gran desafío para el desarrollo de instrumentos que podrían funcionar a nivel internacional.

4.3. Conocimientos tecnológicos

También en el campo de los conocimientos tecnológicos los estudiantes alemanes respondieron una mayoría de preguntas con mayor éxito. Debe tenerse en cuenta que el conocimiento técnico depende en mayor grado de los conocimientos cotidianos que los campos de enseñanza con medios y educación mediática, dada la omnipresencia de los medios y su presencia como parte de nuestra vida diaria. Adquirir un nivel de alfabetización mediática y conocimiento técnico puede ser parte de la formación de profesores, pero también tiene lugar en los procesos informales de aprendizaje. Por lo tanto, parece viable interpretar que los estudiantes alemanes interactúan con los medios de forma distinta a como lo hacen los estudiantes norteamericanos. Esta tesis de uso variable de los medios está respaldada por datos empíricos, por ejemplo en lo que respecta a las redes sociales: en EEUU, el 76% de los jóvenes entre los 13 y 17 años de edad dijeron usar redes sociales en 2014/15 (Lenhart, 2015), mientras que en Alemania solo el 68,5% de los jóvenes entre los 14 y 17 años comenzaron a usar redes sociales en el mismo periodo, el 57% si consideramos el grupo etario que va desde los 12 hasta los 17 (MPFS, 2014). En consecuencia, medir los procesos informales de aprendizaje supone un gran desafío a la hora de evaluar el éxito de los programas de educación de profesores en el desarrollo de competencias pedagógicas mediáticas y sus variables dependientes. Para este estudio podemos concluir que la integración de más ítems sobre el uso informal de los medios sería de ayuda para interpretar los resultados.

4.4. Creencias y eficiencia individual

De acuerdo con Redman (2012), las posibilidades de las nuevas tecnologías también están determinadas por las experiencias de los estudiantes con estas tecnologías: se descubrió que, una vez que los estudiantes de este estudio se familiarizaron con ciertos medios, sus percepciones cambiaron hacia una evaluación más positiva. Sin embargo, los estudiantes alemanes de nuestro estudio no describieron más oportunidades de aprendizaje que los participantes de EEUU, pero aun así mostraron mayores medias en las creencias correspondientes. Por lo tanto, la correlación de experiencia y creencias como la argumenta Redman (2012) no pudo confirmarse aquí.

No hay diferencias significativas en la eficiencia individual percibida de ambos grupos. Esta observación es digna de ser tenida en cuenta, pues hay evidencia de que los conocimientos TPACK pueden ser predictivos para las creencias de eficiencia individual sobre la integración de la tecnología (Abbitt, 2011). Debido al solapamiento de TPACK y el modelo M³K, aquí pudieron esperarse resultados comparables, lo que significa que de acuerdo con los resultados de Abbitt (2011), los estudiantes alemanes muestran una mayor creencia en su eficiencia individual por sus mayores competencias pedagógicas mediáticas medidas en el estudio. Por lo tanto serán necesarias otras investigaciones para aclarar potenciales factores de confusión y otras influencias que puedan haber llevado a este desenlace.

4.5. Conclusión

Una meta importante de este estudio era la adaptación de un instrumento desarrollado a nivel nacional para su uso en otros contextos nacionales, tomando Alemania y los EEUU como ejemplos. Los resultados muestran que el enfoque comparativo internacional añade varios desafíos: mientras que un proceso de adopción elaborado buscaba asegurar la comparabilidad de las versiones alemana y estadounidense, la base siguió siendo desarrollada por académicos alemanes e influida por un trasfondo alemán en cuanto a la terminología y literatura usadas. No puede descartarse la posibilidad de que este trasfondo tenga un impacto en los resultados, y ello supone un gran desafío para los estudios transnacionales en el campo de la pedagogía mediática.

En cuanto a estas limitaciones, los resultados globales del estudio sugieren que la muestra seleccionada de profesores en formación alemanes tiene mayores competencias pedagógicas mediáticas que la muestra de estudiantes norteamericanos. De acuerdo con sus propios informes, los estudiantes alemanes no tienen más oportunidades de aprendizaje. Como las diferencias en las competencias medidas siguen siendo importantes, las oportunidades de aprendizaje de ambos grupos han que haber diferido en cierto grado y llevado a otras competencias. Podría suponerse que los temas dentro del campo de la pedagogía mediática cubiertos en ambos países varían. Antes de eso se averiguó, considerando la pedagogía mediática como una interacción de los tres campos: enseñanza con medios, enseñanza sobre medios (educación mediática) y reforma escolar; que la mayoría de programas de estudio de EEUU con referencia explícita a la pedagogía mediática se enfocan en la enseñanza con medios y dejan de lado las otras dos áreas, mientras que los programas de estudio alemanes respectivos muestran la misma tendencia pero ponen más énfasis en la educación mediática y la reforma escolar (Tiede & al., 2015). Una transferencia de estas conclusiones a los resultados descritos en este estudio lleva a la suposición de que los contenidos pedagógicos mediáticos en la educación de profesores de ambos países también podrían diferir e incluir una mayor variedad de temas en Alemania. Por lo tanto, sería de gran ayuda una futura investigación sobre un currículo central de temas pedagógicos mediáticos en la educación de profesores para hacer otras investigaciones transnacionales en este campo.

Serán necesarias futuras investigaciones para consolidar estas suposiciones y hallazgos exploratorios. Aunque una comparación transnacional inevitablemente presenta varios desafíos (ej: cultura, historia, enfoque, idioma y trasfondo) también tiene muchas posibilidades, permitiendo lograr perspectivas valiosas al aumentar la variedad de puntos de vista y dando una perspectiva más amplia, globalmente interconectada. Abre una variedad de opciones para estudios futuros, ya que desarrollar las diferencias en la pedagogía mediática en la formación de profesores en Alemania y EEUU a partir de los hallazgos aquí presentados aportará una visión valiosa de mejoras potenciales en ambos sistemas. En cuanto al foco variable de la pedagogía mediática en la educación de profesores, los análisis curriculares y una evaluación comparativa ayudarán a sacar conclusiones sobre el estado actual. En base a los resultados aquí presentados, puede suponerse que de hecho hay diferencias en las competencias pedagógicas mediáticas de los profesores en formación alemanes y norteamericanos, que se dan por diferencias en el papel, forma y foco de la pedagogía mediática en los programas respectivos de formación de profesores. Sin embargo, teniendo en cuenta que la pedagogía mediática no es una parte obligatoria de la formación de profesores en ambos países, tanto EEUU como Alemania se enfrentan a desafíos similares y tienen un potencial parecido para mejorar.

Apoyos

El modelo de competencias pedagógicas mediáticas y los sondeos presentados en este estudio fueron parte del proyecto «M³K: Modelado y Medida de Competencias Pedagógicas Mediáticas». Este proyecto de tres años fue fundado por el Ministerio Federal Alemán de Investigación y Educación en el contexto de la línea de fundación «Modelado y Medida de Competencias en la Educación Superior».

Referencias

Abbit, J.T. (2011). An Investigation of the Relationship between Self-Efficacy Beliefs about Technology Integration and Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) among Preservice Teachers. Journal of Digital Learning in Teacher Education, 27(4), 134-143. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21532974.2011.10784670. (http://goo.gl/8e8AVF) (2016-05-23).

Bentlage, U., & Hamm, I. (Eds.) (2001). Lehrerausbildung und neue Medien. Erfahrungen und Ergebnisse eines Hochschulnetzwerks. Gütersloh, Germany: Verlag Bertelsmann Stiftung.

Blömeke, S. (2000). Medienpädagogische Kompetenz. Theoretische und empirische Fundierung eines zentralen Elements der Lehrerausbildung. München, Germany: Kopaed.

Blömeke, S. (2003). Neue Medien in der Lehrerausbildung. Zu angemessenen (und unangemessenen) Zielen und Inhalten des Lehramtsstudiums. In Medienpädagogik. (http://goo.gl/rrGdPC) (2016-05-23).

Blömeke, S. (2005). Medienpädagogische Kompetenz. Theoretische Grundlagen und erste empirische Befunde. In A. Frey, R.S. Jäger, & U. Renold (Eds.), Kompetenzdiagnostik-Theorien und Methoden zur Erfassung und Bewertung von beru?ichen Kompetenzen. (pp. 76-97). Landau, Germany: Empirische Pädagogik (=Berufspädagogik; 5).

Blömeke, S., & Paine, L. (2008). Getting the Fish out of the Water: Considering Bene?ts and Problems of Doing Research on Teacher Education at an International Level. Teaching and Teacher Education, 24(4), 2027–2037. doi: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2008.05.006

EU Kids Online (2014). EU Kids Online: Findings, Methods, Recommendations (deliverable D1.6). London: EU Kids Online, LSE. (http://goo.gl/Vyefxf) (2016-05-23).

Flanagan, J.C. (1954). The Critical Incident Technique. Psychological Bulletin, 54(4), July.

Fry, S., & Seely, S. (2011). Enhancing Preservice Elementary Teachers’ 21st Century Information and Media Literacy Skills. Action in Teacher Education, 33(2), 206-218. doi: http://doi.org/10.1080/01626620.2011.569468. (http://goo.gl/wmLiVn) (2016-05-23).

Grafe, S. (2011). «Media Literacy» und «Media (Literacy) Education» in den USA: Ein Brückenschlag über den Atlantik. In H. Moser, P. Grell, & H. Niesyto (Eds.), Medienbildung und Medienkompetenz (pp. 59-80). München, Germany: Kopaed. (http://goo.gl/t7C55L) (2016-05-23).

Grafe, S., & Breiter, A. (2014). Modeling and Measuring Pedagogical Media Competencies of Preservice Teachers (M3K). In C. Kuhn, T. Miriam, & O. Zlatkin-Troitschanskaia (Eds.), Current international state and Future Perspectives on Competence Assessment in Higher Education (KoKoHs Working Papers 6, pp. 76-80). Mainz/Berlin, Germany: Humboldt University of Berlin, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz. (http://goo.gl/cl5X6y) (2016-05-23).

Gray, L., Thomas, N., & Lewis, L. (2010). Teachers’ Use of Educational Technology in U.S. Public Schools: 2009 (NCES 2010-040). National Center for Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC. (http://goo.gl/rPkkm1) (2016-05-23).

Gysbers, A. (2008). Lehrer-Medien-Kompetenz. Eine empirische Untersuchung zur medienpädagogischer Kompetenz und Performanz niedersächsischer Lehrkräfte. Berlin, Germany: Vistas.

Harkness, J.A., & Schoua-Glusberg, A. (1998). Questionnaires in Translation. ZUMA-Nachrichten Spezial, 7, 87-125. (http://goo.gl/gzQj8V) (2016-05-23).

Herzig, B., Martin, A., Schaper, N., & Ossenschmidt, D. (2015). Modellierung und Messung medienpa¨dagogischer Kompetenz. Grundlagen und erste Ergebnisse. In B. Koch-Priewe, A. Ko¨ker, J. Seifried & E. Wuttke (Eds.), Kompetenzerwerb an Hochschulen: Modellierung und Messung. Zur Professionalisierung angehender Lehrerinnen und Lehrer sowie fru¨hpa¨dagogischer Fachkra¨fte (pp. 153-176). Bad Heilbrunn: Verlag Julius Klinkhardt. (http://goo.gl/bKMWQp) (2016-05-23).

Hobbs, R. (2010). Digital and Media Literacy: A Plan of Action (White Paper on the Digital and Media Literacy Recommendations of the Knight Commission on the Information Needs of Communities in a Democracy). Washington, DC: The Aspen Institute. (http://goo.gl/Q1pbRv) (2016-05-23).

Imort, P., & Niesyto, H. (2014). Grundbildung Medien in pädagogischen Studiengängen. Reihe medienpädagogik interdisziplinär, Vol. 10. München. (http://goo.gl/dtrzvf) (2016-05-23).

International Society for Technology in Education [ISTE] (2008). ISTE Standards for Teachers. (https://goo.gl/AVPtnS) (2016-05-23).

Kultusministerkonferenz [KMK] (2012). Medienbildung in der Schule. Beschluss der Kultusministerkonferenz vom 8.3.2012. Kultusministerkonferenz. (http://goo.gl/WxTwQm) (2016-05-23).

Lenhart, A. (2015). Teens, Social Media & Technology Overview 2015. Pew Research Center. (http://goo.gl/BTAvE5) (2016-05-23).

Mayring, P. (2000). Qualitative Content Analysis. Forum: Qualitative Social Research, 1(2). (http://goo.gl/Wg9Hm6) (2016-05-23).

Mishra, P., & Koehler, M. J. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A Framework for Teacher Knowledge. Teachers College Record, 108(6), 1,017-1,054. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9620.2006.00684.x

MPFS (Southwest Media Education Research Association) (Ed.) (2014). JIM 2014. Jugend, Information, (Multi-) Media. Stuttgart, Germany: MPFS. (http://goo.gl/d8atIX) (2016-05-23).

NAMLE (National Association for Media Literacy Education). (2008). The Core Principles of Media Literacy Education. (http://goo.gl/Xq6Ywp) (2016-05-23).

OECD (2015). Students, Computers and Learning: Making the Connection. PISA, OECD Publishing. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264239555-en. (http://goo.gl/xsm03i) (2016-05-23).

Oh, E., & French, R. (2004). Preservice Teachers’ Perceptions of an Introductory Instructional Technology Course. Electronic Journal for the Integration of Technology in Education, 3(1), 1-18. (http://goo.gl/JXaQSi) (2016-05-23).

Redman, C. (2012). Experiencing New Technology: Exploring Pre-service Teachers' Perceptions and Reflections Upon the Affordances of Social Media. AARE APERA International Conference, Sydney 2012. (http://goo.gl/67rQzE) (2016-05-23).

Røkenes, F.M., & Krumsvik, R.J. (2014). Development of Student Teachers’ Digital Competence in Teacher Education. A Literature Review. Nordic Journal of Digital Literacy, 9(4), 250-280. (https://goo.gl/YU5xdQ) (2016-05-23).

Schaper, N. (2009). Aufgabenfelder und Perspektiven bei der Kompetenzmodellierung und -messung in der Lehrerbildung. Lehrerbildung auf dem Prüfstand, 2(1), 166-199.

Shulman, L.S. (1986). Those who Understand: Knowledge Growth in Teaching. Educational Researcher, 15(2), 4-31. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3102/0013189X015002004

Siller, F. (2007). Medienpädagogische Handlungskompetenzen. Problemorientierung und Kompetenzerwerb beim Lernen mit neuen Medien. Mainz, Germany: Johannes Gutenberg-Universität. (http://goo.gl/s8bwUR) (2016-05-23).

Stmbw [Bayerische Staatsministerium für Bildung und Kultur, Wissenschaft und Kunst] (2016). Digitale Bildung in Schule, Hochschule und Kultur. Die Zukunftsstrategie der Bayerischen Staatsregierung. München: stmbw. (http://goo.gl/qaCztN) (2016-05-23).

Survey Research Center (2010). Guidelines for Best Practice in Cross-Cultural Surveys. Ann Arbor, MI: Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan. (http://goo.gl/60kGuo) (2016-05-23).

Tiede, J., Grafe, S., & Hobbs, R. (2015). Pedagogical Media Competencies of Preservice Teachers in Germany and the United States: A Comparative Analysis of Theory and Practice. Peabody Journal of Education, 90(4), 533-545. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0161956X.2015.1068083. (http://goo.gl/9CNHzW) (2016-05-23).

Tulodziecki, G. (1997). Medien in Erziehung und Bildung. Grundlagen und Beispiele einer handlungs- und entwicklungsorientierten Medienpädagogik (3rd edition). Bad Heilbrunn: Klinkhardt.

Tulodziecki, G. (2012). Medienpädagogische Kompetenz und Standards in der Lehrerbildung. In R. Schulz-Zander, B. Eickelmann, H. Moser, H. Niesyto, & P. Grell (Eds.), Jahrbuch Medienpädagogik 9 (pp. 271-297). Wiesbaden, Germany: Springer VS. (http://goo.gl/re1wgy) (2016-05-23).

Tulodziecki, G., & Blömeke, S. (1997). Zusammenfassung: Neue Medien-neue Aufgaben für die Lehrerausbildung. In G. Tulodziecki & S. Blömeke (Eds.), Neue Medien-neue Aufgaben für die Lehrerausbildung. (pp. 155-160). Gütersloh, Germany: Verlag Bertelsmann Stiftung.

Tulodziecki, G., & Grafe, S. (2012). Approaches to Learning with Media and Media Literacy Education –Trends and Current Situation in Germany. Journal of Media Literacy Education, 4(1), 44-60. (http://goo.gl/B4nTDE) (2016-05-19).

Tulodziecki, G., Herzig, B., & Grafe, S. (2010). Medienbildung in Schule und Unterricht. Grundlagen und Beispiele. Bad Heilbrunn, Germany: Julius Klinkhardt. (http://goo.gl/HufDWA) (2016-05-23).

U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Technology (2016). Future Ready Learning: Reimagining the Role of Technology in Education. Washington, D.C. (http://goo.gl/MAEGzv) (2016-05-23).

Wilson, C., Grizzle, A., Tuazon, R., Akyempong, K., & Cheung, C.-K. (2011). Media and Information Literacy Curriculum for Teachers. Paris: UNESCO. (http://goo.gl/HWtH5i) (2016-05-23).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/09/16
Accepted on 30/09/16
Submitted on 30/09/16

Volume 24, Issue 2, 2016
DOI: 10.3916/C49-2016-02
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Views 3
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?