Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This paper analyses the phenomenon of academic plagiarism among students enrolled in Secondary Education and High School. It is a subject poorly studied at pre-university level and very scantily discussed in the Spanish-speaking context. It investigates the frequency of committing plagiarism and the relationship between gender and procrastination and such practices. A questionnaire was administered to a representative sample (n=2,794). The results show that plagiarism is certainly present and widespread in the secondary classrooms. Furthermore, it shows that men have significantly higher levels of perpetration than women and than students who tend to leave the tasks until the last moment are more likely to plagiarize. The fruits of this research suggest the need to take into serious consideration the magnitude and severity of the problem identified; secondary schools should urgently plan and undertake measures in order to reduce and prevent the commission of this type of academic fraud. Secondly, results are useful to give clear guidance to teachers about the need for them to follow up and apply an effective control of the writing process of academic essays and tasks by students. Improving IT and library competences of the students has been identified as one of the main strategies needed to effectively address the problem.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

This study addresses the phenomenon of academic plagiarism among students in compulsory secondary education (CSE) and high school. Academic integrity -a value that is undermined by such activities as cheating in exams and plagiarising- is of paramount importance for any education system aiming to educate upright, honest people. The value of integrity is unlikely to be incorporated into the students’ axiological scale if school practices suffer from discord between what is preached –we will not find any education institution that defends corruption and deceit in its discourse– and what is done. We will find, as Morey, Comas, Sureda, Samioti and Amengual (2012) suggest, few schools in our country with a clear policy of containment and disapproval of dishonest practices. Incidentally, these practices are not limited to merely copying and plagiarising. In this regard, it is worth recalling the great influence exerted by the hidden curriculum in school practice and the need for coherence between what is proposed and what is practised. The need for the creation of a «culture of honesty and integrity» (Lathrop & Foss, 2005) in schools seems ever more pressing.

Plagiarising, copying, deceiving and cheating in exams are practices that have always been present in the classroom. However, it is in the last few years, due in part to the development and expansion of the Internet, that the phenomenon has taken on a new, greater, more worrying dimension (Comas & Sureda, 2010). Some bibliometric indicators clearly show that interest in the issue has grown considerably in recent years. If we restrict ourselves to the articles indexed in the SCOPUS database, we find that 38 academic articles were published in the period 1999-2003 (7.6 articles per year), 171 in 2004-2008 (34.2 articles per year) and 308 in 2009-2013 (61.6 articles per year). Considering the studies indexed in the academic search engine Google Scholar, we find 68 resources in 1999-2003 (13.6 articles per year), 232 in 2004-2008 (46.4 articles per year) and 525 in 2009-2013 (105 articles per year)1.

Despite the number of studies carried out, there is no shortage of research gaps. In this regard, the low interest aroused by this issue in secondary education is striking: the vast majority of studies conducted on plagiarism have focused on university settings, as if lower education levels were immune to this phenomenon (Comas, 2009). However, aside from the paucity of studies conducted, there are solid arguments to justify the need to set our sights on this level of education. The fact is that, as Comas (2009) demonstrated by analysing plagiarism among university students, the roots of this phenomenon stretch down to lower levels of the education system: students do not spontaneously begin to develop plagiarising practices when they reach university. Furthermore, the convenience of researching what happens in secondary and high school in relation to academic plagiarism has been implicitly noted by all of those who advocate that information literacy should form part of the core of school curricula (Julien & Barker, 2009; Williamson & McGregor, 2011). The fact is that plagiarising practices, in addition to undermining academic integrity, reveal a lack of information skills by students as far as the use and ethical and legal communication of information is concerned (Morey, 2011).

Having shown not only the pertinence but also the convenience of studying the issue of plagiarism at pre-university levels, we now describe, albeit briefly, some of the main contributions of the few studies existing on the matter.

Research on academic plagiarism among secondary school students -as in the case of that on plagiarism among university students- has focused on the analysis of the prevalence and extent of the phenomenon and on identifying the explanatory factors for this fraudulent practice (Comas, Sureda, Angulo & Mut, 2011). In 1986, before the use of the Internet became widespread, Dant (1986) showed that up to 50.7% of secondary school students surveyed (albeit in a very small sample of only 309 students from one school) claimed to have copied from encyclopaedias when completing academic assignments. Years later, when the Internet was beginning to receive widespread use, McCabe (2005, cited in Sisti, 2007), with data from more than 18,000 students from 61 US schools, noted that up to 60% of students admitted carrying out some form of plagiarism when drafting and presenting academic assignments. McCabe observed that secondary schools ‘are facing a significant problem’. Subsequent studies (Sisti, 2007; Sureda, Comas, Morey, Mut & Gili, 2010; Bacha, Bahous & Nabhani, 2012; Morey, Sureda, Oliver & Comas, 2013) have gauged the magnitude of the problem by showing that, in fact, plagiarism in pre-university education is by no means a trivial issue.

Regarding the causes or factors involved in academic plagiarism, attention has focused on different aspects (Comas & Sureda, 2010): students’ personal factors (academic performance, procrastination, gender, motivation, etc.), institutional factors (the existence of academic regulations that address the issue of plagiarism, the ethical culture of the education centre, the existence and use of detection programmes, etc.), factors linked to teaching (types of assignments that are given, number of assignments given, follow-up on assignments by the teacher, etc.) and factors outside education practice (levels of political corruption, crisis in the system of values, etc.).

In addition to describing and quantifying the practices of plagiarism committed by students in secondary and high school, the present proposal addresses the relationship between these practices and various personal characteristics (gender and procrastination). With respect to the relationship between gender and academic plagiarism, there is a high level of unanimity in the doctrinal corpus regarding the greater prevalence in commiting plagiarism among male university students (Athanasou & Olasehinde, 2002; Straw, 2002; Lin & Wen, 2007; Comas, 2009; Brunell, Staats, Barden & Hub, 2011). If we focus on secondary students, this relationship has been very little studied, and the few existing studies suggest the same trend, that is, a higher frequency in the commission of academic plagiarism among men than among women (Schab, 1969; Cizek, 1999). Concerning the academic procrastination factor, understood as the act, voluntary or involuntary, of putting off and delaying certain programmed actions (Klassen & Rajani, 2008), Roig and DeTomasso (1995) reported significant relationships among the following factors for university students: the higher the level of postponement in assignments, the higher the likelihood of perpetration of academic plagiarism. Similar results were obtained by Daly and Horgan (2007) in a study on the profile of university students with the greatest propensity to commit academic plagiarism. Finally, in our country, the contribution of Clariana, Gotzens, Badia and Cladellas (2012) is notable. Using a small sample, they analysed the relationship between plagiarism and procrastination among pre-university students, concluding that there is a moderate, positive correlation between both variables.

The research questions (CI) we aim to answer with this proposal are

• CI1: What is the prevalence of academic plagiarism and cyberplagiarism among students in secondary and high school?

• CI1.1: Are there significant differences regarding the frequency of academic plagiarism and cyberplagiarism among these students?

• C.1.2: Are there significant differences in terms of the frequency of academic plagiarism among these students according to gender?

• CI2: Are academic plagiarism and cyberplagiarism related to procrastination?

• CI2.1: Are there significant differences in the relationship between procrastination and academic plagiarism and cyberplagiarism among these students?

2. Material and methods

2.1. Population and sample

In total, 1,503 students in second-, third- and fourth-year CSE2 participated in this study (compulsory education in Spain, with a student mean age of between 13 and 16 years), as did 1,291 first- and second-year high school (baccalaureate) students (post-compulsory education in Spain, with mean ages from 16 to 18 years) in the Balearic Islands. The representativeness of this sample is within a margin of error, calculated for the geographical area of this community, of ±1.7%3 for an estimated confidence interval of 95% under the most unfavourable condition of p=q=0.50. The stratified random sampling was used, considering: a) the three years of CSE and the two years of high school, b) the island of residence (Mallorca, Menorca and Ibiza-Formentera) and c) the ownership of the schools (public and private/government-sponsored).

The fieldwork was conducted by three interviewers previously instructed on how to administer the instrument to participating students in an individual and anonymous way in classroom situations in the presence of a teacher employed by the school.

Data collection was carried out between February and April 2010 for the high school sample and February and April 2011 for the CSE sample. No student refused to participate in the study. However, although 1,302 and 1,515 student surveys were obtained from the high school and CSE students, respectively, the sample was smaller because 23 questionnaires were invalidated due to one of the following three reasons: multiplicity of answers in single-answer questions, less than 50% of items answered and the unintelligibility of the answers given by respondents.

Concerning the characteristics of the subjects in the sample, 54.9% were female and 45.1% male. Student age varied between 12 and 23 years, with a mean age of 15.6 years (a standard deviation of 2.6) and 15-year-old subjects being the most numerous.

2.2. Source of data and variables

This study was designed on the basis of a self-reporting questionnaire administered to the participants. This type of questionnaire is the most common among studies on academic integrity and has been shown to offer sufficiently accurate estimates (Cizek, 1999; Comas, 2009; Mut, 2012). For data collection, the following instruments were used: the «Questionnaire on academic plagiarism among CSE students» (for the CSE sample) and the «Questionnaire on academic plagiarism among high school (baccalaureate) students» (for the high school sample), which were expressly designed and based on: a) an analysis of the existing literature on the matter and b) the adaptation of various items in the questionnaires of DeLambert, Ellen and Taylor (2003); Finn and Frone (2004); and Comas (2009). The two questionnaires had 10 questions in common, with the CSE questionnaire being longer (it had three more questions) and derived from the high school (baccalaureate) questionnaire. Once the initial questionnaire had been designed, a validation phase was initiated through, first, the opinion and contributions of eight external experts (three secondary/high school teachers and five university lecturers and national and international researchers, experts in the issue of academic plagiarism), who commented on its viability as well as possible amendments of items to best reflect the aims and dimensions of the study. Second, this questionnaire was administered to two pilot groups of secondary and high school students (46 subjects from the second and fourth years of CSE and the first year of baccalaureate) to verify that the students understood the items. Plagiarism incidents that occurred in the classroom during the completion of the pilot survey were recorded. This validation phase resulted in the rephrasing of some of the initially proposed items and the precision of the variables to be analysed. Once the final version had been drawn up, the questionnaire was administered to a second pre-test sample of 59 second-, third- and fourth-year CSE students. The internal consistency of the questionnaire was calculated using Cronbach’s Alpha, which ranged between 0.73 and 0.84 for the questions comprising the final version of the instrument and the sample as a whole.

The results that are set forth in the present article focus on the analysis of four of the variables addressed in the questionnaire and the ulterior association between these variables (V1 with V2 and V3):

• V1: Self-reported frequency in the commission of different practices that constitute academic plagiarism and cyberplagiarism.

• V2: Gender.

• V3: Index of procrastination.

V1 is based on the answers given by participants in the study regarding the perpetration of six actions constituting plagiarism (set out independently) in the academic year prior to the time of administration of the questionnaire, that is, actions that took place during 2008-2009 for high school students and 2009-2010 for CSE students. These practices are:

• Action 1: Submitting an assignment written by another student that had already been submitted in previous years (for the same class or a different class).

• Action 2: Copying fragments of texts from websites and -without citing- pasting them directly in a document -in which part of the text was written by the student- and submitting it as a class assignment.

• Action 3: Downloading an entire assignment from the Internet and submitting it, without modification, as student’s own work for a class.

• Action 4: Copying fragments from written sources (books, encyclopaedias, newspapers, journal articles, etc.) and adding them -without citing- as parts of the student’s own work for a class.

• Action 5: Drafting an assignment wholly from fragments copied literally from websites (with no part of the assignment having actually been written by the student).

• Action 6: Copying parts of assignments submitted in previous years and using them as sections in a new assignment. For each action, participating students indicated the frequency at which they had performed this practice from the following five options: «Never», «Between one and two times», «Between three and five times», «Between six and 10 times» or «More than 10 times».

As a gauge of V3, which concerns procrastination, we analysed the data regarding two items related to two subjective-scale questions: participants had to rate their degree of agreement with the following statements (between 1 and 10, where 1 represents «Totally disagree» and 10 «Totally agree»): «When I have to do an assignment, I always leave it until the last day» and «When I have to do an assignment, I get to it right away».

2.3. Data processing

The frequency variable for commission of plagiarism (based on the response of participants to six actions constituting plagiarism) was recoded in another variable (index of committing academic plagiarism) by summing up the answers for each student.

Next, for each of the category variables analysed, the frequency and percentage was calculated. For the scale variables (index of procrastination), the items were recoded, and an index of procrastination derived from this operation was established by summing the two items used in operationalizing procrastination. Next, to establish potential associations between the index of committing academic plagiarism and the characteristics of students or independent variables (gender and procrastination index), a statistical analysis was conducted using comparison of means obtained through the application of a t-test for independent samples (for the association between the frequency of committing plagiarism and the gender variable) and analysis of variance (ANOVA) (for the association between the frequency of commission of plagiarism and the procrastination index).

All of the analyses were conducted using the statistical package SPSS (version 19.0). The data matrix can be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1066207.

3. Results

3.1 Self-reported frequency of the commission of different types of academic plagiarism

The most common practices (table 1) are so-called «collage plagiarism» (Comas, 2009), that is, drafting an assignment by copying scattered fragments of text, whether from digital sources or written sources, and including them in an academic assignment without citing their origin. Amongst the least recurrent actions, the most outstanding are downloading a whole assignment from the Internet and submitting it as one’s own and presenting an assignment written and already submitted by another student in previous years.


Draft Content 666423282-32645-en046.jpg

If we analyse the data from the measurements (taking into consideration the values 1 to 5 that correspond to the five possible answers), we are able to establish a ranking in which the actions studied are ordered from most to least frequent (table 2).


Draft Content 666423282-32645-en047.jpg

Going a little further into the exploitation of the results, we totalled the answers for the three practices considered to be academic cyberplagiarism (actions 2, 3 and 5) as well as the answers for the three plagiarism practices from written sources (actions 1, 4 and 6). Based on this calculation, we estimated and compared the means of each grouping. The academic cyberplagiarism grouping has a mean response of 5.64 with a standard deviation of 2.25, whereas the set of actions corresponding to the plagiarism of written sources has a mean response of 5.08, lower than that of the first group, with a standard deviation of 1.83.

3.2. Association between the level of academic plagiarism and gender

For each action except number 4 (table 3), men have higher mean perpetration rates than women, with an appreciable significant relationship between the commission of plagiarism and gender in four of the six actions analysed.


Draft Content 666423282-32645-en048.jpg

The same relationship is found if the analysis is established from the association between gender and the sum of the answers given for the various plagiarism actions studied. Thus, from the t-test for independent samples, we also obtain results that indicate that men engage in academic plagiarism practices significantly more often than women do (× Women: 10.39; × Men 11.33; t=–6,040; gf=2544; Bilateral Sig.=<0,000).

3.3. Association between the level of academic plagiarism and level of procrastination

From the data resulting from the association between the students’ procrastination index and the sum of the six forms of plagiarism analysed in the present study as well as the individual sums of the practices constituting plagiarism of written sources and typical of cyberplagiarism, a significant direct relationship between both groups of variables can be appreciated: the greater the tendency to procrastination, the greater the tendency to engage in plagiarism (tables 4 and 5).


Draft Content 666423282-32645-en049.jpg


Draft Content 666423282-32645-en050.jpg

Individuals who report greater postponement tendencies have higher mean sums of the six actions analysed in the present study if compared with students who have a lower tendency to leave assignments until the last minute.

4. Discussion and conclusions

The results of the present study show that academic plagiarism is widespread among secondary and high school students, with levels practically identical to those for university education. However, the most recurrent practices for secondary and high school students are those that can be considered the least serious. Indeed, although measuring the severity of misconduct is not at all straightforward, it seems sensible to maintain that the seriousness of drafting an assignment from extracts copied without citing, regardless of the source, combined with parts written by the pupils themselves is less serious than submitting completely plagiarised assignments. These results referring to the prevalence of ‘low-intensity’ dishonest behaviours are along the same lines as those obtained in other studies in higher education settings. For instance, Comas (2009) reached very similar conclusions in his doctoral dissertation studying Spanish university students. Ferguson (2013) analysed the frequency of commission of 20 different practices undermining academic integrity amongst students from four US university campuses and found that the most widespread practices were those considered less intentional by the participants in the study. Similar conclusions were reported in the doctoral thesis of Tabor (2013), who conducted a qualitative study on US university students. Specifically, in Tabor’s study, students felt that there are different levels of seriousness in plagiarising practices and that the least serious levels are the most recurrent.

As far as the gender variable is concerned, the results obtained suggest a marked prominence of males over females in regard to committing acts constituting academic plagiarism.

It is worth noting that the data obtained in this study reveal a marked relationship between committing plagiarism and procrastinating or postponement behaviours. This close relationship may have a very simple explanation: students who have a greater tendency to leave tasks to the last minute do not have the time to complete the activity required by the teacher on their own; in this case, drafting the assignment using plagiarism practices is their only option. This fact has clear implications concerning: a) students, as it hints at the need to educate students in better management of time and resources, and b) teachers, as it suggests the need for teachers to conduct an efficient follow up on the assigned tasks. The model of the teacher who sets an assignment and does not follow-up on the task in progress, merely waiting for the submission deadline to correct and grade the assignment, increases the likelihood of students leaving the task until the last minute and thereby engaging in the less-than-honourable act of copying (Comas, 2009). It is therefore advisable that teachers plan and carry out regular check-ups on the tasks to follow up on students’ progress rather than simply waiting for the result. The reality of plagiarism in secondary education raises the need to adopt preventative measures and to introduce values of academic integrity and honesty into schools.

Fraud in education, as Moreno (1998) so rightly, in our opinion, argues, is the main non-violent or «white collar» antisocial behaviour at school, and school is the «first field for practices of fraud and corruption». Dishonest behaviours are learnt and develop in certain settings and contexts, just like any other manifestation of human behaviour. In this regard, if we ask the question of whether schools encourage and promote the developments of academically honest and ethically relevant behaviours, the answer would not reflect well on schools, above all due to the contradiction between explicit and implicit discourse, between the formal and hidden curriculum.

There are three fronts on which schools ought to act to address academic dishonesty: regulations (all secondary schools should incorporate the issue of fraud in their regulations), the adoption of teaching methodologies adapted to the new requirements stemming from the mass use of ICTs in teaching-learning processes and, finally, a strong boost of students’ combined digital and information literacy (So & Lee, 2014), stressing the ability to «use information efficiently and ethically» (Alexandria Declaration, 2005, cited in Wilson, Grizzle, Tuazon, Akyempong & Cheung, 2011).

Notes

1 Data obtained from SCOPUS and Google Scholar for a search for the term «academic plagiarism».

2 Because the data gathered refer to the behaviours carried out in the academic year prior to the administration of the questionnaire, the collection data corresponding to students in the first year were considered irrelevant, as this would have included information regarding the last year of primary schooling.

3 Based on statistical data for academic year 2011-12 from the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport (2012), which puts the number of students enrolled in the Balearic Islands in the second, third and fourth years of CSE and the first and second years of baccalaureate at 41,236.

4 Index of procrastination.

Support and acknowledgements

This study is part of the activities included in the project «El plagio académico entre el alumnado de ESO de Baleares» [Academic plagiarism among CSE students in the Balearic Islands] (Reference EDU2009-14019-C02-01), funded by the Directorate-General for Research of the Ministry of Science and Innovation of the Government of Spain.

The authors of this article belong to the research group «Educación y Ciudadanía» [Education and citizenship] of the University of the Balearic Islands, which has the consideration of Competitive Research Group under the sponsorship of the Directorate-General for Research, Technological Development and Innovation of the Regional Ministry of Innovation, Interior and Justice of the Government of the Balearic Islands and co-funding from FEDER funds.

References

Athanasou, J.A. & Olasehinde, O. (2002). Male and Female Differences in Self-report Cheating. Practical Assessment, Research & Evaluation, 8(5). (http://goo.gl/GvIwSf) (12-01-2014).

Bacha, N., Bahous, R. & Nabhani, M. (2012). High Schoolers’ Views on Academic Integrity. Research Papers in Education, 27(3), 365-381. (DOI: http://doi.org/b4bpwv).

Brunell, A.B., Staats, S., Barden, J. & Hupp, J.M. (2011). Narcissism and Academic Dishonesty: The Exhibitionism Dimension and the Lack of Guilt. Personality and Individual Differences, 50(3), 323-328. (DOI: http://doi.org/d4xdp8).

Cizek, G.J. (1999). Cheating on Tests: How to do it, Detect it, and Prevent it. London: Routledge.

Clariana, M., Gotzens, C., Badia, M. & Cladellas, R. (2012). Procrastination and Cheating from Secondary School to University. Electronic Journal of Research in Educational Psychology, 10(2) 737-754. (http://goo.gl/Invcz3) (10-01-2014).

Comas, R. & Sureda, J. (2010). Academic Plagiarism: Explanatory Factors from Students’ Perspective. Journal of Academic Ethics, 8(3), 217-232 (DOI: http://doi.org/fspd6s).

Comas, R. (2009). El ciberplagio y otras formas de deshonestidad académica entre el alumnado universitario (Tesis doctoral no publicada). Palma de Mallorca: Universidad de las Islas Baleares.

Comas, R., Sureda, J., Angulo, F. & Mut, T. (2011). Academic Plagiarism amongst Secondary Education Students: State of the Art. 4th International Conference of Education, Research and Innovations Proceedings, 4314-4321. Madrid: IATED.

Daly, C. & Horgan, J.M. (2007). Profiling the Plagiarists: An Examination of the Factors that Lead Students to Cheat. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 36(1), 39-50. (DOI: http://doi.org/dd4dgf).

Dant, D.R. (1986). Plagiarism in High School: A Survey. English Journal, 75(2), 81-84.

DeLambert, K., Ellen, N. & Taylor, L. (2003). Cheating ? What is it and why do it: a study in New Zealand tertiary Institutions of the Perceptions and Justifications for Academic Dishonesty. Journal of American Academy of Business, 3 (1/2), 98-104.

Ferguson, L.M. (2013). Student Self-Reported Academically Dishonest Behavior in Two-Year Colleges in the State of Ohio. Tesis Doctoral. (http://goo.gl/D4LFQd) (02-02-2014).

Finn, K. & Frone, M.R. (2004). Academic Performance and Cheating: Moderating role of School Identification and Self-efficacy. Journal of Educational Research, 97(3), 115-123. (DOI: http://doi.org/cw95n3).

Julien, H. & Barker, S., (2009). How High-school Students Find and Evaluate Scientific Information: A Basis for Information Literacy Skills Development. Library & Information Science Research 31(1), 12-17. (DOI: http://doi.org/b7kdpd).

Klassen, L. & Rajani, S. (2008). Academic Procrastination of Undergraduates: Low Self-efficacy to Self-Regulate Predicts Higher Levels of Procrastination. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 3, 915-931. (DOI: http://doi.org/dq2fmv).

Lathrop, A. & Foss, K. (2005). Guiding Students from Cheating and Plagiarism to Honesty and Integrity. Strategies for change. Westrop: Libraries Unlimited.

Lin, C. & Wen, L. (2007). Academic Dishonesty in Higher Education ? A Nationwide Study in Taiwan. Higher Education, 54(1), 85-97. (DOI: http://doi.org/dx25mp).

Moreno, J.M. (2001). Con trampa y con cartón. Cuadernos de Pedagogía, 283, 71-77.

Morey M., Comas, R., Sureda, J., Samioti, G. & Mut, T. (2012). School Intervention against Academic Plagiarism: Analysis of the Internal Regulations of the Centers of Secondary Education. 6th International Technology, Education and Development Conference Proceedings, 5.225-5.230. Valencia: IATED.

Morey, M. (2011). Anàlisi de l'alfabetització informacional entre l'alumnat de la Universitat de les Illes Balears (Tesis doctoral no publicada). Palma de Mallorca: Universidad de las Islas Baleares.

Morey, M., Sureda, J., Oliver, M. & Comas, R. (2013). Plagio y rendimiento académico entre el alumnado de Educación Secundaria Obligatoria. ESE, 24, 225-244.

Mut, T. (2012). La alfabetización informacional: una aproximación al ciberplagio académico entre el alumnado de bachillerato (Tesis Doctoral no publicada). Palma de Mallorca: Universidad de las Islas Baleares.

Roig, M. & DeTommaso, L. (1995). Are College Cheating and Plagiarism Related to Academic Procrastination? Psychological Reports, 77(2), 691-698. (DOI: http://doi.org/cpfgx4).

Schab, F. (1980). Cheating among College and Non-College Bound Pupils, 1969-1979. Clearing House, 53(8), 379-80.

Sisti, D.A. (2007). How do High School Students Justify Internet Plagiarism? Ethics & Behavior, 17(3), 215-231. (DOI: http://doi.org/d35wh2).

So, C. & Lee, A. (2014). Alfabetización mediática y alfabetización informacional: similitudes y diferencias. Comunicar, 42, 137-146. (DOI: http://doi.org/tmc).

Straw, D. (2002). The Plagiarism of Generation ‘why not?’. Community College Week, 14(24).

Sureda, J., Comas, R., Morey, M., Mut, T. & Gili, M. (2010). El ciberplagi acadèmic. Anàlisi del ciberplagi entre l'alumnat de batxillerat de les Illes Balears. Palma: Fundación IBIT.

Tabor, E.L. (2013). Is Cheating always Intentional? The Perception of College Students toward the Issues of Plagiarism. Tesis Doctoral. (http://goo.gl/D4LFQd) (12-01-2014).

Williamson, K. & McGregor, J. (2011). Generating Knowledge and Avoiding Plagiarism: Smart Information Use by High School Students. School Library Research, 14. (http://goo.gl/o3cJIy) (05-02-2014).

Wilson, C., Grizzle, A., Tuazon, R., Akyempong, K. & Cheung, C. (2011). Alfabetización mediática e informacional: currículum para profesores. París: UNESCO.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

En este trabajo se analiza el fenómeno del plagio académico entre el alumnado de Educación Secundaria Obligatoria y Bachillerato. Se trata de un tema poco estudiado en los niveles preuniversitarios y muy escasamente tratado en el contexto hispanohablante. Se investiga la prevalencia de este fenómeno así como su relación con el género y la procrastinación. Los datos fueron obtenidos mediante la administración de un cuestionario a una muestra representativa (n=2.794). Los resultados del estudio muestran que las prácticas constitutivas de plagio están ampliamente extendidas en las aulas de los ciclos educativos medios. Además, se demuestra que los varones presentan niveles de perpetración significativamente superiores a los de las mujeres y que el alumnado que tiende a dejar los trabajos hasta el último momento tiene mayor propensión a cometer plagio. Los frutos de esta investigación sugieren la necesidad de tomar en seria consideración la magnitud y severidad del problema detectado. Los centros de educación secundaria deben proyectar y acometer de manera perentoria medidas en aras de reducir y prevenir la comisión de este tipo de fraudes académicos. Los resultados también hacen recomendable que los docentes hagan un seguimiento y un control efectivo del proceso de elaboración de los trabajos académicos. La mejora de las competencias informacionales del alumnado es señalada como una de las estrategias necesarias para encarar eficazmente el problema.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Este trabajo aborda el fenómeno del plagio académico entre el alumnado de Educación Secundaria Obligatoria (ESO) y Bachillerato. La integridad académica –valor contra el que atentan actividades como copiar y plagiar en las evaluaciones– es de importancia capital para todo sistema educativo que entre sus finalidades contemple contribuir a formar personas íntegras y honestas. Difícilmente se conseguirá que el valor de la integridad se incorpore en la escala axiológica del alumnado si en las prácticas escolares hay disonancia entre lo que se predica –no encontraremos ningún centro educativo que en su discurso defienda la bondad de la corrupción y el engaño– y lo que se hace –encontraremos, como sugieren Morey, Comas, Sureda, Samioti y Amengual (2012), pocas escuelas en nuestro país con una política clara de contención y reprobación de las prácticas deshonestas en el propio centro que, por cierto, no se limitan a copiar y plagiar–. En este sentido, cabe recordar la gran influencia que en la práctica escolar ejerce el currículum oculto y la necesidad de coherencia entre lo que se propone y lo que se practica. La conveniencia de crear en las escuelas una «cultura de la honestidad e integridad» (Lathrop & Foss, 2005) se antoja cada día más urgente.

Plagiar, copiar, engañar, hacer trampa en las evaluaciones son prácticas que siempre han estado presentes en las aulas. Pero ha sido en los últimos años, y no solo a causa del desarrollo y expansión de Internet, cuando el fenómeno ha adquirido una nueva, mayor y más preocupante dimensión (Comas & Sureda, 2010). Algunos indicadores bibliométricos de literatura académica muestran a las claras que recientemente el interés por el tema ha crecido considerablemente. Así, si nos ceñimos al número de artículos indexados en la base de datos Scopus, comprobamos cómo en el periodo 19992003 se publicaron 38 artículos académicos sobre el tema en revistas incluidas en esta base de datos (7,6 trabajos por año), en el tramo 20042008 fueron 171 (34,2 trabajos por año) y, finalmente, el periodo 20092013 cuenta con 308 trabajos sobre la materia (61,6 trabajos por año). Tomando como referencia los trabajos indexados en el buscador académico Google Scholar, para las mismas fechas, observamos cómo en el tramo 19992003 aparecen 68 recursos (13,6 trabajos por año), entre 2004 y 2008 son 232 (46,4 trabajos por año) y, finalmente, datados entre 2009 y 2013 aparecen 525 recursos (105 trabajos por año).

A pesar de ello, no son pocos los agujeros negros que todavía permanecen por escrutar. En este sentido, llama poderosamente la atención el escaso interés que ha suscitado el tema en la enseñanza secundaria: la inmensa mayoría de investigaciones sobre el plagio se han centrado en entornos universitarios, como si los niveles educativos inferiores permanecieran inmunes al fenómeno (Comas, 2009). Sin embargo, y más allá de la escasez de trabajos desarrollados, existen sólidos argumentos para justificar la necesidad de orientar la mirada hacia este nivel educativo. Y es que, como ha demostrado Comas (2009) al analizar el plagio entre el alumnado universitario, las raíces de este fenómeno se extienden a niveles inferiores del sistema educativo: el alumnado no comienza a desarrollar espontáneamente prácticas plagiarias cuando llega a la universidad. Por otra parte, la conveniencia de investigar qué sucede en los niveles de secundaria y bachillerato en relación al plagio académico ha sido implícitamente señalada por todos aquellos que preconizan que la alfabetización informacional debe formar parte del núcleo duro de los currículums escolares (Julien & Barker, 2009; Williamson & McGregor, 2011). Y es que las prácticas plagiarias, además de atentar contra la integridad académica, traslucen un déficit de competencias informacionales por parte del alumnado en lo que respecta a la utilización y comunicación ética y legal de la información (Morey, 2011).

Mostrada no solo la pertinencia sino también la conveniencia de estudiar el tema del plagio en niveles preuniversitarios, a continuación señalamos, aunque sea de forma sucinta, algunas de las principales aportaciones de los escasos estudios existentes sobre la materia.

La mirada investigadora sobre el plagio académico entre el alumnado de secundaria –al igual que entre el universitario– se ha centrado, de forma predominante, en el análisis de la prevalencia y extensión del fenómeno y a desentrañar los factores explicativos de esta práctica fraudulenta (Comas, Sureda, Angulo & Mut, 2011). Ya en 1986, antes de que se generalizase el uso de Internet, Dant (1986) mostró que hasta el 50,7% de alumnos de secundaria encuestados para un estudio (la realidad es que utilizó una muestra muy pequeña: solo 309 estudiantes de un solo centro) afirmaron haber copiado de enciclopedias a la hora de realizar trabajos académicos. Años más tarde, cuando se iniciaba el proceso de generalización del uso de Internet, McCabe (2005, citado en Sisti, 2007), con datos de algo más de 18.000 estudiantes de 61 centros educativos norteamericanos, señaló que hasta el 60% del alumnado admitía haber realizado alguna forma de plagio en la elaboración y presentación de trabajos académicos. Los centros de secundaria –afirmaba McCabe– «se enfrentan a un problema significativo». Trabajos posteriores (Sisti, 2007; Sureda, Comas, Morey, Mut & Gili, 2010; Bacha, Bahous & Nabhani, 2012; Morey, Sureda, Oliver & Comas, 2013) han calibrado la magnitud del problema mostrando que, efectivamente, el plagio en la enseñanza preuniversitaria no es ni mucho menos un tema trivial.

Por lo que respecta a las causas o factores implicados en la comisión de plagio académico, la atención se ha centrado en diferentes aspectos (Comas & Sureda, 2010): factores personales del alumnado (rendimiento académico, procrastinación, género, motivación, etc.); factores institucionales (existencia de normativas académicas que aborden el tema del plagio, la cultura ética del centro, la existencia y uso de programas de detección, etc.); factores ligados a la docencia (tipos de trabajos que se prescriben, número de trabajos demandados, seguimiento de los trabajos por parte del docente, etc.); factores externos a la práctica educativa (niveles de corrupción política, crisis del sistema de valores, etc.).

La presente propuesta aborda, aparte de la descripción y cuantificación de las prácticas plagiarias cometidas por alumnado de ESO y Bachillerato, la relación entre éstas y diversas características personales (género y procrastinación). Con respecto a la relación entre el género y la perpetración de plagio académico, existe un elevado nivel de unanimidad en el corpus doctrinal acerca de la mayor prevalencia en la comisión de plagio entre los universitarios hombres que entre las mujeres (Athanasou & Olasehinde, 2002; Straw, 2002; Lin & Wen, 2007; Comas, 2009; Brunell, Staats, Barden & Hub, 2011). Si nos centramos en el alumnado de secundaria esta relación ha sido escasamente estudiada y, los pocos trabajos existentes, sugieren la misma tendencia, esto es: una mayor frecuencia en la comisión de plagio académico entre hombres que mujeres (Schab, 1969; Cizek, 1999). En lo tocante al factor procrastinación académica, entendida esta como la conducta, voluntaria o involuntaria, de postergación y demora de ciertas acciones programadas (Klassen & Rajani, 2008), Roig y DeTomasso (1995) demostraron, con un estudio entre universitarios, la significación de la relación entre ambas: a mayor nivel de postergación en las tareas mayor posibilidad de perpetración de plagio académico. Similares resultados obtuvieron Daly y Horgan (2007) en un trabajo sobre el perfil del alumnado universitario con mayor propensión a la comisión de plagio académico. Finalmente, ya en nuestro país, destaca la aportación de Clariana, Gotzens, Badia y Cladellas (2012), quienes, a partir de una muestra reducida, analizaron la relación entre plagio y procrastinación entre alumnado de estudios preuniversitarios concluyendo que existe correlación moderada y positiva entre ambas variables.

Las cuestiones de investigación (CI) que se intentan responder con esta propuesta son:

• CI1: ¿Cuál es el nivel de prevalencia en la comisión de plagio y ciberplagio académico entre el alumnado de ESO y Bachillerato?

• CI1.1: ¿Existen diferencias significativas en cuanto a la frecuencia de comisión de plagio y ciberplagio académico entre el alumnado?

• C.1.2: ¿Existen diferencias significativas en cuanto a la frecuencia de comisión de plagio académico entre el alumnado atendiendo al género?

• CI2: ¿Existe relación entre el plagio y ciberplagio académico y la procrastinación?

• CI2.1: ¿Existen diferencias significativas en cuanto a la relación entre la procrastinación y la comisión de plagio y ciberplagio académico entre el alumnado?

2. Material y métodos

2.1. Población y muestra

En el estudio han participado 1.503 alumnos y alumnas de segundo, tercero y cuarto curso de ESO (estudios obligatorios en España con edades promedio del alumnado de entre 13 y 16 años) y 1.291 de primero y segundo de Bachillerato (estudios postobligatorios en España con edades promedio de 16 a 18 años) de las Islas Baleares, lo que representa una muestra con un margen de error, calculado para el ámbito geográfico de dicha comunidad, de ±1,7% para un intervalo de confianza estimado del 95% bajo la condición más desfavorable de p=q=0,50. El proceso de muestreo practicado fue aleatorio estratificado, considerando: a) los tres cursos de ESO y los dos de Bachillerato; b) la isla de residencia (Mallorca, Menorca e IbizaFormentera); y c) la titularidad de los centros (públicos y privados/concertados).

El trabajo de campo fue desarrollado por tres encuestadores previamente instruidos para administrar el instrumento al alumnado participante de manera individual y anónima en situaciones de aula con la presencia de un profesor del centro.

La recogida de datos se realizó entre febrero y abril de 2010 con la muestra de alumnado de Bachillerato y febrero y abril de 2011 con la muestra de alumnado de ESO. Ningún alumno rechazó participar en el estudio; sin embargo, pese a que se obtuvieron un total de 1.302 y 1.515 encuestas de alumnado de Bachillerato y ESO respectivamente, la muestra se contrajo dado que 23 cuestionarios fueron invalidados por alguno de estos tres motivos: multiplicidad de respuesta en ítems de respuesta única; cuestionarios contestados en un porcentaje inferior al 50% de los ítems; ininteligibilidad de las respuestas dadas por los encuestados.

En relación a las características de los sujetos de la muestra: el 54,9% fueron mujeres y el 45,1% hombres. En cuanto a la distribución por edades, estas varían entre los doce y los veintitrés años, situándose la media de edad en 15,6 años (con una desviación típica de 2,6), siendo los sujetos con 15 años los más presentes en la muestra.

2.2. Fuente de datos y variables

El estudio fue diseñado a partir de un cuestionario de autoinforme administrado a los participantes. Este tipo de encuesta es el más frecuente entre los estudios sobre integridad académica y se ha evidenciado que ofrece estimaciones suficientemente precisas (Cizek, 1999; Comas, 2009; Mut, 2012). Para la recolección de datos se empleó como instrumento el «Cuestionario sobre plagio académico entre el alumnado de ESO» (para la muestra de ESO) y el «Cuestionario sobre plagio académico entre el alumnado de Bachillerato» (para la muestra de Bachillerato), diseñados expresamente y fundamentados en: a) el análisis de la literatura existente sobre la materia y b) la adaptación de diversos ítems de los cuestionarios de DeLambert, Ellen y Taylor (2003), Finn y Frone (2004) y Comas (2009). Ambos cuestionarios compartían un total de 10 preguntas, el cuestionario de ESO era más extenso (contaba con tres preguntas más). Una vez diseñado el cuestionario inicial, se inició una fase de validación mediante, en primer lugar, el juicio y aportaciones de ocho expertos externos (tres docentes de la etapa de ESO/Bachillerato y cinco profesores universitarios e investigadores nacionales e internacionales, expertos en la temática de plagio académico), que señalaron y consideraron su viabilidad, así como las posibles enmiendas de ítems de cara al análisis de los objetivos y las dimensiones del estudio. En segundo lugar, se administró a dos grupos piloto de estudiantes de Secundaria y Bachillerato (46 sujetos de segundo de ESO, cuarto de ESO y primero de Bachillerato) para verificar la apropiada comprensión de los ítems por parte del alumnado y se efectuó un registro de todas las incidencias ocurridas en el aula durante la cumplimentación de la encuesta piloto. Esta fase de validación tuvo como resultado la reformulación de algunos de los ítems propuestos inicialmente y la concreción de las variables a analizar. Redactada la versión final, el cuestionario se administró a una segunda muestra pretest conformada por 59 alumnos de segundo, tercero y cuarto de ESO. La consistencia interna del cuestionario se calculó a partir del coeficiente Alfa de Cronbach que en la versión final del instrumento presenta para el total de la muestra, entre las diferentes cuestiones empleadas para la confección del presente trabajo, valores comprendidos entre 0,73 y 0,84.

Los resultados que se exponen en el presente artículo se centran en el análisis de tres de las variables abordadas en el cuestionario y la ulterior asociación entre estas (V1 con V2 y V3):

• V1: Frecuencia autoreferida en la comisión de distintas prácticas de plagio y ciberplagio académico.

• V2: Género.

• V3: Índice de procrastinación.

La V1 se fundamenta en las respuestas emitidas por los participantes en el estudio acerca de la frecuencia en la perpetración de seis acciones constitutivas de plagio (planteadas de manera independiente), correspondientes al curso académico anterior al momento de administración del cuestionario; es decir, aquellas que se llevaron a cabo durante el curso 20082009 para el alumnado de Bachillerato y 20092010 para el alumnado de ESO. Dichas prácticas son:

• Acción 1: Entregar un trabajo realizado por otro alumno/a que ya había sido entregado en cursos anteriores (para la misma asignatura o para otra).

• Acción 2: Copiar de páginas web fragmentos de textos y –sin citar– pegarlos directamente en un documento –en el cual hay una parte de texto escrita por uno mismo– y entregarlo como trabajo de una asignatura.

• Acción 3: Bajar un trabajo completo de Internet y entregarlo, sin modificar, como trabajo propio de una asignatura.

• Acción 4: Copiar fragmentos de fuentes impresas (libros, enciclopedias, periódicos, artículos de revista, etc.) y añadirlos –sin citar– como partes de un trabajo propio de una asignatura.

• Acción 5: Hacer íntegramente un trabajo a partir de fragmentos copiados literalmente de páginas web (sin que ninguna parte del trabajo haya sido realmente escrita por el alumno/a).

• Acción 6: Copiar partes de trabajos entregados durante cursos anteriores y usarlos como apartados de un trabajo nuevo. Para cada acción, el alumnado participante indicó la frecuencia con que había efectuado este tipo de prácticas, pudiendo escoger una de estas cinco posibilidades: «Nunca», «Entre 1 y 2 veces», «Entre 3 y 5 veces», «Entre 6 y 10 veces» o «Más de 10 veces».

Como indicador de medición de la V3 relativa a los Índices de Procrastinación, se han tomado en consideración los datos referentes a dos ítems relativos a dos preguntas de escala de opinión: los participantes debían puntuar entre 1 y 10 su grado de conformidad (donde 1 representaba «Totalmente en desacuerdo» y 10 «Totalmente de acuerdo») con las siguientes afirmaciones: «Cuando tengo que hacer un trabajo, lo dejo siempre para el último día» y «Cuando tengo que hacer un trabajo, me pongo inmediatamente a ello».

2.3. Proceso de datos

La variable frecuencia de comisión de plagio (basada en la respuesta de los participantes a seis acciones constitutivas de plagio) se ha recodificado en otra (Índice de comisión de plagio académico) a partir del sumatorio de respuestas de cada alumno.

Seguidamente, para cada una de las variables de categoría analizadas se ha efectuado el cálculo de la frecuencia y el porcentaje, mientras que en la variable de escala (índice de procrastinación) se ha efectuado una recodificación y se ha establecido –a partir del sumatorio de los dos ítems utilizados en la operativización de la procrastinación– un índice de procrastinación derivado de dicha operación. Posteriormente, con el objetivo de establecer potenciales asociaciones entre el índice de comisión de plagio académico y las características del alumnado o variables independientes (sexo e índice de procrastinación), se ha proyectado el análisis estadístico a partir de la comparación de medias, obtenida mediante la aplicación de la prueba T para muestras independientes (para la asociación entre la frecuencia en la comisión de plagio y la variable género) y el análisis de la varianza ANOVA (para la asociación entre la frecuencia en la comisión de plagio y el índice de procrastinación).

Para el conjunto de análisis producidos se ha utilizado el paquete estadístico SPSS (versión 19.0). La matriz de datos puede consultarse desde: http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1066207.

3. Resultados

3.1 Frecuencia autoreferida en la comisión de distintas modalidades de plagio académico

Las prácticas más comunes (tabla 1) son las conocidas como «plagio collage» (Comas, 2009), esto es, la elaboración de un trabajo a partir de la copia de fragmentos sueltos de texto, ya sea de fuentes digitales ya sea de fuentes impresas, y su inclusión en un trabajo académico sin citar su origen. Entre las acciones menos recurrentes, destaca el descargarse un trabajo completo de Internet y entregarlo como propio y presentar un trabajo elaborado y ya entregado por otro alumno en cursos anteriores.


Draft Content 666423282-32645 ov-es046.jpg

Si analizamos los datos a partir de las medias (tomando en consideración para dicho cálculo los valores 1 a 5 que corresponden a las 5 posiciones de respuesta posibles), podemos establecer una suerte de ranking en el que se ordenan las acciones estudiadas de mayor a menor frecuencia (tabla 2).


Draft Content 666423282-32645 ov-es047.jpg

Profundizando un poco más en la explotación de resultados, se ha efectuado el sumatorio de respuestas de las tres prácticas consideradas ciberplagio académico (acciones 2, 3 y 5) y, por otro lado, el sumatorio de respuestas de las tres prácticas de plagio de fuentes impresas (acciones 1, 4 y 6); a partir de este cálculo se han estimado y comparado las medias de cada conjunto de agrupaciones. La agrupación de acciones de ciberplagio académico presenta una media de respuesta de 5,64 con una desviación típica de 2,25, mientras que el conjunto de acciones correspondientes a plagio de fuentes impresas presenta una media, inferior a la anterior, de 5,08 con una desviación típica de 1,83.

3.2. Asociación entre el nivel de comisión de plagio académico y el género

En todas las acciones estudiadas, salvo en la 4 (tabla 3), los hombres presentan medias de perpetración más altas que las mujeres, apreciándose en cuatro del total de las seis acciones analizadas una relación significativa entre la comisión de plagio y el género.


Draft Content 666423282-32645 ov-es048.jpg

La misma relación se da si el análisis se establece a partir de la asociación entre el género y el sumatorio de respuestas dadas a las diversas acciones plagiarias estudiadas; así, también a partir de la prueba T para muestras independientes, obtenemos unos resultados que apuntan a que los hombres presentan medias significativamente más altas en las prácticas de plagio académico que las mujeres (×mujeres: 10,39; × hombres 11,33; t=–6,040; gl= 2544; Sig. bilateral= <0,000).

3.3. Asociación entre el nivel de comisión de plagio académico y el nivel de procrastinación

De los datos resultantes de la asociación entre el índice de procrastinación del alumnado y los sumatorios de las seis formas de plagio analizadas en el presente trabajo, así como los sumatorios de las prácticas constitutivas de plagio de fuentes impresas y las propias del ciberplagio, se aprecia una significativa relación directa entre ambos grupos de variables: a mayores medias de procrastinación, mayor tendencia a llevar a cabo prácticas constitutivas de plagio (tablas 4 y 5 de las siguientes páginas).


Draft Content 666423282-32645 ov-es049.jpg


Draft Content 666423282-32645 ov-es050.jpg

Aquellos individuos que manifiestan mayor nivel de postergación, presentan unas medias más elevadas en el sumatorio de las seis acciones analizadas en el presente trabajo si se compara con los alumnos que tienen menor tendencia a dejar los trabajos para el último momento.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Los resultados del presente trabajo sugieren que el plagio académico es un fenómeno ampliamente extendido entre los colegiales que cursan titulaciones de nivel secundario y presenta niveles prácticamente idénticos a los de la enseñanza universitaria; si bien es verdad que las prácticas más recurrentes son aquellas que pueden considerarse como menos graves. Efectivamente, aunque medir la trascendencia de conductas impropias no resulta nada sencillo, parece sensato mantener que la gravedad de confeccionar un trabajo a partir de extractos copiados sin citar, sea cual sea la fuente utilizada, combinados con partes escritas por el propio alumno, es menos grave que entregar trabajos plagiados por completo. Estos resultados referidos a la prevalencia de comportamientos no íntegros, digámoslo así, «de baja intensidad» están en la línea de los obtenidos en otros trabajos, referidos a entornos de enseñanza superior. Así, por ejemplo, Comas (2009) llegó a conclusiones muy similares en su trabajo doctoral entre universitarios españoles. Ferguson (2013), al analizar la frecuencia de comisión de 20 tipos diferentes de prácticas atentatorias contra la integridad académica entre alumnado de cuatro campus universitarios estadounidenses, comprobó cómo las prácticas más extendidas eran aquellas valoradas como menos dolosas por parte de los participantes en el estudio. Similares son las conclusiones de la tesis doctoral de Tabor (2013), a partir de datos obtenidos de alumnado universitario de los EEUU, en este caso mediante un enfoque cualitativo: los alumnos consideraban que existen diversos niveles de severidad en las prácticas plagiarias y que los niveles menos graves son los más recurrentes.

Por lo que respecta a la variable de género, los resultados obtenidos sugieren una acentuada preeminencia de los hombres sobre las mujeres a la hora de cometer actos constitutivos de plagio académico.

Es muy destacable el hecho de que, como reflejan los datos obtenidos en este trabajo, se perciba una marcada relación entre la comisión de plagio y las conductas procrastinadoras o de postergación. Esta estrecha relación puede tener una explicación bastante simple: los alumnos que tienen mayor tendencia a dejar las tareas para el último momento no tienen tiempo para elaborar por sí solos la actividad prescrita por el docente y la única salida que les queda es confeccionar el trabajo a partir de alguna de las modalidades de plagio existentes. Este hecho tiene claras implicaciones a dos niveles: a) por un lado a nivel alumnado, ya que deja entrever la necesidad de formarle para una mejor gestión del tiempo y los recursos; b) a nivel docente, ya que sugiere la necesidad de que este haga un eficaz seguimiento de las tareas encomendadas. El modelo de profesor que prescribe un trabajo y no realiza ningún tipo de seguimiento sobre el mismo y solo espera a la fecha de la entrega para corregirlo y emitir una calificación, está abonando la posibilidad de que sus alumnos dejen la tarea para el último momento y, por consiguiente, ante la premura tomen el nada honroso atajo de la copia (Comas, 2009). Es, por tanto, recomendable pautar y llevar a cabo controles periódicos de las tareas, hacer un seguimiento del proceso y no esperar simplemente al resultado. La realidad del plagio en la enseñanza secundaria plantea la necesidad de la adopción de medidas preventivas y la instauración de los valores de la integridad y probidad académica en los centros educativos.

El fraude en la educación es, tal y como en nuestra opinión acertadamente sostiene Moreno (1998), el principal tipo de comportamiento antisocial escolar no violento o «de cuello blanco»; y no solo eso, sino que la escuela es «el primer campo de prácticas del fraude y la corrupción». Las conductas contrarias a la probidad se aprenden y desarrollan como cualquier otra manifestación comportamental humana en unos escenarios y contextos determinados. A este respecto, si nos planteamos la cuestión acerca de si los centros educativos fomentan y promueven el desarrollo de conductas académicamente honestas y éticamente relevantes, la respuesta no dejaría en muy buen lugar a la institución escolar, sobre todo por la contradicción entre los discursos explícitos e implícitos; entre el currículum formal y el oculto.

Tres son los frentes en los que desde las escuelas se debería actuar para hacer frente a la deshonestidad académica: el de la reglamentación (todos los centros de secundaria deberían incorporar en sus reglamentos el tema del fraude en las evaluaciones); la adopción de metodologías docentes adaptadas a los nuevos requisitos emanados del uso masivo de las TIC en los procesos de enseñanzaaprendizaje y, finalmente, un impulso decidido a la alfabetización combinada, digital e informacional (So & Lee, 2014) del alumnado, poniendo el acento en la capacidad de «usar la información de forma eficaz y ética» (Declaración de Alejandría, 2005, citado en Wilson, Grizzle, Tuazon, Akyempong & Cheung, 2011).

Notas

1 Datos obtenidos de SCOPUS y Google Scholar a partir de la búsqueda del término en inglés «academic plagiarism».

2 Puesto que los datos recopilados hacen referencia a comportamientos realizados durante el año académico anterior a la administración del cuestionario, se consideró irrelevante la obtención de datos correspondientes a estudiantes de primer curso, ya que suponía la inclusión de información relativa al último curso de Primaria.

3 Basado en datos estadísticos del curso 201112 del Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte (2012) que cifran en 41.236 el número de alumnado matriculado en las Islas Baleares en segundo, tercero y cuarto de ESO y en primero y segundo de Bachillerato.

4 Índice de procrastinación.

Apoyos y agradecimiento

Este trabajo se enmarca en las actividades del proyecto «El plagio académico entre el alumnado de ESO de Baleares» (Referencia EDU200914019C0201), financiado por la Dirección General de Investigación del Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación del Gobierno de España.

Los autores de este artículo forman parte del Grupo de Investigación «Educación y Ciudadanía» de la Universidad de las Islas Baleares, que cuenta con la consideración de Grupo de Investigación Competitivo bajo el patrocinio de la Dirección General de Investigación, Desarrollo Tecnológico e Innovación de la Consejería de Innovación, Interior y Justicia del Gobierno de las Islas Baleares, y la cofinanciación de los Fondos FEDER.

Referencias

Athanasou, J.A. & Olasehinde, O. (2002). Male and Female Differences in Self-report Cheating. Practical Assessment, Research & Evaluation, 8(5). (http://goo.gl/GvIwSf) (12-01-2014).

Bacha, N., Bahous, R. & Nabhani, M. (2012). High Schoolers’ Views on Academic Integrity. Research Papers in Education, 27(3), 365-381. (DOI: http://doi.org/b4bpwv).

Brunell, A.B., Staats, S., Barden, J. & Hupp, J.M. (2011). Narcissism and Academic Dishonesty: The Exhibitionism Dimension and the Lack of Guilt. Personality and Individual Differences, 50(3), 323-328. (DOI: http://doi.org/d4xdp8).

Cizek, G.J. (1999). Cheating on Tests: How to do it, Detect it, and Prevent it. London: Routledge.

Clariana, M., Gotzens, C., Badia, M. & Cladellas, R. (2012). Procrastination and Cheating from Secondary School to University. Electronic Journal of Research in Educational Psychology, 10(2) 737-754. (http://goo.gl/Invcz3) (10-01-2014).

Comas, R. & Sureda, J. (2010). Academic Plagiarism: Explanatory Factors from Students’ Perspective. Journal of Academic Ethics, 8(3), 217-232 (DOI: http://doi.org/fspd6s).

Comas, R. (2009). El ciberplagio y otras formas de deshonestidad académica entre el alumnado universitario (Tesis doctoral no publicada). Palma de Mallorca: Universidad de las Islas Baleares.

Comas, R., Sureda, J., Angulo, F. & Mut, T. (2011). Academic Plagiarism amongst Secondary Education Students: State of the Art. 4th International Conference of Education, Research and Innovations Proceedings, 4314-4321. Madrid: IATED.

Daly, C. & Horgan, J.M. (2007). Profiling the Plagiarists: An Examination of the Factors that Lead Students to Cheat. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 36(1), 39-50. (DOI: http://doi.org/dd4dgf).

Dant, D.R. (1986). Plagiarism in High School: A Survey. English Journal, 75(2), 81-84.

DeLambert, K., Ellen, N. & Taylor, L. (2003). Cheating ? What is it and why do it: a study in New Zealand tertiary Institutions of the Perceptions and Justifications for Academic Dishonesty. Journal of American Academy of Business, 3 (1/2), 98-104.

Ferguson, L.M. (2013). Student Self-Reported Academically Dishonest Behavior in Two-Year Colleges in the State of Ohio. Tesis Doctoral. (http://goo.gl/D4LFQd) (02-02-2014).

Finn, K. & Frone, M.R. (2004). Academic Performance and Cheating: Moderating role of School Identification and Self-efficacy. Journal of Educational Research, 97(3), 115-123. (DOI: http://doi.org/cw95n3).

Julien, H. & Barker, S., (2009). How High-school Students Find and Evaluate Scientific Information: A Basis for Information Literacy Skills Development. Library & Information Science Research 31(1), 12-17. (DOI: http://doi.org/b7kdpd).

Klassen, L. & Rajani, S. (2008). Academic Procrastination of Undergraduates: Low Self-efficacy to Self-Regulate Predicts Higher Levels of Procrastination. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 3, 915-931. (DOI: http://doi.org/dq2fmv).

Lathrop, A. & Foss, K. (2005). Guiding Students from Cheating and Plagiarism to Honesty and Integrity. Strategies for change. Westrop: Libraries Unlimited.

Lin, C. & Wen, L. (2007). Academic Dishonesty in Higher Education ? A Nationwide Study in Taiwan. Higher Education, 54(1), 85-97. (DOI: http://doi.org/dx25mp).

Moreno, J.M. (2001). Con trampa y con cartón. Cuadernos de Pedagogía, 283, 71-77.

Morey M., Comas, R., Sureda, J., Samioti, G. & Mut, T. (2012). School Intervention against Academic Plagiarism: Analysis of the Internal Regulations of the Centers of Secondary Education. 6th International Technology, Education and Development Conference Proceedings, 5.225-5.230. Valencia: IATED.

Morey, M. (2011). Anàlisi de l'alfabetització informacional entre l'alumnat de la Universitat de les Illes Balears (Tesis doctoral no publicada). Palma de Mallorca: Universidad de las Islas Baleares.

Morey, M., Sureda, J., Oliver, M. & Comas, R. (2013). Plagio y rendimiento académico entre el alumnado de Educación Secundaria Obligatoria. ESE, 24, 225-244.

Mut, T. (2012). La alfabetización informacional: una aproximación al ciberplagio académico entre el alumnado de bachillerato (Tesis Doctoral no publicada). Palma de Mallorca: Universidad de las Islas Baleares.

Roig, M. & DeTommaso, L. (1995). Are College Cheating and Plagiarism Related to Academic Procrastination? Psychological Reports, 77(2), 691-698. (DOI: http://doi.org/cpfgx4).

Schab, F. (1980). Cheating among College and Non-College Bound Pupils, 1969-1979. Clearing House, 53(8), 379-80.

Sisti, D.A. (2007). How do High School Students Justify Internet Plagiarism? Ethics & Behavior, 17(3), 215-231. (DOI: http://doi.org/d35wh2).

So, C. & Lee, A. (2014). Alfabetización mediática y alfabetización informacional: similitudes y diferencias. Comunicar, 42, 137-146. (DOI: http://doi.org/tmc).

Straw, D. (2002). The Plagiarism of Generation ‘why not?’. Community College Week, 14(24).

Sureda, J., Comas, R., Morey, M., Mut, T. & Gili, M. (2010). El ciberplagi acadèmic. Anàlisi del ciberplagi entre l'alumnat de batxillerat de les Illes Balears. Palma: Fundación IBIT.

Tabor, E.L. (2013). Is Cheating always Intentional? The Perception of College Students toward the Issues of Plagiarism. Tesis Doctoral. (http://goo.gl/D4LFQd) (12-01-2014).

Williamson, K. & McGregor, J. (2011). Generating Knowledge and Avoiding Plagiarism: Smart Information Use by High School Students. School Library Research, 14. (http://goo.gl/o3cJIy) (05-02-2014).

Wilson, C., Grizzle, A., Tuazon, R., Akyempong, K. & Cheung, C. (2011). Alfabetización mediática e informacional: currículum para profesores. París: UNESCO.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/14
Accepted on 31/12/14
Submitted on 31/12/14

Volume 23, Issue 1, 2015
DOI: 10.3916/C44-2015-11
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 14
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?