Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Nowadays, as ageing increases in Western societies it has become more evident that multiple generations are ageing concurrently at any given time in history. Therefore, ageing must be approached as a multi-generational phenomenon, not just as a question of elders. In this context, situations that engender increased interactions between generations are garnering more attention. There is a growing emphasis on expanding the role of technology in intergenerational programmes, within the field of intergenerational studies. Consequently, this paper is focused on education and learning processes within intergenerational programmes with a strong technology component. Information from a total of 46 intergenerational programmes from 11 countries has been gathered through a survey. Level of impact, status of generational groups, and centrality of technology have been appraised for all programmes in the sample. Technology learning-teaching constitute the main area of intended impact of these programmes. However, the surveyed programmes employ as well a wide range of strategies to facilitate intergenerational communication, cooperation and relationship formation between generations involved. Interest of programmes examined does not just consist of teaching the use technology but of experimenting with technology in different forms and functions and exploring the positive potential for enhancing intergenerational relationships

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Talking about ageing is not just talking about older people. From a life-span perspective, we all age while we live and from a life-course perspective, our ageing process always happens within the context of diverse age cohorts. Whatever the perspective, it has become evident that multiple individuals and generations are ageing concurrently at any given time in history. Hence, ageing must be approached as a multi-generational phenomenon, not just as a question of older populations. Furthermore, the fact that multiple generations are ageing makes us think of inter-generational interactions as another potential component in the analysis of human ageing processes. From an intergenerational perspective, we not only age but somehow we are ageing together.

Demographic studies conclude that apart from lower fertility and longer life expectancy, modern societies are witnessing «an increase in the number of living generations, and a decrease in the number of living relatives within these generations» (Harper, 2013: 2). In this context, situations that engender increased interactions between successive generations tend to draw positive attention, whether generations are considered in terms of age (e.g. older and younger people), family links (e.g. grandparents and grandchildren), community life (e.g. youth and elders) or organizational membership (e.g. seniors and juniors).

The focus of this paper is linked to the set of planned and intended intergenerational initiatives under the name of intergenerational programmes, and our specific emphasis will be put on education and learning processes within intergenerational programmes with a strong technological component. Typically, the term intergenerational programme refers to activities or programmes that increase cooperation, interaction or exchange between any two generations (Kaplan & Sánchez, 2014).

Within the intergenerational studies field, there is a current emphasis on expanding the role of technology in programmes and practices that intentionally connect generations. European Union (EU)-funded multi-country initiatives that employ technological advances in innovative, generation-connecting ways, such as «Mix@ges – Intergenerational Bonding via Creative New Media», a Grundtvig multilateral project, are prolific. This project, which spans five countries, has explored how the artistic use of digital media can assemble individuals from multiple generations (Fricke, Marley, Morton & Thome, 2013). In the framework of the EU Lifelong Learning Programme (2008-11), 21 projects with a primary interest on intergenerational learning and active ageing through digital skills were launched (European Commission, 2012).

Regarding technology development, we are witnessing an abundance of new software and devices for fostering cross-generational relationships within families (Chen, Wen & Xie, 2012; Davis, Vetere, Francis, Gibbs & Howard, 2008). Gershenfeld & Levine (August 6, 2012) focused on explaining «How can we effectively transform media consumption into quality family time?», by emphasizing video games and their possibilities for facilitating generational encounters in playful learning together. On the same line, Chiong (2009: 22) was able to conclude that «the ubiquity of digital media in children’s and adults’ lives is an important untapped opportunity for intergenerational contact».

We appreciate how Facebook, Twitter and other social media outlets are assisting families with the ability to stay connected in spite of geographical distance. A 2012 survey which concentrated on how 2000 Americans, ages 13-25 and 39-75 utilize online communication, determined that 83% of respondents considered online communication to be an effective method of touching base with family members. Additionally, 30% of the grandparents and 29% of the teens/young adults reported that through online connections, they better understand each other (AARP, 2012).

In considering certain features of intergenerational programmes with a strong technological component such as area and level of impact, status of generational groups, and centrality of technology, it is useful to reflect more largely on the role of technology in the social lives of both younger and older individuals. The Center for Technology and Aging’s recent report, entitled «The new era of connected aging», states that «We are at the dawning of ‘Connected Aging’ in which the growing array of Internet-based technologies and mobile devices increasingly will support older adults to age in place» (Ghosh, Ratan, Lindeman & Steinmetz, 2013: 1).

However, it is also becoming evident that many individuals with limited access to technology, along with technology skills and support, are less likely to obtain the many social benefits associated with the ongoing and numerous advancements in technology. There is recognition, within the literature on how older adults use Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), that adoption of new technologies by older adults is neither quick, simple, nor universally accepted (Feist, Parker & Hugo, 2012; Selwyn, Gorard, Furlong & Madden, 2003). Furthermore, within the population of adults aged 65+, older seniors with lower levels of educational attainment and income are frequently lagging behind in terms of ICT adoption. They are also more likely to have difficulties when using new digital devices, and sceptical attitudes about the benefits of technology (Smith, 2014). On an encouraging note, however, it is also the case that when older adults transcend these obstacles, they tend to become more positive about the online world and adept in utilizing digital technology (Smith, 2014).

In terms of how children/youth use new technologies, here too, the data are mixed. There is certainly potential for technology to contribute to the well-being and development of youth, yet various factors need to be considered, such as the ability of youth to detect and avoid threats which technologies may pose. Fortunately, there is evidence that youth are becoming more high-tech and more able to protect themselves. According to a recent Pew Research Center survey of 802 American youth aged 12-17 and their parents that explored technology use, youth are becoming more skilled at managing the privacy of their online information, including when sharing personal information on their social media profiles, and in taking technical and non-technical steps to keep that information from reaching businesses and advertisers (Madden, Lenhart & al., 2013).

What if we tried to connect different generations around technology issues? In one such example, a group of youth researchers in Australia studying youth online behaviour (Third, Richardson, Collin, Rahilly & Bolzan, 2011) conducted an action research study in which a group of youth facilitated a series of technology education workshops on social networking and cybersecurity for adults. After analysing the subsequent dialogue between the youth and adults, the researchers concluded that the youth in their study could handle the online risks more effectively than most adults anticipated. Many of these youth became proficient in cybersafety issues through informal learning processes, such as peer knowledge sharing and trial and error.

Many technology-oriented intergenerational programmes rely on youth with technology expertise to help older adults navigate and become comfortable with the world of «digital inclusion», while older adult participants contribute to other programme objectives, such as teaching youth about local community history or working collaboratively on community improvement projects. One such example has taken root in a rural community in Scotland: «Young and old would work together; the elders have a vast local knowledge, the young have an intuitive understanding of contemporary technology and practitioners would bring insights from the design sector» (CLD Standards for Scotland Report, 2010: 6).

Over time, new modes of communication become possible. As older adult participants gain technology skills and confidence, they transform themselves into what Ghosh, Ratan, Lindeman & Steinmetz (2013: 12) term as «empowered ‘prosumers’ of information in the digital world», and the technology-related communication dynamic becomes more multi-directional.

Certain assumptions should be put aside when developing intergenerational programmes with a significant technology component. For example, older adults might be more digitally competent than the participating youth. A survey conducted by EU Kids Online (2011) questioned the common assumption that youth were innately digitally literate. Survey results indicated that only 36% of the participating 9-16-year-olds stated that it was very true that they knew more about the Internet than their parents. This report also highlights limitations in the way many youth are currently using computing. In taking a more nuanced view about how youth engage with technology, it is important to consider the degree to which the content is pre-determined and the extent to which the «televisual» experience promotes passivity. As Hall (2012: 97) states, «[Such characteristics are] particularly problematic for the development of creativity and creative education».

This paper describes results from a survey designed to scan and contextualize the terrain of intergenerational programmes that have a substantial technology component. The identified programmes span a range of family contexts and community settings, and utilize new and emerging technologies to build relationships, promote understanding and facilitate cooperation between generations. In reporting survey results, as you see below, we draw significantly on respondents’ survey quotes to demonstrate a composite representation of programme innovation, success and challenge.

2. Material and methods

2.1. Survey

Our project team created a survey aimed at gathering data about intergenerational programmes that have a significant technology component, i.e. programmes in which technology had been included intentionally as a method to connect generations. The survey was organized in two sections: organization/primary contact information, and programme specific questions about the use of technology. In order to identify intergenerational technology programmes to be a part of the survey, project team members utilized a threefold strategy over a 16-week period (from February 1 to May 15, 2013). This strategy included outreach through intergenerational list-serves (managed by local, national, and international membership organizations) and personal contact with intergenerational practitioners, a structured web search (via Google Search), and literature review (via Google Scholar, SCOPUS, and Web of Knowledge) for the period January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2012. The following terms were used in the web search and the literature review: «intergenerational program» and «technology», «intergenerational project» and «technology», «intergenerational activity» and «technology», and «intergenerational technology program». Similar strategies for screening and scoping this type of programmes have already been implemented in the intergenerational field (Bishop & Moxley, 2012; Flora & Faulkner, 2007; Jarrott, 2011).

All programmes retrieved through the web search, literature review and outreach to relevant list-serves were evaluated on the following criteria inspired in previous work by Brophy & Bawden (2005): accessibility (programme is within reach), topicality (programme matches research’s subject matter), and relevance (relevant, partially relevant, not relevant) to the study objectives. Only those programmes partially or fully meeting the following three relevance sub-criteria were considered suitable for our sample: (i) facilitating intergenerational engagement is an explicit goal, (ii) the initiative involves more than a single contact or one-time only activity, and (iii) technology is used as a tool to facilitate connections across age groups.

Of the 72 surveys that were completed and submitted, 46 intergenerational programmes1 were retained for analysis after examining them for redundancy, completeness, and selection criteria.

2.2. Analysis

The project team utilized a mixed-methods analytic strategy (Greene, 2008). After descriptive analysis (ranges and frequencies) of quantitative data, two members of the research team reviewed approximately 25% of the raw data with the overarching purpose of developing response categories to encompass the full range of the survey’s qualitative data and frame it in the context of several themes (provisional coding) prevalent in the intergenerational studies literature that addresses issues related to intergenerational communication, relationship formation, and use of technology. Codes (113 in total) were established for a series of variables that fit into four major categories: programme objectives, programme description, technology use, and (perceived) technology importance. Some excerpts were assigned multiple codes according to principles of simultaneous coding (Saldaña, 2009). After several joint coding sessions, two members of the research team then worked independently to review and code the entire database (consisting of 431 excerpts). All differences in coding were reconciled and an acceptable inter-rater reliability rate (pooled Cohen’s Kappa) of .93 (Hruschka, Schwartz & al., 2004; Lombard, Snyder-Duch & Campanella, n.d.) was finally achieved.

2.3. Sample description

Information from a total of 46 intergenerational programmes from 11 countries was gathered through the survey. United States (19 programmes), United Kingdom (9 programmes), and Germany (7 programmes) were the most represented countries. There were also 3 programmes from Canada, 2 programmes from Ireland and Portugal, and 1 programme from the rest of countries in the sample (Belgium, Hong Kong, Italy, Romania, and Taiwan).

Regarding time in existence, 33 programmes were 1-3 years old and five of our sampled programmes had been in place for ten or more years. Age distribution of participants ranged from 0-5 to 85+ years old, with 80.4% and 67.4% of the programmes including 15-24 and 25-54 years old youth and adults, respectively. The least represented age group of programme participants was that of 65-74 years old, with just 19.6% of sampled programmes. The most typical frequency of intergenerational interaction facilitated by programmes in the sample was weekly (28.3%), followed by programmes whose participants interacted 2-3 times per month (19.6%), and daily/almost daily (15.2%).

There was also a question on the survey which asked about the type(s) of technology being used by the respondents’ organizations. Computer (desktop) devices, including Smart Boards and iPads, were used by 93.5% of the programmes. Approximately half of the programmes (54.3%) had incorporated online platforms for sharing content and mobile communication devices. Lastly, 19.6% of intergenerational programmes in the study were using gaming platforms, 17.4% had adopted digital cameras and e-readers, 15.2% counted on social media, and 13% used online publishing platforms.

3. Results

3.1. Intended impact

Table 1 (see next page), below, categorizes the programmes in the survey according to the major area(s) of intended impact. The most frequent category of response is in the focus area of education and learning; survey responses extended to teaching and learning in non-formal as well as formal education settings.


Draft Content 813650024-36821-en056.jpg

Focusing on the level of intended impact (or change) and examining more closely the respondents’ comments about programme objectives, we can differentiate between programmes in terms of whether the intended benefits were targeted to individual participants, families, local organizations and institutions, and/or entire communities.

Most programmes were designed to have a positive impact on the lives of the participants (74%), whether through helping older individuals in developing ICT skills or through raising awareness of and reducing digital exclusion amongst older people. While a majority of these programmes were primarily focused on enhancing individual participants’ technology-related knowledge and skills, 24% of the programmes in the sample also targeted non-technology related capabilities such as how to maintain a healthy lifestyle and improve second language skills. Interestingly, 15% of programmes in our sample were not pursuing just individual impact but specific reduction of the sense of isolation or exclusion among older people.

3.2. Technological capacity and status

As noted in Tables 2 and 3, below, youth participants were viewed as having more status (at least when it comes to dealing with matters related to technology) and as being more readily positioned to take on the role of technology tutor or teacher than the adult participants.


Draft Content 813650024-36821-en057.jpg


Draft Content 813650024-36821-en058.jpg

Table 3 (see next pages), below, illustrates distinctions in the surveyed programmes with regard to the direction of the technology-related teaching and learning. Although there were significantly more «youth as teacher» responses than «older adults as teachers», the most frequent type of response (63% of programmes) emphasized complementary contributions to both teaching and project leadership. For more detailed analysis, this latter category was broken into two sub-categories: emphasis on joint learning/joint teaching and emphasis on common goals and sense of intergenerational partnership.

3.3. Importance of technology

The programmes that were surveyed utilize a variety of methods to enable cross generational communication, cooperation, and relationship formation. How essential is the technology part of these generation-linking strategies? Table 4, below, addresses this question by distinguishing between respondents’ comments regarding the role of technology as being central vs. secondary to the intergenerational engagement within the surveyed programmes.

A disproportionate number of responses (73.9% versus 36.9% of programmes, respectively) underscored that the technology component was of central rather than secondary importance to the fundamental nature of the surveyed programme models.

The illustrative body of responses identified within the category of «blended technology strategies», for example those that incorporate technology-intensive as well as «technology free» components into programme activities, provides some clues with regard to how practitioners weave new technology tools into their cross-age programme activities. For example, one respondent wrote: «Without the smart board, we found that some of the kids were done with an activity before the older adults were finished». In this particular example, access to the smart board technology complements and enhances an existing activity in need of some modification. It is a question of how the face-to-face contact and technology-mediated contact bolster each other.

Respondents indicated many additional aspects of technology that must be considered for programmes:

• Appropriateness of the technology (21.7% of programmes). This includes developing age friendly technology tools and using high-tech equipment to develop appealing ice breaker activities.

• Comfort level (13% of programmes). Emphasis is on using technology that is non-threatening and user-friendly. «The challenge remains getting participants and staff comfortable with the technology».

• Access to the technology (6.5% of programmes): «We are very aware that many of the most valuable local and intergenerational activities within Historypin happen offline -often inevitably offline because of skills and access».


Draft Content 813650024-36821-en059.jpg

4. Discussion and conclusion

The majority of the intergenerational technology programmes that we examined include an educational function and emphasis, which consists of more than solely learning how to use technology. Reading Table 1 from a diffusion of innovations perspective (Rogers, 2003), the emphasis on learning may just be an early stage, to be followed by a series of steps involving experimentation and, ultimately, adoption of the technology in different formats and contexts. Within the framework of intergenerational practice, the education-learning-technology triangle encloses a rather complex array of possibilities.

The majority of the programmes that we surveyed aspire to have a positive influence on individual programme participants through improving both technology- and non-technology- related knowledge and skills. This knowledge can serve as a conduit for generating new modes of intergenerational collaboration (within and beyond families) and joint social and communal action; it is not necessarily an endpoint in and of itself. Therefore, attention to individual impact (including learning) is not adopting a fully individualistic approach as it is through the multi-generational strategies cast within relationship-building and shared social and community contexts that efforts with an education component take form.

There is a distinct thread of response that undervalues or under appreciates older people’s assets. This orientation for using information technology to enhance the quality of life for older adults can be characterized as «deficit-driven design» in contrast to «positive design». According to Carroll, Convertino, Farroa & Rosson (2011: 7), in the former, «the design intervention orients to and addresses problems, in this case the negatives of growing old alone and isolated, and seeks to mitigate these deficits». However, in positive design, «the design intervention orients to and addresses human or organizational strengths and seeks to leverage but also further strengthen them or facilitate their expression in new activities» (Carroll, Convertino, Farroa & Rosson, 2011: 7).

Earlier in this paper we underscored that often youth participants in intergenerational programmes who have a strong technology component are frequently disproportionally respected for their digital competency and are often positioned in the role of technology teachers/tutors, individually or as equal partners with older adult participants. However, several respondents referenced a multifaceted relationship in which members of both generations make meaningful (and often reciprocal) contributions. The most frequently surveyed model is, when the youth guide the technology education, while the older adults substantially contribute in other ways, such as teaching gerontology students about a topic related to the experience of ageing. The success relies on interlocking goals, and include reciprocity in learning.

As there are so many configurations with regard to participants’ technological competencies and the programmatic roles they play, we have found that the dynamic of who does the teaching is not necessarily a generational issue. Reinforcing our conclusions in this regard, we found multiple accounts in the literature that emphasize the technology teaching capacity of young people in work settings (Bailey, 2009), the often significant influence that grandparents have on youth learning about science and technology (Jane & Robbins, 2007), and the power of intergenerational teams to innovate and apply new technologies (Large, Nesset, Beheshti & Bowler, 2006).

The themes of co-learning, collaboration, and the primacy of the intergenerational relationship that were present in the current survey results are also significant in the broader field of intergenerational studies. This is emphasized as a best practice guideline provided in a recent document by ECIL (European Certificate in Intergenerational Learning) emphasizing the importance of encouraging «reciprocal learning» (i.e., opportunities in which the generations learn from and with one another) (ECIL, 2013).

Our intergenerational technology programmes survey represents a preliminary effort to discover how new technological developments are currently being utilized in a range of intergenerational settings and contexts. The data gathered captures some innovative strategies for effectively applying technology to connect generations in such areas of emphasis as enhancing health and wellbeing, strengthening families, and working to improve community life. However, perhaps as an artefact of how the survey was constructed and distributed (e.g., it is a very short and general survey, and the emphasis is on identifying formal intergenerational programmes), we had limited access to experts at the forefront of technological innovation, in areas such as robotics and the construction of new types of technological devices for recording, organizing, and sharing information.

In concluding, we believe that technology is a powerful medium for intergenerational exchange. Our stance, which has remained consistent from before we began this project to its completion, is that technology is value neutral. In framing this technology «neutrality thesis» (Pitt, 2000) from an intergenerational engagement perspective, we not only pay attention to creative, effective, and positive ways in which technology is being used to connect the generations, but also remain cognizant of the potential of technology to delimit authentic intergenerational communication and meaningful understanding. The main question is how intergenerational programmes can apply technology while staying true to underlying goals and corresponding values for promoting intergenerational learning and education in ageing societies. There are many accounts of the ways in which advances in technology can have a negative as well as a positive influence on the lives of older and younger people. For example, within the family contexts the expertise of youth using electronic media and peer-oriented participation in social networks can be a divisive influence on family relations (Figuer, Malo & Bertran, 2010), and sometimes technology functions as both, a barrier and an opportunity (EMIL, 2013: 25).

The results from our survey of intergenerational technology programmes are promising. We learned about various ways in which technological tools and services can help: older adults to have positive ageing experiences and maintain social connectivity; youth to gain skills that contribute to their employability; community residents to preserve local history and take part in local planning endeavours; and family members to stay in contact and maintain lines of social support across geographic distance. The challenge, which many of the programmes that were surveyed confront relates to relationship-building, particularly with regard to discovering ways in which «high tech» can lead to «high touch».

Notes

1 More information about the 46 technology-intensive intergenerational programmes that were surveyed can be found in the online database maintained by Generations United (see http://goo.gl/s9O0UC). Organizations that run intergenerational programmes with an intensive technology component can fill out an online survey so that these programmes can be added to this database (see http://goo.gl/PyegRb).

References

AARP (2012). Connecting Generations. [A Report of Selected Findings from a Survey and Focus Groups Conducted by Microsoft and AARP]. (http://goo.gl/Kcn0Pk) (13-10-14).

Bailey, C. (2009). Reverse Intergenerational Learning: A Missed Opportunity? AI & Society, 23(1), 111-115. (http://goo.gl/hDgcEt). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00146-007-0169

Bishop, J.D., & Moxley, D.P. (2012). Promising Practices Useful in the Design of an Intergenerational Program: Ten Assertions Guiding Program Development. Social Work in Mental Health, 10(3), 283-204. (http://goo.gl/ZfN6Pp). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15332985.2011.649637

Brophy, J., & Bawden, D. (2005). Is Google Enough? Comparison of an Internet Search Engine with Academic Library Resources. Aslib Proceedings, 57(6), 498-512. (http://goo.gl/J89Msx). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/00012530510634235

Carroll, J., Convertino, G., Farroq, U., & Rosson, M. (2011). The Firekeepers: Aging Considered as Resource. Universal Access in the Information Society, 11, 7-15. (http://goo.gl/NPzlRU). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10209-011-0229-9

Chen, Y., Wen, J., & Xie (2012). I Communicate with my Children in the Game: Mediated Intergenerational Family Relationships through a Social Networking Game. The Journal of Community Informatics, 8(1). (http://goo.gl/LcQRnr) (13-10-14).

Chiong, C. (2009). Can Video Games Promote Intergenerational Play & Literacy Learning? Report from a Research and Design Workshop. (http://goo.gl/S2kvyE) (20-10-14).

CLD Standards for Scotland (2010). Mapping the Future: An Intergenerational Project. (http://goo.gl/IcZWrX) (20-10-14).

Davis, H., Vetere, F., Francis, P., Gibbs, M., & Howard, S. (2008). I Wish We Could Get Together: Exploring Intergenerational Play Across a Distance via a ‘Magic Box’. Journal of Intergenerational Relationships, 6(2), 191-210. (http://goo.gl/fas2G4). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15350770801955321

ECIL. (2013). ECIL Project. Best Practice Guidelines. Unpublished Manuscript. Centre for Intergenerational Practice: The Beth Johnson Foundation, Stoke-on-Trent, United Kingdom.

EMIL. (2013). EMIL’s European Year 2012 Roundtable Events: Final Report. (http://goo.gl/3BK5qB) (01-10-14).

EU Kids Online. (2011). EU Kids Online Final Report. (http://goo.gl/tHHFd6) (15-10-14).

European Commission (2012). ICT for Seniors’ and Intergenerational Learning. (http://goo.gl/McdPPO) (06-10-14).

Feist, H. Parker, K., Hugo, G. (2012). Older and Online: Enhancing Social Connections in Australian Rural Places. The Journal of Community Informatics, 8(1). (http://goo.gl/G79PZt) (13-10-14).

Figuer, C., Malo, S., & Bertran, I. (2010). Cambios en las relaciones y satisfacciones intergeneracionales asociados al uso de las TIC. Intervención Psicosocial, 19(1), 27-39. (http://goo.gl/7keoZE). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5093/in2010v19n1a5

Flora, P.K., & Faulkner, G.E. (2007). Physical Activity: An Innovative Context for Intergenerational Programming. Journal of Intergenerational Relationships, 4(4), 63-74. (http://goo.gl/p7lmQU). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J194v04n04_05) (02-02-15).

Fricke, A., Marley, M., Morton, A., & Thomé, J. (2013). The Mix@ges Experience: How to Promote Intergenerational Bonding through Creative Digital Media. (http://goo.gl/QaquBx) (06-10-14).

Gershenfeld, A., & Levine, M. (2012). Can Video Games Unite Generations in Learning? What Makers of Technology for Early Education can learn from ‘Sesame Street’. (http://goo.gl/Zok433) (13-10-14).

Ghosh, R., Ratan, S., Lindeman, D., & Steinmetz, V. (2013). The New Era of Connected Aging: A Framework for Understanding Technologies that Support Older Adults in Aging in Place. (http://goo.gl/NjoVbS) (06-10-14).

Greene, J.C. (2008). Is Mixed Methods Social Inquiry a Distinctive Methodology? Journal of Mixed Methods Research, 2(1), 7-22. (http://goo.gl/Wr4vjH). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1558689807309969

Hall, T. (2012). Digital Renaissance: The Creative Potential of Narrative Technology in Education. Creative Education, 3(1), 96-100. (http://goo.gl/rdV8q3). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/ce.2012.31016

Harper, S. (2013). Future Identities: Changing Identities in the UK – The Next 10 Years. (http://goo.gl/IIzZLq) (13-10-14).

Hruschka, D.J., Schwartz, D., & al. (2004). Reliability in Coding Open-Ended Data: Lessons Learned from HIV Behavioral Research. Field Methods, 16(3), 307-331. (http://goo.gl/9e1kRK) DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1525822X04266540

Jane, B., & Robbins, J. (2007). Intergenerational Learnings: Grandparents Teaching Everyday Concepts in Science and Technology. Asia-Pacific Forum on Science Learning and Teaching, 8(1), 1-18. (http://goo.gl/XQkdvh) (13-10-14).

Jarrott. S.E. (2011). Where Have We Been and Where Are We Going? Content Analysis of Evaluation Research of Intergenerational Programs. Journal of Intergenerational Relationships, 9(1), 37-52. (http://goo.gl/aSEDGs) DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15350770.2011.544594

Kaplan, M., & Sánchez, M. (2014). Intergenerational Programmes. In S. Harper, & K. Hamblin (Eds.), International Handbook on Ageing and Public Policy. (pp. 367-383). Cheltenham: Elgar.

Large, A., Nesset, V., Beheshti, J., & Bowler, L. (2006). Bonded Design. A Novel Approach to Intergenerational Information Technology Design. Library & Information Science Research, 28(1), 64-82. (http://goo.gl/LJ9vgb). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lisr.2005.11.014

Lombard, M., Snyder-Duch, J., & Campanella, C. (n.d), Practical Resources for Assessing and Reporting Intercoder Reliability in Content Analysis Research Projects. (http://goo.gl/T2wY8I) (01-10-14).

Madden, M., Lenhart, A., & al. (2013). Teens, Social Media, and Privacy. (http://goo.gl/PKHn8A) (06-10-14).

Pitt, J.C. (2000). Thinking about Technology: Foundations of the Philosophy of Technology. New York: Seven Bridges Press.

Rogers, E.M. (2003). Diffusion of Innovations. New York, NY: The Free Press.

Saldaña, J. (2009). The Coding Manual for Qualitative Researchers. London: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Gorard, S., Furlong, J., & Madden, L. (2003). Older Adults’ Use of Information and Communications Technology in Everyday Life. Ageing & Society, 23(5), 561-582. (http://goo.gl/Fht3p8). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0144686X03001302

Smith, A. (2014). Older Adults and Technology Use. (http://goo.gl/8MA6Uv) (06-10-14).

Third, A., Richardson, I., Collin, P., Rahilly, K., & Bolzan, N. (2011). Intergenerational Attitudes towards Social Networking and Cybersafety: A Living Lab. (http://goo.gl/xxuCp6) (13-10-14).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Actualmente, conforme el envejecimiento en las sociedades occidentales aumenta, resulta más evidente que en cualquier momento histórico dado hay varias generaciones envejeciendo simultáneamente. Por tanto, el envejecimiento debe ser estudiado como fenómeno multi-generacional y no solo como un asunto de personas mayores. En este contexto, están suscitando más atención las situaciones que implican más interacciones intergeneracionales. Dentro del campo intergeneracional está aumentando el interés en torno a las posibilidades de expandir el papel de la tecnología en los programas intergeneracionales. En consecuencia, este artículo se centra en los procesos de educación y aprendizaje acaecidos dentro de programas intergeneracionales con un fuerte componente tecnológico. Mediante un sondeo se recogió información sobre un total de 46 de este tipo de programas de 11 países. Todos se han evaluado en la muestra según su nivel de impacto, el estatus de los grupos generacionales y la centralidad de la tecnología. La enseñanza-aprendizaje de la tecnología constituye la principal área de impacto buscada por estos programas, que, no obstante, también utilizan una amplia variedad de estrategias para facilitar la comunicación, la cooperación y la formación de relaciones intergeneracionales entre las generaciones implicadas. El interés de los programas analizados no solo consiste en enseñar a utilizar la tecnología sino en experimentar diferentes formas y funciones con ella, así como en explorar el potencial positivo de la tecnología para mejorar las relaciones intergeneracionales

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Hablar de envejecimiento no es hablar solo de personas mayores. Desde la perspectiva del ciclo vital, envejecemos mientras vivimos y, desde una perspectiva del curso vital, nuestro proceso de envejecimiento sucede siempre en el contexto de distintas cohortes de edad. Sea cual sea la perspectiva, se ha vuelto evidente que múltiples individuos y generaciones envejecemos al mismo tiempo en cualquier momento dado de la historia. Por tanto, el envejecimiento debe ser abordado como un fenómeno multi-generacional y no solo como una cuestión relativa a la población más envejecida. Además, el hecho de que varias generaciones envejezcan a la vez nos hace pensar en las interacciones intergeneracionales como otro ingrediente potencial a la hora de analizar los procesos de envejecimiento humano. Desde una perspectiva intergeneracional no solo envejecemos sino que, de alguna manera, envejecemos juntos.

Los análisis demográficos concluyen que además de una fertilidad más baja y de una mayor esperanza de vida, las sociedades modernas están experimentando «un aumento del número de generaciones vivas y una disminución del número de parientes vivos dentro de esas generaciones» (Harper, 2013: 2). En este contexto, las situaciones que generan mayor interacción entre las sucesivas generaciones tienden a suscitar atención en positivo, ya consideremos a las generaciones en términos de edad (por ejemplo, personas mayores y jóvenes), de vínculos familiares (por ejemplo, abuelos y nietos), de vida comunitaria (por ejemplo, jóvenes y ancianos) o de pertenencia organizativa (por ejemplo, seniors y juniors).

El interés de este trabajo está vinculado al conjunto de iniciativas intergeneracionales planificadas e intencionadas denominadas programas intergeneracionales, y nuestro énfasis específico son los procesos educativos y de aprendizaje en este tipo de programas con un componente tecnológico importante. Por lo general, el término programa intergeneracional se refiere a actividades o programas que aumentan la cooperación, interacción o intercambio entre dos generaciones cualesquiera (Kaplan & Sánchez, 2014).

En la actualidad, dentro del campo de los estudios intergeneracionales existe un interés en ampliar el papel de la tecnología en los programas y prácticas que intencionadamente conectan las generaciones. Proliferan la iniciativas internacionales financiadas por la Unión Europea, tales como el proyecto multilateral Grundtvig «Mix@ges: vinculación intergeneracional mediante nuevos medios creativos», que utilizan los desarrollos tecnológicos de forma innovadora y poniendo en contacto a las generaciones. El citado proyecto, con cinco países implicados, ha investigado cómo el uso artístico de los medios digitales puede juntar a personas de múltiples generaciones (Fricke, Marley, Morton & Thome, 2013). En el marco del Programa de Aprendizaje Permanente de la Unión Europea (2008-11) se pusieron en marcha 21 proyectos con un interés centrado en el aprendizaje intergeneracional y el envejecimiento activo a través de competencias digitales (European Commission, 2012).

En relación con el desarrollo tecnológico, estamos viendo un aumento de nuevo software y dispositivos para fomentar las relaciones entre generaciones familiares (Chen, Wen & Xie, 2012; Davis, Vetere, Francis, Gibbs & Howard, 2008). Gershenfeld & Levine (06-08-2012) se centraron en explicar «¿cómo podemos transformar de forma eficaz el tiempo de consumo de medios en tiempo familiar de calidad?» haciendo hincapié en los videojuegos y sus posibilidades para facilitar los encuentros generacionales mediante un aprendizaje lúdico conjunto. En la misma línea, Chiong (2009: 22) pudo concluir que «la ubicuidad de los medios digitales en las vidas de los niños y los adultos es una oportunidad importante y desaprovechada para el contacto intergeneracional».

Valoramos cómo Facebook, Twitter y otros instrumentos para la comunicación social están ayudando a las familias a estar conectadas a pesar de la distancia geográfica. Una encuesta de 2012 sobre cómo 2.000 norteamericanos, con edades comprendidas entre 13-25 y 39-75 años, utilizaban la comunicación online, concluyó que el 83% de los encuestados consideraba que dicha comunicación es un método eficaz para mantener el contacto con familiares. Además, el 30% de los abuelos y el 29% de los adolescentes y jóvenes dijeron que a través de conexiones online se pueden entender mejor unos con otros (AARP, 2012).

Si tomamos en consideración ciertas características de los programas intergeneracionales con un fuerte componente tecnológico, tales como el área y el nivel de impacto, el estatus de los grupos generacionales o la centralidad de la tecnología, puede resultar útil reflexionar más ampliamente sobre el papel de la tecnología en las vidas sociales de jóvenes y mayores. Un informe reciente del «Center for Technology and Aging» titulado «La nueva era del envejecimiento conectado» que «estamos en los albores del envejecimiento conectado, con una creciente variedad de tecnologías basadas en Internet y de dispositivos móviles que apoyarán cada vez más a las personas mayores para que envejezcan donde viven» (Ghosh, Ratan, Lindeman & Steinmetz, 2013: 1).

Sin embargo, también resulta evidente que muchos individuos con acceso limitado a la tecnología, así como con escasas habilidades tecnológicas y apoyo, tienen menos posibilidades de lograr los altos beneficios sociales asociados con los continuos y numerosos avances de la tecnología. En la literatura sobre cómo las personas mayores usan las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación (TIC) se ha reconocido que la adopción de nuevas tecnologías por parte de dichas personas no es ni rápida, ni simple, ni está universalmente aceptada (Feist, Parker & Hugo, 2012; Selwyn, Gorard, Furlong & Madden, 2003). Más aún, dentro de la población de adultos con más de 65 años, las personas mayores con niveles educativos y de ingresos más bajos, con frecuencia son quienes van rezagadas en cuanto a la adopción de las TIC. También son más propensas a tener dificultades cuando utilizan nuevos dispositivos digitales y actitudes escépticas acerca de los beneficios de la tecnología (Smith, 2014). Sin embargo, y esto es alentador, también es cierto que cuando las personas mayores superan esos obstáculos tienden a volverse más positivas acerca del mundo online y más partidarias de utilizar la tecnología digital (Smith, 2014).

En cuanto a cómo los niños y los jóvenes utilizan las nuevas tecnologías, los datos también son variables. Sin duda, hay potencial para que la tecnología contribuya al bienestar y desarrollo de la juventud; sin embargo, necesitamos tener en cuenta varios factores al respecto, tales como la capacidad de los jóvenes para detectar y evitar las amenazas que las tecnologías pueden plantear. Afortunadamente, contamos con evidencias de que los jóvenes son cada vez más diestros con la alta tecnología y más capaces de protegerse a sí mismos. Según una reciente encuesta del «Pew Research Center», dirigida a 802 jóvenes norteamericanos de entre 12 y 17 años y a sus padres, que analizó el uso de la tecnología, los jóvenes se están volviendo más hábiles en el manejo de la privacidad de su información online, incluso cuando comparten información personal en sus perfiles de redes sociales y a la hora de adoptar medidas técnicas y no técnicas para mantener esa información fuera del alcance de empresas y anunciantes (Madden, Lenhart & al., 2013).

¿Qué pasaría si intentáramos poner en contacto a distintas generaciones en torno a asuntos tecnológicos? En un ejemplo de ello, investigadores de la juventud en Australia que estudiaban el comportamiento juvenil online (Third, Richardson, Collin, Rahilly & Bolzan, 2011) llevaron a cabo un proyecto de investigación-acción en el cual un grupo de jóvenes se prestaron a colaborar en una serie de talleres de educación tecnológica para adultos sobre redes sociales y ciberseguridad. Tras analizar el consiguiente diálogo entre esos jóvenes y esos adultos, los investigadores concluyeron que los jóvenes participantes en su estudio podían manejar los riesgos online más eficazmente de lo que la mayoría de los adultos había pensado. Muchos de esos jóvenes se convirtieron en expertos en asuntos de ciberseguridad mediante procesos de aprendizaje informal tales como compartir conocimiento con otros jóvenes o a través de ensayo y error.

Muchos programas intergeneracionales orientados a la tecnología se apoyan en jóvenes con conocimientos tecnológicos para ayudar a personas mayores a navegar y a sentirse cómodas en el mundo de la «inclusión digital»; a su vez, las personas mayores participantes contribuyen al logro de otros objetivos del programa, como enseñar a los jóvenes cosas sobre la historia de la comunidad local o sobre cómo trabajar colaborativamente en proyectos de mejora de la comunidad. Un ejemplo de lo que decimos ha logrado echar raíces en una comunidad rural de Escocia: «Jóvenes y mayores trabajarían juntos; los mayores tienen un amplio conocimiento local, los jóvenes tienen un conocimiento intuitivo de la tecnología contemporánea y los profesionales aportarían conocimiento desde el sector del diseño» (CLD Standards for Scotland Report, 2010: 6).

Con el tiempo, son posibles nuevos modos de comunicación. A medida que las personas mayores participantes aumentan sus habilidades tecnológicas y su confianza se transforman en lo que Ghosh, Ratan, Lindeman y Steinmetz (2013: 12) han llamado «prosumidores empoderados de información en el mundo digital», y la dinámica de comunicación relacionada con la tecnología se vuelve más multidireccional.

A la hora de llevar a cabo programas intergeneracionales con un componente tecnológico importante deberíamos dejar de lado ciertas presuposiciones. Por ejemplo, las personas mayores pueden ser más competentes digitalmente que los jóvenes participantes. Un sondeo realizado por EU Kids Online (2011) cuestionó la idea comúnmente aceptada según la cual los jóvenes son alfabetos digitales de forma innata. Los resultados del sondeo indicaron que solo el 36% de los participantes con edades entre 9 y 16 años dijeron que era totalmente cierto que sabían más que sus padres sobre Internet. Este informe también puso de manifiesto algunas limitaciones en la forma en que muchos jóvenes están utilizando los ordenadores en la actualidad. Si adoptamos una visión más moderada acerca de cómo los jóvenes se relacionan con la tecnología es importante tener en cuenta el grado en que los contenidos están predeterminados y el punto hasta el cual la experiencia «televisual» promueve la pasividad. Como dice Hall (2012: 97), «tales características son particularmente problemáticas para el desarrollo de la creatividad y de la educación creativa».

El presente artículo describe los resultados de una encuesta diseñada para analizar y contextualizar el terreno de los programas intergeneracionales con un sustancial componente tecnológico. Los programas identificados abarcan diversos contextos familiares y entornos comunitarios y utilizan tecnologías nuevas y emergentes para construir relaciones, promover el entendimiento y facilitar la cooperación entre las generaciones. Como se verá más adelante, a la hora de presentar los resultados del sondeo nos hemos basado de forma significativa en citas de los encuestados con el fin de poder ofrecer un panorama compuesto de innovaciones, logros y retos de estos programas.

2. Materiales y métodos

2.1. Encuesta

El equipo del proyecto diseñó un cuestionario dirigido a recoger datos sobre programas intergeneracionales con un componente tecnológico de calado, es decir, aquellos en los que la tecnología había sido incluida intencionadamente como método para conectar a las generaciones. El cuestionario se estructuró en dos secciones: información básica de contacto y de la organización, por un lado, y preguntas específicas acerca del uso de la tecnología en el programa, por el otro. Con el fin de identificar los programas intergeneracionales tecnológicos a incluir en la encuesta, los miembros del equipo de investigación utilizaron una estrategia triple durante un período de 16 semanas (del 1 de febrero al 15 de mayo de 2013). Esa estrategia consistió en el envío de mensajes a través de listas electrónicas de comunicación sobre intergeneracionalidad (gestionadas por organizaciones locales, nacionales e internacionales), contactos personales con profesionales intergeneracionales, una búsqueda estructurada en Internet (a través del buscador Google) y una revisión de la literatura (mediante Google Scholar, Scopus y Web of Knowledge) para el período comprendido entre el 1 de enero de 2009 y el 31 de diciembre de 2012.

Los siguientes términos fueron utilizados tanto en la búsqueda en Internet como en la revisión de literatura: «intergenerational program» y «technology», «intergenerational project» y «technology», «intergenerational activity» y «technology» e «intergenerational technology program». Ya han sido utilizadas previamente en el campo intergeneracional estrategias similares para revisar y ofrecer una panorámica sobre este tipo de programas (Bishop & Moxley, 2012; Flora & Faulkner, 2007; Jarrott, 2011).

Todos los programas encontrados mediante la búsqueda en Internet, la revisión de la literatura y los mensajes enviados a listas electrónicas relevantes fueron evaluados en virtud de los siguientes criterios, inspirados en el trabajo previo de Brophy y Bawden (2005): accesibilidad (el programa es accesible), temática (el programa cubre la temática de la investigación) y relevancia (relevante, parcialmente relevante, no relevante) con relación a los objetivos del estudio. Solo los programas que cumplían parcial o totalmente los tres criterios de relevancia siguientes fueron incluidos en la muestra: 1) el programa tiene como objetivo explícito facilitar la implicación intergeneracional; 2) la iniciativa consiste en más de un solo encuentro o más de una actividad llevada a cabo solamente una vez; 3) la tecnología se utiliza como herramienta para facilitar conexiones entre distintos grupos de edad. Una vez examinados los 72 cuestionarios completados y recibidos en cuanto a su redundancia, completitud y criterios de selección, se seleccionaron para el análisis 46 programas intergeneracionales1.

2.2. Análisis

El equipo del proyecto utilizó una estrategia analítica de metodología combinada (Greene, 2008). Después de un análisis descriptivo (rangos y frecuencias) de datos cuantitativos, dos miembros del equipo de investigación examinaron aproximadamente el 25% de los datos con el propósito fundamental de desarrollar categorías de respuesta capaces de cubrir por completo la información cualitativa del cuestionario y encuadrarla en varios temas (codificación provisional) frecuentes en la literatura sobre estudios intergeneracionales que se ocupa de cuestiones relacionadas con la comunicación intergeneracional, la formación de relaciones y el uso de la tecnología. Se crearon códigos (113 en total) para una serie de variables organizadas en cuatro categorías principales: objetivos del programa, descripción del mismo, uso e importancia (percibida) de la tecnología. Algunos de los fragmentos extractados fueron codificados en múltiples códigos de acuerdo con los principios de la codificación simultánea (Saldaña, 2009). Después de varias sesiones conjuntas de codificación, dos miembros del equipo de investigación trabajaron de manera independiente para revisar y codificar la base de datos completa (consistente en 431 fragmentos). Se discutieron todas las codificaciones distintas y se logró una aceptable tasa de fiabilidad entre codificadores (Kappa de Cohen agrupada) de 0,93 (Hruschka, Schwartz & al., 2004; Lombard, Snyder-Duch & Campanella, n.d.).

2.3. Descripción de la muestra

El sondeo realizado permitió recabar información de un total de 46 programas intergeneracionales de 11 países. Estados Unidos (19 programas), Reino Unido (9) y Alemania (7) fueron los países más representados. La muestra también incluyó 3 de Canadá, dos de Irlanda y Portugal y 1 cada uno de estos países: Bélgica, Hong Kong, Italia, Rumania y Taiwán.

Con respecto a la antigüedad de estos programas, 33 de ellos tenían entre uno y tres años y cinco estaban en marcha desde hacía diez años o más. La distribución de la edad de los participantes iba desde los 0-5 años hasta por encima de 85 años, con un 80,4% y un 67,4% de los programas en los que estaban implicados, respectivamente, jóvenes de 15 a 24 años y adultos de 25 a 54 años. El grupo de edad menos representado entre los participantes fue el de 65 a 74 años, presente solo en el 19,6% de los programas de la muestra. La frecuencia más típica de interacción intergeneracional facilitada por los programas seleccionados fue la semanal (28,3%), seguida de los programas cuyos participantes interactuaban 2-3 veces al mes (19,6%) y a diario o casi diariamente (15,2%).

El cuestionario también incluyó una pregunta sobre el tipo de tecnología utilizada en los programas. El 93,5% se servían de ordenadores, iPads y tablets. Aproximadamente la mitad de los programas (54,3%) habían incorporado plataformas online para compartir contenidos y dispositivos de comunicación móvil. Por último, el 19,6% de los programas intergeneracionales en el estudio utilizaban plataformas de juego, un 17,4% habían adoptado cámaras digitales y libros electrónicos, el 15,2% contaban con medios de comunicación social y un 13% incluían el uso de plataformas de publicación on-line.

3. Resultados

3.1. Impacto intencionado

La tabla 1 clasifica los programas de la muestra según las áreas principales de impacto intencionado. La categoría más frecuente de respuesta es la que se refiere al área de educación y aprendizaje; las respuestas recibidas se referían a enseñanza y aprendizaje tanto en contextos no formales como formales.


Draft Content 813650024-36821 ov-es056.jpg

Centrándose en el nivel de impacto (o cambio) previsto y examinando más de cerca los comentarios de los encuestados sobre los objetivos del programa, podemos diferenciar entre los programas en términos de si los beneficios previstos iban dirigidos a los participantes individuales, a las familias, a las organizaciones e instituciones locales y/o a comunidades enteras.

La mayoría fueron diseñados para tener un impacto positivo en las vidas de los participantes (74%), ayudando a las personas mayores a desarrollar sus habilidades TIC o mediante el aumento de la concienciación y la reducción de la exclusión digital con respecto a las personas mayores. Si bien la mayoría de los programas iban principalmente encaminados a aumentar el conocimiento y las habilidades tecnológicas individuales de los participantes, un 24% de los programas de la muestra también trataban de incidir sobre capacidades no relacionadas con la tecnología: cómo mantener un estilo de vida saludable o cómo mejorar las habilidades para manejar un segundo idioma. Curiosamente, el 15% de la muestra no solo pretendían lograr un impacto individual sino una reducción específica de la sensación de aislamiento o exclusión entre las personas mayores.

3.2. Capacidad y estatus tecnológicos

Como se señala en las tablas 2 y 3, se percibía a los jóvenes participantes con más estatus –al menos en asuntos relacionados con la tecnología– y se les posicionaba más rápidamente que a los adultos en el rol de tutores o maestros tecnológicos.


Draft Content 813650024-36821 ov-es057.jpg


Draft Content 813650024-36821 ov-es058.jpg

La tabla 3 ilustra las diferencias en los programas de la muestra con respecto a la dirección de la enseñanza-aprendizaje con relación a la tecnología, aunque hubo un número significativamente mayor de respuestas «jóvenes como maestros» que «personas mayores como maestras», el tipo más frecuente de respuesta (63% de los programas) aludió a contribuciones complementarias tanto en la enseñanza como en el liderazgo del proyecto. Con el fin de posibilitar un análisis más detallado, esta última categoría fue dividida en dos subcategorías: énfasis en el aprendizaje y en la enseñanza conjuntos, y énfasis en objetivos comunes y sentido de colaboración intergeneracional.

3.3. Importancia de la tecnología

Los programas incluidos en la muestra utilizaban una variedad de métodos para posibilitar la comunicación, la cooperación y la formación de relaciones entre las generaciones. ¿Hasta qué punto el componente tecnológico era una parte esencial de estas estrategias para conectar a las generaciones? En la tabla 4 se aborda esta pregunta distinguiendo entre los comentarios de los encuestados que consideraban central o secundario el papel de la tecnología de cara a la conexión intergeneracional en los programas estudiados.

Un número muy elevado de respuestas (el 73,9% frente al 36,9%, respectivamente) subrayaron que el componente tecnológico no era de importancia secundaria sino central para la esencia de los programas tipo analizados.

Los ejemplos de respuestas pertenecientes a la categoría de «tecnología combinada», como es el caso de los programas que incorporan a sus actividades componentes tecnológicos intensivos y otros «sin tecnología», aportan algunas pistas sobre cómo los profesionales introducen herramientas tecnológicas en las actividades dirigidas a diversas edades. Por ejemplo, un encuestado escribió lo siguiente: «Sin la tablet, veíamos que algunos niños terminaban una actividad antes de que las personas mayores la hubiesen finalizado». En este caso concreto, el acceso a la tecnología en forma de tablet complementa y mejora una actividad existente que necesita alguna modificación. Sería necesario ver cómo el contacto cara a cara y el contacto mediado por la tecnología se pueden reforzar mutuamente.

Los encuestados indicaron muchos aspectos adicionales sobre la tecnología que deben ser tenidos en cuenta en los programas:

• Lo apropiado de la tecnología (21,7% de los programas). Esto incluye el desarrollo de herramientas tecnológicas amigables con las personas de edad así como el uso de equipamiento de alta tecnología para desarrollar actividades atractivas a la hora de romper el hielo.

• Nivel de confort (13%). El énfasis se pone en el uso de tecnología no amedrentadora y fácil para el usuario. «Sigue existiendo el desafío de conseguir que los participantes y el personal se sientan cómodos con la tecnología».

• Acceso a la tecnología (6,5% de los programas): «Somos muy conscientes de que muchas de las actividades locales e intergeneracionales más valiosas de Historypin suceden sin conexión on-line (con frecuencia, algo inevitable por las habilidades y el acceso)».


Draft Content 813650024-36821 ov-es059.jpg

4. Discusión y conclusión

La mayoría de los programas tecnológicos intergeneracionales analizados tienen una función y un énfasis educativos que van más allá de solamente aprender a usar la tecnología. Leyendo la tabla 1 desde la perspectiva de la difusión de innovaciones (Rogers, 2003), el énfasis en el aprendizaje puede que solo sea una primera fase, a la que le seguirán una serie de pasos de experimentación y, finalmente, la adopción de la tecnología en diferentes formatos y contextos. En el marco de la práctica intergeneracional, el triángulo educación-aprendizaje-tecnología encierra una gama de posibilidades bastante compleja.

La mayoría de los programas estudiados aspiran a tener una influencia positiva en los participantes individuales mediante la mejora del conocimiento y las habilidades tecnológicas y no tecnológicas. Ese conocimiento puede servir como conducto para generar nuevos modos de colaboración intergeneracional (dentro y fuera de las familias) y acciones comunitarias y sociales conjuntas; en sí mismo, ese conocimiento no es necesariamente un punto final. Por lo tanto, la atención al impacto individual (incluido el aprendizaje) no equivale a adoptar un enfoque totalmente individualista dado que los esfuerzos educativos se llevan a cabo a través de estrategias multi-generacionales introducidas en la construcción de relaciones y en contextos comunitarios y sociales compartidos.

Se aprecia que hay una línea de respuesta que subestima o menosprecia las capacidades de las personas mayores. Esta orientación encaminada a utilizar la tecnología de la información para aumentar la calidad de vida de las personas mayores puede caracterizarse como «diseño guiado por déficits» y contrasta con el «diseño positivo». Según Carroll, Convertino, Farroa y Rosson (2011: 7), en el primero, «el diseño se orienta y aborda problemas, en este caso los inconvenientes de envejecer solo y aislado, y se busca mitigar estos déficits». Sin embargo, en el diseño positivo, «el diseño se orienta a y aborda las fortalezas humanas y organizacionales tratando no solo de explotarlas sino, más allá, de fortalecerlas o de facilitar su expresión en nuevas actividades» (Carroll, Convertino, Farroa & Rosson, 2011: 7).

Más arriba en este documento se señaló que, a menudo, los jóvenes participantes en programas intergeneracionales con un fuerte componente tecnológico son objeto de una consideración desproporcionada por su competencia digital, lo que, con frecuencia, les coloca en el papel de tutores/maestros tecnológicos, ya sea individualmente o como colaboradores en condiciones de igualdad con las personas mayores participantes. Sin embargo, varios de los programas encuestados hacen referencia a una relación polifacética en la cual los miembros de ambas generaciones realizan contribuciones significativas (y, a menudo, recíprocas). El modelo que con más frecuencia ha aparecido en el estudio ha sido el de jóvenes guiando la educación tecnológica mientras que las personas mayores contribuyen sustancialmente de otras maneras tales como enseñar a estudiantes de gerontología temas relacionados con la experiencia de envejecer. El éxito se basa en tener objetivos interconectados e incluir reciprocidad en el aprendizaje.

Como hay tantas configuraciones distintas con respecto a las competencias tecnológicas de los participantes y a los roles que desempeñan en los programas, hemos encontrado que la dinámica de quién es el que enseña no necesariamente es una cuestión generacional. A modo de respaldo a nuestras conclusiones al respecto, hemos encontrado varias interpretaciones en la literatura que hacen hincapié en la capacidad de los jóvenes para la enseñanza de la tecnología en entornos de trabajo (Bailey, 2009), en la significativa influencia que, con frecuencia, los abuelos tienen en el aprendizaje de los jóvenes sobre ciencia y tecnología (Jane & Robbins, 2007), y en la potencia de los equipos intergeneracionales para innovar y aplicar nuevas tecnologías (Large, Nesset, Beheshti & Bowler, 2006).

Las cuestiones del co-aprendizaje, la colaboración y la primacía de la relación intergeneracional, presentes en los resultados de nuestra investigación, también son importantes en el campo más amplio de los estudios intergeneracionales. Esto ha quedado realzado en una de las orientaciones de buena práctica proporcionadas en un documento reciente de ECIL (Certificado Europeo de Aprendizaje Intergeneracional) que subraya la importancia de alentar el «aprendizaje recíproco» (es decir, las oportunidades en las que las generaciones aprenden unas de otras y con las otras) (ECIL, 2013).

Nuestro sondeo de los programas intergeneracionales tecnológicos supone un esfuerzo preliminar para descubrir cómo los nuevos desarrollos tecnológicos están siendo actualmente utilizados en diversos entornos y contextos intergeneracionales. Los datos recopilados recogen algunas estrategias innovadoras para aplicar de modo efectivo la tecnología a la conexión de generaciones en áreas de interés como la mejora de la salud y el bienestar, el fortalecimiento de las familias y el trabajo de mejora de la vida comunitaria. No obstante, y quizá como efecto accidental de la manera en que se organizó y articuló el sondeo (por ejemplo, se trata de una encuesta muy breve y general cuyo énfasis se puso en la identificación de programas intergeneracionales formales), tuvimos un limitado acceso a expertos que están en la vanguardia de la innovación tecnológica, en áreas como la robótica y la construcción de nuevos tipos de dispositivos tecnológicos dedicados a registrar, organizar y compartir información.

En conclusión, creemos que la tecnología es un medio poderoso para el intercambio intergeneracional. Nuestra postura, consistente desde el inicio del proyecto hasta su finalización, es que la tecnología es neutral en términos valorativos. Encuadrar esta «tesis de neutralidad» (Pitt, 2000) tecnológica desde la perspectiva de la implicación intergeneracional nos ha llevado no solo a prestar atención a formas creativas, eficaces y positivas en las cuales se utiliza la tecnología para conectar las generaciones sino también hemos continuado siendo conscientes del potencial de la tecnología para demarcar la auténtica comunicación intergeneracional y el entendimiento significativo entre generaciones. La cuestión principal es cómo los programas intergeneracionales pueden aplicar la tecnología permaneciendo fieles a los objetivos subyacentes y a los valores asociados a la promoción del aprendizaje y la educación intergeneracionales en sociedades que envejecen. Hay muchas interpretaciones sobre los modos en que los avances tecnológicos pueden tener tanto una influencia positiva como negativa sobre las vidas de las personas mayores y jóvenes. Por ejemplo, en los contextos familiares la pericia de los jóvenes para utilizar medios electrónicos y para la participación entre pares en redes sociales puede tener una influencia divisiva en las relaciones familiares (Figuera, Malo & Bertran, 2010) y, a veces, la tecnología funciona como barrera y como oportunidad (EMIL, 2013: 25).

Los resultados de nuestro análisis de programas intergeneracionales tecnológicos son prometedores. Aprendimos varias formas en las cuales las herramientas y servicios tecnológicos pueden ayudar a las personas mayores a tener experiencias positivas de envejecimiento y a mantener la conectividad social, a los jóvenes a adquirir habilidades que contribuyan a su empleabilidad, a los residentes de una comunidad a preservar la historia local y a participar en áreas de planificación local, y a los miembros de la familia a estar en contacto y a mantener líneas de apoyo social en la distancia geográfica. El desafío al que muchos de los programas de la muestra se enfrentan es construir relaciones, especialmente en lo que se refiere a descubrir maneras en que la «alta tecnología» (high tech) pueda conducir a un «alto contacto» (high touch).

Notas

1 Se puede encontrar más información sobre los 46 programas intergeneracionales tecnológicos seleccionados consultando la base de datos on-line gestionada por Generaciones Unidas (http://goo.gl/s9O0UC). Las entidades que realizan programas intergeneracionales con un componente tecnológico importante pueden rellenar un cuestionario on-line para que estos pueden añadirse a la base de datos (véase http://goo.gl/PyegRb).

Referencias

AARP (2012). Connecting Generations. [A Report of Selected Findings from a Survey and Focus Groups Conducted by Microsoft and AARP]. (http://goo.gl/Kcn0Pk) (13-10-14).

Bailey, C. (2009). Reverse Intergenerational Learning: A Missed Opportunity? AI & Society, 23(1), 111-115. (http://goo.gl/hDgcEt). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00146-007-0169

Bishop, J.D., & Moxley, D.P. (2012). Promising Practices Useful in the Design of an Intergenerational Program: Ten Assertions Guiding Program Development. Social Work in Mental Health, 10(3), 283-204. (http://goo.gl/ZfN6Pp). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15332985.2011.649637

Brophy, J., & Bawden, D. (2005). Is Google Enough? Comparison of an Internet Search Engine with Academic Library Resources. Aslib Proceedings, 57(6), 498-512. (http://goo.gl/J89Msx). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/00012530510634235

Carroll, J., Convertino, G., Farroq, U., & Rosson, M. (2011). The Firekeepers: Aging Considered as Resource. Universal Access in the Information Society, 11, 7-15. (http://goo.gl/NPzlRU). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10209-011-0229-9

Chen, Y., Wen, J., & Xie (2012). I Communicate with my Children in the Game: Mediated Intergenerational Family Relationships through a Social Networking Game. The Journal of Community Informatics, 8(1). (http://goo.gl/LcQRnr) (13-10-14).

Chiong, C. (2009). Can Video Games Promote Intergenerational Play & Literacy Learning? Report from a Research and Design Workshop. (http://goo.gl/S2kvyE) (20-10-14).

CLD Standards for Scotland (2010). Mapping the Future: An Intergenerational Project. (http://goo.gl/IcZWrX) (20-10-14).

Davis, H., Vetere, F., Francis, P., Gibbs, M., & Howard, S. (2008). I Wish We Could Get Together: Exploring Intergenerational Play Across a Distance via a ‘Magic Box’. Journal of Intergenerational Relationships, 6(2), 191-210. (http://goo.gl/fas2G4). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15350770801955321

ECIL. (2013). ECIL Project. Best Practice Guidelines. Unpublished Manuscript. Centre for Intergenerational Practice: The Beth Johnson Foundation, Stoke-on-Trent, United Kingdom.

EMIL. (2013). EMIL’s European Year 2012 Roundtable Events: Final Report. (http://goo.gl/3BK5qB) (01-10-14).

EU Kids Online. (2011). EU Kids Online Final Report. (http://goo.gl/tHHFd6) (15-10-14).

European Commission (2012). ICT for Seniors’ and Intergenerational Learning. (http://goo.gl/McdPPO) (06-10-14).

Feist, H. Parker, K., Hugo, G. (2012). Older and Online: Enhancing Social Connections in Australian Rural Places. The Journal of Community Informatics, 8(1). (http://goo.gl/G79PZt) (13-10-14).

Figuer, C., Malo, S., & Bertran, I. (2010). Cambios en las relaciones y satisfacciones intergeneracionales asociados al uso de las TIC. Intervención Psicosocial, 19(1), 27-39. (http://goo.gl/7keoZE). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5093/in2010v19n1a5

Flora, P.K., & Faulkner, G.E. (2007). Physical Activity: An Innovative Context for Intergenerational Programming. Journal of Intergenerational Relationships, 4(4), 63-74. (http://goo.gl/p7lmQU). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J194v04n04_05) (02-02-15).

Fricke, A., Marley, M., Morton, A., & Thomé, J. (2013). The Mix@ges Experience: How to Promote Intergenerational Bonding through Creative Digital Media. (http://goo.gl/QaquBx) (06-10-14).

Gershenfeld, A., & Levine, M. (2012). Can Video Games Unite Generations in Learning? What Makers of Technology for Early Education can learn from ‘Sesame Street’. (http://goo.gl/Zok433) (13-10-14).

Ghosh, R., Ratan, S., Lindeman, D., & Steinmetz, V. (2013). The New Era of Connected Aging: A Framework for Understanding Technologies that Support Older Adults in Aging in Place. (http://goo.gl/NjoVbS) (06-10-14).

Greene, J.C. (2008). Is Mixed Methods Social Inquiry a Distinctive Methodology? Journal of Mixed Methods Research, 2(1), 7-22. (http://goo.gl/Wr4vjH). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1558689807309969

Hall, T. (2012). Digital Renaissance: The Creative Potential of Narrative Technology in Education. Creative Education, 3(1), 96-100. (http://goo.gl/rdV8q3). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/ce.2012.31016

Harper, S. (2013). Future Identities: Changing Identities in the UK – The Next 10 Years. (http://goo.gl/IIzZLq) (13-10-14).

Hruschka, D.J., Schwartz, D., & al. (2004). Reliability in Coding Open-Ended Data: Lessons Learned from HIV Behavioral Research. Field Methods, 16(3), 307-331. (http://goo.gl/9e1kRK) DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1525822X04266540

Jane, B., & Robbins, J. (2007). Intergenerational Learnings: Grandparents Teaching Everyday Concepts in Science and Technology. Asia-Pacific Forum on Science Learning and Teaching, 8(1), 1-18. (http://goo.gl/XQkdvh) (13-10-14).

Jarrott. S.E. (2011). Where Have We Been and Where Are We Going? Content Analysis of Evaluation Research of Intergenerational Programs. Journal of Intergenerational Relationships, 9(1), 37-52. (http://goo.gl/aSEDGs) DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15350770.2011.544594

Kaplan, M., & Sánchez, M. (2014). Intergenerational Programmes. In S. Harper, & K. Hamblin (Eds.), International Handbook on Ageing and Public Policy. (pp. 367-383). Cheltenham: Elgar.

Large, A., Nesset, V., Beheshti, J., & Bowler, L. (2006). Bonded Design. A Novel Approach to Intergenerational Information Technology Design. Library & Information Science Research, 28(1), 64-82. (http://goo.gl/LJ9vgb). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lisr.2005.11.014

Lombard, M., Snyder-Duch, J., & Campanella, C. (n.d), Practical Resources for Assessing and Reporting Intercoder Reliability in Content Analysis Research Projects. (http://goo.gl/T2wY8I) (01-10-14).

Madden, M., Lenhart, A., & al. (2013). Teens, Social Media, and Privacy. (http://goo.gl/PKHn8A) (06-10-14).

Pitt, J.C. (2000). Thinking about Technology: Foundations of the Philosophy of Technology. New York: Seven Bridges Press.

Rogers, E.M. (2003). Diffusion of Innovations. New York, NY: The Free Press.

Saldaña, J. (2009). The Coding Manual for Qualitative Researchers. London: Sage.

Selwyn, N., Gorard, S., Furlong, J., & Madden, L. (2003). Older Adults’ Use of Information and Communications Technology in Everyday Life. Ageing & Society, 23(5), 561-582. (http://goo.gl/Fht3p8). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0144686X03001302

Smith, A. (2014). Older Adults and Technology Use. (http://goo.gl/8MA6Uv) (06-10-14).

Third, A., Richardson, I., Collin, P., Rahilly, K., & Bolzan, N. (2011). Intergenerational Attitudes towards Social Networking and Cybersafety: A Living Lab. (http://goo.gl/xxuCp6) (13-10-14).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/06/15
Accepted on 30/06/15
Submitted on 30/06/15

Volume 23, Issue 2, 2015
DOI: 10.3916/C45-2015-10
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 9
Views 1
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?