Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The South African government has emphasized the need to expand the role of media education to promote equal access, with a level of quality and relevance that will empower disadvantaged groups. However, it is a challenging, time-consuming process, as well as requiring considerable and consistent expenditure and partnerships between many donor agencies. There is little research on the causes behind unequal access to technology, or comparative studies of the barriers that impede the diffusion and adoption of media and information literacy in South Africa. It is thus not surprising that the media and information literacy component is still missing from the agenda that lists Africa’s myriad problems, as well as the absence of qualified teachers, training for the trainers and the presence of IT literacy in the curricula, all of which are essential elements for any future development. The UNESCO model of curricula could help close the digital divide and promote social inclusion. As a contribution to that goal, this study investigates some of the pertinent issues related to media and information literacy via a sample of students at the University of Cape Town. This research offers some practical solutions on how to help raise the levels of media and information literacy among the disadvantaged, in the case in South Africa.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

A historical perspective shows that the present technological revolution is transforming the social topography of our very existence. This transformation is largely facilitated by information and communication technologies (ICTs) with the ability to store, transfer, process and disseminate data (Singh, 2010).

The nature of information literacy in Africa can be determined by changing technologies. Internet can affect the degree of access to forums in terms of topics discussed, the influence these digital forums have on information literacy and the extent to which they replicate or differ from the affective and emotive manifestations of public interaction in the «real» world.

The perception that ICTs are a critical ingredient for media governance in Africa has resulted in various initiatives that are meant to strengthen civil society, assure transparency in government and make it easier for citizens, and the youth in particular, to access information, engage in democratic discourse and affect the direction of policy (Kedzie, 1997). This dream to offer media and information literacy to all young people to eliminate or at least lessen educational inequalities, and the subsequent rippling effect on the workplace and society, is still too utopian to attain on practical terms (Saleh, 2003).

The accessibility of information through affordable technology can certainly empower people’s ability to be economically viable, as a result enhancing the economic growth of countries in Africa. This is clearly captured in the MIL curriculum developed by UNESCO that defines the essential competencies and skills needed to equip citizens to engage with media and information systems effectively and to develop critical thinking and life-long learning skills to socialize and become active citizens. However, the prospects and concerns of such models are directly affected by restricted budgets, as well as the absence of qualified teachers, training for the trainers and the induction of media and information literacy into the curricula, all of which remain essential elements for any social development. The lack of telecommunications infrastructure, computers and connectivity, the high costs and the absence of awareness of the possible implications, the lack of related skills and support and attitudinal barriers are all blocks to development (Ott & Rosser, 2000).

In this dim reality, media information and literacy could be the only remaining refuge to attain education progress, and offer practical solutions governance based on citizens’ participation to inform and motivate a «mass of people with a low rate of literacy and income, and the socio-economic attributes that go with it» (Hameso, 2002). This deferred dream is affected by the level of investments in technology, in computers and networks. This general dim reality is even more pessimistic in Africa with its widening wealth gap between small, politically connected elite and the majority unemployed, homeless and impoverished masses. Africa’s myriad of problems includes corruption, human rights violations, and internal conflict that have deemed political freedom and democracy of being a big failure and resonated with the exclusion of ethnic minorities from political processes (Rothchild, 2000).

South Africa’s present status quo is influenced by its historical memory of slavery and colonial rule, which in turn delayed its educational revival, arbitrarily carved boundaries and disregarded social and natural divisions of geography and population settlement harnessed in many cases a profound national identity crisis and conflicts (Ott & Rosser, 2000).

In a recent national study that attempts to map the level of literacy in primary schools, the majority of learners in Grade (3) and Grade (6) do not read and count. For example, in the Gauteng province (70%) of the province’s Grade (3) learners was found to be illiterate. This happens at a time that the South African government has laid enormous stress on expanding the role of media education to embrace both formal and non-formal sectors, though the process remains very time consuming and carries heavy recurrent and non-recurrent expenditures, as well as has a dire need for partnerships between many donor agencies. Historically, very little effort was directed towards understanding the digital divide and the asymmetries of critical issues such as poverty, HIV, conflict, peace, security, education and IT literacy development (Ernst, Mystelka & Gianiatos, 1998).

In the South African case, there are a number of local hurdles; namely, teachers’ struggle to maintain their motivation levels; students’ appalling discipline and attendance; parents’ disengagement in the students learning environment; principals and teachers’ overwhelming with departmental admin. But the absence of concrete plans in the light of a plagued system by ad-hoc requests and regular goal-post changes in particular within the context of racial, class and gender disparities.

This research draws on the author’s experience as an educator and trainer in South Africa and the Middle East, while referring to the UNESCO Training the Trainers (TTT) in Information Literacy (IL) curriculum. This goal could incorporate interactive computer technology to meet the educational requirements of the deprived, displaced and remotely located, economically weaker population to overcome the current iceberg and enable a breakthrough in the community-building mechanisms of the internet (Quebral, 1975). However, it is thus important to differentiate between digital divide as a theory, and repercussions of its prevalence as a technological problem between those who do and those who do not have physical access. The significance of this divide is its bipolar explanation to internet access, where the Internet is a perquisite for overcoming inequality in a society which dominant functions and social groups are increasingly organized around the Internet (Van Dijk, 2005).

As such, the research attempts to set the parameters of the possible effects of the use of media information and literacy to stipulate critical participation in an independent way within a shared domain in which issues could be engaged (Habermas, 1991). To serve that goal, some of the key clues and indicators of media and information literacy are discussed, then the findings of a pilot study is evaluated of a sample of young learners in South Africa. Though findings cannot be generalized, the research might help provide some indicators on how information and media literacy stand and how these communities operate and how the youth perceive the related challenges.

2. Literature review

A critical goal of the study was to evaluate how ICT can enhance information literacy among the younger generations as a result of its possibility to offer unlimited from which democracy in the larger society can be engendered and/or reinvigorated. History must be weighed very carefully to reassess the earlier projections of its impact as developing societies were too optimistic about the endless possibilities for communication and networking prospects (Castells, 2002). In this section, the researcher aims to identify some of the trends and developments within the literature on the subject matter in Africa, especially in South Africa. A departure point is to acknowledge the close connection between social and economic advancement on one hand, and the media and information literacy creation, dissemination, and utilization on the other hand (Baliamoune, 2003).

Internet penetration rates in 1997 in North America were (267) times greater than in Africa. Three years later, i.e., by October 2000, the gap had grown to a multiple of 540. Africa (14.1%) of the world population has only an estimated (2.6%) of the world Internet users. Until March 2006, only three countries of Africa’s (57) countries (54 official and three non-official states) had an access rate higher than the worldwide internet usage rate of (15.7%) including the Reunion (25.3%), Saint Helena (20.4%), & Seychelles (23.8%) (Fuchs & Horak, 2008). As such, media and information literacy in Africa was very slow and was severely delayed as a result of the limited infrastructure, lack of local content and the overall low-income levels.

Communities can only be empowered when they become able to take control of their local knowledge management disparities and target the groups that are most marginalized (Fuchs and Horak, 2008). According to Mundy and Sultan information is useful «only if it is available, if the users have access to it, in the appropriate form and language, if it is communicated, if it circulates among the various users with appropriate facilities, if it is exchanged» (Mundy & Sultan, 2001).

Several extensive studies emphasized the fact there is a very positive correlation between media and information literacy and civic engagement. According to the ITU’s (2003) «ICT Markets and Trends Report» of 2007 only (3.8%) of the world’s Internet users are situated in Africa. The report estimates (55%) of the population in Sub-Saharan Africa are unconnected without access to fixed, mobile and/or data services.

The New Partnership for African Development (NEPAD), in 2001, established with the assignment of accelerating the development of African inter-country, intra-country and global connectivity (Harindranath & Sein, 2007). However, many studies confirmed the remaining gap between those who are able to access the internet and services that have become necessary for effective citizenry and those who are not able to, has widened (Katiti, 2010).

In a study titled «The Integrated Self-Determination and Self-Efficacy Theories of ICT Training and Use: The Case of the Socio-Economically Disadvantaged» concluded that physical access through infrastructure is not enough to overcome the limited ICT penetration in Africa (Techatassanasoontorn, & Tanvisuth, 2008). The Swedish Department of Empowerment documented the fact that infrastructural limitations on internet usage in Africa still works as a pull factor against enhancing development, but the lack of digital literacy and skills premium stand out a real iceberg blocking development among different African countries, and even within the social fabrics in Africa. The Institute for Research on Innovation and Technology Management during the 1995-2003 period showed that countries privatizing their telecommunication sector enjoy a higher degree of media and information literacy expansion and digital freedom (Rahman, 2006).

Many studies highlighted the fact that media and information literacy could accelerate progress and bypass the processes of accumulation of human capacities and fixed investment; which in turn could help narrow the gaps in productivity and output that separate industrialized and developing countries (Steinmueller, 2001).

The World Bank has also funded many projects to serve that purpose since 1995 to improve the quality of life of Africans through media and information literacy, by implementing it as a tool to improve the socio-economic, political or cultural conditions. In addition, the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) is sponsoring a project titled «Communication for Influence in Central, East and West Africa» (CICEWA) to assess the impact of media and information literacy on maximizing development (Wanjiku, 2009). This of course besides the «World Summit on the Information Society» (WSIS) Plan of Action that aims to connect rural villages with media and information literacy and establish community access points (Gillwald & Lisham, 2007), however, the goal of finding out the exact number of rural villages in Africa is by itself a great challenge.

It seeks to overcome the permanent barrier that exists for the implementation of media and information literacy and that lies in part in the discrepancies between ideas and theoretical models and its implementation, as well as in the existing inequalities, still a sad reality for the asymmetric generation and empowerment of specific groups (Gregson and Bucy, 2001). For example, at the school levels a total of (68,662) students, (2,627) teachers, (217) school administrators, and (428) additional education stakeholders in West and Central Africa participated in the study, only (17%) involved subject-specific media and information literacy for teaching and learning purposes» (Karsenti & Ngamo, 2007). This happens at a time, when media and information literacy could open up opportunities for citizens to participate in the public sphere through what is described as «media participation» (Tettey, 2002).

Many studies referred to the social, ideological (racism), and economic factors that resulted with structural inequalities in South Africa. The UNHDR (2005) calculated that (34.1%) of the South African population lives on less than ($2) per day, the life expectancy at birth decreased to (49.0) years in 2000-05, the public expenditures on education decreased to (5.3%) of the GDP in 2000-02, and South Africa is listed as number (9) of countries with the highest income inequality that resulted with very high crime rate (UNHDR, 2005).

South Africa has nine provinces, three of which are considered thriving media and information literacy clusters: Gauteng, the Western Cape, and KwaZulu Natal, there is no significant relationship between telecommunication investments on the one hand and on the other hand Internet usage or PC usage. Although private annual telecommunication investment after a first increase decreased, Internet and PC usage increased in South Africa during the last decade.

In South Africa, it is given a priority on the national level to consolidate democracy and human rights through citizens’ increased accessibility to information as well as increased opportunities for communicating freely with each other on matters of civic importance (Tlabela, Roodt, Paterson & Weir-Smith, 2007). However, there are still significant challenges facing media and information literacy to reduce the differences in access between social groups, thereby extending the benefits of technology to all sectors of the grassroots (ITU, 2003).

At the end of this section, one has to be careful about the foregoing discussion support Ott’s (1998) admonishment to attenuate the utopian enthusiasm about the democratizing impact of ICTs in Africa. Nonetheless, there is minimal impact in the numbers and categories of those who engage in and hence influence the direction of information literacy on the continent. The majority of the «publics» including the new generation are the marginalized segments of society, who are still unable to rupture the nature of literacy through ICTs because of economic, language or other constraints.

3. Methodology

In this section, the research refers to some of the latest data base indicators to how media and information literacy stands in South Africa, and then taking a case study from the University of Cape Town on issues of DC++ among young elite students. In the first stage of the analysis, data are drawn from the Internet Usage and Population Statistics of World Stats, only (6.7%) have Internet penetration in Africa, which represent (3.9%) of the total world users. In this setting, two-thirds of people reside in rural areas with less than (4%) having a fixed line telephone connection. The statistical data show that almost all African countries with very low Internet access are among the least developed countries in the world in terms of health, education, and income. As such, a close correlation between global social gaps and the global digital divide.

In table 1, one could easily correlate between clustering of low values for both Digital Access Index (DAI)1 and Human Development Index (HDI)2 in Africa. This clustering lends further weight to the idea that both the HDI and DAI have a strong spatial component.

In table 2, media and information literacy is taking a very unequal development. Internet access and experiences of new media vary in the nature of consumption giving priority to mobile phones at the expense of Internet access and computers. Hence, the socioeconomic status in Africa is an important predictor of how people are incorporating the Web into their everyday lives and even with regard to the nature of these activities.

In table 3, statistics indicate a strong correlation between the ability of individuals in a country to adopt media and information literacy and the level of development in the same country or region. This finding supports the statistical hypothesis between development and information and communication technologies.

And in the second stage, a pilot study is based on a sample of UCT students, who were surveyed to question their knowledge, perception of the possibilities, and challenges facing media and information literacy. It is a multi-method approach mixing surveys (120 subjects) and intensive interviews. It was very high response rate, as (100) respondents gave back the survey.

In many youth circles, DC++ has become a reality, which simply means is a free and open-source, peer-to-peer file-sharing client that can be used to connect to the Direct Connect network or to the ADC protocol. Modified versions of DC++, based on DC++’s source code were developed for specialized communities (e.g. music-sharing communities), or in order to support specific experimental features (Ullner, 2008).

In this initial stage of the research application, a purposive non-probability sample was drawn from students in the University of Cape Town (UCT) in different faculties among graduate and undergraduate students to engage in piracy while being DC++ users3. The study was conducted in April 2011.

In figure 1, findings indicated that (80%) of the sample had access with a majority of speaking English (56%), while (50%) were white from the faculty of humanities (31%), and (26%) from the faculty of Engineering).

In figure 2, findings indicated that the majority of the students (46%) had moderate knowledge of DC++, while only (15%) are in the high knowledge category.

In figure 3, findings indicated that (61%) of the students were generally users. The resulted emphasized that only (21%) used DC++ on daily bases, while the majority (35%) used it once a month.

In figure 4, findings indicated that (90%) of the students used unlicensed items, while (97%) of the sample indicated that they used unlicensed items as a result of cost reasons.

In figure 5, findings projected a split between the students who agreed to implement any deterring (53%), while (47%) disagreed. Besides, the sample had a divergence on the reasons for deterring as (70%) relate to person downloading, while (67%) admitted of their conscious awareness of the violations.

The regression results of the tables have the expected sign with the exception of the openness variable, which has a negative coefficient in most of the estimations. As such, the information literacy variables as in the case of (DC++) variable generally has a negative coefficient that complies with the findings of many previous studies in that regard such as that of Thompson and Rushing (1999) who indicated that strengthening patent protection has a positive effect only in countries that have a high GDP per capita (above $4000.00). The results suggest an urgent need for absorptive capacity policies among youth, by investing in education, information and communications technology, while advocating for relevant ideas of information property rights.

Though, findings cannot be generalized, the research stands out as a pilot study to set he scene with regard to media and information literacy levels of awareness, motivations and assessment among students, who are privileged elite and minority having internet access and skills. The main criteria for the sample selection were: UCT students, who access and use their computers on daily bases.

4. Discussion

This research has explored the emergence and interpretation of ICT among young learners in the ‘new’ South Africa. Through utilising a framework of contrasting «goals» and «tools», it has sought to expose the shortcomings and contradictions in the implementation of ICT among youth as a result of either government legislation and the vagueness of rhetoric targeted at the implementation of ICT policy.

Having young students, in particular in Africa, being media literate is essential to achieve any economic, social and political development. If the youth are information literate, then they will be able to locate information and use it to acquire more skills and competencies. But one of the major problems is that incorporating media and information literacy has not been put in place policies and mechanisms to address the serious information gaps that exist as a result of the limited ability to locate and use effectively the information in the media to serve the disadvantaged majority.

Media have to restore their original feisty, robust, fearless mission, by offering discourse that can be trusted with a continuous process of inclusion of all societal colors to complement the curricula that have been based on wrong information with the aim bridging the digital divide.

Media and information literacy not only requires gathering reams of statistics from teachers that cannot improve literacy, but also increases the quality of teachers’ time with students. In that regard, fudging the «matric pass rate» statistics annually may make certain individuals look good but it clearly does not measure knowledge, literacy or numeracy currently. It is also very common in many of the African countries including South Africa of either not reading carefully the statistics, or trying to project a positive frame about the country that is motivated, by pride, or lack of knowledge, or even clash of interest. The different indicators emphasized the close links and connections between the improvement of media and information literacy and education on one hand, and with the improvement of teacher quality and on metrics that count on the other hand (Saleh, 2009).

On the micro levels, media and information literacy could provide a road map of how to stimulate social progress, yet it remains in the domain of the rich and business or military elites. And on the macro levels, it remained as one of the key areas where the post-apartheid government has failed miserably to date. Until the value of education becomes ingrained in South African culture, the mentality of entitlement without effort will prevail until further notice. So far, the South Africa rushed into implementing media and information literacy models without assessing and understanding their impacts at the recipient level that resulted from not considering the localization and domestication of their implementation. This unplanned incorporation of media and information literacy with the curricula is an outcome of the usual mobility restrictions, attitudes towards women, education and religious influences, especially at the community level where such social constraints are critical.

South Africa stands in a dire need for low-cost alternatives to conventional education (in terms of recurrent and non-recurrent budgetary inputs) that could be effective in quickly bringing in curricular reforms. This can be mostly based on print materials and interfacing or interactive (or contact) sessions, or the conventional means of curriculum development that might help domestication of the UNESCO model to fit the local challenges. It is thus strongly recommended to set up alternative and innovative approaches to improve the media and information literacy culture through the orientation of citizens with affordable, appropriate and accessible options of technologies.

Practice-based research is also pertinent to attain the goal, by creating the knowledge, expertise and ethics involved as in the case of DC++ to implement deterring factors to help raise the bar of competencies of young learners.

The pilot study has projected a general trend of indecision about punishment for copyright infringement, though the majority of the sample linked the economic factor not just the direct digital skills needed to follow this educational model. A number of policy recommendations are needed to attain the goal of mass engagement of media and information literacy in South Africa:

1) Policies should attempt to overcome current impediments facing coherence among national policies, by emphasizing its significance in the public agenda to provide the requirements, create the suitable environment and discuss the possibilities of domestication or localization.

2) Increase effective administration, transparency and public participation through information sharing within each country, including freedom of expression and support for consumer awareness groups.

3) Goal-oriented policies toward educational and workforce openness and tolerance in order to stimulate greater labor force participation of women, improve educational and training opportunities for the majority of the disadvantaged black and colored communities in South Africa.

4) Stipulate educational access and infrastructures with a focus on digital literacy at the primary level and research creativities.

5) Build up strategies that are based on reading and using the database that can help include the marginal groups after defining and understanding their differences of race, color and gender related challenges in the South African society.

6) Identify connectors in local communities to find solutions based on understanding and appreciation of the differences. But the challenge remains in how to create engagement and community-based leadership in giving high priority to educational improvement programs and providing the necessary resources, expertise, skills, motivations and access to succeed in accordance with the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Scarce public funds need to be complemented by maximum mobilization of private investment, through the establishment and sustainability of a welcoming environment for private initiative and risk-taking that could boost access by the poor to media and information literacy services and opportunities. At the end, training around MIL therefore has got huge potential in enhancing the participation of the generations to come in South Africa and other developing societies in the information society. Media and information literacy remains hanging in the air between hopes of progress and dopes of harsh reality.

Notes

1 The Digital Access Index (DAI) measures the overall ability of individuals in a country to access and use new ICTs. DAI is built on four fundamental vectors that impact a country’s ability to access ICTs: infrastructure, affordability, knowledge and quality and actual usage of ICTs. It allows the cross examination of peers through a transparent and globally measurable way of tracking progress towards improving access to ICTs.

2 The Human Development Index (HDI) is a comparative measure of life expectancy, literacy, education and standards of living for countries worldwide, by identifying the level of development and measuring the impact of economic policies on quality of life.

3 Free and open-source, peer-to-peer file-sharing client connects to the Direct Connect network the rapid proliferation of pee-to-peer networks has created a new channel for digital sharing.


Draft Content 233319306-26662-es003.jpg


Draft Content 233319306-26662-es004.jpg


Draft Content 233319306-26662-es005.jpg


Draft Content 233319306-26662-es006.jpg


Draft Content 233319306-26662-es007.jpg


Draft Content 233319306-26662-es008.jpg


Draft Content 233319306-26662-es009.jpg


Draft Content 233319306-26662-es010.jpg


Draft Content 233319306-26662-es011.jpg

References

Baliamoune, M. (2003). An Analysis of the Determinants and Effects of ICT Diffusion in Developing Countries. Information Technology for Development, 10, 1, 151-169.

Castells, M. (2002). The Internet Galaxy. Oxford (UK): Oxford University Press.

Ernst, D., Mystelka, L. & Gianiatos, G. (1998). Technological Capabilities in the Context of Export-led Growth: A Conceptual Framework. In D. Ernst (Ed.), Technological Capabilities and Export Success in Asia (pp. 5-45). London (UK): Routledge.

Freedom House (2010). Freedom in the World 2010 Survey Re lease. Freedom in the World 2010 Survey Release, 2010 (www. freedomhouse.org/template.cfm?page=15) (05-12-2011).

Fuchs, C. & Horak, E. (2008). Africa and the Digital Divide. Te le matics and Informatics, 25, 1, 99-116.

Gillwald, A. & Lisham, A. (2007). The Political Economy of ICT Policy Making in Africa: Historical Contexts of Regulatory Frame works. Policy Performance, Research Questions and Methodo logical Issues, 1, 1. (www.gersterconsulting.ch/docs/ICT-Africa_ Re port_ final_fr.pdf) (30-11-2011).

Gillwald, A. & Stork, C. (2008). Towards Evidence-based ICT Policy & Regulation: ICT access and usage in Africa. Research ICT Africa, 2, 18, 35-42.

Gregson, K. & Bucy, E. (2001). Media Participation: A Legiti mi zing Mechanism of Mass Democracy. New Media & Society, 3, 3, 357.

Habermas, J. (1991). The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere. (Translation by T. Burger) Massachusetts (U.S.): MIT Press.

Hameso, S. (2002). Issues and Dilemmas of Multi-Party Democracy in Africa. West Africa Review, 3, 2-8.

Harindranath, G. & Sein, M. (2007). Revisiting the role of ICT in development. 9th International Conference on Social Impli ca tions of Computers in Developing Countries. São Paulo, Brazil, 1, 1, 1-6.

ITU (Ed.) (2003). Investment: International Telecommunication Association Statistics, ITU. (www.itu.int) (07-8-2011).

Karsenti, T. & Ngamo, S. (2007). The Quality of Education in Africa: the Role of ICTs in Teaching. International Review of Edu ca tion / Internationale Zeitschrift für Erziehungswissenschaft, 53, 5/6, 665-686.

Katiti, E. (2010). NEPAD ICT Broadband Infrastructure Pro gramme: Interconnection via Umojanet. Presentation to the Afri can Peering and Interconnection. Forum, 1, 1, 1-19.

Kedzie, C.R. (1997). Communication and Democracy: Coincident Revolutions and the Emergent Dictator’s Dilemma. Santa Monica, CA: Rand.

Mundy, P. & Sultan, J. (2001). Information Revolutions. Tech ni cal Centre for Agricultural Rural Cooperation, 1, 1, 77-97.

Ott, D. & Rosser, M. (2000). The Electronic Republic? The Role of the Internet in Promoting Democracy in Africa. Democratization, 7, 1, 137-155.

Ott, D. (1998). Power to the People: The Role of Electronic Media in Promoting Democracy in Africa, 3/3 (www rstmonday. dk/issues/issue3_4/ott/index.html#author) (05-02-2012).

Quebral, N. (1975). Development communication. In J. Jamias (Ed.), Readings development communication (pp. 1-11). Laguna (Philippines): UPLB College of Agriculture.

Rahman, H. (2006). Empowering Marginal Communities and Information Networking. Hershey, Pennsylvania: Idea Group Pu blishing.

Rothchild, D. (2000). Ethnic Bargain and State Breakdown in Africa. Nationalism and Ethnic Politics, 1, 1, 54-74.

Saleh, I. (2003). Unveiling the Truth About Middle Eastern Media. Privatization in Egypt: Hope or Dope? Cairo (Egypt): Taiba Press.

Saleh, I. (2009). Media Literacy in MENA: Moving Beyond the Vicious Cycle of Oxymora - Mapping World Media Education Po licies. Comunicar, 32, 1, 119-129 (DOI: 10.3916/c32-2009-02-010).

Singh, S. (2010). The South African Information Society, 1994-2008: Problems with Policy, Legislation, Rhetoric and Imple men tation. Journal of Southern African Studies, 36, 1, 209-227.

Steinmueller, W. (2001). ICTs and the Possibilities for Leap frogging by Developing Countries. International Labour Review, 140, 2, 193-210.

Techatassanasoontorn, A. & Tanvisuth, A. (2008). The Inte grated Self-Determination and Self-Efficacy. Theories of ICT. SIG on Global Development Workshop. Paris: December 13, 1, 6-10.

Tettey, W. (2002). Local Government Capacity Building and Civic Engagement: An Evaluation of the Sample Initiative in Ghana. Perspectives on Global Development & Technology, 1, 2, 28-165.

Thompson, M. & Rushing, F. (1999). An Empirical Analysis of the Impact of Patent Protection of Economic Growth: An Extension. Journal of Economic Development, 24, I, 67-76.

Tlabela, K., Roodt, J., Paterson, A. & Weir-Smith, G. (2007). Mapping ICT Access in South Africa. Cape Town (South Africa): HSRC Press.

Ullner, F. (2008). PC Pitstop and its P2P-report. DC++: Just These Guys, Ya Know? January 17, 2008 (http://dcpp.word press. com/2008/01/17/pc-pitstop-and-its-p2p-report/). (17-04-2012).

United Nations Human Development Report (Ed.) (2005). UNHDP 2005. New York: United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

UNSTATS (Ed.) (2002). United Nations Statistical Databases (http://unstats.un.org) (1995-2002). International Telecommu ni ca tion (07-09-2011).

US Census Bureau / Nielsen Online, ITU (Ed) (2009). Computer In dustry Almanac. June 30 (www.internetworldstats . com/ stats5.htm#me) (6-6-2011).

Van Dijk, J. (2005). The Deepening Divide: Inequality in the In formation Society. London: Sage Publications.

Wanjiku, R. (2009). Kenya Communications Amendment Act (2009) Progressive or retrogressive? Association for Progressive Communications (APC), 1, 1, 1-20.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

El gobierno de Sudáfrica ha realizado recientemente un enorme esfuerzo en la expansión del papel de la educación en medios, con el objeto de ofrecer un acceso equitativo y de calidad a toda la población, especialmente hacia los grupos desfavorecidos. Sin embargo, este proceso requiere tiempo y recursos ingentes y constantes, además de la necesaria colaboración de otras instituciones. Actualmente, existe en Sudáfrica escasa investigación sobre las causas de las desigualdades de acceso a la tecnología o los obstáculos que existen para la difusión y puesta en marcha de la alfabetización mediática en Sudáfrica. No es sorprendente, por ello, que entre los múltiples problemas que existen hoy en África todavía la alfabetización mediática e informacional no sea una prioridad. Siguen existiendo muchos maestros con escasos conocimientos en esta materia, la capacitación de formadores es muy pobre y su incorporación en programas de alfabetización muy anecdótica. El Currículum UNESCO MIL de Alfabetización Mediática es un reto para ayudar a superar esta brecha digital y promover la inclusión social. Con este objetivo, este estudio analiza algunas cuestiones relacionadas con la alfabetización mediática a partir de una muestra de estudiantes de la Universidad de Cape Town, proponiendo algunas soluciones prácticas sobre cómo ayudar a mejorar los niveles de alfabetización mediática e informacional en las sociedades menos favorecidas, como es el caso de Sudáfrica.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Desde una perspectiva histórica, la actual revolución tecnológica está transformando la topografía social de nuestra propia existencia. Esta transformación es posible, en gran parte, por las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación (TIC), que tienen la capacidad de almacenar, transferir, así como de procesar y de difundir datos (Singh, 2010).

La naturaleza de la alfabetización informacional en África puede estar condicionada por los cambios en las tecnologías. Internet afecta considerablemente al nivel de acceso, a las conversaciones, los foros digitales en la alfabetización informacional, generando diferencias en las manifestaciones afectivas y emotivas de interacción pública con el mundo real.

La percepción de que las TIC son un ingrediente fundamental para la gobernanza mediática en África se ha traducido en diversas iniciativas que tienen por objeto fortalecer la sociedad civil, garantizar la transparencia en el gobierno, y facilitar a los ciudadanos, en particular a los jóvenes, el acceso a la información, participando en el discurso democrático, hacia un mayor compromiso con la política (Kedzie, 1997). El objetivo de ofrecer una alfabetización mediática e informacional a todos los jóvenes para eliminar, o por lo menos, reducir las desigualdades educativas, y su consecuente efecto dominó en el trabajo y en la sociedad han generado un planteamiento excesivamente utópico lejos de una visión práctica (Saleh, 2003).

La accesibilidad de la información a través de la tecnología, sin duda, puede potenciar la capacidad de las personas para ser autosuficientes económicamente, y por lo tanto, para impulsar el crecimiento económico de los países de África. El Currículum MIL de la UNESCO define las competencias y habilidades esenciales que se necesitan para enseñar a los ciudadanos a relacionarse con los medios de comunicación y los sistemas de información con eficacia, para desarrollar el pensamiento crítico y aptitudes para aprender a socializar y convertirse en ciudadanos activos. Sin embargo, estas propuestas están directamente afectadas por los limitados presupuestos y por la ausencia de profesores cualificados; la formación de los formadores y la no presencia de la alfabetización mediática e informacional en los planes de estudio, ya que éstos siguen siendo elementos esenciales de cualquier desarrollo social. La falta de una infraestructura de telecomunicaciones; ordenadores y conectividad, los altos costes, la falta de concienciación sobre las posibles consecuencias, la escasez de recursos de apoyo y las barreras psicológicas… siguen siendo obstáculos importantes para cualquier desarrollo (Ott & Rosser, 2000).

En esta difícil realidad, la educación en medios de comunicación y la alfabetización pueden ser el único refugio que queda para alcanzar el progreso educativo y ofrecer soluciones prácticas de gobierno basadas en la participación de los ciudadanos para informar y motivar a una «masa de personas con bajos niveles de formación e ingresos» (Hameso, 2002). Esta aspiración se ve afectada por el nivel de inversiones en tecnología, en ordenadores y redes de comunicación. Esta triste realidad general es aún más pesimista en África por su más amplia brecha entre la riqueza cada vez mayor de una minoría, representada por una élite política, y una mayoría formada por desempleados, personas sin hogar y masas empobrecidas. Entre la multitud de problemas de África, se encuentran la corrupción, las violaciones de los derechos humanos y los conflictos internos que han hecho fracasar la libertad política y la democracia; también es un grave problema la exclusión de las minorías étnicas de los procesos políticos (Rothchild, 2000).

El actual status quo de Sudáfrica se ve influido por la memoria histórica de la esclavitud y la dominación colonial –que a su vez postergó el renacimiento educativo–, las fronteras trazadas arbitrariamente y el desprecio por las divisiones sociales y naturales, que generaron, en muchos casos, una profunda crisis de identidad nacional y conflictos (Ott & Rosser, 2000).

En un reciente estudio nacional, con una radiografía sobre el nivel de alfabetización en las escuelas primarias, la mayoría de los estudiantes de 3º y 6º Grado no sabían leer ni contar. En la provincia de Gauteng, el 70% los estudiantes de 3º eran analfabetos. Esto sucede en el momento en que el gobierno de Sudáfrica ha enfatizado la expansión de la educación en medios, tanto en la educación formal como no formal, si bien el proceso sigue siendo muy lento y conlleva ingentes gastos recurrentes, demandando una gran colaboración de muchos sectores. Históricamente, se ha dedicado muy poco esfuerzo a entender y actuar sobre la brecha digital y las asimetrías sociales como la pobreza, el VIH, los conflictos, la paz, la seguridad, la educación, y el desarrollo de la alfabetización en tecnologías (Ernst, Mystelka & Gianiatos, 1998).

En Sudáfrica existe una serie de obstáculos locales, concretamente, la necesidad de los profesores de mantener sus niveles de motivación; los problemas de disciplina y absentismo escolar; la falta de atención paterna al entorno de aprendizaje de los estudiantes; la abrumadora relación de directores y profesores con la administración departamental. Pero esta ausencia de planes concretos, a la luz de un sistema plagado de clientelismo hay que entenderlo en un contexto particular de desigualdades raciales, de clase y de género.

Esta investigación se basa en la experiencia personal del autor como educador en Sudáfrica y Oriente Medio, en el marco del Currículum UNESCO de formación de profesores en alfabetización informacional (ALFIN). La tecnología informática interactiva puede satisfacer las necesidades educativas de los marginados, inmigrantes, los pobres para superar el estado actual, permitiendo avances en la creación de comunidades en Internet (Quebral, 1975). Sin embargo, es importante diferenciar entre la brecha digital como teoría y sus repercusiones de prevalencia como un problema tecnológico entre quienes tienen y no tienen acceso físico. La importancia de esta división genera una explicación bipolar sobre el acceso a Internet, incentivo para superar la desigualdad en una sociedad cuyas funciones dominantes y grupos sociales están cada vez más organizados en torno a Internet (Van Dijk, 2005).

Como tal, la investigación trata de establecer los parámetros de los posibles efectos que la utilización de la alfabetización mediática e informacional tiene para fomentar la participación crítica de manera independiente dentro de un dominio compartido (Habermas, 1991). Con ese propósito, se reflexiona sobre algunas de las claves e indicadores de la alfabetización mediática e informacional, tras los resultados de un estudio piloto que evalúa una muestra de jóvenes estudiantes en Sudáfrica. Aunque las conclusiones no pueden generalizarse, la investigación podría ayudar a proporcionar indicadores sobre cómo funciona la información y la alfabetización mediática en estas comunidades y cómo los jóvenes perciben estos desafíos.

2. Revisión bibliográfica

Un objetivo fundamental de este estudio fue evaluar cómo las TIC pueden mejorar la alfabetización informacional en las generaciones más jóvenes, dada su capacidad de fortalecer la democracia en una sociedad que, en general, puede estar en peligro. El análisis de experiencias pasadas nos demuestra que eran demasiado optimistas sobre las potencialidades de la comunicación y las perspectivas de red en estos países (Castells, 2002). Se pretende identificar algunas de las tendencias y desarrollos dentro de la literatura sobre el tema en África, especialmente en Sudáfrica. Como punto de partida hay que reconocer la estrecha relación entre progreso social y económico, por un lado, y la creación, difusión y utilización de la alfabetización mediática e informacional, por otro lado (Baliamoune, 2003).

Las tasas de penetración de Internet en 1997 en América del Norte fueron 267 veces mayores que en África. Tres años más tarde, es decir, en octubre de 2000, la brecha había crecido a un múltiplo de 540. África, con el 14,1% de la población mundial, tiene solo un 2,6% estimado de los usuarios mundiales de Internet. Hasta marzo de 2006, solo tres países de 57 de África (54 oficiales y tres Estados no oficiales) tuvieron una tasa de acceso superior a los niveles de uso de Internet en todo el mundo (15,7%), incluida Reunión (25,3%), Santa Helena (20,4%), y Seychelles (23,8%) (Fuchs & Horak, 2008). Como tal, la alfabetización mediática e informacional en África era muy lenta y se retrasó gravemente como consecuencia de la escasez de infraestructura, la falta de contenido local y los bajos niveles de ingresos generalizados.

Las comunidades solo pueden ser fuertes cuando se vuelven capaces de tomar el control de sus diferencias locales de gestión del conocimiento y dirigirse a los grupos más marginados (Fuchs y Horak, 2008). Según la información de Mundy y Sultan (2001) es útil «solo si está disponible, si los usuarios tienen acceso a ella, en la forma apropiada y el lenguaje, si está comunicada, si circula entre los distintos usuarios con instalaciones adecuadas, si se intercambia».

Varios estudios hicieron hincapié en el hecho de que existe una correlación muy positiva entre la alfabetización mediática e informacional y la participación cívica. Según el documento «Mercados de las TIC e Informe de tendencias» de 2007 (UIT, 2003), solo el 3,8% de los internautas del mundo se encuentran en África. El informe estima que el 55% de la población en el África subsahariana no está conectada y carece de un acceso fijo, móvil y/o de servicios de datos.

La Nueva Asociación para el Desarrollo de África (NEPAD), en 2001, se creó con la misión de acelerar el desarrollo de la conectividad de África entre países, dentro del país y a nivel mundial (Harindranath & Sein, 2007). Sin embargo, muchos estudios confirman que la brecha que se abre entre aquellos que son capaces de acceder a Internet y a los servicios que se han hecho necesarios para la ciudadanía efectiva y aquellos que no son capaces de hacerlo, se ha ampliado (Katiti, 2010).

Un reciente estudio titulado «Las teorías integradas de autodeterminación y auto-eficacia de la formación y uso de las TIC: El caso de los desfavorecidos socioeconómicos» concluyó que el acceso a través de la infraestructura no es suficiente para superar la limitada penetración de las TIC en África (Techatassanasoontorn & Tanvisuth, 2008). El Departamento Sueco de Potenciación documentó que las limitaciones de infraestructura en el uso de Internet en África aún funcionan como un factor de atracción frente a la promoción del desarrollo, pero la falta de alfabetización digital y la ausencia de competencias actúan como un verdadero hándicap que bloquea el desarrollo entre los diferentes países de África. El Instituto de Investigación en Innovación y Gestión Tecnológica, en el período 1995-2003, concluyó que los países que han privatizado su sector de telecomunicaciones gozan de un grado más alto de extensión de la alfabetización mediática e informacional y de libertad digital (Rahman, 2006).

Muchos estudios han destacado que la alfabetización mediática e informacional podría acelerar el progreso y los procesos de acumulación de capacidades humanas e inversión fija; ésta a su vez podría ayudar a reducir las brechas en la productividad y la producción que separan a los países industrializados de aquéllos que están aún en vías de desarrollo (Steinmueller, 2001).

El Banco Mundial también ha financiado muchos proyectos desde 1995 para mejorar la calidad de vida de los africanos mediante la alfabetización informacional, como una herramienta para mejorar las condiciones socioeconómicas, políticas o culturales. Además, la Asociación para las Comunicaciones Progresivas (APC) está patrocinando el proyecto «Comunicación para la influencia en África Central, Oriental y Occidental» (CICEWA) para evaluar el impacto de la alfabetización mediática e informacional en la maximización del desarrollo (Wanjiku, 2009), además del Plan de Acción de la «Cumbre Mundial sobre la Sociedad de la Información» (WSIS) que tiene como objetivo conectar las aldeas rurales con la alfabetización mediática e informacional, y establecer puntos de acceso comunitario (Gillwald & Lisham, 2007), si bien determinar el número exacto de pueblos rurales en África es de por sí ya un gran reto.

Se pretende superar la barrera permanente que existe para la implementación de la alfabetización mediática e informacional, que radica en parte en las discrepancias entre las ideas y modelos teóricos, y su puesta en práctica en la realidad, así como las desigualdades existentes, que siguen siendo una triste realidad para la generación asimétrica y la potenciación de grupos específicos (Gregson & Bucy, 2001). Por ejemplo, en el ámbito escolar, un total de 68.662 estudiantes, 2.627 docentes, 217 directores de escuelas y 428 simpatizantes por la educación en África Occidental y Central participaron en el estudio, en el que solo el 17% destacó la alfabetización mediática e informacional para la enseñanza y el aprendizaje» (Karsenti & Ngamo, 2007). Esto ocurre cuando la alfabetización mediática podría ofrecer a los ciudadanos la oportunidad de participar en la esfera pública a través de lo que se ha llamado «participación activa en los medios de comunicación» (Tettey, 2002).

Muchos estudios han tratado sobre los factores sociales, ideológicos –el racismo–, y económicos que dieron lugar a las desigualdades estructurales en Sudáfrica. El UNHDR (2005) calcula que 34,1% de la población sudafricana vive con menos de 2$ al día, la esperanza de vida al nacer se redujo a 49 años en el período 2000-05, los gastos públicos en educación se redujeron a 5,3% del PIB en 2000-02, y Sudáfrica ocupa el 9º en la lista de los países con la mayor desigualdad en los ingresos y una tasa de criminalidad muy alta (UNHDR, 2005).

Sudáfrica tiene nueve provincias, tres de las cuales se consideran florecientes núcleos de alfabetización mediática e informacional: Gauteng, Cabo Occidental y KwaZulu-Natal, no existe una relación significativa entre la inversión en telecomunicaciones y el uso de Internet. A pesar del aumento de la inversión privada anual en telecomunicaciones, que después disminuyó, el uso de Internet y la informática en Sudáfrica se ha incrementado durante la última década.

Se considera una prioridad nacional consolidar la democracia y los derechos humanos, a través de una mayor accesibilidad de los ciudadanos a la información, por las mayores oportunidades que existen para comunicarse libremente entre sí sobre temas cívicos (Tlabela, Roodt, Paterson & Weir-Smith, 2007). Sin embargo, existen retos aún importantes para reducir las diferencias de acceso entre los grupos sociales, extendiendo así los beneficios de la tecnología a todos los sectores (ITU, 2003).

Finalmente, debe tenerse la amonestación de Ott (1998), para atenuar el entusiasmo utópico sobre el impacto democratizador de las TIC en África. Sin embargo, hay un impacto mínimo en el número y categorías de los que participan en ellas y, por lo tanto, pueden influir en la dirección de la alfabetización informacional en el continente. La mayoría de los «públicos», incluyendo a las nuevas generaciones, son los segmentos marginados de la sociedad, incapaces de alcanzar la alfabetización a través de las TIC, debido a las limitaciones económicas, del lenguaje o de cualquier otro tipo.

3. Metodología

Algunos indicadores recientes demuestran cómo se encuentra la alfabetización mediática e informacional en Sudáfrica, como por ejemplo el estudio de la Universidad de Ciudad del Cabo entre jóvenes estudiantes de la élite. En una primera fase, los datos se obtuvieron a partir de las estadísticas sobre el uso de Internet y población de World Stats, y refleja que solo el 6,7% tienen una penetración de Internet en África, lo que representa el 3,9% de los usuarios mundiales. En este contexto, de los dos tercios de población residentes en zonas rurales, solo el 4% tiene conexión de línea telefónica fija. La estadística muestra que casi todos los países africanos, con bajo acceso a Internet, se hallan entre los países menos desarrollados del mundo en términos de salud, educación e ingresos. Por lo tanto, existe una estrecha correlación entre las brechas sociales mundiales y la brecha digital mundial.

En la tabla 1 se puede observar fácilmente una correlación entre la agrupación de los valores bajos tanto para el Índice de Acceso Digital (IAD)1 como para el Índice de Desarrollo Humano (IDH)2 en África. Esta agrupación da más peso a la idea de que tanto el IDH y el IAD tienen un fuerte componente espacial.

En la tabla 2 se muestra que la alfabetización mediática e informacional está teniendo un desarrollo muy desigual. El acceso a Internet y las experiencias de los nuevos medios varían en la naturaleza del consumo dándose prioridad a los teléfonos móviles en detrimento del acceso a Internet y de los ordenadores. Por lo tanto, la situación socioeconómica en África es un importante predictor de cómo la gente está incorporando la web en su vida cotidiana e incluso con respecto a la naturaleza de estas actividades.

En la tabla 3 se comprueba que las estadísticas indican una fuerte correlación entre la capacidad de los individuos de un país para adoptar la alfabetización mediática e informacional y el nivel de desarrollo en el mismo país o región. Este hallazgo apoya la hipótesis estadística sobre la relación entre el desarrollo y las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación.

Y en la segunda etapa, un estudio piloto se basa en una muestra de estudiantes de la UCT, quienes fueron preguntados sobre su conocimiento, percepción de las posibilidades, y desafíos a los que se enfrenta la alfabetización mediática e informacional. Se trata de un método de múltiples encuestas: 120 sujetos y entrevistas intensivas. La tasa de respuesta fue muy alta, ya que 100 de los encuestados respondieron a la encuesta.

En muchos círculos de jóvenes, DC++ se ha convertido en una realidad, lo que simplemente significa que se trata de un país libre y de código abierto, «peer-to-peer», para compartir archivos de cliente que se pueden utilizar para conectarse a la red Direct Connect o al protocolo ADC. Las versiones modificadas de DC++, basadas en el código fuente DC++, fueron desarrolladas por comunidades especializadas (por ejemplo, comunidades dedicas a compartir música), o con el fin de apoyar características específicas en fase de experimentación (Ullner, 2008).

En esta etapa inicial de aplicación de la investigación, se tomó una muestra intencional no probabilística de estudiantes de la Universidad de Ciudad del Cabo (UCT), de distintas facultades, entre estudiantes de grado y posgrado3, en abril de 2011.

En la figura 1, los resultados indicaron que el 80% de la muestra tenía acceso con una mayoría de angloparlantes (56%), mientras que el 50% eran de raza blanca: el 31% de la Facultad de Humanidades y el 26% en la Facultad de Ingeniería.

En la figura 2, los resultados indicaron que la mayoría de los estudiantes (46%) tenía un conocimiento moderado de DC++, mientras que solo el 15% está en la categoría de conocimiento alto.

En la figura 3, los resultados indicaron que el 61% de los estudiantes eran por lo general usuarios. El resultado hizo hincapié en que solo el 21% utilizan DC++ en bases diarias, mientras que la mayoría (35%) lo utilizó una vez al mes.

En la figura 4, los resultados indicaron que el 77% de los conocimientos de los estudiantes sobre el DC++ derivaba de la publicidad, mientras que el 74% se derivaba del boca a boca, y solo el 37% se derivaba de su interpretación de los cursos.

En la figura 5, los resultados indicaron que el 90% de los estudiantes utilizaban elementos no autorizados, mientras que el 97% de la muestra indicó que utiliza elementos no autorizados por razones de coste.

En la figura 6, los resultados reflejaron una división entre los estudiantes que accedieron a implementar cualquier disuasión (53%), mientras el 47% no estuvo de acuerdo. Además, la muestra tuvo una divergencia con respecto a las razones por las que desistir de esta actitud (70%) se refieren a la descarga personal, mientras que el 67% admitió ser consciente de las ilegalidades.

Los resultados de la regresión de las tablas tienen el signo esperado, con la excepción de la variable de transparencia, que tiene un coeficiente negativo en la mayoría de las estimaciones. Como tal, las variables de la alfabetización informacional como en el caso de la variable (DC++) generalmente tienen un coeficiente negativo que cumple con los hallazgos de muchos estudios previos en este sentido, como el de Thompson y Rushing (1999), quienes indican que una mayor protección de las patentes tiene un efecto positivo solo en los países que tienen un PIB per cápita alto (por encima de 4.000,00 $). Los resultados sugieren la necesidad urgente de políticas con capacidad de absorción entre los jóvenes, mediante la inversión en educación, información y tecnología de las comunicaciones, mientras aboguen por ideas relevantes sobre derechos de propiedad de la información.

Aunque los resultados no pueden generalizarse, esta investigación pone en evidencia cómo un estudio piloto relacionó los niveles de alfabetización mediática e informacional con la toma de conciencia, la motivación y la evaluación entre los estudiantes, élite privilegiada y minoritaria en estos contextos con acceso a Internet. Los principales criterios para la selección de la muestra fueron el ser estudiantes de la UCT con acceso y uso de sus ordenadores a diario.

4. Discusión

Esta investigación ha estudiado el surgimiento y la interpretación de las TIC entre los jóvenes estudiantes en la ‘nueva’ Sudáfrica. A través de la utilización de un marco de contraste de «objetivos» y «herramientas», se ha tratado exponer las deficiencias y contradicciones en la aplicación de las TIC entre los jóvenes como resultado de la legislación del gobierno y la vaguedad de la retórica dirigida a la política de implementación de las TIC.

Contar con jóvenes estudiantes, en particular en África, que estén formados en los medios, es fundamental para lograr cualquier desarrollo económico, social y político. Si los jóvenes están alfabetizados en medios serán capaces de analizar la información y utilizarla para adquirir más habilidades y competencias. Pero uno de los principales problemas es que aún no se cuenta con políticas y mecanismos para institucionalizar la alfabetización mediática e informacional y abordar las graves carencias de información que existen, como resultado de la escasa capacidad de localizar y utilizar eficazmente la información en los medios, al servicio de la mayoría desfavorecida.

Los medios de comunicación tienen que recuperar su misión batalladora, robusta, sin miedo, ofreciendo un discurso que puede ser de confianza, con un continuo proceso de inclusión de todas las gamas cromáticas de la sociedad para complementar los planes de estudios que se han basado en la información incorrecta con el objetivo de reducir la brecha digital.

La alfabetización mediática e informacional, no solo requiere reunir montones de estadísticas de los profesores que no pueden mejorar la alfabetización, sino que también aumenta la calidad del tiempo de los profesores con los alumnos y con ello hacer un mejor trabajo. En ese sentido, falseando la «tasa de aprobación matricial», las estadísticas anuales pueden hacer que ciertos casos individuales se vean bien, pero está claro que no miden el conocimiento, la alfabetización ni la aritmética actuales. También es muy común en muchos de los países africanos, incluido Sudáfrica, no leer detenidamente las estadísticas, o tratar de proyectar una actitud positiva sobre el país que está motivada, por el orgullo, o la falta de conocimiento, o incluso por un conflicto de intereses. Los diferentes indicadores destacan los estrechos vínculos y conexiones entre la mejora de la alfabetización mediática e informacional y la educación, por un lado, y la mejora de la calidad docente y los indicadores con los que se cuenta por el otro lado (Saleh, 2009).

En niveles micro, la alfabetización mediática e informacional podría proporcionar una hoja de ruta para estimular el progreso social, aunque permanece en el dominio de las élites ricas, empresariales o militares. En niveles macro, se mantuvo como una de las áreas clave donde en el gobierno post-apartheid ha fracasado estrepitosamente hasta la fecha. Hasta que el valor de la educación no arraigue en la cultura sudafricana, la ley del mínimo esfuerzo prevalecerá. Hasta ahora, Sudáfrica había aplicado modelos de alfabetización mediática e informacional sin evaluar y comprender sus impactos en los receptores. Esta acción puntual de la alfabetización mediática e informacional a los planes de estudio no ha dado resultados generando restricciones en las actitudes hacia las mujeres, la educación y las influencias religiosas, especialmente en las comunidades sociales.

Sudáfrica necesita alternativas de bajo coste para la educación convencional, impulsando rápidamente reformas en los planes de estudio, con materiales impresos u on-line, con sesiones interactivas, o con medios convencionales de desarrollo curricular, que podrían ayudar a la implementación del modelo de la UNESCO. Por tanto, se recomienda establecer enfoques alternativos e innovadores para mejorar la alfabetización mediática e informacional mediante la orientación de los ciudadanos a tecnologías asequibles, adecuadas y accesibles.

La investigación basada en la práctica es básica para lograr el objetivo, mediante la creación del conocimiento, experiencia y ética, como en el caso de DC++ para implementar factores disuasorios que ayuden a elevar el nivel de competencias de los jóvenes estudiantes.

El estudio piloto refleja una tendencia general de duda sobre la penalización por la vulneración de los derechos de autor, aunque la mayoría de la muestra se refería al factor económico, no solo a las habilidades digitales directas necesarias para seguir este modelo. Se propone una serie de recomendaciones políticas necesarias para lograr una mayor participación popular en la alfabetización mediática e informacional en Sudáfrica:

1) Las acciones deben tratar de superar los obstáculos actuales a los que se enfrentan, con políticas nacionales coherentes, haciendo hincapié en la importancia de la agenda pública para exigir demandas, crear el ambiente adecuado y reflexionar sobre las posibilidades de integración y contextualización.

2) Aumentar la gestión eficaz, la transparencia y la participación pública a través de intercambio de información dentro de cada país, incluida la libertad de expresión y apoyo a los consumidores.

3) Desarrollar políticas orientadas hacia la apertura educativa y laboral, y la tolerancia, con el fin de estimular una mayor integración laboral de las mujeres, mejorando sus oportunidades educativas y formativas para la mayoría de las comunidades desfavorecidas y de color en Sudáfrica.

4) Establecer el acceso a la educación y a las infraestructuras, enfatizando la alfabetización digital en Primaria.

5) Fomentar la lectura y el acceso a la información para integrar a los grupos marginales, comprendiendo sus diferencias de raza, color y género en la sociedad sudafricana.

6) Identificar las interacciones en las comunidades locales para comprender y reconocer sus diferencias. Sin embargo, el reto sigue encontrándose en la forma de crear un compromiso y liderazgo comunitario basado en dar prioridad a los programas de mejora educativa y proporcionar los recursos necesarios, los conocimientos, habilidades, motivaciones y el acceso para tener éxito en conformidad con los Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio (ODM). Los escasos fondos públicos deben ser complementados por la máxima movilización de la inversión privada, a través de la creación y mantenimiento de un ambiente acogedor para la iniciativa privada y la toma de riesgos que podrían impulsar el acceso de los pobres a los servicios y oportunidades que ofrece la alfabetización mediática e informacional. Al final, la formación en MIL, por lo tanto, tiene un enorme potencial en la mejora de la participación de las generaciones venideras en Sudáfrica y en otras sociedades en desarrollo en la sociedad de la información. La alfabetización mediática e informacional mantiene en el aire las esperanzas de progreso ante la dura realidad.

Notas

1 El Índice de Acceso Digital (IAD) mide la capacidad global de los individuos en un país para acceder y utilizar las nuevas TIC. El IAD se basa en cuatro vectores fundamentales que inciden en la capacidad del país para acceder a las TIC: infraestructura, asequibilidad, conocimiento y calidad y el uso real de las TIC. Permite que el interrogatorio de los compañeros a través de una forma transparente y medible a nivel mundial de seguimiento de los progresos para mejorar el acceso a las TIC.

2 El Índice de Desarrollo Humano (IDH) es una medida comparativa de la esperanza de vida, la alfabetización, la educación y los niveles de vida para los países de todo el mundo, identificando el nivel de desarrollo y medir el impacto de las políticas económicas en la calidad de vida.

3 Una red libre y de código abierto, peer-to-peer para compartir archivos de clientes que se conecta a la red Direct Connect la rápida proliferación de redes peer-to-peer ha creado un nuevo canal de distribución digital.


Draft Content 233319306-26662 ov-es003.jpg


Draft Content 233319306-26662 ov-es004.jpg


Draft Content 233319306-26662 ov-es005.jpg


Draft Content 233319306-26662 ov-es006.jpg


Draft Content 233319306-26662 ov-es007.jpg


Draft Content 233319306-26662 ov-es008.jpg


Draft Content 233319306-26662 ov-es009.jpg


Draft Content 233319306-26662 ov-es010.jpg


Draft Content 233319306-26662 ov-es011.jpg

Referencias

Baliamoune, M. (2003). An Analysis of the Determinants and Effects of ICT Diffusion in Developing Countries. Information Technology for Development, 10, 1, 151-169.

Castells, M. (2002). The Internet Galaxy. Oxford (UK): Oxford University Press.

Ernst, D., Mystelka, L. & Gianiatos, G. (1998). Technological Capabilities in the Context of Export-led Growth: A Conceptual Framework. In D. Ernst (Ed.), Technological Capabilities and Export Success in Asia (pp. 5-45). London (UK): Routledge.

Freedom House (2010). Freedom in the World 2010 Survey Re lease. Freedom in the World 2010 Survey Release, 2010 (www. freedomhouse.org/template.cfm?page=15) (05-12-2011).

Fuchs, C. & Horak, E. (2008). Africa and the Digital Divide. Te le matics and Informatics, 25, 1, 99-116.

Gillwald, A. & Lisham, A. (2007). The Political Economy of ICT Policy Making in Africa: Historical Contexts of Regulatory Frame works. Policy Performance, Research Questions and Methodo logical Issues, 1, 1. (www.gersterconsulting.ch/docs/ICT-Africa_ Re port_ final_fr.pdf) (30-11-2011).

Gillwald, A. & Stork, C. (2008). Towards Evidence-based ICT Policy & Regulation: ICT access and usage in Africa. Research ICT Africa, 2, 18, 35-42.

Gregson, K. & Bucy, E. (2001). Media Participation: A Legiti mi zing Mechanism of Mass Democracy. New Media & Society, 3, 3, 357.

Habermas, J. (1991). The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere. (Translation by T. Burger) Massachusetts (U.S.): MIT Press.

Hameso, S. (2002). Issues and Dilemmas of Multi-Party Democracy in Africa. West Africa Review, 3, 2-8.

Harindranath, G. & Sein, M. (2007). Revisiting the role of ICT in development. 9th International Conference on Social Impli ca tions of Computers in Developing Countries. São Paulo, Brazil, 1, 1, 1-6.

ITU (Ed.) (2003). Investment: International Telecommunication Association Statistics, ITU. (www.itu.int) (07-8-2011).

Karsenti, T. & Ngamo, S. (2007). The Quality of Education in Africa: the Role of ICTs in Teaching. International Review of Edu ca tion / Internationale Zeitschrift für Erziehungswissenschaft, 53, 5/6, 665-686.

Katiti, E. (2010). NEPAD ICT Broadband Infrastructure Pro gramme: Interconnection via Umojanet. Presentation to the Afri can Peering and Interconnection. Forum, 1, 1, 1-19.

Kedzie, C.R. (1997). Communication and Democracy: Coincident Revolutions and the Emergent Dictator’s Dilemma. Santa Monica, CA: Rand.

Mundy, P. & Sultan, J. (2001). Information Revolutions. Tech ni cal Centre for Agricultural Rural Cooperation, 1, 1, 77-97.

Ott, D. & Rosser, M. (2000). The Electronic Republic? The Role of the Internet in Promoting Democracy in Africa. Democratization, 7, 1, 137-155.

Ott, D. (1998). Power to the People: The Role of Electronic Media in Promoting Democracy in Africa, 3/3 (www rstmonday. dk/issues/issue3_4/ott/index.html#author) (05-02-2012).

Quebral, N. (1975). Development communication. In J. Jamias (Ed.), Readings development communication (pp. 1-11). Laguna (Philippines): UPLB College of Agriculture.

Rahman, H. (2006). Empowering Marginal Communities and Information Networking. Hershey, Pennsylvania: Idea Group Pu blishing.

Rothchild, D. (2000). Ethnic Bargain and State Breakdown in Africa. Nationalism and Ethnic Politics, 1, 1, 54-74.

Saleh, I. (2003). Unveiling the Truth About Middle Eastern Media. Privatization in Egypt: Hope or Dope? Cairo (Egypt): Taiba Press.

Saleh, I. (2009). Media Literacy in MENA: Moving Beyond the Vicious Cycle of Oxymora - Mapping World Media Education Po licies. Comunicar, 32, 1, 119-129 (DOI: 10.3916/c32-2009-02-010).

Singh, S. (2010). The South African Information Society, 1994-2008: Problems with Policy, Legislation, Rhetoric and Imple men tation. Journal of Southern African Studies, 36, 1, 209-227.

Steinmueller, W. (2001). ICTs and the Possibilities for Leap frogging by Developing Countries. International Labour Review, 140, 2, 193-210.

Techatassanasoontorn, A. & Tanvisuth, A. (2008). The Inte grated Self-Determination and Self-Efficacy. Theories of ICT. SIG on Global Development Workshop. Paris: December 13, 1, 6-10.

Tettey, W. (2002). Local Government Capacity Building and Civic Engagement: An Evaluation of the Sample Initiative in Ghana. Perspectives on Global Development & Technology, 1, 2, 28-165.

Thompson, M. & Rushing, F. (1999). An Empirical Analysis of the Impact of Patent Protection of Economic Growth: An Extension. Journal of Economic Development, 24, I, 67-76.

Tlabela, K., Roodt, J., Paterson, A. & Weir-Smith, G. (2007). Mapping ICT Access in South Africa. Cape Town (South Africa): HSRC Press.

Ullner, F. (2008). PC Pitstop and its P2P-report. DC++: Just These Guys, Ya Know? January 17, 2008 (http://dcpp.word press. com/2008/01/17/pc-pitstop-and-its-p2p-report/). (17-04-2012).

United Nations Human Development Report (Ed.) (2005). UNHDP 2005. New York: United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

UNSTATS (Ed.) (2002). United Nations Statistical Databases (http://unstats.un.org) (1995-2002). International Telecommu ni ca tion (07-09-2011).

US Census Bureau / Nielsen Online, ITU (Ed) (2009). Computer In dustry Almanac. June 30 (www.internetworldstats . com/ stats5.htm#me) (6-6-2011).

Van Dijk, J. (2005). The Deepening Divide: Inequality in the In formation Society. London: Sage Publications.

Wanjiku, R. (2009). Kenya Communications Amendment Act (2009) Progressive or retrogressive? Association for Progressive Communications (APC), 1, 1, 1-20.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/09/12
Accepted on 30/09/12
Submitted on 30/09/12

Volume 20, Issue 2, 2012
DOI: 10.3916/C39-2012-02-03
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 1
Views 2
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?