Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Download the PDF version

Resumen

E-Learning environments are enhancing both their functionalities and the quality of the resources provided, thus simplifying the creation of learning ecologies adapted for students with disabilities. The number of students with disabilities enrolled in online courses is so small, and their impairments are so specific that it becomes difficult to quantify and identify which specific actions should be taken to support them. This work contributes to scientific literature with two key aspects: 1) It identifies which barriers these students encounter, and which tools they use to create learning ecologies adapted to their impairments; 2) It also presents the results from a case study in which 161 students with recognised disabilities evaluate the efficiency and ease of use of an online learning environment in higher education studies. The work presented in this paper highlights the need to provide multimedia elements with subtitles, text transcriptions, and the option to be downloadable and editable so that the student can adapt them to their needs and learning style.

Resumen

Los entornos de aprendizaje en línea están mejorando sus funcionalidades y la calidad de los recursos, facilitando que estudiantes con discapacidad puedan crear y adaptar sus propias ecologías de aprendizaje. Normalmente, el número de estudiantes con discapacidad matriculados es tan residual y sus discapacidades tan particulares, que resulta difícil identificar y cuantificar qué medidas de asistencia son relevantes para este colectivo en general. El objetivo de este trabajo es hacer entender cómo aprenden los estudiantes en entornos en línea dependiendo de su discapacidad y de las características del entorno. Consistentemente, se definen cinco ecologías de aprendizaje que son más frecuentes. Este trabajo contribuye a la literatura científica en dos aspectos fundamentales: 1) identificar qué barreras se encuentran, qué herramientas de apoyo utilizan los estudiantes online con discapacidad y cómo las combinan para formar ecologías de aprendizaje adaptadas a discapacidades específicas; 2) presentar los resultados en los que 161 estudiantes con discapacidad reconocida evalúan la eficiencia y facilidad de uso de un entorno de aprendizaje online en el ámbito universitario. Se resalta la necesidad de proveer elementos multimedia con subtítulos, transcripciones de texto, y la opción de que sean descargables y editables para que el estudiante pueda adaptarlos a sus necesidades y estilo de aprendizaje.

Keywords

Learning ecology, accessibility, e-learning, disability, PLE, transcripts, assistive technology, students

Palabras clave

Ecología de aprendizaje, accesibilidad, enseñanza virtual, discapacidad, entorno personal de aprendizaje, transcripciones, tecnología de asistencia, estudiantes

Introduction

Learning Content Management Systems (LCMS) provide access to learning content and services independently of time and location barriers. In the new paradigm of ubiquitous learning, academic services are extending their accessibility through technologies and devices (Díez-Gutiérrez & Díaz-Nafría, 2018; Tabuenca, Ternier, & Specht, 2013; Virtanen, Haavisto, Liikanen, & Kääriäinen, 2018), offering new opportunities to scaffold learning ecologies that may be especially favourable for people with disabilities (Bryant, Rao, & Ok, 2016; Perelmutter, McGregor, & Gordon, 2017). People with disabilities can eliminate barriers, thus ensuring an efficient and easy use of ICT. Exclusion from ICT applications has implications beyond remaining outside the information society, it also means being ostracized from an autonomous and independent life. Recent reports refute the fact that people with disabilities are large users of new technologies, and mobile devices in particular (Vodafone Spain Foundation, 2013; Zubillaga-del-Río & Alba-Pastor, 2013; Gutiérrez & Martorell, 2011). Educational systems have difficulties converting ICTs into learning and knowledge technologies. Therefore, it becomes necessary to guide teachers in this transition (Sancho, 2008).

Online courses are usually structured by computer engineers and hosted in LCMS. Teachers then add their subjects and activities according to the curriculum. Each teacher must have a minimum level of digital competence that allows them to enhance these sections with texts, images, assessments, videos and other multimedia content. When teaching students with disabilities, it is not necessary for every educator to become an accessibility expert. However, they should have a clear vision of the existing barriers and a general idea of how these students can make effective use of their computer (Copper, 2006). Almost everyone with disabilities can be taught how to make effective use of the computer with the help of assistive technologies provided by the operating system or specialized software (and/or hardware) (Williams, Jamali, & Nicholas, 2006).

Resource ecologies in the learning context

A learning ecology is defined as the set of physical or virtual spaces that provide opportunities to learn (Barron, 2004). Jackson (2013) developed a definition indicating that the learning ecology of a specific individual includes the processes, contexts, relationships, and interactions that give rise to opportunities and resources for learning. Indeed, each person has a wide and diverse range of possibilities for training and learning, which requires individuals to take more and more control of their own learning process (González-Sanmamed, Sangrà, Souto-Seijo, & Estévez Blanco, 2018; Caamaño, González-Sanmamed & Carril, 2018).

Ubiquitous technology is encouraging students to learn how to use tools beyond the software and resources that are commonly available to teachers and students. Luckin (2008) designed the Ecology of Resources (EoR) model to cover the need to consider a broader spectrum of learning resources beyond the student's desktop. This model represents how existing tools in the student's usual context can offer new ways of assistance (Luckin, 2010). The fact that students have a wide variety of resources available is not enough. It must be ensured that for each particular environment, the resources are organized and activated in an appropriate manner for each student who may need to access them. In a learning scenario, Luckin distinguishes the following elements that make up an ecology of learning resources. This paper highlights the specialized EoR model in the context of students with disabilities (Figure 1):

  • Environment. Usual learning context. For example, the desk and the computer where the student normally studies.
  • Tools and people. Tools or people that (added to the usual environment) facilitate student learning. For example, headphones that facilitate adapted listening, or transcripts of videos that allow the student to read the transcripts.
  • Knowledge and skills. Capacities or content that the student is interested in acquiring. For example, learning a programming language.
  • Barriers or filters. They prevent access to any of the aforementioned elements. For example, in the case of a student with a hearing impairment, there are videos that do not contain subtitles or transcripts.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/9a53ceaa-ebcd-435d-9651-bf2baaec05b0/image/1e1a9c47-945e-48dc-9f14-9daf6fb0af50-ueng-05-01.png


The working hypothesis is that, according to the Universal Learning Design paradigm (Meyer & Rose, 2000), e-Learning environments must provide a variety of multi-format resources in the form of accessible collections. Specifically, the objective of this study is to answer the following research questions:

  • RQ1: Which learning ecologies can be identified in online students with disabilities? And more specifically, what barriers does this group encounter, and what tools do they rely on? A related work study is carried out to represent the ecologies in the EoR model (Luckin, 2010)
  • RQ2: How to assess whether the support tools provided in online environments are sufficient and suitable for students with disabilities to learn. The results of a study are presented in which students with certified disabilities evaluate these tools. Furthermore, the creation of ecologies is confirmed.

Classification of learning ecologies in students with disabilities

Students with disabilities may need more than just one tool to carry out their activity in online environments. The ecologies defined here are not separate, they can combine learning objectives, environments, tools, and barriers. The classification has been made from the perspective of Copper (2006), which considers that, in general, it is not appropriate to consider medical classifications of disability when seeking to identify the means for people with disabilities to make efficient use of the computer. It is preferable to consider the person's abilities and disabilities with respect to what they should do to make more effective use of their computer, adopting a functional approach. Learning ecologies bring together the limitations suffered by people with a certain sensory limitation. This may be a visual, auditory, motor, cognitive, psychic limitation or even suffer specific learning difficulties, such as dyslexia and dysgraphia, or attention deficit hyperactivity disorders (ADHD) and autism. On many occasions the same person suffers from functional and sensory limitations of various types, the casuistry being very diverse.

Five learning ecologies can be distinguished mainly in students with disabilities based on sensory differences and the limitations that each disability presents (Carbó-Badal, Castro-Belmonte, & Latorre-Dena, 2017; Rodríguez-Martín, 2017). In presenting the ecologies, the difficulties inherent in each functional diversity are summarized. Furthermore, technological solutions are presented that help to address these barriers.

Learning ecology in online students with a hearing impairment (EHI)

This group comprises students who suffer from a mild hearing loss or difficulty in hearing to a substantial loss in both ears or deafness. People who wear hearing aids can be included. The barriers are mainly access to audio and video content (e.g. voices and sounds) when reproducers are not equipped to play subtitles or do not provide volume controls (Fuertes, González, Mariscal-Vivas, & Ruiz, 2005). Another barrier is enriched text without the option to adjust the text size, and colors of the subtitles, and web applications that do not allow multimodal interaction (e.g. only with a mouse, without a voice option). Below are some of the main relevant tools to provide an optimal access:

  • Transcripts and subtitles of audio content, including audio-only content and multimedia audio tracks.
  • Media players that display subtitles and provide options to adjust the text size and subtitle colors.
  • Options to stop, pause and adjust the volume of audio content (regardless of system volume).
  • High quality audio with the lowest possible background noise.
  • See representation of EHI in (Tabuenca & Rodrigo, 2019b).

Learning ecology in online students with a visual impairment (EVI)

This category includes users with severe visual impairments, such as blindness, other moderate visual impairments, such as glaucoma or even color blindness.

People with visual disabilities need to adapt the representations of the data according to their tools. This group mainly faces barriers in accessing multimedia content when they lack adequate audio or textual transcriptions, or if they are only accessible using the mouse (ONCE, 2019). The audio description for visual content, both static (i.e. images) and dynamic (i.e. videos) is very important. In terms of formulas, the fields that are poorly arranged and not accessible by tabulators give rise to a serious difficulty in use. Similar barriers are disorganized contextual menus or menus that are inaccessible via the keyboard (Venegas-Sandoval & Mansilla-Gómez, 2010).

Below are some of the main relevant tools to provide optimal access:

  • Enable an option to enlarge or reduce the size of text and images.
  • Define font sizes with relative units so that the font size can be enlarged or decreased using the graphic interface options.
  • Provide a link to select a high contrast color palette. It is important to provide the possibility to customize text fonts, colors and their distribution on the screen.
  • The structure must be clear both for the user who can see the whole content and for anyone who accesses the information through a screen reader.
  • Sections must be marked as section headings. Thus, users of screen readers can easily move between the different sections using voice synthesis (pressing the letter "H").
  • The HTML and CSS code used must include formal grammars to ensure the correct display of content in different browsers.
  • Provide textual transcripts for audios and videos.
  • Provide audio descriptions for videos or movies.
  • See representation of EVI in Tabuenca and Rodrigo (2019b).

Learning ecology in online students with a physical/motor impairment (EPI)

A motor disability is a series of alterations that affect the carrying out of movements. There are people with complete paralysis and others with motor difficulties in their lower limbs (difficulty in displacement) or higher (difficulty in speech or manipulation problems).

This group mainly faces barriers when using the keyboard and mouse (Sanz-Troyano, Torrente, Moreno-Ger, & Fernández-Manjón, 2010).

Below are some of the main relevant tools to provide optimal access:

  • Hardware support (e.g. ergonomic keyboards, keyboard housings, one-hand keyboards, adapted mice, joystick, head pointers and stylus integrated into caps or helmets, mouth rods, page turning devices, armrests, supports and mechanical stands).
  • Software support (e.g. predictive virtual keyboard, voice recognition programs and transcribers, digital recorder).
  • Provide the student with extra time to complete oral / written activities or assessments.
  • Mechanical elements and adaptations in keyboards and mice or pointing pencils.
  • See representation of EPI (Tabuenca & Rodrigo, 2019b).

Learning ecology in online students with mental impairment (EMI)

People with mental disabilities are characterized by alterations in cognitive and affective processes. This group faces barriers related to information reasoning and communications skills (Cuesta & Ramos, 2012). The lack of specific information or ambiguous statements can cause a lot of anxiety in these students. They can suffer alterations in their reasoning, difficulty in recognizing reality, processing information, difficulties in adapting to a specific environment, and elaborating contextualized information. They may suffer paranoia or stage fright, which reduces their ability to communicate. They may even suffer cognitive limitations. The pharmacological treatments they receive can affect their attention span, concentration, memory, verbal and written comprehension, and the management of information.

Below are some of the main relevant tools to provide optimal access:

  • Provide precise instructions for carrying out the assessment tests and exam modalities.
  • Make flexible delivery deadlines for assignments and evaluation tests.
  • Use simple and illustrative iconographies with bright colors and simple shapes that help their understanding and memorization.
  • Offer alternative types of evaluation tests (e.g. multiple-choice questions or short questions). This adaptation should ideally not affect the evaluation of the skills required to pass the course.
  • See representation of EMI in (Tabuenca & Rodrigo, 2019b).

Learning ecology in online students with specific attention or hyperactivity difficulties (EAD)

There is a group of disorders connected with significant difficulties in the acquisition and use of reading and writing, or attention deficits. They are usually caused by neurological alterations or dysfunctions that affect perceptual, psycholinguistic processes, working memory and strategies of learning and meta-cognition (Romero & al., 2005). Dyslexia (difficulty reading) may exist in isolation, but it is usually accompanied by dysgraphia (difficulty in writing), as both processes are cognitively linked.

On the other hand, attention deficit hyperactivity disorders cause dysfunctions in the mechanisms of executive control and behavior inhibition, which directly affects work memory, concentration, the self-regulation of motivation, the organization of tasks, the internalization of language and the processes of analysis and synthesis (Faraone, Biederman, & Mick, 2006).

In general, all of the disorders explained here can give rise to greater impulsiveness, lack of concretion in completing tasks. Consequently, they may have greater possibilities of failing answers as they usually present poorly readable spelling, crossings out and a lack of organization in their ideas. Below are some of the adaptations that might help these students:

  • Computer or tablet with assistive apps, and digital recorders.
  • Text-to-speech conversion software (which read, for example, the texts on the computer screen or mobile devices).
  • Provide extra time to complete individual activities (e.g. tasks, assignments).
  • Receive contextual information of what is being displayed in the blackboard or any presentation document. The instructor must make an extra effort to verbalize aloud what he is pointing at in each moment.
  • See representation of EAD in (Tabuenca & Rodrigo, 2019b).

This work is structured as follows: In this first section, RQ1 has been addressed by classifying learning ecologies according to each particular disability, with the aim of clearly identifying the needs to be taken into account when creating learning contents and structuring them in adapted LCMS.

In the next section, RQ2 is addressed by presenting an evaluation study of an online learning environment and its support tools. Section 3 presents the results of the study from the perspective of 161 students with certified disabilities. Finally, in section 4 the conclusions are presented based on the results obtained.

Method

This study uses the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) as a reference to explore how users accept and use technology (Davis, Bagozzi, & Warshaw, 1989). This tool is effective in predicting the acceptance of systems by users (Robles-Gómez & al., 2015). The model has been extended by adding constructs to complete it with additional psychological factors related to the use or intention to use the system: an e-learning system (Liaw, 2008), online lifelong learning (Suh & Lee, 2007), digital skills and Internet (Yi & Hwang, 2003), online social networks (Liu, Chen, Sun, Wible, & Kuo, 2010), cognitive absorption (Venkatesh, 2000), etc.

However, there are no previous models measuring the acceptance of a technological system by exploring its accessibility features. This study proposes to explore improvements in accessibility that influence the willingness to use a specific technological system. In this case, the system is a repository of e-learning audio-visual resources at UNED (CadenaCampus). CadenaCampus allows live broadcasting from the university's videoconference classrooms. There are more than 700 classrooms equipped with video-conference studios. They provide the option of connecting with users via chat and shared desk. The system is integrated into the university's LCMS and also functions as an external repository. The portal features a tagged semantic structure with specific metadata to enable content searches with different criteria.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/9a53ceaa-ebcd-435d-9651-bf2baaec05b0/image/1a9e8ce1-5c66-45d4-b375-e1464f5236d2-ueng-05-02.png


This study aims to identify which learning ecologies students with disabilities actually use, assessing the accessibility of the resources provided by the CadenaCampus system and focusing on two key characteristics: 1) The accessibility of the content search engine; 2) The accessibility of the audio-visual content player. The following constructs have been added to measure the degree of acceptance and use of resources that improve system accessibility:

  • Availability of textual transcriptions.
  • Availability of subtitles.
  • Availability of subtitled videos.
  • Audio availability.
  • Availability of the option to download the aforementioned elements to use in offline mode.
  • Semantic labelling to support the search system and recommendation of educational resources.

Participants

At the end of the academic year an email was sent to the students with recognized disabilities (n=7,397) in which they were invited to evaluate the accessibility characteristics of the CadenaCampus system. A total of 161 students agreed to participate in the study by accepting informed consent.

The participants in this study were people with recognized disabilities (assigned to the student attention services department for students with disabilities at the university), with an average age of 46.2 years old (SD=11.06), 51.37% being men.

The sociodemographic results (Table 1) confirm that people with disabilities usually have more than one disability due to the diseases or accidents suffered. The most frequent disabilities are reduced manipulation and strength (EPI), limited cognitive ability (EMI), limited vision (EVI), and limited hearing ability (EHI). A large part of the respondents was studying (43.84%), but many others were working as employees (36.99%), were pensioners (30.82%), or unemployed (17.12%).

These data are consistent with the current status of the group of people with disabilities issued in Spain that reflects that this group is poorly integrated into the labor market (Jiménez-Lara & Huete-García, 2018).

Materials

The self-developed questionnaire was shared with students using a link to an accessible online platform. The wording of the questions (ease of reading and being understood) was reviewed and contrasted by three university academics, experts in the areas of psychology, sociology and technological accessibility. Two technicians with motor and mental disabilities respectively, and an external collaborator with poor vision participated in the writing.

The level of accessibility to the online questionnaire was automatically validated with the TAW tool (Web Accessibility Test) and manually validated by a blind collaborator associated with this research group. The questionnaire is shared in Tabuenca & Rodrigo (2019b) and the results are shown below.

Results

Compliance with audio-visual recordings

The first question explored the degree of student satisfaction with specific characteristics of video and audio recordings, which are very beneficial resources for groups with disabilities (Table 2). Cronbach's alpha was calculated to obtain a good internal consistency (α=0.91).


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/9a53ceaa-ebcd-435d-9651-bf2baaec05b0/image/a2af9364-8de4-4975-a37d-a1ed73f99831-ueng-05-03.png


The results were satisfactory despite the recordings being produced by inexperienced users in communications, both live and without post-production.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/9a53ceaa-ebcd-435d-9651-bf2baaec05b0/image/09922399-912c-40a9-8770-01887698531f-ueng-05-04.png


Textual transcriptions as a support tool

Textual transcripts are very important for deaf people, people with cognitive deficits, and old people. They are an intermediate product for subtitling and facilitating the production of abstracts and concept maps easily.

In this case, the transcripts were provided to students as a learning resource and can be downloaded to be used offline. To the question "Do you think that the transcripts helped you to acquire the knowledge better?", 85.5% answered affirmatively (n=113).


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/9a53ceaa-ebcd-435d-9651-bf2baaec05b0/image/8f8dde40-39ff-4b0e-a619-4cbf8622d52e-ueng-05-05.png


Usefulness of the support tools

Students with disabilities may require more time to visualize, listen to and process the information. They appraise very positively the availability of resources in download mode to be able to work with these elements more quietly and offline (Table 3). Cronbach's alpha was calculated to obtain a good internal consistency (α=0.89).

Ease of use in the support tools

Resources in CadenaCampus are visually arranged next to the corresponding video with an iconography designed for this purpose and including contextual information. This question explores the ease of identifying audio-visual materials and their option to download files (Table 3). Cronbach's alpha was calculated demonstrating good internal consistency (α=0.94).

Folksonomy of accessibility

Students with disabilities (like any other student) use search engines to find learning objects adapted to their specific needs. These platforms add metadata to learning objects to make them easier to find by using certain terms. In this research, we have explored the possibility of enriching metadata with terms related to the accessibility of resources. Several experts identified 12 folksonomy terms that could be used to allocate resources in specific formats, taking both the (infinitives and participles of the) verbs and the most similar nouns (Table 4). For each of the terms, students were requested to indicate how often they used them. In addition, they were offered the option of reporting an additional term.

The results confirm the suitability of using a social indexation by means of simple labels on a flat namespace, without predefined hierarchies or kinship relationships. Likewise, they confirmed the use of the terms previously identified by the experts. Alternative terms suggested by the participants of the group studied were "inclusive", "audiobook", "outline", "summary", "video-class", "functional diversity", "exams" and "download". The indexation of learning objects with these metadata implies a valuable support tool for educators and designers when embedding learning objects in any LCMS.

Discussion and conclusions

Educators and designers of educational content should have an overview of how students with disabilities can use a computer and what technological tools facilitate the construction of learning ecologies according to their limitations. In this work, five learning ecologies for online students have been set out, classifying them according to the type of disability (RQ1): students with hearing impairment, visual impairment (EVI), physical / motor disability (EPI), psychic disability / mental disorder (EMI), and students with specific attention difficulties or hyperactivity (EAD) (Section 1.2). Inspired by the model proposed by Luckin (2010), we have identified barriers and support tools that can help students with disabilities in their learning activities.

In this work, 161 students with recognized disabilities have evaluated some of the support tools based on their experience throughout their university course. The results confirm that the system being studied includes all the elements raised by Luckin (2010) as necessary to satisfy an accessible and quality learning environment (RQ2). To corroborate these conclusions, the main tools and the access barriers are summarized below:

  • Audio-visual recordings. This is one of the main elements in e-learning environments. It was commonly defined in all ecologies (EHI, EVI, EPI, EMI and EAD). The assessment obtained has been good in terms of accessibility, quality, and usefulness of the recordings offered (Section 3.1).
  • Textual transcripts. They are essential, not only for students with hearing problems (EVI), but also as an element of assistance for any student. They can be modified to create summaries, concept maps, or to add notes with comments and doubts. 85% of the participants confirm this assertion (Section 3.2).
  • Textual enrichment of audio-visual elements through transcriptions and subtitles. This feature supports students with both hearing and visual impairment (EHI and EVI). Participants rated transcripts more positively followed by subtitles. Likewise, they rated very favourably that the transcripts fitted literally with what the teacher had said.
  • Downloading materials. This feature allows students to customize contents and organize their study without sequencing or depending on an Internet connection. This tool is key since 53% of the students had reduced handling capacity (EPI), and 21% had some visual limitation (EVI). The LCMS under study offered different support tools to students with disabilities.

The results show that downloading videos was the support tool they found in an easier and more accessible way (M=3.87), followed by audio download (M=4.56), downloading transcripts, and finally the subtitles (Section 3.4).

With all of the aforementioned, the results reinforce the working hypothesis. Learning environments must have a wide variety of related multi-format resources in the form of accessible collections (Meyer & Rose, 2000). With the convenient semantic labelling and a good profile of registered users, the systems can offer each student the resources that best suit their needs (González-Sanmamed & al., 2018).

Figure 2 illustrates a holistic representation that includes the main support tools, how they can be extracted from each other, and what associated interface the student with disabilities can use in their learning.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/9a53ceaa-ebcd-435d-9651-bf2baaec05b0/image/3b550af6-9188-448a-a7ef-45d242b1cb6c-ueng-05-06.png


The results presented in this study are exploratory and should be taken with caution as they are based on a sample of 161 out of 7,397 students with recognized disabilities. Important aspects such as the assessment of the effect on gender learning and age that have been included as tasks for future work have been omitted from this study.

References

  1. BarronB, . 2004.ecologies for technological fluency: Gender and experience differences&author=Barron&publication_year= Learning ecologies for technological fluency: Gender and experience differences.Journal of Educational Computing Research 31(1):1-36
  2. Santos-CaamañoF J, González-SanmamedM, Muñoz-CarrilP C, . 2018.desarrollo de las ecologías de aprendizaje a través de las herramientas en línea&author=Santos-Caamaño&publication_year= El desarrollo de las ecologías de aprendizaje a través de las herramientas en línea.Diálogo Educacional (56)18
  3. BryantB R, RaoK, OkM W, . 2014.design for learning and assistive technology&author=Bryant&publication_year= Universal design for learning and assistive technology.Advances in Medical Technologies and Clinical Practice11-26
  4. Carbó-BadalO, Castro-BelmonteM, Latorre-DenaF, . 2017.Red de servicios de apoyo a personas con discapacidad en la universidad. Guía de adaptaciones en la universidad. Prácticas innovadoras inclusivas: Retos y oportunidades.
  5. ChoiK S, ChoW H, LeeS, LeeH, KimC, . 2004.relationships among quality, value, satisfaction and behavioral intention in health care provider choice&author=Choi&publication_year= The relationships among quality, value, satisfaction and behavioral intention in health care provider choice.Journal of Business Research 57(8):913-921
  6. CroninJ J, TaylorS A, . 1992.service quality: A reexamination and extension&author=Cronin&publication_year= Measuring service quality: A reexamination and extension.Journal of Marketing 56(3)
  7. CopperM, . 2006.online learning accessible to disabled students: An institutional case study&author=Copper&publication_year= Making online learning accessible to disabled students: An institutional case study.Research in Learning Technology (1)14
  8. Lancheros-CuestaD J, Carrillo-RamosA, . 2012.Modelo de adaptación basado en preferencias en ambientes virtuales de aprendizaje para personas con necesidades especiales.Avances: Investigación en Ingeniería 9(1):111-119
  9. DavisF D, BagozziR P, WarshawP R, . 1989.acceptance of computer technology: A comparison of two theoretical models&author=Davis&publication_year= User acceptance of computer technology: A comparison of two theoretical models.Management Science 35(8):982-1003
  10. Díez-GutiérrezE, Díaz-NafríaJ M, . 2018.learning ecologies for a critical. [Ecologías de aprendizaje ubicuo para la ciberciudadanía crítica&author=Díez-Gutiérrez&publication_year= Ubiquitous learning ecologies for a critical. [Ecologías de aprendizaje ubicuo para la ciberciudadanía crítica]]Comunicar 26:49-58
  11. FaraoneS V, BiedermanJ, MicjE, . 2005.age-dependent decline of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: A meta-analysis of follow-up studies&author=Faraone&publication_year= The age-dependent decline of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: A meta-analysis of follow-up studies.Psychological Medicine 36(2):159-165
  12. FuertesJ L, GonzálezA L, Mariscal-VivasG, RuizC, . 2005.Herramientas de apoyo a la educación de personas sordas en la universidad española.Enseñanza 430:45-52
  13. Fundación Vodafone (Ed.). 2013.Acceso y uso de las TIC por las personas con discapacidad. Conclusiones y resumen ejecutivo.
  14. González-SanmamedM, SangràA, Souto-SeijoA, Estévez-BlancoI, . 2018.de aprendizaje en la era digital: Desafíos para la educación superior&author=González-Sanmamed&publication_year= Ecologías de aprendizaje en la era digital: Desafíos para la educación superior.Publicaciones 48(1)
  15. GutiérrezP, MartorellA, . 2011.with intellectual disability and ICTs. [Las personas con discapacidad intelectual ante las TIC&author=Gutiérrez&publication_year= People with intellectual disability and ICTs. [Las personas con discapacidad intelectual ante las TIC]]Comunicar 18:173-180
  16. JacksonN J, . 2013.The concept of learning ecologies. In: JacksonN., CooperG.B., eds. learning, education and personal development&author=Jackson&publication_year= Life-wide learning, education and personal development.
  17. Jiménez-LaraA, Huete-GarcíaA, . 2016.Informe Olivenza 2016, sobre la situación de la discapacidad en España. In: , ed. Observatorio Estatal de la Discapacidad &author=&publication_year= Olivenza: Observatorio Estatal de la Discapacidad .1-698
  18. LiawS S, . 2008.students’ perceived satisfaction, behavioral intention, and effectiveness of e-learning: A case study of the blackboard system&author=Liaw&publication_year= Investigating students’ perceived satisfaction, behavioral intention, and effectiveness of e-learning: A case study of the blackboard system.Computers & Education 51(2):864-873
  19. LiuI F, ChenM C, SunY S, WibleD, KuoC H, . 2010.the TAM model to explore the factors that affect Intention to use an online learning community&author=Liu&publication_year= Extending the TAM model to explore the factors that affect Intention to use an online learning community.Computers & Education 54(2):600-610
  20. LuckinR, . 2010. , ed. learning contexts. Technology-rich, learner-centred ecologies&author=&publication_year= Re-designing learning contexts. Technology-rich, learner-centred ecologies.London: Routledge.
  21. LuckinR, . 2008.learner centric ecology of resources: A framework for using technology to scaffold learning&author=Luckin&publication_year= The learner centric ecology of resources: A framework for using technology to scaffold learning.Computers & Education 50(2):449-462
  22. MeyerA, RoseD H, . 2000.Universal design for individual differences.Educational Leadership 58(3):39-43
  23. OhH, . 1999.quality, customer satisfaction, and customer value: A holistic perspective&author=Oh&publication_year= Service quality, customer satisfaction, and customer value: A holistic perspective.International Journal of Hospitality Management 18(1):67-82
  24. ONCE (Ed.). n.d.Concepto de ceguera y deficiencia visual. Madrid: Organización Nacional de Ciegos Españoles.
  25. PerelmutterB, McgregorK K, GordonK R, . 2017.technology interventions for adolescents and adults with learning disabilities: An evidence-based systematic review and meta-analysis&author=Perelmutter&publication_year= Assistive technology interventions for adolescents and adults with learning disabilities: An evidence-based systematic review and meta-analysis.Computers & Education 114:139-163
  26. Robles-GómezA, RosS, HernándezR, TobarraL, CamineroA C, AgudoJ M, . 2015.User acceptance of a proposed self-evaluation and continuous assessment system.Journal of Educational Technology & Society 18(2):97-109
  27. Rodríguez-MartínA, . 2017. , ed. innovadoras inclusivas: Retos y oportunidades&author=&publication_year= Prácticas innovadoras inclusivas: Retos y oportunidades.Oviedo: Universidad de Oviedo. 2019-2027
  28. RomeroJ F, CervánR L, . 2006. , ed. en el aprendizaje: Unificación de criterios diagnósticos&author=&publication_year= Dificultades en el aprendizaje: Unificación de criterios diagnósticos.Sevilla: Consejería de Educación de la Junta de Andalucía.
  29. Sanz-TroyanoE, TorrenteJ, Moreno-GerP, Fernández-ManjónB, . 2010. , ed. criterios de accesibilidad en una herramienta de juegos educativos&author=&publication_year= Introduciendo criterios de accesibilidad en una herramienta de juegos educativos.Valencia: XI Simposio Nacional de Tecnologías de la Información y las Comunicaciones en la Educación (SINTICE).
  30. SprengR A, MackoyR D, . 1996.empirical examination of a model of perceived service quality and satisfaction&author=Spreng&publication_year= An empirical examination of a model of perceived service quality and satisfaction.Journal of Retailing 72(2):90014-90021
  31. SuhC K, LeeT H, . 2007.User acceptance of e-learning for voluntary studies. In: , ed. Proceedings of the WSEAS International Conference on Computer Engineering and Applications&author=&publication_year= 2007 Proceedings of the WSEAS International Conference on Computer Engineering and Applications.Gold Coast: Australia. 538-544
  32. SanchoJ M, . 2008.De TIC a TAC, el difícil tránsito de una vocal.Investigación en la Escuela 64:19-30
  33. TabuencaB, TernierS, SpechtM, . 2013.lifelong learners to build personal learning ecologies in daily physical spaces&author=Tabuenca&publication_year= Supporting lifelong learners to build personal learning ecologies in daily physical spaces.International Journal of Mobile Learning and Organisation 7
  34. TabuencaB, RodrigoC, . 2019.Representación de ecologías de aprendizaje en estudiantes con discapacidades.
  35. Venegas-SandovalC A, Mansilla-GómezG M, . 2017.en web para personas con discapacidad visual&author=Venegas-Sandoval&publication_year= Accesibilidad en web para personas con discapacidad visual.Síntesis Tecnológica 2:1-10
  36. VenkateshV, . 2000.of perceived ease of use: Integrating control, intrinsic motivation, and emotion into the technology acceptance model&author=Venkatesh&publication_year= Determinants of perceived ease of use: Integrating control, intrinsic motivation, and emotion into the technology acceptance model.Information Systems Research 11(4):342-365
  37. VirtanenM A, HaavistoE, LiikanenE, KääriäinenM, . 2018.learning environments in higher education: A scoping literature review&author=Virtanen&publication_year= Ubiquitous learning environments in higher education: A scoping literature review.Education and Information Technologies 23:985-998
  38. WilliamsP, JamaliH R, NicholasD, . 2006.ICT with people with special education needs: What the literature tells us&author=Williams&publication_year= Using ICT with people with special education needs: What the literature tells us.Aslib Proceedings 58(4):330-345
  39. YiM Y, HwangY, . 2003.the use of web-based information systems: Self-efficacy, enjoyment, learning goal orientation, and the technology acceptance model&author=Yi&publication_year= Predicting the use of web-based information systems: Self-efficacy, enjoyment, learning goal orientation, and the technology acceptance model.International Journal of Human-Computer Studies 59(4):431-449
  40. Zubillaga-Del-RíoA, Alba-PastorC, . 2013.in the perception of technology among university students. [La discapacidad en la percepción de la tecnología entre estudiantes universitarios&author=Zubillaga-Del-Río&publication_year= Disability in the perception of technology among university students. [La discapacidad en la percepción de la tecnología entre estudiantes universitarios.Comunicar 20:165-172



Click to see the English version (EN)

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

Resumen

Los entornos de aprendizaje en línea están mejorando sus funcionalidades y la calidad de los recursos, facilitando que estudiantes con discapacidad puedan crear y adaptar sus propias ecologías de aprendizaje. Normalmente, el número de estudiantes con discapacidad matriculados es tan residual y sus discapacidades tan particulares, que resulta difícil identificar y cuantificar qué medidas de asistencia son relevantes para este colectivo en general. El objetivo de este trabajo es hacer entender cómo aprenden los estudiantes en entornos en línea dependiendo de su discapacidad y de las características del entorno. Consistentemente, se definen cinco ecologías de aprendizaje que son más frecuentes. Este trabajo contribuye a la literatura científica en dos aspectos fundamentales: 1) identificar qué barreras se encuentran, qué herramientas de apoyo utilizan los estudiantes online con discapacidad y cómo las combinan para formar ecologías de aprendizaje adaptadas a discapacidades específicas; 2) presentar los resultados en los que 161 estudiantes con discapacidad reconocida evalúan la eficiencia y facilidad de uso de un entorno de aprendizaje online en el ámbito universitario. Se resalta la necesidad de proveer elementos multimedia con subtítulos, transcripciones de texto, y la opción de que sean descargables y editables para que el estudiante pueda adaptarlos a sus necesidades y estilo de aprendizaje.

ABSTRACT

E-Learning environments are enhancing both their functionalities and the quality of the resources provided, thus simplifying the creation of learning ecologies adapted for students with disabilities. The number of students with disabilities enrolled in online courses is so small, and their impairments are so specific that it becomes difficult to quantify and identify which specific actions should be taken to support them. This work contributes to scientific literature with two key aspects: 1) It identifies which barriers these students encounter, and which tools they use to create learning ecologies adapted to their impairments; 2) It also presents the results from a case study in which 161 students with recognised disabilities evaluate the efficiency and ease of use of an online learning environment in higher education studies. The work presented in this paper highlights the need to provide multimedia elements with subtitles, text transcriptions, and the option to be downloadable and editable so that the student can adapt them to their needs and learning style.

Palabras clave

Ecología de aprendizaje, accesibilidad, enseñanza virtual, discapacidad, entorno personal de aprendizaje, transcripciones, tecnología de asistencia, estudiantes

Keywords

Learning ecology, accessibility, e-learning, disability, PLE, transcripts, assistive technology, students

Introducción

Los sistemas de gestión del contenido educativo (LCMS: Learning Content Management Systems) ofrecen acceso a contenido y servicios de aprendizaje de manera independiente a las barreras de tiempo y ubicación. En el nuevo paradigma del aprendizaje ubicuo, los servicios académicos están incrementando su accesibilidad a través de tecnologías y dispositivos (Díez-Gutiérrez & Díaz-Nafría, 2018; Tabuenca, Ternier, & Specht, 2013; Virtanen, Haavisto, Liikanen, & Kääriäinen, 2018), ofreciendo nuevas oportunidades para articular ecologías de aprendizaje especialmente favorables para personas con discapacidad (Bryant, Rao, & Ok, 2016; Perelmutter, McGregor, & Gordon, 2017). Asegurando el uso eficiente y fácil de las TIC (Tecnologías de la Información y la Comunicación) mediante herramientas de apoyo, se pueden eliminar las barreras de las personas con discapacidad. Ser excluido de estas aplicaciones de las TIC implica estar fuera no solo de la sociedad de la información, sino de una vida autónoma e independiente. Informes recientes refutan el hecho de que las personas con discapacidad son grandes usuarias de las nuevas tecnologías y, en concreto, de los dispositivos móviles (Fundación Vodafone España, 2013; Zubillaga-del-Río & Alba-Pastor, 2013; Gutiérrez & Martorell, 2011). Los sistemas educativos encuentran dificultades en convertir las TIC en TAC (Tecnologías del Aprendizaje y el Conocimiento), y por tanto se hace necesario guiar al profesorado en esta conversión (Sancho, 2008).

Los cursos online se alojan habitualmente en LCMS que inicialmente son estructurados por técnicos en informática, y más adelante los docentes crean sus asignaturas y actividades acorde al plan de estudios. Cada docente debe tener una competencia digital mínima que le permita enriquecer estas secciones con textos, imágenes, evaluables, vídeos u otros contenidos multimedia. En lo que se refiere a la atención a los estudiantes con discapacidad, no es necesario que todos los educadores se conviertan en expertos de accesibilidad. Sin embargo, sí deben tener una apreciación clara de las barreras existentes y una descripción general de cómo estas personas pueden elegir hacer un uso efectivo del ordenador (Copper, 2006) y del resto de herramientas de apoyo. Prácticamente todas las personas con discapacidad pueden ser habilitadas para hacer un uso efectivo del ordenador con la ayuda de las tecnologías de asistencia o herramientas de apoyo proporcionadas por el propio sistema operativo, o software y/o hardware especializado (Williams, Jamali, & Nicholas, 2006).

Ecologías de recursos en contextos de aprendizaje

Una ecología de aprendizaje se define como el conjunto de espacios físicos o virtuales que proveen oportunidades para aprender (Barron, 2004). Jackson (2013) elaboró una definición indicando que la ecología de aprendizaje de un individuo concreto comprende los procesos, contextos, relaciones, e interacciones, que desencadenan oportunidades y recursos para el aprendizaje. Efectivamente, cada persona tiene un abanico de posibilidades, amplio y diverso para formarse y aprender, lo que exige a los individuos tomar cada vez más el control de su propio proceso de aprendizaje (González-Sanmamed, Sangrà, Souto-Seijo, & Estévez-Blanco, 2018; Caamaño, González-Sanmamed, & Carril, 2018).

La tecnología ubicua está facilitando que los estudiantes puedan aprender utilizando herramientas más allá del software y los recursos que están comúnmente a disposición de profesores y alumnos. Luckin diseñó el modelo de Ecología de Recursos (EoR: Ecology of Resources) para cubrir la necesidad de considerar un espectro más amplio de recursos de aprendizaje más allá del escritorio del estudiante (Luckin, 2008). Este modelo sirve para representar cómo herramientas existentes en el contexto habitual del estudiante pueden ofrecer nuevas formas de asistencia (Luckin, 2010). El mero hecho de que haya una gran variedad de recursos disponibles no es suficiente. Hay que garantizar que, para cada entorno particular, los recursos se organicen y se activen de manera adecuada para cada estudiante que los pueda necesitar. En un escenario de aprendizaje, Luckin distingue los siguientes elementos que componen una ecología de recursos de aprendizaje, que en el presente trabajo se han especializado al contexto de estudiantes con discapacidad (Figura 1):

  • Entorno. Contexto de aprendizaje habitual del estudiante. Por ejemplo, el escritorio de trabajo y el ordenador con el que estudia normalmente.
  • Herramientas y personas de apoyo. Artefactos o personas que, sumados al entorno habitual, facilitan el aprendizaje al estudiante. Por ejemplo, los auriculares que facilitan una audición adaptada, o las transcripciones de los vídeos que permiten la lectura de las conversaciones.
  • Conocimiento y habilidades. Capacidades o contenidos que el estudiante está interesado en adquirir. Por ejemplo, aprender un lenguaje de programación.

Barreras. Impiden acceder a cualquiera de los anteriores elementos. Por ejemplo, en el caso de un estudiante con discapacidad auditiva, son los vídeos que no contienen subtítulos ni transcripciones.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/bf353406-46f6-42ba-991e-4c2fb314401d/image/d538be26-654b-4a2e-8271-c44106361220-u05-01.png


La hipótesis de trabajo es que los entornos de aprendizaje online deben disponer de una variedad de recursos multi-formato relacionados en forma de colecciones accesibles, acorde al paradigma del Diseño Universal del Aprendizaje (Meyer & Rose, 2000). Coherentemente, el objetivo de este estudio se centra en contestar a las siguientes preguntas de investigación:

  • P1. ¿Qué ecologías de aprendizaje se pueden identificar en estudiantes online con discapacidades? Y más específicamente, ¿qué barreras encuentra este colectivo, y en qué herramientas se apoyan? Para ello se realiza un estudio de trabajo relacionado con el fin de representar las ecologías en el modelo de EoR (Luckin, 2010).
  • P2. ¿Cómo valorar si las herramientas de apoyo facilitadas en los entornos online son suficientes y adecuadas para el aprendizaje de estudiantes con discapacidad? Para ello, se presentan los resultados de un estudio en el que estudiantes con discapacidad certificada valoran estas herramientas y se corrobora la creación de ecologías.

Clasificación de ecologías de aprendizaje en estudiantes con discapacidad

Los estudiantes con discapacidad pueden necesitar más de una herramienta para desarrollar su actividad en entornos online. Las ecologías aquí definidas no son disjuntas, sino que pueden combinarse objetivos de aprendizaje, entornos, herramientas y barreras.

La clasificación se ha realizado desde la perspectiva de Copper (2006), por la cual se considera que, en general, no es apropiado considerar clasificaciones médicas de discapacidad cuando se busca identificar los medios para que las personas con discapacidad puedan hacer un uso eficiente del ordenador. Es preferible considerar las capacidades y discapacidades de la persona con respecto a lo que deben hacer para realizar un uso más efectivo de su ordenador, adoptando un enfoque funcional. Las ecologías del aprendizaje aglutinan las limitaciones que sufren las personas con una determinada limitación sensorial. Esta podrá ser una limitación visual, auditiva, motora, cognitiva, psíquica o incluso sufrir dificultades específicas para el aprendizaje, como pueden ser la dislexia y la disgrafía, los trastornos de déficit de atención e hiperactividad (TDAH) y el autismo. En muchas ocasiones una misma persona sufre limitaciones funcionales y sensoriales de varios tipos, siendo la casuística muy diversa.

Se pueden distinguir principalmente cinco ecologías de aprendizaje en estudiantes con discapacidad basadas en las diferencias sensoriales y las limitaciones que presenta cada discapacidad (Carbó-Badal, Castro-Belmonte, & Latorre-Dena, 2017; Rodríguez-Martín, 2017). Al presentar cada ecología, se resumen las dificultades inherentes a cada diversidad funcional. Además, se presentan soluciones tecnológicas que ayudan a afrontar dichas barreras.

Ecologías de aprendizaje en estudiantes online con discapacidad auditiva (EDA)

Este colectivo lo integran estudiantes que sufren desde una pérdida auditiva leve o dificultad para oír, hasta una perdida sustancial en ambos oídos o sordera. También forman parte de él las personas que usan audífonos.

La discapacidad motriz es el conjunto de alteraciones que afectan a la ejecución de movimientos. Existen personas con parálisis completa y otras con dificultades motrices en miembros inferiores (dificultad de desplazamiento) o superiores (dificultad de habla y articulación del lenguaje o problemas de manipulación).

Las barreras a las que se enfrenta este colectivo son principalmente de acceso a los contenidos multimedia de audio y vídeo en relación a las voces y sonidos, cuando los reproductores no están equipados para reproducir subtítulos y/o no proporcionan controles de volumen (Fuertes, González, Mariscal-Vivas, & Ruiz, 2005). También supone una barrera no disponer de opción de ajuste en el tamaño del texto y colores para los subtítulos y las aplicaciones web que no permitan interacción multimodal (p. ej. solo con ratón, sin opción de voz).

Las herramientas de apoyo que necesita este colectivo para tener un acceso óptimo se listan a continuación:

  • Transcripciones y subtítulos del contenido de audio, incluido el contenido de solo audio y las pistas de audio en multimedia.
  • Reproductores multimedia que muestran subtítulos y brindan opciones para ajustar el tamaño del texto y los colores de los subtítulos.
  • Opciones para detener, pausar y ajustar el volumen del contenido de audio (independientemente del volumen del sistema).
  • Audio de alta calidad que se distingue claramente de cualquier ruido de fondo.
  • Ver representación de EDA (Tabuenca & Rodrigo, 2019).

Ecologías de aprendizaje en estudiantes online con discapacidad visual (EDV)

Engloba usuarios con deficiencia visual grave como la ceguera, y otras discapacidades visuales moderadas como el glaucoma o incluso el daltonismo. Las personas con discapacidad visual necesitan que se cambie la forma de representación de los datos mostrados, en formas más adaptadas a sus herramientas de apoyo.

Las barreras a las que se enfrenta este colectivo son principalmente de acceso a los contenidos multimedia si disponen del audio adecuado o de las transcripciones textuales, o si no son accesibles sin utilizar el ratón (ONCE, 2019). Es muy importante también la falta de audio-descripción para el contenido visual, tanto estático (imágenes) como dinámico (vídeos). En relación a los formularios, los campos mal ordenados y no accesibles por tabulador suponen un grave perjuicio de uso, así como los menús contextuales desorganizados o inaccesibles por teclado (Venegas-Sandoval & Mansilla-Gómez, 2010).

Las herramientas de apoyo que necesita este colectivo para tener un acceso óptimo son:

  • Poder agrandar o reducir texto e imágenes.
  • Definir los tamaños de las fuentes con unidades relativas para que se pueda ampliar o disminuir el tamaño de la fuente desde las opciones de los interfaces gráficos.
  • Disponer de enlace para seleccionar paleta de colores de alto contraste. Es importante tener la posibilidad de personalizar las fuentes del texto, los colores y su distribución.
  • La estructura debe ser clara tanto para el usuario que puede ver todo el contenido, como para el que accede a la información a través de un lector de pantalla.
  • Los distintos apartados deben estar marcados como encabezados de sección. Así, los usuarios de lectores de pantalla por síntesis de voz podrán desplazarse con facilidad entre los distintos apartados pulsando la letra “H”.
  • El código HTML y CSS empleado debe ajustarse a las gramáticas formales para garantizar la correcta visualización de los contenidos en distintos navegadores.
  • Disponer de las transcripciones textuales del audio de los vídeos.
  • Disponer de audio-descripciones de vídeos o películas.
  • Ver representación de EDV (Tabuenca & Rodrigo, 2019).

Ecologías de aprendizaje en estudiantes online con discapacidad física/motriz (EDM)

La discapacidad motriz es el conjunto de alteraciones que afectan a la ejecución de movimientos. Existen personas con parálisis completa y otras con dificultades motrices en miembros inferiores (dificultad de desplazamiento) o superiores (dificultad de habla y articulación del lenguaje o problemas de manipulación).

Las barreras a las que se enfrenta este colectivo son principalmente en cuanto al manejo del teclado y el ratón como elemento apuntador (Sanz-Troyano, Torrente, Moreno-Ger, & Fernández-Manjón, 2010).

Las herramientas de apoyo que necesita este colectivo para tener un acceso óptimo son:

  • Apoyo hardware (teclados ergonómicos, carcasas de teclado, teclados de una mano, ratones adaptados, joystick, licornios, varillas de boca, pasa-páginas, reposabrazos, soportes y atriles mecánicos).
  • Apoyo software (teclado virtual predictivo, programas de reconocimiento de voz y transcriptores, grabadora digital).
  • Facilitar tiempo suficiente para que se complete el ejercicio oral/escrito por parte del estudiante.
  • Elementos mecánicos y adaptaciones en teclados y ratones o lápices apuntadores.
  • Ver representación de EDM (Tabuenca & Rodrigo, 2019).

Ecologías de aprendizaje en estudiantes online con discapacidad psíquica o trastorno mental (EDP)

Las personas con discapacidad psíquica se caracterizan por sufrir alteraciones en los procesos cognitivos y afectivos.

Las barreras a las que se enfrenta este colectivo son en relación a la información y las capacidades de razonamiento y comunicación (Cuesta & Ramos, 2012). La falta de información concreta o que sea muy ambigua les puede causar mucha ansiedad en este tipo de estudiantes, o sufrir alteraciones en el razonamiento con dificultad para reconocer la realidad, procesar y elaborar la información del entorno y su adaptación al mismo. Pueden sufrir paranoia o miedo escénico, lo que les reduce su capacidad de comunicarse o incluso tener limitaciones cognitivas.

Los tratamientos farmacológicos que reciben pueden afectar en su capacidad de atención, concentración, memoria, comprensión verbal y escrita, y manejo de la información. La ayuda que necesita este colectivo para tener un acceso óptimo se basa en:

  • Proporcionar las instrucciones muy precisas para la realización de las pruebas de evaluación y las modalidades de examen.
  • Resulta conveniente poder flexibilizar los plazos de entrega de los trabajos o pruebas parciales de evaluación.
  • Utilizar una iconografía muy simple e ilustrativa, con colores llamativos y formas sencillas que ayude a su entendimiento y memorización.
  • Ver representación de EDP (Tabuenca & Rodrigo, 2019).

Ecologías de aprendizaje en estudiantes online con dificultades específicas del aprendizaje o de la atención e hiperactividad (EDE)

Existe un grupo de trastornos que se manifiestan como dificultades significativas en la adquisición y uso de la lectura y la escritura, o déficits de atención debidos generalmente a alteraciones o disfunciones neurológicas que afectan a los procesos perceptivos, psicolingüísticos, memoria de trabajo y a las estrategias de aprendizaje y meta-cognición (Romero & al., 2005). La dislexia (dificultad para la lectura) puede existir de forma aislada, pero lo habitual es que venga acompañada de la disgrafía (dificultad en la escritura), al estar ambos procesos cognitivamente vinculados. Por otro lado, los trastornos de déficit de atención e hiperactividad (TDAH) provocan disfunciones en los mecanismos de control ejecutivo e inhibición del comportamiento, lo cual afecta a la memoria del trabajo, la concentración, la autorregulación de la motivación, la organización de tareas, la interiorización del lenguaje y los procesos de análisis y síntesis (Faraone, Biederman, & Mick, 2006).

De forma global, todos los trastornos explicados aquí provocan una mayor impulsividad y falta de concreción y plenitud en las tareas planteadas, por lo que pueden tener mayores posibilidades de errar en las respuestas y de presentar trabajos con grafía poco legible, tachones y falta de organización en las ideas expuestas. Algunas de las adaptaciones que necesitan son:

  • Material de apoyo habitual, ordenador o tableta con software específico o grabadoras digitales.
  • Software de conversión texto a voz (que leen, por ejemplo, los textos de la pantalla del ordenador o dispositivos móviles).
  • Proporcionar tiempo más prolongado para las actividades que se realicen de forma individual, de forma que se favorezca la redacción y la revisión ortográfica de los textos escritos.
  • Recibir información contextual de lo que se está mostrando en la pizarra o documento de presentación, el instructor deberá hacer un esfuerzo extra para verbalizar en voz alta lo que está señalando en cada momento.
  • Ver representación de EDE (Tabuenca & Rodrigo, 2019).

Este trabajo está estructurado de la siguiente forma. En esta primera sección se ha abordado la P1, clasificando las ecologías de aprendizaje en función de cada discapacidad particular, con el objetivo de identificar claramente las necesidades a tener en cuenta al crear contenidos de aprendizaje y estructurarlos en LCMS adaptados. En la siguiente sección, se aborda la P2, presentando un estudio de evaluación sobre un entorno de aprendizaje online y sus herramientas de apoyo. La sección tres presenta los resultados del estudio desde la perspectiva de 161 estudiantes con discapacidad certificada. Finalmente, en la sección cuatro se extraen las conclusiones en base a los resultados obtenidos.

Método

Este estudio utiliza como referencia el modelo TAM (Technology Acceptance Model) para explorar cómo los usuarios aceptan y usan la tecnología (Davis, Bagozzi, & Warshaw, 1989). Esta herramienta es efectiva para predecir la aceptación de sistemas por parte de los usuarios (Robles-Gómez & al., 2015). Ha sido extendido añadiendo constructos que completan el modelo con factores adicionales de tipo psicológico relacionados con el uso o la intención de uso del sistema que se quiere estudiar: un sistema de e-learning (Liaw, 2008), formación continua on-line (Suh & Lee, 2007), competencias con el ordenador y/o con Internet (Yi & Hwang, 2003), comunidades on-line (Liu, Chen, Sun, Wible, & Kuo, 2010), absorción cognitiva (Venkatesh, 2000), etc.

Sin embargo, no existen trabajos que midan la aceptación de un sistema tecnológico gracias a sus características de accesibilidad. Este estudio propone añadir conclusiones sobre si las mejoras en accesibilidad también influyen en la predisposición en intención de uso de un sistema tecnológico concreto, en este caso, a un repositorio de recursos audiovisuales e-learning (CadenaCampus) de la UNED. CadenaCampus permite la emisión en directo desde las más de 700 aulas de videoconferencia de la universidad con la posibilidad de que los usuarios conectados se comuniquen a través del chat y escritorio compartido. El sistema está integrado en el LCMS de la universidad y también funciona como repositorio externo. Posee una estructura semantizada con un perfil específico de metadatos de forma que permite al usuario realizar búsquedas con diferentes criterios.

  • Disponibilidad de transcripciones textuales.
  • Disponibilidad de subtítulos.
  • Disponibilidad de vídeos subtitulados.
  • Disponibilidad de audios.
  • Disponibilidad de la opción de descarga de los elementos anteriores y su uso en modo off-line.
  • Etiquetación semántica de apoyo al sistema de búsqueda y recomendación de recursos educativos.

Participantes

Al final del curso académico se envió un correo electrónico a los estudiantes con discapacidad reconocida (n=7.397) en el que se les invitaba a evaluar las características de accesibilidad del sistema CadenaCampus. Un total de 161 estudiantes accedieron a participar en el estudio aceptando el consentimiento informado.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/bf353406-46f6-42ba-991e-4c2fb314401d/image/d3132cc4-4fd5-4e3f-80c0-d57072880b42-u05-02.png


Los participantes en este estudio fueron personas con discapacidad reconocida (adscritos a los servicios de atención a los estudiantes con discapacidad de la universidad), con una edad media de 46,2 años (SD=11,06), siendo el 51,37% hombres. Los resultados sociodemográficos (Tabla 1) confirman que las personas con discapacidad suelen presentar más de una discapacidad debido a las enfermedades o accidentes sufridos.

Las más frecuentes son la capacidad de manipulación y fuerza reducida (EDM), la capacidad cognitiva limitada (EDP), la visión limitada (EDV), y la limitación en la capacidad de oír (EDA). Gran parte de los encuestados se encontraban estudiando (43,84%), pero otros muchos se encontraban trabajando por cuenta ajena (36,99%), eran pensionistas (30,82%), o en situación de desempleo (17,12%). Estos datos concuerdan con el estado actual del colectivo de personas con discapacidad emitido en España, que refleja cómo este colectivo está poco integrado en el mercado laboral (Jiménez-Lara & Huete-García, 2018).

Materiales

El cuestionario de elaboración propia fue compartido con los encuestados mediante un enlace a una plataforma online accesible. La redacción de las preguntas (facilidad para leer y ser entendidas) fue revisada y contrastada por tres académicos de la universidad expertos en las áreas de psicología, sociología y accesibilidad tecnológica.

Dos técnicos con discapacidades motórica y mental, respectivamente, y un colaborador externo con baja visión participaron en la redacción. El número y formato de las preguntas fue adaptado a una disposición matricial para hacer el cuestionario más breve y sencillo de rellenar.

El nivel de accesibilidad del cuestionario on-line fue validado automáticamente con la herramienta TAW (Test de Accesibilidad Web) y manualmente por una colaboradora ciega asociada al grupo de investigación. El cuestionario se encuentra compartido en el anexo (Tabuenca & Rodrigo, 2019) y los resultados se muestran a continuación.

Resultados

Conformidad con las grabaciones audiovisuales

La primera cuestión exploraba el grado de satisfacción de los estudiantes con respecto a determinadas características de las grabaciones de vídeo y audio, que son recursos muy beneficiosos para los colectivos con discapacidad (Tabla 2). Se calculó el alfa de Cronbach obteniendo una buena consistencia interna (α=0,91).


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/bf353406-46f6-42ba-991e-4c2fb314401d/image/2f525080-5bcb-4ff0-8ec2-5a6569438c68-u05-03.png


Los resultados fueron satisfactorios a pesar de ser grabaciones producidas por usuarios inexpertos en comunicación, en directo y sin post-producción.

Transcripciones textuales como herramienta de apoyo

Las transcripciones textuales son muy importantes para personas sordas, con déficit cognitivo, y personas mayores. Son un producto intermedio al subtitulado y permiten la fabricación de resúmenes y mapas conceptuales de forma más ágil y rápida.

En el caso que nos ocupa, las transcripciones se han puesto a disposición de los estudiantes como recurso de aprendizaje, pudiéndose descargar para ser utilizadas en modo offline. A la pregunta “¿consideras que las transcripciones te servirán para adquirir mejor los conocimientos?”, el 85,5% respondieron afirmativamente (n=113).

Utilidad de las herramientas de apoyo

Los estudiantes con discapacidad pueden requerir mayor tiempo de visualización, escucha y tiempo para procesar la información. Valoran muy positivamente la disponibilidad de recursos en modo descarga para poder trabajar con dichos elementos más tranquilamente y offline (Tabla 3). Se calculó el alfa de Cronbach obteniendo una buena consistencia interna (α=0,89).

Facilidad de uso en las herramientas de apoyo

En CadenaCampus los recursos en sus diferentes formatos están dispuestos visualmente al lado del correspondiente vídeo con una iconografía diseñada al efecto y disponiendo de información contextual. Esta pregunta explora la facilidad para identificar los materiales audiovisuales y su opción de descargar ficheros (Tabla 3). El alfa de Cronbach se calculó demostrando una buena consistencia interna (α=0,94).


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/bf353406-46f6-42ba-991e-4c2fb314401d/image/b6f197b4-390c-416f-9700-54054b8703d6-u05-04.png


Folksonomía de la accesibilidad

Los estudiantes con discapacidad (como cualquier otro estudiante) usan motores de búsqueda para encontrar elementos de aprendizaje adaptados a sus necesidades. Estas plataformas añaden metadatos a los objetos de aprendizaje para facilitar que sean encontrados utilizando determinados términos. En esta investigación, se ha explorado la posibilidad de enriquecer esos metadatos con términos relacionados con la accesibilidad de los recursos y que pudieran ser de utilidad para los usuarios. Para ello, varios expertos identificaron 12 términos folksonómicos que podían servir para localizar recursos en formatos concretos, tomando tanto los infinitivos y participios de los verbos, como los sustantivos más cercanos (Tabla 4).

Para cada uno de los términos se pedía indicar con qué frecuencia los utilizaban. Además, se les ofreció la opción de reportar algún término adicional.

Los resultados refutan la idoneidad de utilizar una indexación social por medio de etiquetas simples en un espacio de nombres llano, sin jerarquías ni relaciones de parentesco predeterminadas y también del uso concreto de los términos escogidos previamente por los expertos. Otros términos frecuentemente sugeridos por los participantes del colectivo estudiado fueron “inclusivo”, “audiolibro”, “esquema”, “resumen”, “vídeo-clase”, “diversidad funcional”, “exámenes” y “descarga”. La indexación de los objetos de aprendizaje con estos metadatos implica una valiosa herramienta de apoyo que educadores y diseñadores deben tener en cuenta al incrustar objetos de aprendizaje en cualquier LCMS.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/bf353406-46f6-42ba-991e-4c2fb314401d/image/22dd5bfa-3cfb-4369-b261-089c9c8a1cea-u05-05.png


Discusión y conclusiones

Educadores y diseñadores de contenido educativo deben tener una visión general de cómo los estudiantes con discapacidad pueden usar un ordenador y qué elementos tecnológicos les facilitan la construcción de ecologías de aprendizaje acorde a sus limitaciones.

En este trabajo se han delimitado cinco ecologías de aprendizaje para estudiantes online clasificándolas en función del tipo de discapacidad (P1): estudiantes con discapacidad auditiva, discapacidad visual (EDV), discapacidad física/motriz (EDM), discapacidad psíquica / trastorno mental (EDP), y estudiantes con dificultades específicas al aprendizaje, de la atención o hiperactividad (EDE) (epígrafe 1.2).

Manteniendo el marco de referencia propuesto por Luckin (2010), se han identificado qué barreras al aprendizaje encuentran los estudiantes en cada una de ellas y, además, se han reconocido algunas de las principales herramientas de apoyo que pueden ayudar a estudiantes con discapacidad en sus actividades de aprendizaje.

En este trabajo, 161 estudiantes con discapacidad reconocida han evaluado algunas de las herramientas de apoyo basados en su experiencia a lo largo del curso universitario.

Los resultados permiten asegurar que en el sistema objeto de estudio existen todos los elementos planteados por Luckin (2010) como necesarios para satisfacer un entorno de aprendizaje accesible y de calidad (P2). Para refutarlo, se resumen a continuación los principales hitos relacionados con la existencia de herramientas específicas y las barreras de acceso que se han conseguido eliminar.

  • Reproducciones audiovisuales. Uno de los principales elementos en los entornos de aprendizaje online siendo común su utilización en todas las ecologías (EDA, EDV, EDM, EDP y EDE). La valoración obtenida ha sido buena en lo que respecta a la accesibilidad, la calidad, y la utilidad de las grabaciones ofrecidas (epígrafe 3.1).
  • Transcripciones textuales. Esenciales no solo para los estudiantes con problemas auditivos (EDV), sino también como elemento de asistencia para cualquier estudiante, pudiendo fabricar a partir de ellos nuevos resúmenes, mapas conceptuales o apuntes, incorporando los estudiantes sus propios comentarios y dudas. El 85% de los participantes confirman esta aseveración (epígrafe 3.2).
  • Enriquecimiento textual de elementos audiovisuales mediante transcripciones y subtítulos. Sirve de apoyo tanto a estudiantes con limitaciones auditivas como visuales (EDA y EDV). Los participantes valoraron más positivamente las transcripciones seguidas por los subtítulos. Igualmente, valoraron muy favorablemente que las transcripciones se ajustasen literalmente a lo dicho por el docente.
  • Descarga de materiales. Posibilita a los estudiantes personalizar los contenidos y organizar su estudio sin dependencias de secuenciación o conexión a Internet. Esta herramienta es clave, ya que el 53% de los estudiantes tenían capacidad de manipulación reducida (EDM) y el 21% alguna limitación visual (EDV). El LCMS objeto de estudio ofrecía diferentes herramientas de apoyo a estudiantes con discapacidad. Los resultados muestran que la descarga de vídeos fue la herramienta de apoyo que encontraron de manera más fácil y accesible (M=3,87), seguida por la descarga de audios (M=4,56), la descarga de transcripciones, y finalmente los subtítulos (epígrafe 3.4).

Con todo lo anterior, los resultados refuerzan la hipótesis de trabajo y los entornos de aprendizaje deben disponer de una gran variedad de recursos multiformato relacionados en forma de colecciones accesibles (Meyer & Rose, 2000).

Con la conveniente etiquetación semántica y un buen perfilado de usuarios registrados, los sistemas pueden ofrecer a cada estudiante los recursos que mejor se adaptan a sus necesidades (González-Sanmamed & al., 2018).

La Figura 2 ilustra una representación holística que incluye las principales herramientas de apoyo, cómo se pueden extraer unas a partir de otras, y qué interfaz asociada puede utilizar el estudiante con discapacidad en su aprendizaje.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/bf353406-46f6-42ba-991e-4c2fb314401d/image/0aebd43f-bcef-4248-ac59-0d8f9b373686-u05-06.png


Los resultados presentados en este estudio son exploratorios y deben tomarse con cautela, ya que están basados en una muestra de 161 sobre 7.397 estudiantes con discapacidad reconocida. Han quedado fuera del estudio aspectos importantes como la valoración del efecto en el aprendizaje del género y la edad, incluidos como tareas para trabajo futuro.

References

  1. BarronB, . 2004.ecologies for technological fluency: Gender and experience differences&author=Barron&publication_year= Learning ecologies for technological fluency: Gender and experience differences.Journal of Educational Computing Research 31(1):1-36
  2. Santos-CaamañoF J, González-SanmamedM, Muñoz-CarrilP C, . 2018.desarrollo de las ecologías de aprendizaje a través de las herramientas en línea&author=Santos-Caamaño&publication_year= El desarrollo de las ecologías de aprendizaje a través de las herramientas en línea.Diálogo Educacional (56)18
  3. BryantB R, RaoK, OkM W, . 2014.design for learning and assistive technology&author=Bryant&publication_year= Universal design for learning and assistive technology.Advances in Medical Technologies and Clinical Practice11-26
  4. Carbó-BadalO, Castro-BelmonteM, Latorre-DenaF, . 2017.Red de servicios de apoyo a personas con discapacidad en la universidad. Guía de adaptaciones en la universidad. Prácticas innovadoras inclusivas: Retos y oportunidades.
  5. ChoiK S, ChoW H, LeeS, LeeH, KimC, . 2004.relationships among quality, value, satisfaction and behavioral intention in health care provider choice&author=Choi&publication_year= The relationships among quality, value, satisfaction and behavioral intention in health care provider choice.Journal of Business Research 57(8):913-921
  6. CroninJ J, TaylorS A, . 1992.service quality: A reexamination and extension&author=Cronin&publication_year= Measuring service quality: A reexamination and extension.Journal of Marketing 56(3)
  7. CopperM, . 2006.online learning accessible to disabled students: An institutional case study&author=Copper&publication_year= Making online learning accessible to disabled students: An institutional case study.Research in Learning Technology (1)14
  8. Lancheros-CuestaD J, Carrillo-RamosA, . 2012.de adaptación basado en preferencias en ambientes virtuales de aprendizaje para personas con necesidades especiales&author=Lancheros-Cuesta&publication_year= Modelo de adaptación basado en preferencias en ambientes virtuales de aprendizaje para personas con necesidades especiales.Avances: Investigación en Ingeniería 9(1):111-119
  9. DavisF D, BagozziR P, WarshawP R, . 1989.acceptance of computer technology: A comparison of two theoretical models&author=Davis&publication_year= User acceptance of computer technology: A comparison of two theoretical models.Management Science 35(8):982-1003
  10. Díez-GutiérrezE, Díaz-NafríaJ M, . 2018.learning ecologies for a critical cybercitizenship. [Ecologías de aprendizaje ubicuo para la ciberciudadanía crítica&author=Díez-Gutiérrez&publication_year= Ubiquitous learning ecologies for a critical cybercitizenship. [Ecologías de aprendizaje ubicuo para la ciberciudadanía crítica]]Comunicar 26:49-58
  11. FaraoneS V, BiedermanJ, MicjE, . 2005.age-dependent decline of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: A meta-analysis of follow-up studies&author=Faraone&publication_year= The age-dependent decline of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: A meta-analysis of follow-up studies.Psychological Medicine 36(2):159-165
  12. FuertesJ L, GonzálezA L, Mariscal-VivasG, RuizC, . 2005.Herramientas de apoyo a la educación de personas sordas en la universidad española.Enseñanza 430:45-52
  13. Fundación Vodafone (Ed.). 2013.Acceso y uso de las TIC por las personas con discapacidad. Conclusiones y resumen ejecutivo.
  14. González-SanmamedM, SangràA, Souto-SeijoA, Estévez-BlancoI, . 2018.de aprendizaje en la era digital: Desafíos para la educación superior&author=González-Sanmamed&publication_year= Ecologías de aprendizaje en la era digital: Desafíos para la educación superior.Publicaciones 48(1)
  15. GutiérrezP, MartorellA, . 2011.with intellectual disability and ICTs. [Las personas con discapacidad intelectual ante las TIC&author=Gutiérrez&publication_year= People with intellectual disability and ICTs. [Las personas con discapacidad intelectual ante las TIC]]Comunicar 18:173-180
  16. JacksonN J, . 2013.The concept of learning ecologies. In: JacksonN., CooperG.B., eds. learning, education and personal development&author=Jackson&publication_year= Life-wide learning, education and personal development.
  17. Jiménez-LaraA, Huete-GarcíaA, . 2016.Informe Olivenza 2016, sobre la situación de la discapacidad en España. In: , ed. Observatorio Estatal de la Discapacidad&author=&publication_year= Olivenza: Observatorio Estatal de la Discapacidad.1-698
  18. LiawS S, . 2008.students’ perceived satisfaction, behavioral intention, and effectiveness of e-learning: A case study of the blackboard system&author=Liaw&publication_year= Investigating students’ perceived satisfaction, behavioral intention, and effectiveness of e-learning: A case study of the blackboard system.Computers & Education 51(2):864-873
  19. LiuI F, ChenM C, SunY S, WibleD, KuoC H, . 2010.the TAM model to explore the factors that affect Intention to use an online learning community&author=Liu&publication_year= Extending the TAM model to explore the factors that affect Intention to use an online learning community.Computers & Education 54(2):600-610
  20. LuckinR, . 2010. , ed. learning contexts. Technology-rich, learner-centred ecologies&author=&publication_year= Re-designing learning contexts. Technology-rich, learner-centred ecologies.London: Routledge.
  21. LuckinR, . 2008.learner centric ecology of resources: A framework for using technology to scaffold learning&author=Luckin&publication_year= The learner centric ecology of resources: A framework for using technology to scaffold learning.Computers & Education 50(2):449-462
  22. MeyerA, RoseD H, . 2000.Universal design for individual differences.Educational Leadership 58(3):39-43
  23. H.Oh,, . 1999.quality, customer satisfaction, and customer value: A holistic perspective&author=H.&publication_year= Service quality, customer satisfaction, and customer value: A holistic perspective.International Journal of Hospitality Management 18(1):67-82
  24. ONCE (Ed.). n.d.Concepto de ceguera y deficiencia visual. Madrid: Organización Nacional de Ciegos Españoles.
  25. PerelmutterB, McgregorK K, GordonK R, . 2017.technology interventions for adolescents and adults with learning disabilities: An evidence-based systematic review and meta-analysis&author=Perelmutter&publication_year= Assistive technology interventions for adolescents and adults with learning disabilities: An evidence-based systematic review and meta-analysis.Computers & Education 114:139-163
  26. Robles-GómezA, RosS, HernándezR, TobarraL, CamineroA C, AgudoJ M, . 2015.User acceptance of a proposed self-evaluation and continuous assessment system.Journal of Educational Technology & Society 18(2):97-109
  27. Rodríguez-MartínA, . 2017. , ed. innovadoras inclusivas: Retos y oportunidades&author=&publication_year= Prácticas innovadoras inclusivas: Retos y oportunidades.
  28. RomeroJ F, CervánR L, . 2006. , ed. en el aprendizaje: Unificación de criterios diagnósticos&author=&publication_year= Dificultades en el aprendizaje: Unificación de criterios diagnósticos. Sevilla: Sevilla: Consejería de Educación de la Junta de Andalucía.
  29. Sanz-TroyanoE, TorrenteJ, Moreno-GerP, Fernández-ManjónB, . 2010. , ed. criterios de accesibilidad en una herramienta de juegos educativos&author=&publication_year= Introduciendo criterios de accesibilidad en una herramienta de juegos educativos.Valencia: XI Simposio Nacional de Tecnologías de la Información y las Comunicaciones en la Educación (SINTICE).
  30. SprengR A, MackoyR D, . 1996.empirical examination of a model of perceived service quality and satisfaction&author=Spreng&publication_year= An empirical examination of a model of perceived service quality and satisfaction.Journal of Retailing 72(2):90014-90021
  31. SuhC K, LeeT H, . 2007.acceptance of e-learning for voluntary studies&author=Suh&publication_year= User acceptance of e-learning for voluntary studies. In: , ed. Proceedings of the WSEAS International Conference on Computer Engineering and Applications&author=&publication_year= 2007 Proceedings of the WSEAS International Conference on Computer Engineering and Applications.Gold Coast: Australia. 538-544
  32. SanchoJ M, . 2008.De TIC a TAC, el difícil tránsito de una vocal.Investigación en la Escuela 64:19-30
  33. TabuencaB, TernierS, SpechtM, . 2013.lifelong learners to build personal learning ecologies in daily physical spaces&author=Tabuenca&publication_year= Supporting lifelong learners to build personal learning ecologies in daily physical spaces.International Journal of Mobile Learning and Organisation 7(3-4):177
  34. TabuencaB, RodrigoC, . 2019.Representación de ecologías de aprendizaje en estudiantes con discapacidades.
  35. Venegas-SandovalC A, Mansilla-GómezG M, . 2017.en web para personas con discapacidad visual&author=Venegas-Sandoval&publication_year= Accesibilidad en web para personas con discapacidad visual.Síntesis Tecnológica 2:1-10
  36. VenkateshV, . 2000.of perceived ease of use: Integrating control, intrinsic motivation, and emotion into the technology acceptance model&author=Venkatesh&publication_year= Determinants of perceived ease of use: Integrating control, intrinsic motivation, and emotion into the technology acceptance model.Information Systems Research 11(4):342-365
  37. VirtanenM A, HaavistoE, LiikanenE, KääriäinenM, . 2018.learning environments in higher education: A scoping literature review&author=Virtanen&publication_year= Ubiquitous learning environments in higher education: A scoping literature review.Education and Information Technologies 23(2):985-998
  38. WilliamsP, JamaliH R, NicholasD, . 2006.ICT with people with special education needs: What the literature tells us&author=Williams&publication_year= Using ICT with people with special education needs: What the literature tells us.Aslib Proceedings 58(4):330-345
  39. YiM Y, HwangY, . 2003.the use of web-based information systems: Self-efficacy, enjoyment, learning goal orientation, and the technology acceptance model&author=Yi&publication_year= Predicting the use of web-based information systems: Self-efficacy, enjoyment, learning goal orientation, and the technology acceptance model.International Journal of Human-Computer Studies 59(4):431-449
  40. Zubillaga-Del-RíoA, Alba-PastorC, . 2013.in the perception of technology among university students. [La discapacidad en la percepción de la tecnología entre estudiantes universitarios&author=Zubillaga-Del-Río&publication_year= Disability in the perception of technology among university students. [La discapacidad en la percepción de la tecnología entre estudiantes universitarios.Comunicar 20:165-172
Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/19
Accepted on 31/12/19
Submitted on 31/12/19

Volume 28, Issue 1, 2020
DOI: 10.3916/C62-2020-05
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Views 60
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?