Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The increasing development of new multimedia materials as supporting vehicles of film languages has raised some global literacy questions and problems within teacher training. These new literacy problems pose a specific curricular question: How shall different media, social and cultural contexts approach the specific training of teachers (and, in fact, media makers) in order to address those global problems of a common film language with the corresponding civic and curricular appropriations? The UNESCO MIL Curriculum for Teachers places media and information literacy at the core of lifelong learning for the acquisition of necessary civic competences within a universal perspective. A review of some European case studies helps us to understand some of the most contemporary interrelations between the predominant multimedia messages and their communication channels and social networks, taking account of the preservation of the collective memory of sounds and images as a form of cultural heritage connected to the audiovisual cultures of the world at large, since these processes never occur in geographical or cultural isolation. The aim of this article is to present the context of a possible inter-disciplinary and inter-cultural approach to a global film literacy process, taking some interesting European case studies that appeared in «Comunicar, 35» as a starting point.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

The UNESCO Media and Information Literacy Curriculum for Teachers (backed up by the Alexandria Declaration of 2005) clearly places media and information literacy at the core of lifelong learning as a means of acquiring the competences that «can equip citizens with critical thinking skills enabling them to demand high-quality services from media and other information providers. Collectively, they foster an enabling environment in which media and other information providers can provide quality services» (UNESCO (2011: 16). To this end the UNESCO MIL document describes aspects of the major pedagogical approaches that form the main strategies, or guidelines, for the use of the MIL Curriculum, such as the Textual and Contextual Analysis of different media objects, such as films (UNESCO (2011: 37).

These guidelines urge a reflection on the necessary training of teachers in order to acquire the required competences to develop those approaches.

The increasing development of multimedia materials as supporting vehicles of filmic language has raised some new questions and problems within media studies and within different pedagogical approaches. One of the most important problems enunciated in those contexts is one that questions the extent of the media limits of the different vehicles supporting the original works. That is, up to what point are we still watching a given film when it is shown, no longer on a big screen projected from a celluloid reel (the presentation form for which it was conceived) but on a small television or computer screen beamed from a file, a DVD or laser disc and controlled through sequences of computer commands, each involving different pedagogical effects? This problem is not entirely new and we can recognize some parts of it in former discussions about the differences between cinema and television, or cinema and video for educational purposes. Nevertheless, there are some new aspects that confer a more pluridimensional character on the problem when in a multimedia network context. To approach some of those aspects is an attempt to contribute to the global reflection on the increasing development of the multimedia information and communication technologies, their real nature and pedagogical value for a higher degree of media and film literacy.

2. From the moving image to the moving mind in time

Since the very beginning of film, history film enthusiasts of all kinds, but especially industrialists and other film entrepreneurs, have been rather optimistic about the large possibilities of using films in educational environments. Thomas Edison, for example, is supposed to have said in the early twenties, according to Larry Cuban (1986: 9): «I believe that the motion picture is destined to revolutionize our educational system and that in a few years it will supplant largely, if not entirely, the use of textbooks».

As we know today, it did not happen exactly that way. But, in spite of the failure of the prophecy, there are many other links and connections that have been established between motion pictures and education to our day, and I think that this process is far from being completed. Those connections are not always clear enough or so well known in the media and educational fields, whose agents are, generally and intuitively, aware of the existence of some dimensions of mutual influence, but who do not act so often, at least consciously, in consequence of their presence and implications.

Some of those dimensions present quite a number of really specific and almost palpable characteristics that assume great importance for the global communication process, and therefore educational process, going on in modern societies, of which, cinema, television, video, books, pictures, texts, sounds, computers, records and other media devices are integrated parts. To research and study this complex media body is a task of great importance in general and of specific relevance in what concerns film and its languages.

In fact, Edison was not the only one with rather optimistic visions for the development of the field, and we could think that at least some of the more obvious structural connections should have been normally established between the fields of audiovisual communication and education. There are, indeed, many links between both fields, but we cannot say, in a general way, that there are many stable institutional links between the different nations’ communication industries and their educational systems, though a few exceptions can be noticed.

Travelling in time and technology, since the Edison epoch to our own epoch, we could turn our attention to other industrialists, or technology traders, and notice their beliefs, not only concerning film as a powerful pedagogical medium, but regarding multimedia as global phenomena, in which cinema and films are taking continuously a growing part. John Sculley, a former chief of Apple Computer Inc., wrote in his foreword to «Learning with Interactive Multimedia»: «Imagine a classroom with a window on all the world’s knowledge. Imagine a teacher with the capability to bring to life any image, any sound, any event. Imagine a student with the power to visit any place on earth at any time in history. Imagine a screen that can display in vivid colour the inner workings of a cell, the births and deaths of stars, the clashes of armies and the triumphs of art... I believe that all this will happen not simply because people have the capability to make it happen, but also because people have a compelling need to make it happen» (Ambron & Hooper, 1990: 7).

It is very interesting, to notice that the differences between both beliefs in the pedagogical power of the media are almost non-existent. However, this reveals more about how intensive and constant the industry’s expectations to penetrate the educational markets have been over the years, than it shows some really tested perspectives for the different media within different pedagogical contexts. Nevertheless, we have to admit that these perspectives are now much more realistic than ever before, because of the new technological multimedia contexts. This means that we can no longer dismiss them as a bunch of new/old prophecies based on the industry’s best wishes. In fact, some of them are already happening – Youtube being a good example. Thus, we must deal with them, trying to discover what are the new facts that characterize the media, their materials, their languages and their real implications, mainly from a pedagogical point of view, upon the communication processes that can be developed towards different audiences, even if the audiences consist of one only receiver at the time, within a formal educational context or any other possible context.

Some comparative studies of different pedagogical experiences done with multimedia materials which were based upon the educational use of cinematographic sequences and their reception conditions, provided the opportunity to observe some main tendencies, with regard of broader intertextual aspects such as the multitude of cinematic facts and hypertextual information that usually follow along with a given filmic multimedia material, such as different spin off materials and devices. Those tendencies were:

1) Filmic material on discs or in files, especially feature films, is still considered, in general, very interesting and attractive pedagogical materials.

2) The use of filmic materials is more effective when it is registered upon a physical support.

3) The related pedagogical processes are more stimulating if the filmic materials and the manipulation software are interconnected and compatible structures.

4) The filmic structure of the pedagogical materials and their language and narrative systems seem to remain interesting and attractive devices especially if they are connectable to each other, or to other pedagogical devices, such as hypertext film comments, or other cinematic information and literacy facts.

These tendencies may change with the nature of the end users aims and expectations, but in general we may say that they reflect some of the most important pedagogical implications that proceed from the main structural characteristics of the most common multimedia materials that use filmic language devices. Specially, they show that the interconnections between different levels of reality, fiction and virtual reality appear to have a rather complex nature assuming, consequently, a rather complex system of pedagogical effects. In turn, the use of filmic language within a multimedia context reflects with particular sharpness some of the problems that occur in different environments of multimedia users, either they are teachers, students, or other ordinary media consumers: the hyper-real character of the filmic media; the substantial degree of mutation that distinguishes the manipulation of those media through different tools; the huge quantity of information at the user’s disposal in each frame, image, sound or their sequence; the necessity to close or open the structures of multimedia systems in order to establish different possible pedagogical patterns and exploring ways. So, the user of a filmic multimedia material, in front of such phenomena, has always the possibility of playing different roles in interaction with those materials and that is why the user, teacher or student, needs specific training and adequate literacy to play those roles.

3. Films as texts

One of the most important roles is the role of the receiver decoding the filmic message through the specific devices of the multimedia materials. He is generally no longer the abstract spectator taken from the collective darkness of the movie theatre, nor is he, anymore, the single manipulator of a non-intelligent video cassette recorder with rather limited possibilities of intervention upon the original work. The user/receiver of the filmic multimedia material is, indeed, a reader of multiple texts, but his role will not only be that of a reader, as Umberto Eco (1979) has presented him to us before, creating meaning through his mental capacity of recognition, interpretation and association. He will be a much more active reader and especially a much more powerful one. So powerful that, probably, he will not confine himself to the role of a reader and will become, in fact, a new creator with almost unlimited possibilities to manipulate the original work and even preserve his manipulation as a new work to be watched and studied, i.e., the user may easily become an author and a creator. Such a phenomenon necessarily implies, from a pedagogical point of view, a vast range of complex literacy problems: towards the materials and their language systems (hardware and software); towards the pre-established working strategies to interact with the materials; and mainly, towards the structures those combine and integrate all those items. In principle, we may say that an open structure will always be more effective, from a pedagogical point of view, than a closed one, in spite of the many exploring ways that a closed multimedia filmic material may offer to its user, these will always be in a limited number, while the query patterns and manipulation possibilities of a material with an open structure are, in fact, unlimited. This fact, only, implies a great demand of film and media literacy.

Besides these textual and contextual aspects there are, of course, also problems of legal and authoral character that need to be addressed. The user should never forget the authorship implications of the original work. Although we will not approach these problems here, since from a strict pedagogical point of view they are not relevant in this context, these aspects should be properly addressed within other curricular contexts.

4. The question of Interactivity

Some of the main questions regarding pedagogical strategies to approach the different multimedia filmic materials present, generally, a common keyword: Interactivity. Nevertheless, interactivity does not mean exactly the same in all materials and its possibilities of manipulation may be quite different according to the structure of the material. A more open structure usually offers a higher degree of interactivity than a rather closed one. In my opinion, and again from a pedagogical point of view, one can only say that a multimedia material comprehends an interactive strategy when it offers a real possibility to the user to act upon the original work, preserving his results. Such a procedure represents, indeed, a wide range of new pedagogical possibilities and although there is, in general, a rather strong charge of didacticism impregnating the most common strategies of interactivity, this could tempt us to predict that the field is not too far from achieving a vast line of materials well suited to the most different of pedagogical aims. But, however it may be, we can never forget that the individual aims of the user may be quite different in essence depending from the context of his usage. He may just want to be entertained, viewing the film and playing the game, not giving it another thought, or he may have some critical, pedagogical or aesthetical aims. The multimedia authors and editors are certainly aware of the possible existence of all those user aims. Thus, the certainty of this usage will not depend only from the aims and strategies of the materials and of their producing institutions, but also, and in a very high degree, more often from the role that the user will be playing, or at least from the role that he will be given to play. We know from the recent past that some television movies have been designed and produced according to specific language patterns that are well suited to television’s way of grabbing an audience, as for example, a large number of close up shots and highly fragmented redundant sequences synchronized with some easily identifiable popular musical scores. We do also know that some actual examples of feature films have been screened in so-called interactive movie theatres. And the industry, naturally, will try to explore every technological and media novelty in order to grab larger audiences. But, in general, any film that was made in the past, or that will be made in the future within a normal film production context, will do: westerns, comedies, science fiction, tragedies, horror movies, documentaries, etc. Any film, or genre, will easily fit in exciting multimedia packages, instructional or for pure entertainment, with different aims and implying different utilization strategies, and consequently with different pedagogical implications, aiming at different audiences. We run the risk, of course, of finding ourselves playing video games instead of watching the film works of some of the major profiles in the history of film art, that will depend from which point of view the user will be looking at it and, of course, it will depend from his degree of film literacy. From a pedagogical point of view, any filmic multimedia material may become a very effective material, although of rather complex evaluation, since it is, almost always, potentially incredibly didactic, but yet, still interesting as long as it preserves in its mutant structure all the original language mechanisms intact, in order to keep on offering to its audiences the possibility of a dramatic and exciting perceptive experience, no matter what kind of interactive strategy the audiences may choose. But the main problem will be to know how to train the teachers with adequate skills in order to be able to approach, in a pedagogically effective way, those complex realities and virtual-realities that have been enunciated above?

5. Do we need Media Education to achieve Media Literacy?

In fact, most of the times, we can become media literate just by being exposed to the media, without any formal media educational process, since all processes of media exposure contain some kind of media pedagogy that forms and conforms the media users (senders and receivers) in many ways, developing production, reading, interpretation and reproduction mechanisms, of which, many times, the very same senders and receivers are simply not aware. When this happens (and it happens quite often) the media users maybe functionally media literate in some degree, but they are, nevertheless, alienated in several ways concerning the pedagogical processes that take place within their public and private media spheres. Then, some more specific media education processes may really become important in order to achieve some better media literacy results, both for media readers and media makers.

It was with this in mind that a group of independent scholars and experts from different countries and institutions gathered together to join their efforts around the attempt to produce some kind of a Media Literacy common approach that became to be known as «The European Charter for Media Literacy», which was in fact a public declaration of commitment to some essential Media Literacy factors, such as: «Raise public understanding and awareness of Media Literacy, in relation to the media of communication, information and expression; Advocate the importance of Media Literacy in the development of educational, cultural, political, social and economic policy; Support the principle that every citizen of any age should have opportunities, in both formal and informal education, to develop the skills and knowledge necessary to increase their enjoyment, understanding and exploration of the media». (www.euromedialiteracy.eu/about.php).

Coming to this point, it means that we will have to develop formal and non-formal media education strategies for school environments, for parental environments and, necessarily, for professional media environments. Since we know that the media industries are usually almost completely closed to such pedagogical approaches, it means that we will have to concentrate our efforts on the environments of academic media training, that is, universities and other media training centres. Within this perspective, besides journalism, the other fields of major importance to be concerned with media education and media literacy are film, videogames, music, advertising and, because all the media tend to converge towards it, the internet.

Some of these aspects were already raised in earlier contexts, in an attempt to develop some reflection and discussion about their nature: «The Internet is actually the largest database for information support in the daily life of individuals but even institutions and services. Among those we can count students and teachers, but also media and opinion makers, as well as information providers including journalists. When it is essentially used as a path for communication channels for electronic messages, the web contains a series of useful information, presented by individuals, institutions, governments, associations and all types of commercial and non-commercial organizations. But who are the gate-keepers of that electronic flow? Who makes up the major streamlines of the global agenda? How and where are the most powerful editorial lines shaped? Beyond the boundless and instantaneous allocation of data, the Internet developed new ways for cultural, economic and social life. This development is related to communication instruments and access to the communication and information industries. It is apparent in politics, education, commerce, and in many other fields of public and private character. All these areas contribute to the rapid change of our traditional paradigms of public sphere and space and we don’t know yet if our position as individual and social actors in the above is changing as quickly and maybe we are not yet completely aware of the implications of such changes. The potential threat of widespread alienation in such new environments of media exposure should not be dismissed lightly» (Reia, 2006: 123-134).

6. Do we need Film Literacy?

Film, is probably the most eclectic and syncretic of all media and it has an incredible power of attraction which is replicated in all other media through the usage of film languages in any kind of media contexts: music videos to promote music; real footage to enhance videogames; film genres and film stars to reach publicity targets; film inserts and excerpts of all kinds in «YouTube», «Facebook», «Myspace» and millions of other websites in the internet.

Film, in its many different forms, became the most common vehicle of those New Environments of Media Exposure, thus, becoming also one of the most important instruments for a Multidimensional and Multicultural Media Literacy among the many different media users, consumers, producers and «prosumers» of all ages, social and cultural levels, although different levels of media literacy, their nature or even their lack can show differences or similarities, according to the local and global contexts where they are developed and practiced: «Appropriations and usage patterns of these media technologies are in many ways rather specific, so one of the main risks, in a media literacy context, is the danger of generalization about common patterns of appropriation. However, one general feature in our attitudes towards these media cultural effects has been taking them as they were often ambivalent: television is still seen both as educational and as a drug; mobile phones are perceived both as a nuisance and as a life-saver; computer games are viewed both as learning tools and as addictive timewasters and film has been looked at since the very beginnings of the 7th art as a medium of great educational power as well as a medium with an enormous range of escapism dimensions» (Reia, 2008: 155-165).

The urgency to approach film, its languages and appropriations as a main vehicle of media literacy has also to do with the enormous importance of this medium in the construction of our collective memories. The richness and diversity of the film languages, techniques and technologies of film are seen as instruments of great importance, from the primitive films of Lumière and Mélies to the most sophisticated virtual inserts in YouTube. Their role as vehicles of artistic and documentary narratology and as factors of authentic film literacy, acquires an absolutely unquestionable importance in any society that calls itself a knowledge and information society as constructive contributions to our collective and cultural memories.

Having this in mind, specially within the new context of media policies that are expected to be developed all around the world and consequently some possible new media and film literacy approaches, it was a task of major importance to produce the thematic dossier of «Comunicar, 35» concerning the role of «Film Languages in the European Collective Memory» (Reia, 2010). Let us now see how its content can help us to establish some links to the necessary global media literacy strategies that have to be drawn, especially in what concerns the training of teachers in order to be able to deal with multiple film and audiovisual literacy challenges.

7. Five «Easy Pieces» of Literacy – 5 case studies in «Comunicar, 35»

Paraphrasing the film of Bob Rafelson (1970), one should always find some «easy pieces» to put together our capacities, our cultural stories and our memories. That was the challenge that was taken by the authors of Comunicar 35 – putting together different film literacy approaches in an attempt to build up some cultural bridges among different generations, movements and appropriations concerning the European collective film memory, presented here as a case study and an example of many other possible film literacy approaches.

The conservation of the collective memory of sounds and images as a European cultural heritage means acknowledging the various evolutionary contexts of audiovisual communication in Europe as well as their relations with the cultures of the world at large, as these processes never occur in geographical or cultural isolation. The language of film takes on a vital role in these processes of communicative and educational evolution as a vehicle of collective communication and education, that is, as a factor for an in-depth learning of the most varied domains of human knowledge – i.e., multiple literacies, including media and film literacy.

It is also important to examine the evolution of the pedagogical dimensions of audiovisual communication in general and cinematographic education in particular as the true starting point for an entire cultural repository that we cannot neglect or ignore, otherwise we risk casting into oblivion some of the most important traces of our European cultural identity which, by their nature, are often so fragile. We are therefore obliged to delve into the media, channels, technologies and language we have developed for over a century to add clarity to the collective creativity and necessities of the artistic and documentary narration that represents us and which enables us to reflect on our own human condition. But strange though it may seem, the societies, sciences and technologies within which these narratives develop can also suffer from memory loss, just as we as individuals are forgetful or get old and are unable to regenerate the hetero-recognition mechanisms, and sometimes not even self-recognition, or because we cannot distance ourselves sufficiently from our prevailing knowledge and narratives in order to gain a more holistic, universal and reflective perspective. It is not because artists, scientists or pedagogues, like other human beings, have a «short memory», but because the arts, sciences and technologies and their languages are closed off and isolated within their own particular spaces and sometimes separated from knowledge, application and even dissemination. This can happen in any branch of the arts or sciences, even when the fundamental principles of their languages belong to education or communication, which in itself is an enormous contradiction. Thus the technological and communicative supports of the records of the individual and collective production of knowledge turn inwards in their apparent self-sufficiency from the standpoint of the evolution of communication, taking into account the technological and linguistic development of the past century, which has shown itself to be fairly redundant as well as being a reducing agent that has erroneously and inefficiently preserved the procedural knowledge of construction and communication of scientific or cultural learning. Consequently, we are now obliged to analyze the possible risks of the loss of this collective property, which is often incredibly insubstantial and for that reason all the more valuable. To do this, we must also preserve, articulate and systematize some of the main features of the processes of cultural communication as phenomena of collective memorization and learning. As so many scientists and researchers have stated over the years, in the exercise of their scientific irreverence and theoretical restlessness, the scientist is hardly ever able to take a step back and view science, in space and time, in such a way that he can see it move, «and yet, it moves». And, as it was said before, the role of Cinema and Film Languages as vehicles of artistic and documentary narratives, in a comprehensive and holistic perspective, acquires an absolutely unquestionable importance as a factor of authentic media and film literacy, as it may be seen in these 5 different approaches gathered together, among others, in the thematic dossier of «Comunicar, 35» (Reia, 2010):

1) Cary Balzagette –was the head of the BFI’s department of Film Education for many years and her intellectual authority is recognized by many other authors when she refers to the vital, leading role of the BFI in this field– by presenting the main pedagogical approaches to film language, especially in what we call film pedagogy, as developed within the broader activities of the BFI, which pioneered an educational perspective for the media as a process that resulted in broader interest in media literacy and film literacy in particular. Her article «Analogue Sunset, The educational role of the British Film Institute, 1979-2007» (Bazalgette, 2010), traces the main lines of activity of the BFI in this field over the last 25 years, its continuous educational approaches clearly demonstrating that the study of cinema and films is absolutely essential for understanding the world and times we live in.

2) Michel Clarembeaux –director of the Audiovisual Centre (CAV) of Liège, Belgium– develops a reflection on the theme «Film Education: memory and heritage» (Clarembeaux, 2010), within which film education is identified, especially in these times of transition and migration in digital environments, as an urgent need to construct a profound literacy media, given that the importance of film language cannot be underestimated in the development of the capacity to analyze contemporary media, in which cinema stands out in its various forms and supports as the «supreme art form of memory», be it individual or collective. The author also suggests we can and should bring about a convergence between some kind of «pedagogy of film education» and a desire on the part of the public to preserve the collective memory of a broader and more varied cultural heritage, pointing with concrete examples of specific films and authors to support this hypothesis, but also remembering the importance of film clubs in this context.

3) Andrew Burn –professor of Media Education at London University’s Institute of Education– contributes with his article, «Thrills in the dark: young people’s moving image cultures and media education» (Burn, 2010), in which he discusses the role of film language in this era of transition among media, channels and cultural environments, taking horror movies as a study object. He takes cinema and videogames as an example, and emphasizes the hybridization of the genre and the transmutation of forms of interaction among the young and the media, film channels, and real and virtual videos; he shows how a particular love for horror and disaster movie genres in North American cinema, but also in Europe, still persists among the young, whose influence extends to other audiovisual forms, genres and products to the desperation of many anguished teachers who are inclined more towards prohibition than towards the more complicated option of studying and analyzing these terrifying-loving objects that are so attractive to the youngsters.

4) Mirian Tavares –a Professor of Visual Arts at the University of the Algarve– emphasizes in her article «Understanding cinema: the avant-gardes and the construction of film discourse» (Tavares, 2010) the huge importance of the historic avant-gardes in the construction of film discourse and how they were essential in gaining recognition for cinema as an art form, offering their perspectives within the cross-roads of these key concepts towards a possible renewed film literacy.

5) Enrique Martínez-Salanova –author of the «Creative Classroom of Cinema and Education» (Martínez-Salanova, 2010)– writes about «Educational Systems in the Heterodox History of the European Cinema», proposing a network of analyses that links specific films to traditionally difficult educational topics like violence, exclusion, marginalization and neglection.

8. Conclusions

Although these case studies are benchmarked by the cultural context of European cinema and European film literacy appropriations, it seems quite adequate to conclude, according to the general analysis of the evolution of the different media landscapes in the beginning of this text, that these reflections may well be taken into consideration for other similar literacy approaches in other places and within other cultural contexts, such as those that may be developed along with the desirable different appropriations that may be possibly achieved within the UNESCO Media and Information Literacy Curriculum for Teachers, since for Cinema as for Art, their various languages and their different technological supports have the ability to help us to simultaneously preserve factual records of events as well as the capacity to approach all those events and the global phenomena that surround them in an inclusive, holistic and universal way.

References

Ambron, S. & Hooper, K. (1990). Learning with Interactive Multimedia. Washington: Microsoft Press/Apple Computer.

Andrew, J.D. (1976). The Major Film Theories, an Introduction. Oxford: University Press.

Arnheim, R. (1971). Film as Art, 1933-1957. Los Angeles: University of California Press.

Askew, K. & Wilk, R. (2002). The Anthropology of Media : A Reader. Massachusets: Blackwell Publisher.

Balázs, B. (1945). Theory of the Film: Character and Growth of a New Art. New York: Dover Publications.

Bazalgette, C. (2010). Analogue Sunset. The Educational Role of the British Film Institute, 1979-2007. Comunicar, 35, 15-24. (DOI: 10.3916/C35-2010-02-01).

Belton, J. (1996). Movies and Mass Culture. London: Athlone Press.

Biskind, P. (1983). Seeing is Believing. New York: Bloomsbury.

Bordwell, D. (1996). Post-Theory. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.

Burch, N. (1979). To the Distant Observer. London: Scolar Press.

Burn, A. (2010). Thrills in the Dark: Young People’s Moving Image Cultures and Media Education. Comunicar 35, 33-42. (DOI: 10.3916/C35-2010-02-03).

Carroll, N. (1995). Philosophy and Film. New York: Routledge.

Chapman, J. (2005). Comparative Media History. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Clarembeaux, M. (2010). Film Education: Memory and Heritage. Comunicar, 35, 25-32. (DOI: 10.3916/C35-2010-02-02).

Cuban, L. (1986). Teachers and Machines. New York: Teachers College Press.

Deleuze, G. (1983). A Imagem-Movimento. Lisboa: Assírio & Alvim.

Eco, U. (1983). The Role of the Reader. London: Hutchinson & Co.

Finney, A. (1996). The State of European Cinema. London: Cassell.

Flores, T.M. (2007). Cinema e Experiência Moderna. Coimbra: Editora Minerva.

Hayward, S. (1996). Key Concepts in Cinema Studies. London: Routledge.

Lipovetsky, G. & Serroy, J. (2007). L’écran global. Paris: Du Seuil.

Martínez-Salanova, E. (2010). Education in European Cinema and Society’s Exclusion of the Young. Comunicar, 35, 53-60. (DOI: 10.3916/C35-2010-02-05).

Mattelard, A. & Neveu, E. (2003). Introdução aos Cultural Stu dies. Porto: Porto Editora.

Modood, T. (2007). Multiculturalism. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Monaco, J. (1981). How to Read a Film. New York: Oxford University Press.

Morin, E. (1972). Les Stars. Paris: Seuil.

Munt, S.R. (2000). Cultural Studies and the Working Class. Lon don: Cassell.

Reia, V. (2006). New Environments of Media Exposure. Internet and narrative structures: from Media Education to Media Pedagogy and Media Literacy. In U. Carlsson (Ed.), Regulation, Awareness, Empowerment. Göteborg: Nordicom.

Reia, V. (2008). Multidimensional and Multicultural Media Literacy. Social Challenges and Communicational Risks on the Edge between Cultural Heritage and Technological Development. In U. Carl sson & S. Tayie (Eds.), Empowerment through Media Education. Göteborg: Nordicom.

Reia, V. (2010). Film Languages in the European Collective Me mory. Comunicar, 35, 10-13. (DOI: 10.3916/C35-2010-02-00).

Storey, J. (1994). Cultural Theory and Popular Culture. London: Prentice Hall.

Tavares, M.E.N. (2010). Understanding Cinema: the Avant-gardes and the Construction of Film Discourse. Comunicar, 35, 43-51. (DOI: 10.3916/C35-2010-02-04).

UNESCO (Ed.) (2011). Media and Information Literacy Curri culum for Teachers. Paris: UNESCO.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

El creciente desarrollo de nuevos materiales multimedia como apoyo al lenguaje fílmico ha promovido y generado algunos interrogantes y problemas en torno a la necesaria alfabetización global, así como nuevas perspectivas en la formación de los docentes. Así han surgido nuevos interrogantes sobre el currículum en medios: ¿cómo sintonizar la formación específica de los docentes con la dinámica diaria de los diversos medios de comunicación en contextos culturales diversos, con el objeto de aproximar los problemas globales a un lenguaje cinematográfico común, poseedor de apropiaciones cívicas y curriculares contemporáneas? El Curriculum MIL de la UNESCO (Media and Information Literacy), destinado a la formación del profesorado, sitúa la alfabetización mediática e informacional en el centro del aprendizaje a lo largo de toda la vida, así como en la adquisición de las competencias cívicas necesarias desde una perspectiva universal. Este trabajo plantea el análisis de algunos estudios de caso europeos para comprender las actuales interrelaciones entre los mensajes multimedia predominantes, sus canales de comunicación y las redes sociales, teniendo muy presente la importancia de la conservación de la memoria colectiva de sonidos, imágenes… como patrimonio cultural conectada con las diversas culturas del mundo, y sabiendo que estos procesos jamás ocurren geográfica y socialmente aislados. En esta propuesta se avanza un posible modelo interdisciplinario e intercultural para una alfabetización fílmica global, partiendo de estudios fílmicos de casos europeos, seleccionados de las aportaciones de «Comunicar, 35».

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

El Currículum MIL de la UNESCO para docentes sitúa claramente, como lo hacía ya la Declaración de Alejandría de 2005, a la Alfabetización Mediática e Informacional en el centro del aprendizaje permanente como una forma de adquirir competencias que «doten a los ciudadanos con las habilidades de pensamiento crítico que les permitan exigir servicios de alta calidad a los medios de comunicación y otros proveedores de información. En conjunto, fomentan un entorno propicio en el que los medios de comunicación y otros proveedores de información puedan proporcionar servicios de calidad» (UNESCO, 2011: 16). En consecuencia, el Currículum MIL de la UNESCO señala algunos aspectos de los principales enfoques pedagógicos como estrategias centrales o pautas para el uso de los medios, entre ellos el análisis textual y contextual de los distintos objetos multimedia, como los filmes (UNESCO, 2011: 37).

Teniendo en cuenta estas pautas es necesario reflexionar sobre la imprescindible formación de los profesores para adquirir las competencias necesarias con miras a desarrollar dichos enfoques.

El creciente desarrollo de materiales multimedia como vehículos de apoyo al lenguaje fílmico ha generado nuevas preguntas y problemas en los estudios mediáticos y en los diferentes enfoques pedagógicos. Uno de los problemas más importantes que han sido enunciados en estos nuevos contextos es el que cuestiona los límites de dichos vehículos frente a las obras originales. Es decir, hasta qué punto nos encontramos aún en la presencia de una obra cinematográfica determinada, cuando ésta es proyectada, ya no en una gran pantalla desde un rollo de celuloide (que, por lo general, solía ser la forma de presentación para la que fue concebida), sino en un pequeña pantalla de televisión u ordenador desde un archivo, un disco DVD o disco láser, y controlada a través de secuencias de comandos de ordenador, cada uno de los cuales implica diferentes efectos pedagógicos. Este problema no es totalmente nuevo y lo podemos reconocer ya en discusiones previas sobre las diferencias entre el cine y la televisión, o entre el cine y el vídeo con fines educativos. Sin embargo, hay algunos aspectos nuevos que le dan un carácter más pluridimensional al problema al hablar de un contexto de red multimediática. El abordar algunos de esos aspectos es un esfuerzo por contribuir a la reflexión global sobre el creciente desarrollo de las TIC multimedia, su verdadera naturaleza y su valor pedagógico en la búsqueda de un mayor grado de alfabetización mediática y cinematográfica.

2. De la imagen en movimiento a la mente moviéndose en el tiempo

Desde los inicios de la historia del cine, los amantes de las películas de todo tipo, y especialmente los industriales y otros empresarios, han sido más bien optimistas sobre las posibilidades de utilizar películas en entornos educativos. Por ejemplo, se dice que en los tempranos años veinte, Thomas Edison dijo, de acuerdo con Larry Cuban (1986: 9): «Creo que las películas están destinadas a revolucionar nuestro sistema educativo y en pocos años más sustituirán, en gran medida, si no totalmente, la utilización de los libros de texto».

Como sabemos, esto no sucedió exactamente así. Sin embargo, a pesar del fracaso de la profecía, sí se han establecido muchos otros vínculos entre el cine y la educación en nuestros días, y creo que este proceso está lejos de haber concluido. Esas conexiones no siempre son lo suficientemente claras o tan bien conocidas ni en los medios ni en el campo educativo, cuyos agentes son generalmente, y de manera intuitiva, conscientes de la existencia de la influencia mutua, pero a menudo no actúan en consecuencia, al menos no de forma consciente, frente a esa presencia y sus implicaciones.

Algunas de esas dimensiones presentan un buen número de características muy específicas y casi palpables que tienen gran importancia en el proceso de comunicación global, y por lo tanto, en el proceso educativo en las sociedades modernas, de las que el cine, la televisión, el vídeo, los libros, los cuadros, los textos, los sonidos, los ordenadores, los discos y otros dispositivos mediáticos son parte integral. Investigar y estudiar este complejo cuerpo mediático es una tarea de gran importancia, en general, y de especial relevancia en lo que se refiere al cine y sus lenguajes.

De hecho, Edison no fue el único con una visión optimista respecto al desarrollo del campo, y podríamos pensar que al menos algunas de las conexiones estructurales más evidentes se habrían establecido normalmente entre los campos de la comunicación audiovisual y la educación. Hay, de hecho, muchos vínculos entre ambos campos, aunque no podemos decir, en general, que haya muchos vínculos institucionales estables entre las industrias de la comunicación de las diferentes naciones y sus sistemas educativos, a pesar de que pueden encontrarse algunas excepciones.

Viajando en el tiempo y la tecnología, desde la época de Edison hasta nuestra propia época, podríamos dirigir nuestra atención a otros empresarios o comerciantes de tecnología, y ver sus creencias, no solo respecto al cine como un medio pedagógico de gran alcance, sino al multimedia como fenómeno global, en el que el cine tiene un papel creciente. John Sculley, un ex jefe de Apple Computer, escribió en su prólogo de «Learning with Interactive Multimedia»: «Imagine un aula con una ventana a todo el conocimiento del mundo. Imagínese un profesor con la capacidad para dar vida a cualquier imagen, cualquier sonido, cualquier evento. Imagine a un estudiante con el poder de visitar cualquier lugar del mundo en cualquier momento de la historia. Imagine una pantalla que puede mostrar en colores vivos el funcionamiento interno de una célula, el nacimiento y muerte de las estrellas, los enfrentamientos de ejércitos y los triunfos del arte… Creo que todo esto sucederá no solo porque la gente tiene la capacidad de hacer que suceda, sino también porque la gente tiene una necesidad imperiosa de hacer que suceda» (Ambron & Hooper, 1990: 7). Es muy interesante observar que las diferencias entre ambas creencias en el poder pedagógico de los medios son casi inexistentes. Sin embargo, esto revela más de las intensas y constantes expectativas de la industria para penetrar en los mercados de la educación en los últimos años, que algunas perspectivas probadas por los distintos medios en diferentes contextos pedagógicos.

Sin embargo, tenemos que admitir que estas perspectivas son ahora mucho más realistas que nunca, gracias a los nuevos contextos tecnológicos multimedia. Esto significa que ya no podemos descartarlas como un montón de nuevas/viejas profecías basadas en los mejores deseos de la industria. De hecho, algunas de ellas ya están ocurriendo, YouTube es un buen ejemplo. Por lo tanto, tenemos que tratar con ellas, tratando de descubrir cuáles son las nuevas características de los medios, sus materiales, sus lenguajes y sus consecuencias reales, sobre todo desde un punto de vista pedagógico; sobre los procesos de comunicación que pueden ser desarrollados para diferentes públicos, aún si el público se trata de un receptor único en el momento, dentro de un contexto de educación formal o de cualquier otro posible contexto.

Algunos estudios comparativos de las diferentes experiencias pedagógicas con materiales multimedia que se basan en el uso educativo de secuencias cinematográficas y sus condiciones de recepción brindan la oportunidad de observar algunas tendencias principales en relación con aspectos intertextuales más amplios, como la multitud de hechos cinematográficos e información hipertextual que suelen seguir a través de un determinado material fílmico multimedia, como materiales derivados y dispositivos. Esas tendencias fueron las siguientes:

1) El material fílmico, sobre todo películas, en discos o en archivos, todavía se consideran, en general, materiales pedagógicos muy interesantes y atractivos.

2) El uso de materiales fílmicos es más eficaz cuando se registra en un soporte físico.

3) Los procesos pedagógicos relacionados son más estimulantes si los materiales fílmicos y la manipulación de software son estructuras interconectadas y compatibles.

4) La estructura fílmica de los materiales pedagógicos, sus lenguajes y sus sistemas narrativos parecen seguir siendo dispositivos interesantes y atractivos, especialmente si pueden conectarse entre sí o con otros dispositivos pedagógicos, como los comentarios hipertextuales de la película o cualquier otro elemento de alfabetización informacional y cinematográfica.

Estas tendencias pueden cambiar dependiendo de la naturaleza de los objetivos y expectativas de los usuarios finales, pero en general podemos decir que reflejan algunas de las implicaciones pedagógicas más importantes resultado de las principales características estructurales de los materiales multimedia más comunes que utilizan los dispositivos fílmicos del lenguaje. Especialmente, muestran que las interconexiones entre los distintos niveles de realidad, ficción y realidad virtual parecen ser de una naturaleza más bien compleja asumiendo, en consecuencia, un sistema bastante complejo de los efectos pedagógicos. A su vez, el uso del lenguaje fílmico dentro de un contexto multimedia refleja con particular nitidez algunos de los problemas que se producen en diferentes ambientes de usuarios multimedia, ya sean profesores, estudiantes, u otros consumidores comunes de medios de comunicación ordinarios: el carácter hiperreal de los medios fílmicos; el sustancial grado de la mutación que distingue a la manipulación de estos medios a través de diferentes herramientas; la gran cantidad de información a disposición del usuario en cada cuadro, imagen, sonido o secuencia; la necesidad de cerrar o abrir las estructuras de los sistemas multimedia con el fin de establecer diferentes posibles modelos pedagógicos y formas de exploración. Por lo tanto, el usuario de material multimedia fílmico siempre tiene, frente a estos fenómenos, la posibilidad de jugar diferentes roles en interacción con dichos materiales y es por eso que el usuario, profesor o estudiante, necesita de una formación específica y una adecuada alfabetización para desempeñar esos roles.

3. Películas como textos

Una de las funciones más importantes es el papel del receptor como decodificador del mensaje fílmico a través de los dispositivos específicos de los multimedia. Por lo general ya no se trata de un espectador abstracto tomado de la oscuridad colectiva de una sala de cine, ni es ya el manipulador único de un grabador de videocasete no inteligente con limitadas posibilidades de intervenir sobre la obra original. El usuario/receptor del material fílmico multimedia es, en efecto, un lector de múltiples textos, pero su papel no solo será el de lector, como Umberto Eco (1979) nos lo ha presentado antes, creando significado a través de su capacidad mental de reconocimiento, interpretación y asociación. Será un lector mucho más activo y, especialmente mucho más poderoso. Tan poderoso que, probablemente, no se limitará a la función de un lector y se convertirá, de hecho, en un nuevo creador con posibilidades casi ilimitadas para manipular la obra original, e incluso preservar su manipulación como una nueva obra para ser vista y estudiada, es decir, el usuario puede fácilmente convertirse en autor y creador. Este fenómeno necesariamente implica, desde un punto de vista pedagógico, una amplia gama de complejos problemas de alfabetización: respecto a los materiales y sus sistemas de lenguaje (hardware y software); respecto a las estrategias preestablecidas de trabajo para interactuar con los materiales y, sobre todo, respecto a las estructuras que combinan e integran todos esos elementos. En principio, podemos decir que una estructura abierta será siempre más eficaz, desde un punto de vista pedagógico, que una cerrada, a pesar de las muchas maneras en que una exploración del material fílmico cerrado puede ofrecer a sus usuarios, éstas siempre serán un número limitado, mientras que los patrones de consulta y posibilidades de manipulación de un material con estructura abierta, son de hecho, ilimitados. Este hecho, solo, implica una gran demanda de alfabetización fílmica y mediática.

Además de estos aspectos textuales y contextuales, hay, por supuesto, también problemas de carácter legal y derechos de autor que deben tratarse. El usuario no debe olvidar nunca las consecuencias de la autoría de la obra original. A pesar de que no abordaremos dichos problemas aquí, ya que desde un estricto punto de vista pedagógico no son relevantes en este contexto, estos aspectos deben ser tratados adecuadamente en otros contextos curriculares.

4. La cuestión de la interactividad

Algunas de las cuestiones principales relativas a las estrategias pedagógicas para abordar los diferentes materiales multimedia fílmicos presentan, por lo general, una palabra clave: interactividad. Pero la interactividad no significa exactamente lo mismo para todos los materiales y sus posibilidades de manipulación pueden ser muy diferentes de acuerdo con la estructura del material. Una estructura más abierta por lo general ofrece un mayor grado de interactividad que una cerrada. En mi opinión y, de nuevo, desde el punto de vista pedagógico, solo se puede decir que un material multimedia interactivo comprende una estrategia interactiva cuando se ofrece una posibilidad real al usuario de actuar sobre la obra original, preservando sus resultados. Este procedimiento representa, en efecto, un amplio rango de nuevas posibilidades pedagógicas y aunque hay, en general, una carga bastante fuerte de didactismo impregnando las estrategias más comunes de interactividad, esto podría tentarnos a predecir que el campo no está demasiado lejos de lograr una amplia línea de materiales adecuados a la mayoría de los diferentes objetivos pedagógicos. Pero, como quiera que sea, no podemos olvidar nunca que los objetivos individuales de los usuarios pueden ser muy diferentes en esencia, dependiendo del contexto de uso. El usuario podría solo desear entretenerse viendo una película y jugando con videojuegos, o puede tener algunos objetivos críticos, pedagógicos o estéticos. Los autores y editores multimedia son, sin duda, conscientes de la posible existencia de todos los objetivos de los usuarios. Así, la certeza de su uso no dependerá solamente de los objetivos y estrategias de los materiales y de sus instituciones productoras, sino también, y en alto grado, más a menudo del papel que el usuario tenga, o al menos del papel que se le haga desempeñar. Sabemos, por el pasado reciente, que algunas películas de la televisión han sido diseñadas y producidas de acuerdo con patrones específicos de lenguaje que se adaptan bien a la forma que tiene la televisión para atrapar a determinada audiencia, por ejemplo, utilizando un gran número de primeros planos y secuencias redundantes muy fragmentadas y sincronizadas con algunas partituras musicales populares fácilmente identificables. Nosotros también sabemos que algunos ejemplos de películas se han proyectado en las denominadas salas de cine interactivo. Y la industria, naturalmente tratará de explorar todas las novedades tecnológicas y mediáticas, con el objetivo de captar un público más amplio. Pero, en general, cualquier película que se hizo en el pasado, o que se haga en el futuro, en un contexto de producción de cine normal, será: western, comedia, ciencia ficción, drama, película de terror, documental, etc. Cualquier género encaja fácilmente en atractivos paquetes multimedia, educativos o de entretenimiento puro, con diferentes objetivos y que implican diferentes estrategias de uso y por consiguiente con diferentes implicaciones pedagógicas, dirigidos a diferentes públicos. Corremos el riesgo, por supuesto, de encontrarnos jugando con videojuegos en lugar de ver el trabajo cinematográfico de alguno de los perfiles importantes de la historia del séptimo arte, pero esto dependerá del punto de vista del usuario que se acerque a ella y, por supuesto, dependerá de su grado de alfabetización cinematográfica. Desde un punto de vista pedagógico, cualquier material fílmico multimedia puede convertirse en un material muy eficaz, a pesar de su evaluación compleja, ya que casi siempre es potencialmente muy didáctico, sin embargo seguirá siendo interesante siempre que conserve en su estructura mutante todos los mecanismos originales del lenguaje intactos, con el fin de seguir ofreciendo a su público la posibilidad de una experiencia perceptiva dramática y emocionante, no importa qué tipo de estrategia interactiva elija el público. El principal problema será saber cómo preparar a los maestros con las habilidades suficientes para poder abordar, de una manera pedagógicamente eficaz, las complejas realidades y las realidades virtuales que se han enunciado antes.

5. ¿Necesitamos la Educación en Medios para lograr la alfabetización mediática?

Es un hecho que la mayoría de las veces, podemos llegar a ser alfabetizados mediáticamente solo con estar expuestos a los medios de comunicación, sin ningún tipo de proceso formal educativo mediático, ya que todos los procesos de exposición a los medios contienen algún tipo de pedagogía que forma y se ajusta a los usuarios de dichos medios (emisores y receptores) de muchas maneras, desarrollando los mecanismos de producción, lectura, interpretación y reproducción, y de los cuales, los emisores y los receptores muchas veces simplemente no son conscientes. Cuando esto sucede (y sucede muy a menudo) los usuarios de los medios pueden ser funcionalmente competentes mediáticamente en algún grado, pero están, sin embargo, alienados de muchas maneras respecto a los procesos pedagógicos que tienen lugar en sus esferas mediáticas públicas y privadas. Por ello, algunos procesos educativos mediáticos pueden ser importantes para lograr mejores resultados de alfabetización, tanto para los lectores como para los responsables de los medios de comunicación.

Bajo esta premisa un grupo de investigadores independientes y expertos de diferentes países e instituciones unieron esfuerzos en un intento de producir una especie de enfoque común de la alfabetización mediática, que se convirtió en lo que se conoce como la «Carta Europea para la Alfabetización Mediática», y que fue, de hecho, una declaración pública de compromiso en cuanto a algunos factores esenciales de alfabetización mediática como: «Aumentar la comprensión y la conciencia pública de la alfabetización respecto a los medios de comunicación, información y de expresión; abogar por la importancia de la alfabetización mediática en el desarrollo de la política educativa, cultural, política, social y económica; apoyar el principio de que todos los ciudadanos de cualquier edad deben tener la oportunidad, tanto en la educación formal como en la informal, de desarrollar las habilidades y conocimientos necesarios para aumentar su disfrute, comprensión y exploración de los medios de comunicación» (www.euromedialiteracy.eu/about.php).

Llegados a este punto, significa que tendremos que desarrollar estrategias formales y no formales de educación mediática para los entornos escolares, para los entornos de los padres y, necesariamente, para entornos profesionales de los medios de comunicación. Sabemos que las industrias mediáticas suelen estar casi completamente cerradas a los enfoques pedagógicos, lo cual significa que tendremos que concentrar nuestros esfuerzos en los ámbitos de la formación académica mediática, es decir, en universidades y otros centros de formación. Dentro de esta perspectiva, además del periodismo, los otros campos de gran importancia para abordar desde la educación y alfabetización en medios son el cine, los videojuegos, la música, la publicidad y, debido a que todos tienden a converger, Internet. Algunos de estos aspectos se plantearon ya en anteriores contextos, en un intento de desarrollar una reflexión y discusión acerca de su naturaleza: «Internet es en realidad la mayor base de datos que provee información a los individuos en la vida cotidiana, y también a instituciones y servicios.

Entre los usuarios podemos contar a alumnos y profesores, pero también medios de comunicación y formadores de opinión, así como proveedores de información, incluyendo periodistas. Cuando se utiliza esencialmente como un canal de comunicación para mensajes electrónicos, la web contiene una serie de información útil, presentada por individuos, instituciones, gobiernos, asociaciones y todo tipo de organizaciones comerciales y no comerciales. Pero ¿quiénes son los guardianes de ese flujo electrónico? ¿Quiénes delinean los principales flujos de la agenda global? ¿Cómo y dónde están las líneas editoriales más poderosas? Más allá de la difusión ilimitada e instantánea de datos, Internet ha desarrollado nuevas formas de vida cultural, económica y social. Este desarrollo está relacionado con los instrumentos de comunicación y con el acceso a las industrias de la comunicación y la información; es evidente en la política, la educación, el comercio, y en muchos otros campos de carácter público y privado. Todas estas áreas contribuyen al rápido cambio de nuestros paradigmas tradicionales del espacio público y no sabemos aún si nuestra posición como actores individuales y sociales está cambiando tan rápidamente y tal vez aún no somos completamente conscientes de las implicaciones de tales cambios. La amenaza potencial de la alienación generalizada en los nuevos entornos de exposición a los medios no deben ser tomados a la ligera» (Reia, 2006: 123-134).

6. ¿Necesitamos los conocimientos cinematográficos?

El cine es probablemente el más ecléctico y sincrético de todos los medios de comunicación y tiene un increíble poder de atracción que se replica en todos los otros medios de comunicación a través del uso del lenguaje cinematográfico en todo tipo de contextos: vídeos musicales para promocionar música, imágenes reales para mejorar los videojuegos; géneros cinematográficos y estrellas de cine para alcanzar los objetivos de la publicidad, inserciones y extractos de películas de todo tipo en «YouTube», «Facebook», «Myspace» y millones de otros sitios web en Internet.

El cine, en sus múltiples formas, se convirtió en el vehículo más común de estos nuevos entornos de exposición a los medios, convirtiéndose así en uno de los instrumentos más importantes para una alfabetización mediática multidimensional y multicultural entre los usuarios de diferentes medios de comunicación, consumidores, productores y «prosumidores» de todas las edades, niveles sociales y culturales. A pesar de los diferentes niveles de alfabetización mediática, su naturaleza o su falta puede mostrar diferencias y similitudes, de acuerdo con los contextos locales y globales en los que se han desarrollado y practicado: «las apropiaciones y los patrones de uso de estas tecnologías de comunicación son en muchos aspectos bastante específicos, así que uno de los principales riesgos, en un contexto de alfabetización mediática, es la generalización de los patrones comunes de apropiación. Sin embargo, generalmente seguimos actuando ante los efectos culturales de los medios considerándolos con frecuencia ambivalentes: la televisión todavía es vista tanto educativa y como una droga, los teléfonos móviles son percibidos como una molestia y como un salvavidas; los juegos de ordenador son vistos como instrumentos de aprendizaje y como una pérdida de tiempo adictiva y las películas, desde sus inicios mismos, han sido vistas como el séptimo arte y como un medio de gran poder educativo, pero también como un medio con grandes dosis de escapismo» (Reia, 2008 : 155-165).

La urgencia de abordar el cine, sus lenguajes y apropiaciones como el principal vehículo de alfabetización mediática, también tiene que ver con la enorme importancia de este medio en la construcción de nuestra memoria colectiva. La riqueza y diversidad de los lenguajes cinematográficos, técnicas y tecnologías del cine son vistos como instrumentos de gran importancia, desde las primitivas películas de Lumière y Mélies hasta las inserciones virtuales más sofisticadas en YouTube. Su papel como vehículo de la narratología artística y documental, y como factor de una alfabetización fílmica, adquiere una importancia absolutamente incuestionable en cualquier sociedad que se llame a sí misma sociedad del conocimiento y de la información como contribución constructiva a nuestra memoria colectiva y cultural.

Teniendo esto en cuenta, especialmente en el nuevo contexto de las políticas de los medios de comunicación que se espera se desarrollen en todo el mundo y, consecuentemente, algunos nuevos enfoques de alfabetización mediática y cinematográfica, era una tarea de gran importancia producir el dossier temático de «Comunicar, 35», «Film Languages in the European Collective Memory» (Reia, 2010). Vamos a ver cómo su contenido nos puede ayudar a establecer algunos vínculos con las estrategias globales de alfabetización mediática necesarias que deben tenerse en cuenta, especialmente en lo que se refiere a la formación de profesores con el fin de poder enfrentarse a los múltiples desafíos de la alfabetización audiovisual y fílmica.

7. Cinco casos de la alfabetización en «Comunicar»

Parafraseando la película de Bob Rafelson (1970), uno siempre debe encontrar algunas «piezas fáciles» para juntar nuestras capacidades, nuestras historias culturales y nuestros recuerdos. Ese fue el desafío asumido por los autores de «Comunicar 35»: reunir los diferentes enfoques de alfabetización fílmica en un intento de construir algunos puentes culturales entre distintas generaciones, movimientos y apropiaciones respecto a la memoria colectiva del cine europeo, que se presenta aquí como un caso de estudio y un ejemplo de muchos otros posibles enfoques de alfabetización cinematográfica.

La conservación de la memoria colectiva de los sonidos y las imágenes como un patrimonio cultural europeo significa el reconocimiento de los diversos contextos evolutivos de la comunicación audiovisual en Europa, así como de sus relaciones con las culturas del mundo en general, ya que estos procesos nunca se producen en el aislamiento geográfico o cultural. El lenguaje cinematográfico tiene un papel vital en estos procesos de la evolución comunicativa y educativa como un vehículo de comunicación y educación colectiva, es decir, como un factor para un aprendizaje en profundidad de los campos más variados del conocimiento humano, es decir, como alfabetización múltiple, incluidos los medios y los conocimientos cinematográficos.

También es importante examinar la evolución de las dimensiones pedagógicas de la comunicación audiovisual en general y de la educación cinematográfica en particular como el verdadero punto de partida para un repositorio cultural completo que no podemos descuidar o ignorar, de lo contrario corremos el riesgo de dejar en el olvido algunas de las más importantes huellas de nuestra identidad cultural europea que, por su naturaleza, son a menudo tan frágiles. Por tanto, estamos obligados a profundizar en los medios, los canales, las tecnologías y el lenguaje que hemos desarrollado desde hace más de un siglo para añadir claridad a la creatividad colectiva y a las necesidades de la narración artística y documental que nos representa y que nos permite reflexionar sobre nuestra propia condición humana. Sin embargo, por extraño que parezca, las sociedades, las ciencias y las tecnologías dentro de las cuales se desarrollan estas narrativas también pueden perder la memoria, al igual que nosotros; como individuos somos olvidadizos o nos hacemos viejos y no somos capaces de regenerar los mecanismos de hetero-reconocimiento, e incluso a veces ni de auto-reconocimiento, o no podemos distanciarnos lo suficiente de nuestro conocimiento y relatos predominantes para tener una perspectiva más holística, universal y reflexiva. No es porque los artistas, científicos o pedagogos, al igual que otros seres humanos, tengan una «corta memoria», sino porque las artes, las ciencias y las tecnologías y sus lenguajes están cerrados y aislados dentro de sus propios espacios particulares y, algunas veces separados del conocimiento, de la aplicación e incluso de la difusión. Esto puede suceder en cualquier rama de las artes o las ciencias, aun cuando los principios fundamentales de sus lenguajes pertenecen a la educación o la comunicación, lo que en sí mismo es una enorme contradicción. Así, los soportes tecnológicos y de comunicación de las grabaciones de la producción individual y colectiva de conocimiento se abstraen en su aparente autosuficiencia desde el punto de vista de la evolución de la comunicación, considerando el desarrollo tecnológico y lingüístico del siglo pasado, que ha demostrado ser bastante redundante, además de ser un agente reductor que ha conservado ineficientemente y erróneamente el conocimiento procedimental de la construcción y comunicación del aprendizaje científico y cultural. En consecuencia, estamos obligados a analizar los posibles riesgos de la pérdida de esta propiedad colectiva, que a menudo es muy insustancial y por esa razón más valiosa aún. Para ello, también debemos preservar, articular y sistematizar algunas de las principales características de los procesos de comunicación cultural como fenómeno de memorización y aprendizaje colectivo. Como tantos científicos e investigadores han afirmado en los últimos años, en el ejercicio de su irreverencia científica e inquietud teórica, el científico casi nunca es capaz de dar un paso atrás y ver la ciencia en el espacio y el tiempo, de tal manera que pueda verla moverse, «y sin embargo se mueve». Y, como se dijo antes, el papel del cine y del lenguaje cinematográfico como vehículos de las narrativas artísticas y documentales, en una perspectiva integral y holística, adquiere una importancia absolutamente incuestionable como un factor de una auténtica alfabetización mediática y fílmica, como puede verse en estos cinco enfoques reunidos, entre otros, en el dossier temático de «Comunicar, 35» (Reia, 2010):

1) Cary Balzagette –exdirectora del Departamento de Educación Cinematográfica del British Film Institute (BFI) durante muchos años, y cuya autoridad intelectual es reconocida por muchos otros autores por el liderazgo del BFI en este campo– presenta los principales enfoques pedagógicos del lenguaje cinematográfico, especialmente en lo que llamamos pedagogía de cine, desarrollada dentro de las actividades más amplias del BFI, pionero de la perspectiva educacional de los medios como un proceso que dio lugar a un amplio interés en la alfabetización mediática y en particular, en la alfabetización cinematográfica. Su artículo «Analogue sunset, the educational role of the British Film Institute, 1979-2007» (Bazalgette, 2010), traza las principales líneas de la actividad desarrollada por el BFI en este campo durante los últimos 25 años, sus continuos enfoques educativos demuestran claramente que el estudio de cine y de las películas es absolutamente esencial para la comprensión del mundo y el tiempo en que vivimos.

2) Michel Clarembeaux –director del Centro Audiovisual (CAV) de Lieja, Bélgica– reflexiona sobre el tema «Educación cinematográfica: memoria y patrimonio» (Clarembeaux, 2010), en el que se identifica a la educación cinematográfica, especialmente en estos tiempos de transición y migración a entornos digitales, como una necesidad urgente de construir una profunda alfabetización mediática, dado que la importancia del lenguaje cinematográfico no puede subestimarse en la tarea de desarrollar la capacidad de analizar los medios de comunicación contemporáneos, entre los que el cine destaca en sus diversas formas y soportes como el «supremo arte de la memoria», ya sea individual o colectiva. El autor también sugiere que podemos y debemos lograr una convergencia entre una especie de «pedagogía de la educación cinematográfica» y el deseo del público de preservar la memoria colectiva de un patrimonio cultural más amplio y variado, señalando ejemplos concretos de películas y autores específicos para apoyar esta hipótesis, pero también para recordar la importancia de los cineclubes en este contexto.

3) Andrew Burn –profesor de Educación en Medios del London University’s Institute of Education– contribuye con su artículo, «Thrills in the dark: young people’s moving image cultures and media education» (Burn, 2010), en el que analiza el papel del lenguaje cinematográfico en esta época de transición entre medios de comunicación, canales y entornos culturales, teniendo las películas de terror como objeto de estudio. Toma el cine y los videojuegos como un ejemplo, y hace hincapié en la hibridación del género y la transmutación de las formas de interacción entre los jóvenes y los medios de comunicación, canales de películas y vídeos reales y virtuales; muestra cómo un amor particular por los géneros cinematográficos de horror y de desastres, no solo en Estados Unidos sino también en Europa, todavía persiste entre los jóvenes, cuya influencia se extiende a otras formas audiovisuales, géneros y productos; ante la desesperación y angustia de muchos profesores, quienes se inclinan más hacia la prohibición que hacia la complicada opción de estudiar y analizar estos amados objetos terroríficos que son tan atractivos para los jóvenes.

4) Mirian Tavares –profesora de Artes Visuales de la Universidad del Algarve– subraya en su artículo «Understanding cinema: the avant-gardes and the construction of film discourse» (Tavares, 2010) la gran importancia de las vanguardias históricas en la construcción del discurso cinematográfico y cómo fueron esenciales para que el cine fuera reconocido como una forma de arte, ofreciendo sus puntos de vista dentro de las encrucijadas de estos conceptos clave hacia una alfabetización fílmica renovada posible.

5) Enrique Martínez-Salanova –autor de «Creative Classroom of Cinema and Education» (Martínez-Salanova, 2010)– escribe acerca de los «Sistemas Educativos en la Heterodoxa Historia del Cine Europeo», que propone una red de análisis que vincule películas específicas con temas educativos tradicionalmente difíciles como la violencia, la exclusión, la marginación y la desatención.

8. Conclusiones

Aunque se han citado estos casos de estudio, dado el contexto cultural del cine europeo y las apropiaciones de la alfabetización cinematográfica europea, parece adecuado concluir, de acuerdo con el análisis general de la evolución de los diferentes paisajes de los medios de comunicación citados en el principio de este texto, que estas reflexiones pueden tener en cuenta otros enfoques similares de alfabetización en otros lugares y dentro de otros contextos culturales, como los que se pueden desarrollar, junto con apropiaciones diferentes que pueden lograrse dentro del «UNESCO Media and Information Literacy Curriculum for Teachers», dado que para el cine y para el arte, sus diversos lenguajes y sus diferentes soportes tecnológicos tienen la capacidad de ayudarnos a preservar registros documentados de eventos y, simultáneamente, la capacidad de acercarse a todos aquellos acontecimientos y fenómenos globales que los rodean, en una forma inclusiva, holística y universal.

Referencias

Ambron, S. & Hooper, K. (1990). Learning with Interactive Multimedia. Washington: Microsoft Press/Apple Computer.

Andrew, J.D. (1976). The Major Film Theories, an Introduction. Oxford: University Press.

Arnheim, R. (1971). Film as Art, 1933-1957. Los Angeles: University of California Press.

Askew, K. & Wilk, R. (2002). The Anthropology of Media : A Reader. Massachusets: Blackwell Publisher.

Balázs, B. (1945). Theory of the Film: Character and Growth of a New Art. New York: Dover Publications.

Bazalgette, C. (2010). Analogue Sunset. The Educational Role of the British Film Institute, 1979-2007. Comunicar, 35, 15-24. (DOI: 10.3916/C35-2010-02-01).

Belton, J. (1996). Movies and Mass Culture. London: Athlone Press.

Biskind, P. (1983). Seeing is Believing. New York: Bloomsbury.

Bordwell, D. (1996). Post-Theory. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.

Burch, N. (1979). To the Distant Observer. London: Scolar Press.

Burn, A. (2010). Thrills in the Dark: Young People’s Moving Image Cultures and Media Education. Comunicar 35, 33-42. (DOI: 10.3916/C35-2010-02-03).

Carroll, N. (1995). Philosophy and Film. New York: Routledge.

Chapman, J. (2005). Comparative Media History. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Clarembeaux, M. (2010). Film Education: Memory and Heritage. Comunicar, 35, 25-32. (DOI: 10.3916/C35-2010-02-02).

Cuban, L. (1986). Teachers and Machines. New York: Teachers College Press.

Deleuze, G. (1983). A Imagem-Movimento. Lisboa: Assírio & Alvim.

Eco, U. (1983). The Role of the Reader. London: Hutchinson & Co.

Finney, A. (1996). The State of European Cinema. London: Cassell.

Flores, T.M. (2007). Cinema e Experiência Moderna. Coimbra: Editora Minerva.

Hayward, S. (1996). Key Concepts in Cinema Studies. London: Routledge.

Lipovetsky, G. & Serroy, J. (2007). L’écran global. Paris: Du Seuil.

Martínez-Salanova, E. (2010). Education in European Cinema and Society’s Exclusion of the Young. Comunicar, 35, 53-60. (DOI: 10.3916/C35-2010-02-05).

Mattelard, A. & Neveu, E. (2003). Introdução aos Cultural Stu dies. Porto: Porto Editora.

Modood, T. (2007). Multiculturalism. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Monaco, J. (1981). How to Read a Film. New York: Oxford University Press.

Morin, E. (1972). Les Stars. Paris: Seuil.

Munt, S.R. (2000). Cultural Studies and the Working Class. Lon don: Cassell.

Reia, V. (2006). New Environments of Media Exposure. Internet and narrative structures: from Media Education to Media Pedagogy and Media Literacy. In U. Carlsson (Ed.), Regulation, Awareness, Empowerment. Göteborg: Nordicom.

Reia, V. (2008). Multidimensional and Multicultural Media Literacy. Social Challenges and Communicational Risks on the Edge between Cultural Heritage and Technological Development. In U. Carl sson & S. Tayie (Eds.), Empowerment through Media Education. Göteborg: Nordicom.

Reia, V. (2010). Film Languages in the European Collective Me mory. Comunicar, 35, 10-13. (DOI: 10.3916/C35-2010-02-00).

Storey, J. (1994). Cultural Theory and Popular Culture. London: Prentice Hall.

Tavares, M.E.N. (2010). Understanding Cinema: the Avant-gardes and the Construction of Film Discourse. Comunicar, 35, 43-51. (DOI: 10.3916/C35-2010-02-04).

UNESCO (Ed.) (2011). Media and Information Literacy Curri culum for Teachers. Paris: UNESCO.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/09/12
Accepted on 30/09/12
Submitted on 30/09/12

Volume 20, Issue 2, 2012
DOI: 10.3916/C39-2012-02-08
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 7
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?