Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The technological landscape in relation to the minors presents numerous challenges facing the telecommunication industry, with families and schools. However, academic literature still remains silence in showing the strategic policies that the industry is managing in order to address these challenges. Therefore, this article has two aims: to provide an overview of the state of the art in order to present the main findings of the child protection policies in international telecom companies (17), stressing the analysis regarding their products and services and how do they manage the collaboration with key stakeholders. Research was conducted using qualitative methodology: CSR reports and websites of the companies were analysed in order to define what are their strategic actions, as well as the individuals and institutions that collaborate with. The findings show interesting insights, even with some differences by regions, among the most significant policies pursued by the sector are: self-regulation, product innovation regarding protection tools and a network of collaborations with stakeholders have been established, as an opportunity for facilitating new policies and strategies. In conclusion, telecom industry needs to integrate their policies regarding minor protection, promoting an integral management approach that comprises not only product development but also strengthen relationships with the main stakeholders as parents and institutions.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction and Background

Children and teenagers are growing up in a connected world where screens –Internet, videogames and cell phones– have taken on a greater importance. This technological panorama shows us millions of minors with screens in their pockets, giving them permanent access to contents that they themselves can create for their own and shared use.

In spite of the novelty of digital technology, it is true that the relationship between minors and the media has always attracted the attention of academics. In the 1930s we find the first research into cinema and radio, better known as the «Payne Fund Studies», which evolved towards television in the 1950s (Wartella & Reeves, 1985). At the beginning of the new millennium, the traditional media –radio, television and press– were joined by smart phones, tablets and videogame consoles. In parallel, interest in research has continued to grow by offering different approaches which, simultaneously, cover a wide range of media and technologies. Following the classification used by Bringué & Sádaba (2008), there are three major subject groups dealing with the relationship between minors and technology: consumption patterns, effects of use and legislative development.

The first of these analyzes the access and consumption of the child and teenage population groups (Colás & al., 2013; Tolsá & Bringué, 2012; Bringué & Sádaba, 2011, 2009, 2008; Sádaba, 2014, 2008; Rideout & al., 2010; Staksrud & al., 2009; Lenhart & al., 2008; Hasebrink & al., 2008). These studies describe quantitative aspects such as the technological equipment in homes, place of access, moment of access and time spent, together with the influence of socio-demographical variables such as sex, age and socio-economic status. There are many studies on the consumption of traditional media and new technologies (Rideout & al., 2005) and minors’ attitudes towards them (Jones & Fox, 2009; Livingstone & al., 2010; Lenhart & al., 2005). Particular international relevance has been given to the projects «EU Kids Online I and II» coordinated by Sonia Livingstone (Livingstone & al., 2013; D´Haenens & al., 2013; Livingstone & al., 2012) and those carried out by the «Pew Research Center» in the United States (Jones & Fox, 2009; Lenhart & al., 2008, 2006).

A second group of work delves deeper into the effects of these technologies (Byron, 2008; Livingstone, 2009), with special emphasis on the negative and positive consequences shown as risks and opportunities. The typology proposed by Livingstone & Haddon (2009) classifies three risks: contents, contacts and conducts. Regarding the positive potential, they underline the benefits for education, socialization, learning, participation, promotion of entertainment, creativity and documentation (Middaugh & Kahne, 2013; Livingstone & al., 2012; Staksrud & al., 2009; Livingstone & Haddon, 2009; Janes & Fox, 2009; Byron, 2008; Hasebrink & al., 2008; Katz, 2006; Buckingham & Rodríguez, 2013).

Finally, in the studies on the development of legislation, which are focused on the protection of minors, according to Tolsá (2012), there are three key elements which are particularly relevant in this area: regulations, family mediation and media literacy. These studies aim to inspire measures to protect the physical and psychological integrity of the minor (Lunt & Livingstone, 2012). Carlsson (2006) highlights the importance of a system which combines regulation and self-regulation, taking into account that technology is advancing at an incredible rate and that current legislation may easily become obsolete. Most of the few studies on self-regulation analyzed, on the one hand, regulatory and legislative policies and, on the other, the operators’ codes of conduct (Lievens, 2007; Ahlert & al., 2005). They are all aware of the constraints in the existing judicial solutions and advocate a common self-regulatory framework for the whole industry. As regards family mediation, the need for parents to control and accompany their children in this new digital reality is emphasized. The parental figure is of great importance to instill guidelines and habits for the use of these technologies (Llopis, 2004; Austin & al., 1999). Finally, the studies focusing on the spread of educational knowledge are a valuable resource for the promotion of responsible use (García Matilla, 2004; Buckingham & Domaille, 2003).

In this third field of regulatory studies, only limited attention has been paid to the role of the telecommunication companies in spite of the fact that over many years they have proposed numerous self-regulation codes and policies concerning child protection. It is difficult to gauge how much of this is genuine or self-interested, although different international organizations such as the European Commission and the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) have insisted on the need for the collaboration and involvement of public authorities, the industry, education agents and civil society. Nor must we underestimate the contribution of the social context in ensuring that companies behave in a socially responsible way: this has been formalized in the development and consolidation of the areas of Corporative Social Responsibility. Whatever the case, and far from acting unilaterally, we see that the operators have begun to develop multiple relationships with stakeholders such as schools, families, specialized NGOs, public authorities expert researchers and even communication media in an effort to contribute to the protection of children and teenagers in the digital world.

The interest of these companies in being part of this debate may be explained from the double perspective of social responsibility and market logic. Applying McNeal’s classification (1987), the relationship of children and teenagers with ICT takes on a threefold dimension: present, future and influence. Present because they are users of 2.0 services, and create contents and use social networks and online games with great skill. The future dimension indicates that in a few years these users will be adults and potential customers for these services. Finally, their influence can be seen in family shopping decisions, for example, in the categories of products such as toys, food or entertainment and, without doubt, technology as well. These issues are not ignored by the marketing departments in the companies (Jiménez & Ramos, 2007), given that young people are a very attractive market for the operators. The European Commission estimates that in the future this segment will generate 30,000 million Euros (Clarke, 2005).

However, this is a sensitive and vulnerable age group. Clarke (2005: 4) defines them as «our protected market». Their cognitive development is not comparable to that of an adult and, therefore, they are not always aware of the opportunities and dangers. Consequently, children may make improper use of contents or access contents which could harm them. However, we can also intuit a field of opportunities for a company which, as an expert in ICTs, has greater knowledge to reduce risks but also to make the most of innovation and of the development of tools as the bases for future business lines which will, then, become important means for generating income.

The complexity of acting on this age group, which is still dependent on the family and school, makes joint action necessary. In the words of Carlsson (2006: 14): «No one instrument of regulation is sufficient; today and in the future some form of effective interaction between all three kinds of media regulation –that is, between government, the media and civil society–. All the relevant stakeholders –within government, the media sector and civil society– need to develop effective means by which to collaborate».

From this perspective it is comprehensible that the International Telecommunications Union should intercede so that the public authorities by stimulating regulation, the NGOs– with educational aims, experts from research, and companies with their commercial offer, join forces in order to create responsible digital citizens. Simultaneously, national and international civil associations carry out extensive work for online protection. No less important is the joint action of the different agents in the ICT production line –operators, manufacturers developers or software companies– to develop and commercialize solutions which, apart from protecting children will also offer them tools to make the most of these technological opportunities.

In view of the combination of risks and opportunities, what the IUT (2009: 58) emphasizes takes on a new meaning: «Businesses must put protecting children at the heart of their work, paying special attention to protecting the privacy of young users’ personal data, preserving their right to freedom of expression, and putting systems in place to address violations of children’s rights when they occur. Where domestic laws have not yet caught up with international law, business has an opportunity –and the responsibility– to bring their business practices in line with those standards».

The answer to these questions demands a complex approach taking into account not only the characteristics of children and young teenagers but also the market pressures, the social and economic nature of the companies together with the current technological acceleration. All of the above is faithfully reflected in the policies proposed by the sector. The objective of this article is to find and analyze the main action points of the companies in the sector on the subject of online protection of minors, in order to identify their strengths and the tendencies they have in mind.

2. Material and methods

From an international perspective, this section shows the policies followed by different telecommunication companies. To do so, we have selected operators who have developed formal policies on the proper use of new technologies. As there are no earlier studies giving a list of operators regarding this topic, a theoretical focus group has been followed (Denzin & Lincoln, 1994; Visauta, 1989), not a statistical one. The following are the criteria which justify the selection of the sample:

Firstly, given that this is an international study and following a relevance criterion, we turned to the latest «Wireless Intelligence» report. It gives a list of the 20 telecommunications companies with the most mobile connections and the highest incomes in the world: China Mobile, Grupo Vodafone, Grupo América Móvil, Grupo Telefónica, China Unicom, Grupo Verizon Wireless, VimpelCom, Orange Group, Grupo Bharti Airtel, AT&T, China Telecom, Deutsche Telekom, Grupo MTN, Grupo Telenor, Grupo Telecom Italia, NTT DOCOMO, Sprint Nextel, Sistema Group, Telkomsel, au (KDDI) (Wireless Intelligence, 2014). However, not all of these have this type of policies, so some of them have been ruled out.

Secondly, to see their appropriateness for the aim of the research, from among the above companies we analyzed those that had signed some of the principal agreements for the sector. These are: «CEO Coalition to make Internet a better place for kids», «European Framework for Safer Mobile use by Young Teenagers and Children», «Safer Social Networking Principles», «Pan-European Games Information System», «Mobile Alliance against Child Sexual Abuse» and Principles for a Safer Use of Connected Devices and Online Services». For this reason, seven of these have been ruled out: Grupo América Móvil, China Unicom, Grupo Bharti Airtel, China Telecom, Sistema Group, Telkomsel, au (KDDI).

Finally, four additional cases have been selected due to their interest in this area: Yoigo and Ono, two Spanish companies which, although they have a smaller turnover, are developing important policies on minors; British Telecom which, although not included in the «Wireless Intelligence» report, is outstanding for its contribution; and Télmex, a Mexican multinational which in the last few months has developed important education programs. In short, following the three above-mentioned criteria, the sample is made up of the following companies: Orange, Vodafone, Telefónica, Deutsche Telekom, Telecom Italia, VimpelCom, Telenor, AT&T, Sprint Nextel, Verizon, NTT, China Mobile, MTN, Télmex, Yoigo, Ono y British Telecom.

The methodology used was document analysis of the reports of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and of corporate websites over the last year. The latest available reports3 2012-13 and websites4 date from the period between February 2014 and April 2014. Both types of platform are considered by the experts to be the most frequently used for the reporting information on social responsibility in companies (Moreno & Capriotti, 2009; Kolk & al., 1999). Thanks to the richness of contents, data can be found on the most common corporative actions and the stakeholders: schools and educational institutions, types of authorities, most outstanding NGOs, commercial partners, awareness campaigns, etc. This information groups what the companies say regarding their protection programs, most of which comes from their CSR departments. The document analysis was carried out by means of a set of analytical-synthetic procedures on the subject-matter of the platforms (Yin, 2011; Weber, 1990). This was executed through a technical reading of the documents and the websites in search of the parts that reveal greater content on protection policies for minors and new technologies. Once the most significant topics had been identified, a set of content categories was applied to the analyzed material: (1) the strategic guidelines of each company: related with the strategic objectives pursued with these policies. As we have seen in the previous section, the relationship between minors and new technologies implies multiple challenges for the industry, from self-regulation to collaboration with social agents. (2) Actions within the strategic guidelines of the companies: projects and specific activities are developed which include the resources needed to undertake them. (3) Groups of interest: each type of action is addressed to a specific group of interest. Among them: the minors themselves, educators (parents, teachers and siblings), the ICT industry, public institutions, NGOs, civil associations, journalists and experts.

3. Analysis and results

The analysis of the main policies of the telecommunication sector in the area of child online protection takes into account the aforementioned companies listed in the following order: Orange, Vodafone, Telefonica, Deutsche Telekom, Telecom Italia Group VimpelCom, Telenor Group, AT & T, Sprint Nextel, Verizon, NTT Group, China Mobile, MTN Group, Telmex, Telstra, ONO and British Telecom. The analysis has been done according to three elements. First, the strategic lines of each company are specified in the short and medium term. These guidelines respond to substantial advances in technology to assess and respond to children’s needs in the online world. Among them is how the ICT industry can help promote safety for children using the Internet or any technologies or devices that can connect to it, as well as guidance on how to enable responsible digital citizenship, learning and civic participation. The updated version provides guidance specifically aimed at companies that develop, provide or make use of information and communication technologies. Second, the actions that each company are developing to achieve their strategic lines are analysed. These include codes of conduct, systems to notify suspected online abuse, and how they drive innovative solutions and create digital platforms that can expand educational opportunities. Finally, we present the stakeholders involved and the partnerships, including governments, companies, civil society, parents and educators. The table can be viewed at the following link: http://goo.gl/KyoiTU.

As a result of this analysis five strategic lines may be drawn on the telecommunication sector regarding the online protection of children and teenagers:

1) Self-regulation. In its Recommendation 98/560/ EC of 24 September 1998, the European Commission requires «promoting the voluntary establishment of national frameworks for the protection of minors and human dignity. This involves encouraging the participation of relevant parties (users, consumers, businesses and public authorities) in establishing, implementing and evaluating national measures taken in this domain» (European Commission, 2012b). Examples of this are the internal codes of conduct regarding the services and contents commercialized by the operator’s brand which often extend to the contents of it suppliers. But perhaps what best guide the self-regulation of the industry are the sectoral codes. Also noteworthy regarding Internet is «CEO Coalition to make Internet a better place for kids» of December 2011, promoted by the European Commission, and in the area of cell phones the «European Framework for Safer Mobile Use by Young Teenagers and Children» of 2007. Other agreements signed by the industry are: «Safer Social Networking Principles, Pan-European Games Information System», «Mobile Alliance against Child Sexual Abuse» and «Principles for a Safer Use of Connected Devices and Online Service».

2) Products and services. This refers to the development of specific tools, most of which are for the protection of younger users. Outstanding amongst these tools are the systems that restrict access to certain unsuitable contents, together with limiters of time/use, shopping and online applications commercializing product packs which allow for personalized configuration. Also of assistance is the availability of helplines through which customers can complain about illegal contents.

3) Awareness and information. This may be the most important strategic line in European companies whereas some companies in the United States and Japan make more effort with the development of the above-mentioned tools. The International Telecommunications Union (2009: 17) defines the role of industry and families as «overlapping, but differing» and suggests «a need for a national-base and shared strategy to keep children safe online, that is capable of influencing and empowering both industry and families». Given that sometimes minors have greater skills, the industry invests in awareness and information programs which address teachers. The awareness programs hope to attract attention to the importance of spreading educational habits in the use of TICs.

4) Classification of contents. This is based on accepted national norms which are coherent with the methods applied in equivalent media, for example, games or movies. Traditionally, they are classified as mobile commercial content, that is, content produced by mobile operators or in collaboration with third parties. Nevertheless, given the problems in practice, some countries have committed themselves to establishing a dual system of classification with contents for adults only and general/other. Regarding illegal contents (pornography and violence against children), most companies offer a helpline for complaints.

5) Collaborations. A good example of joint effort is the grouping of associations and strategic agreements between companies and institutions. The need for different social agents to be involved is being accepted. According to Carlsson (2006: 12), children’s disadvantage in front of media requires a higher involvement of all those responsible of their protection. The operators construct bridges with different public authorities –ministries, law enforcement agencies, local administration, etc., NGOs and civil associations, educational institutions, representatives of families, and expert researchers– with inter-sectoral agreements. Thus, all the companies tighten their links with the same groups of interest: parents and teachers, national and international public institutions, commercial suppliers and partners, other operators, NGOs and civil associations, journalists and experts. However, within these large groups, each firm is in contact with specific individuals.

4. Discussion and conclusions

We can see how the industry is adopting voluntary self-regulatory measures which show their permanent commitment to the protection of young people. The telecommunications companies are aware of their particular responsibility to lay down the foundations for a safe virtual world for children and teenagers. In this sense, collaboration and association within the industry are key points in the process. The agreements signed bring together the main representatives of the sector in order to share knowledge, initiatives and new tools for the protection of minors. But the telecommunications companies are only one piece in the jigsaw also made up of radio broadcasters, social networks, application creators, content developers and gadget manufacturers.

Nonetheless, for the moment, most of the industry’s policies have been motivated by public institutions such as the European Commission or the International Telecommunications Union, with agreements which include some directives which must be obeyed by the signatory companies. For this reason, a certain uniformity can be found in the policies of the companies analyzed, especially amongst the European ones as they are limited by the lines marked by the European Commission.

Differences between regions can also be found. While the European telecommunications companies place great importance on policies regarding education and information, the analyzed American and Asian companies focus their protection policies on the product and service. More specifically, this means that whereas the former consider these programs as part of their Corporative Social Responsibility policies, the latter include this information in the customer business areas on their websites. However, the two perspectives should work together. Parents and teachers must be given the information necessary to understand how young people use ICT services in order to educate them to become responsible users. The literature points out that education and communication with the users are fundamental to guarantee an appropriate digital experience for children and teenagers. These education programs addressing parents deal with topics such as contents and services, inappropriate contacts and privacy management. However, awareness is only part of these policies as there is also a need for the development of products and services which from their very conception avoid risks for young people as much as possible.

All of the corporations that were analyzed have developed tools intended to minimize the dangers of use and, to a lesser extent, to advance the proper use of new technologies. This can be confirmed if we compare the number of instruments intended to minimize risks –content filters, access restriction, blocking etc.– to those intended to maximize the potential of new technologies such as GPS tracking systems and tools for schools support.

In this specific area of children and teenagers, the challenges and opportunities spring from a common source: the use of these companies’ services. Future research could analyze how this is managed within the companies. In this sense and a priori, it might be better to integrate these policies into organizational units dedicated to the development of products and services in such a way that their safe and responsible use would be included in the commercial offer. They could, in this way, avoid risks and create new tools from an area closer to the phases of conception and development of services. At the same time, their actions for the protection of minors should not share management with other areas of the Department of Corporative Social Responsibility such as investments in the community, employee volunteering programs or the environmental impact.

The development of these policies favors the industry itself as it promotes user confidence. This is not surprising since, in their preferences, the stakeholders express interest in features such as Web quality, coverage, and connection speed together with pricing, but also appreciate variables such as social responsibility and company commitment to the public, especially concerning children and teenagers.

Notes

1 According to the European Commission media literacy is «the ability to access the media, to understand and to critically evaluate different aspects of the media and media contents and to create communications in a variety of contexts».

2 For Freeman and Reed (1983: 91), «stakeholder» is «any identifiable group or individual who can affect the achievement of an organization’s objectives or who is affected by the achievement of an organization’s objectives».

3 Corporative social responsibility reports, also called sustainability reports. Orange (2014a), Vodafone (2013), Telefónica (2013), ONO (2013), Yoigo (2013), Deutsche Telekom (2014a), Telecom Italia (2014a), British Telecom (2014), VimpelCom (2014a), Telenor (2014a), AT&T (2013), Sprint Nextel (2013), Verizon (2014), NTT (2014a), China Mobile (2014a), MTN (2014).

4 Websites, a section dedicated to social responsibility, protection of minors. In the case of American and Asian companies customer area. Orange (2014b), Vodafone (2014), Telefónica (2014), ONO (2014), Yoigo (2014), Deutsche Telekom (2014b), Telecom Italia (2014b), British Telecom (2014), VimpelCom (2014b), Telenor (2014b), AT&T (2014), SprintNextel (2014), Verizon (2013), NTT (2014b), China Mobile (2014b), Telméx (2014).

References

Ahlert, C., Nash, V., & Marsden, C. (2005). Implications of the Mobile Internet for the Protection of Minors. L’ICT Trasforma la Societa. Milano: Forum per la Tecnologia della Informazione.

Austin, E.W., Bolls, P., Fujioka, Y., & Engelbertson, J. (1999). How and Why Parents Take on the Tube. Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, 43, 175-192.

Bringué, X., & Sádaba, C. (2008). La generación interactiva en Iberoamérica. Niños y adolescentes ante las pantallas. Barcelona: Ariel.

Bringué, X., & Sádaba, C. (2011). Menores y redes sociales. Madrid: Fundación Telefónica.

Buckingham, D., & Domaille, K. (2003). Where Are We Going and How Can We Get There? In Von Feilitzen, C., & Carlsson, U. (Eds.), Promote of Protect? Perspectives on Media Literacy and Media Regulations. Göteborg: Nordicom.

Buckinghman, D., & Rodríguez, C. (2013). Aprendiendo sobre el poder y la ciudadanía en un mundo virtual. Comunicar, 40, 49-58. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-05

Byron, T. (2008). Safer Children in a Digital World. The Report of the Byron Review. Nottingham: Department for Children, Schools and Families, and the Department for Culture, Median and Sport.

Carlsson, U. (Ed.) (2006). Regulation, Awareness Empowerment: Young People and Harmful Media Content in the Digital Age. Göteborg: Nordicom.

Castells, P., & Bofarull, I. (2002). Enganchados a las pantallas: Televisión, videojuegos, Internet y móviles. Barcelona: Planeta.

Clarke, A. (2005). Young Children and ICTs Current Issues in the Provision of ICT Technologies and Services for Young Children. Luxembourg: ETSI White Paper.

Colás, P; González, T., & De-Pablos, J. (2013). Juventud y redes sociales: Motivaciones y usos preferentes. Comunicar, 40, XX, 15-23.

Comisión Europea (2009). Recomendación 2009/625/CE de la Comisión, de 20 de agosto de 2009, sobre la alfabetización mediática en el entorno digital para una industria audiovisual y de contenidos más competitiva y una sociedad del conocimiento incluyente. (http://goo.gl/ciuXzl) (19-01-2015).

Comisión Europea (2012a). Safer Internet Progamme. (http://goo.gl/POl111) (02-02-2013).

Denzin, N.K., & Lincoln, Y.S. (1994). Handbook of Qualitative Research. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

D´Haenens, L., Vandoninck, S., & Donoso, V. (2013). How to Cope and Build Online Resilience? (http://goo.gl/aaxdWY) (21-04-2014).

EU Kids Online España (2011). Riesgos y seguridad en Internet: los menores españoles en el contexto europeo. Resultados de la encuesta de EU Kids Online a menores de entre 9 y 16 años y a sus padres y madres. (http://goo.gl/JSzzmR) (02-03-2013).

Freeman, E., & Reed, D. (1983). Stockholders and Stakeholders: A New Perspective on Corporate Governance. California Management Review, S25(3), 88-106.

García-Matilla, A. (2004). ¿Qué debería ser hoy la alfabetización en medios? Por una visión interdisciplinar, transversal, integrada, global… y también política, de la alfabetización audiovisual. New York. Media Literacy: Art or/and Social Studies.

GSMA Intelligence (2014). Operator Group Ranking. GSMA Intelligence Analysis. (http://goo.gl/b6TmMP) (03-06-2014).

Hasebrink, U., Livingstone, S., & Haddon, L. (2008). Comparing Children’s Online Opportunities and Risks across Europe: Cross-national Comparisons for EU Kids Online. London: EU Kids Online.

Huertas, A., & Figueras, M. (Eds.) (2014). Audiencias juveniles y cultura digital. Bellaterra: Institut de la Comunicació-Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. (http://goo.gl/D6jIca) (23-01-2015).

Jiménez, G., & Ramos, M. (2007). Móviles y jóvenes: estrategias de los principales operadores de España. Comunicar, 29(XV), 121-128.

Jones, C., & Shao, B. (2011). The Net Generation and Digital Natives: Implications for Higher Education. Nueva York: Higher Education Academy.

Jones, S., & Fox, S. (2009). Generations Online 2009. (http://goo.gl/KmXIjF) (10-04-2014).

Katz, J.E. (2006). Magic in the Air: Mobile Communication and the Transformation of Social Life. New Brunswick: Transaction Publishers.

Kolk, A., Tulder, R., & Welters, C. (1999). International Codes of Conduct and Corporate Social Responsibility: Can Transnational Corporations Regulate Themselves? Transnational Corporations, 8(1), 143-180.

Lenhart, A., Kahne, J., & al. (2008). Teens, Video Games, and Civics: Teens´gaming Experiences are Diverse and Include Significant Social Interaction and Civic Engagement. Washington D.C.: Pew Internet & American Life Project.

Lenhart, A., Madden, M., & Hitlin, P. (2005). Teens and Technology: Youth are Leading the Transition to a Fully and Mobile Nation. Washington DC: Pew Internet & American Life Project.

Lenhart, A., Madden, M., & Rainie, L. (2006). Teens and the Internet Findings submitted to the House Subcommittee on Telecommunications and the Internet. Washington DC: Pew Internet & American Life Project.

Ley Orgánica 2/2006, de 3 de mayo, de Educación (BOE, 4 de mayo de 2006). (http://goo.gl/ezVuZj) (30-04-2014).

Lievens, E. (2007). Protecting Children in the New Media Environment: Rising to the Regulatory Challenge? Telematics and Informatics, 24, 4, 315-330.

Livingstone, S., & Haddon, L. (2009). EU Kids Online: Final Report. LSE, London: EU Kids Online.

Livingstone, S., Haddon, L., & Görzig, A. (Eds.). (2012). Children, Risk and Safety on the Internet: Research and Policy Challenges in Comparative Perspective. Bristol: Policy Press.

Livingstone, S., Haddon, L., Görzig, A., & Ólafsson, K. (2010). Risks and Safety on the Internet: The Perspective of European Children. Initial Findings. London: EU Kids Online.

Livingstone, S., Kirwil, L., Ponte, C., & Staksrud, E. (2013). In their Own Words: What Bothers Children Online? (http://goo.gl/WJrcNM) (12-05-2014).

Llopis, R. (2004). La mediación familiar del consumo infantil de televisión: Un análisis referido a la sociedad española. Comunicación y Sociedad, 17, 2, 125-147.

Lunt, P., & Livingstone, S. (2012). Media Regulation: Governance and the Interests of Citizens and Consumers. London: Sage.

McNeal, J.U. (1987). Children as Consumers. Lexington: Lexington Books.

Middaugh, E., & Kahne, J. (2013). Nuevos medios como herramienta para el aprendizaje cívico. Comunicar, 40, XX, 99-108.

Moreno, A., & Capriotti, P. (2009). Communicating CSR, Citizenship and Sustainability on the Web. Journal of Communication Management, 13, 2, 157-175.

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants Part 1. On the Horizon, 9, 5, 1-6.

Rideout, V., Foehr, U.G. & Roberts, D.F. (2010). Generation M2: Media in the Lives of 8-18 Years-olds. Executive Summary. (http://goo.gl/EWdSud) (12-05-2014).

Rideout, V., Roberts, D.F., & Foehr, U.G. (2005). Generation M: Media in the lives of 8-18 Years-olds. Executive Summary. (http://goo.gl/v44ABR) (30-04-2014).

Sádaba, C. (2008). Los jóvenes y los nuevos espacios para la comunicación. La generación interactiva. In Martín Algarra, M., Seijas, L., & Carrillo, M. (Eds.), Nuevos escenarios de la comunicación y la opinión pública. (pp. 173-178). Madrid: Edipo.

Sádaba, C. (2014). Use of Information and Communication Technologies by Latin American Children and adolescents: The Interactive Generations Case. Media@LSE Working Papers Series, 29. London: London School of Economics. (http://goo.gl/cR7Uls) (12-10-2014).

Staksrud, E., Livingstone, S., Haddon, L., & Ólafsson, K. (2009). What do we Know about Children’s Use of Online Technologies? A Report on Data Availability and Research Gaps in Europe. London: EUKids Online.

Tolsá, J., & Bringué, X. (2012). Leisure, Interpersonal Relationships, Learning and Consumption: The Four Key Dimensions for the Study of Minors and Screens. Communication and Society, XXV, 1, 253-288.

Tolsá, J.C. (2012). Los menores y el mercado de las pantallas: una propuesta de conocimiento integrado. Madrid: Colección Generaciones Interactivas. Fundación Telefónica.

Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones (2009). Protección para la industria en línea: directrices para la industria. Ginebra: UIT.

Visauta, V.B. (1989). Técnicas de investigación social. Barcelona: PPU.

Wartella, E., O´Keefe, B., & Scantilin, R. (2000). Children and Interactive Media. A Compendium of Current Research and Directions for the Future. New York: The Markle Foundation.

Weber, R.P. (1990). Basic Content Analysis. Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications.

Yin, R. & K. (2011). Qualitative Research from Start to Finish. New York: The Guilford Press.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

El paisaje tecnológico de las pantallas en relación al menor apunta a numerosos desafíos que la industria afronta junto a las familias y el sector educativo. Sin embargo, hay poca bibliografía que ahonde en las políticas estratégicas que está implantando el sector para hacer frente a los retos. Por ello, este artículo tiene dos objetivos: en primer lugar, realizar una síntesis del estado de la cuestión para, seguidamente, presentar los principales hallazgos sobre cómo están afrontando este panorama las 17 principales empresas internacionales en su política comercial y en su relación con grupos de interés. La metodología aplicada es de carácter cualitativo, y analiza los informes de responsabilidad social y webs de las compañías, con el fin de identificar las líneas estratégicas y acciones empresariales, así como las personas e instituciones con quienes colaboran. Los resultados muestran que, pese a algunas diferencias entre regiones, el sector se atiene a un interés por la autorregulación, la innovación en los productos, en las herramientas de protección, así como en el mantenimiento de una estrecha red de colaboraciones con grupos de interés, que permite retroalimentar las políticas y estrategias. De este análisis se concluye que el sector necesita integrar las políticas de protección al menor no solo con el desarrollo de productos responsables, sino estrechando aún más los vínculos con grupos de interés clave como padres e instituciones.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

Niños y adolescentes crecen inmersos en un mundo conectado donde las pantallas –Internet, videojuegos y móviles– han cobrado gran importancia. Este paisaje tecnológico dibuja a millones de menores con una pantalla en su bolsillo que les permite un acceso permanente a contenidos que ellos mismos pueden generar para uso propio y compartido.

A pesar de la novedad que implica la tecnología digital, lo cierto es que la relación entre menores y medios siempre ha suscitado el interés de los académicos. En los años treinta del siglo pasado se sitúan las primeras investigaciones sobre el cine y la radio, más conocidas como «Payne Fund Studies», que evolucionarán hacia la televisión en los cincuenta (Wartella & Reeves, 1985). Con la llegada del nuevo milenio, a los medios tradicionales –radio, televisión y prensa– se les suman los teléfonos inteligentes, tabletas y consolas de videojuegos. También el interés de la investigación ha seguido creciendo aportando distintos enfoques que abarcan, al mismo tiempo, una amplia categoría de medios y tecnologías. Siguiendo la clasificación empleada por Bringué y Sádaba (2008) se pueden distinguir tres grandes grupos de estudios de la relación entre menores y tecnología: pautas de consumo, efectos del uso y desarrollo normativo.

El primero analiza el acceso y consumo que hacen los distintos grupos de población infantil y juvenil (Huertas & Figueras, 2014; Colás & al., 2013; Tolsá & Bringué, 2012; Bringué & Sádaba, 2011, 2009, 2008; Sádaba, 2014, 2008; Rideout & al., 2010; Staksrud & al., 2009; Lenhart & al., 2008; Hasebrink & al., 2008); estos estudios describen aspectos cuantitativos tales como el equipamiento tecnológico en los hogares, el lugar de acceso, el momento, la duración de uso así como la influencia de variables sociodemográficas –género, edad y estatus socioeconómico–. Son numerosos los estudios que buscan conocer el consumo en medios tradicionales y nuevas tecnologías (Rideout & al., 2005) y las actitudes del menor frente a ellos (Jones & Fox, 2009; Livingstone & al., 2010; Lenhart & al., 2005). Especial relevancia internacional adquieren los proyectos «EU Kids Online I-II» coordinados por Sonia Livingstone (Livingstone & al., 2013; D´Haenens & al., 2013; Livingstone & al., 2012) y los llevados a cabo por el «Pew Research Center» en Estados Unidos (Jones & Fox, 2009; Lenhart & al., 2008; 2006).

Un segundo grupo de trabajos ahonda en los efectos de estas tecnologías (Byron, 2008; Livingstone, 2009), con un especial énfasis en las consecuencias negativas y positivas traducidas en riesgos y oportunidades. La tipología propuesta por Livingstone y Haddon (2009) clasifica los riesgos en tres: contenidos, contactos y conductas. Respecto al potencial positivo, se subrayan los beneficios en la educación, la socialización, el aprendizaje, la participación, el fomento del entretenimiento, la creatividad o la documentación (Middaugh & Kahne, 2013; Livingstone & al., 2012; Staksrud & al., 2009; Livingstone & Haddon, 2009; Janes & Fox, 2009; Byron, 2008; Hasebrink & al., 2008; Katz, 2006; Buckingham & Rodríguez, 2013).

Por último, en lo que se refiere a los estudios de carácter normativo, que tienen su foco en la protección del menor, se distinguen de acuerdo con Tolsá (2012) tres elementos clave que inciden de un modo especialmente relevante en este ámbito: la regulación, la mediación familiar y la alfabetización mediática1 o «media literacy». Estos estudios tratan de impulsar medidas para salvaguardar la integridad física y psicológica del menor (Lunt & Livingstone, 2012). Carlsson (2006) destaca la importancia de un sistema que combine regulación y autorregulación, habida cuenta de que la tecnología avanza con pasos de gigante y la regulación puede quedar obsoleta. La mayor parte de los escasos estudios sobre autorregulación analizan, por un lado, las políticas regulatorias y legislativas y, por otro, los códigos de conducta de los operadores (Lievens, 2007; Ahlert & al., 2005). Todos reconocen limitaciones en las soluciones jurídicas existentes y abogan por un marco común de autorregulación para toda la industria. En lo que a mediación familiar se refiere, se destaca la necesidad de los padres para ejercer el control y el acompañamiento de sus hijos en la nueva realidad digital. Su figura alcanza gran trascendencia para conformar pautas y hábitos de conducta ante estas tecnologías (Llopis, 2004; Austin & al., 1999). Finalmente, los estudios centrados en divulgar conocimientos educativos son fuente rica para la promoción de un uso responsable (García-Matilla, 2004; Buckingham & Domaille, 2003).

En este tercer campo de estudios normativos, se ha prestado una atención limitada al papel de las empresas de telecomunicaciones pese a llevar años impulsando numerosos códigos y políticas de autorregulación en el ámbito de la protección al menor. Cuánto de genuino o de interesado hay tras este esfuerzo es difícil de calibrar si bien distintos organismos internacionales como la Comisión Europea y la Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones (UIT) han insistido en la necesidad de la colaboración e implicación de las autoridades públicas, la industria, los agentes educativos y la sociedad civil. Tampoco hay que menospreciar el peso que ha podido tener en estas contribuciones un contexto social que demanda a las empresas un comportamiento socialmente responsable y que se ha concretado en el desarrollo y la consolidación de las áreas de Responsabilidad Social Corporativa. En cualquier caso, y lejos de actuar unilateralmente, se aprecia cómo las operadoras han comenzado a desarrollar múltiples relaciones con «stakeholders»2 como colegios, familias, ONG especializadas, autoridades públicas, expertos investigadores e incluso medios de comunicación en un esfuerzo por contribuir a la protección de niños, niñas y adolescentes en el mundo digital.

El interés de estas empresas por estar presentes en este debate puede explicarse desde la doble perspectiva de la responsabilidad social y de la lógica del mercado. Aplicando la clasificación de McNeal (1987), la relación de niños, niñas y adolescentes con las TIC adquiere una triple dimensión: actual, futura y de influencia. Actual porque son usuarios de servicios 2.0 y crean contenidos, utilizan con destreza redes sociales y juegos «online». La dimensión futura apunta a que en unos años, estos usuarios serán mayores de edad y potenciales clientes de estos servicios. Finalmente, su influencia se deja ver en las decisiones de compra familiares, por ejemplo, en categorías de productos como juguetes, alimentación o entretenimiento y, sin lugar a dudas, también tecnología. Estas cuestiones no pasan desapercibidas para los departamentos de marketing de las empresas (Jiménez & Ramos, 2007), dado que los más jóvenes constituyen un mercado muy atractivo para las operadoras. La Comisión Europea estimó que este segmento generará en el futuro 30.000 millones de euros (Clarke, 2005).

Sin embargo, se trata de un grupo de edad sensible y vulnerable. Clarke (2005: 4) los define como «un mercado protegido». Su desarrollo cognitivo no es equiparable al de un adulto y, por tanto, no siempre son conscientes de las oportunidades y los peligros. En consecuencia, los más pequeños pueden hacer un uso indebido o acceder a un contenido que puede perjudicarles. No obstante, también se adivina un horizonte de oportunidades para la empresa que, como experta en servicios TIC, tiene un conocimiento superior para mitigar riesgos pero también para aprovechar las ventajas en innovación y en el desarrollo de herramientas que abran futuras líneas de negocio y, por ende, se conviertan en palancas importantes de generación de ingresos.

La complejidad de actuación sobre este grupo de edad, dependiente todavía de la familia y de la escuela, hace necesaria la acción conjunta. En palabras de Carlsson (2006: 14): «un solo instrumento de regulación es insuficiente. Hoy y en el futuro será necesaria la interacción efectiva entre los tres tipos de agentes. Es decir, gobierno, medios de comunicación y sociedad civil tendrán que llegar a resultados satisfactorios. Todas las partes interesadas pertinentes tendrán que colaborar».

Desde esta perspectiva se entiende que la Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones abogue para que autoridades públicas –estimulando la regulación–, ONG –con fines educativos–, expertos –desde la investigación– y empresas –con su oferta comercial– aúnen sus esfuerzos para crear ciudadanos digitales responsables. Junto a ellos, asociaciones civiles nacionales e internacionales desarrollan una extensa labor en la protección online. Y no menos importante es la acción conjunta de diferentes actores de la cadena de producción de las TIC –operadores, fabricantes, desarrolladores o empresas de software– para desarrollar y comercializar soluciones que, además de proteger a los más pequeños, pongan a su disposición herramientas para aprovechar las oportunidades de estas tecnologías.

Viendo el conjunto de riesgos y oportunidades adquiere nuevo sentido lo subrayado por la UIT (2009: 58): «Va en interés de la industria tomar medidas y estar en la vanguardia, no solo porque es lo correcto desde el punto de vista moral, sino también porque, a la larga, logrará así que los usuarios tengan confianza en Internet como medio de comunicación. Sin esa confianza, la tecnología nunca podrá desarrollar todo su potencial para enriquecer y capacitar a todas las personas y, además, contribuir a la prosperidad económica y bienestar de cada país».

La respuesta a estas cuestiones requiere de una aproximación compleja que tenga en cuenta no solo las propiedades de los menores sino también las presiones de los mercados, la naturaleza social y económica de las empresas así como la presente aceleración tecnológica. La conjunción de todo lo dicho tiene su fiel reflejo en las políticas impulsadas desde el sector. Es objeto de este artículo conocer y analizar las líneas de acción de las principales empresas del sector en el ámbito de la protección «online» del menor con el fin de identificar las líneas de fuerza que las definen y las tendencias que se apuntan.

2. Material y métodos

El presente apartado ilustra, desde una visión internacional, las políticas que han impulsado distintas empresas de telecomunicaciones. Con tal fin, se han seleccionado operadoras que desarrollan políticas formales sobre buen uso de las nuevas tecnologías. A falta de estudios previos que especifiquen un listado de operadoras respecto a este tema, se ha seguido un muestreo teórico (Denzin & Lincoln, 1994; Visauta, 1989), no estadístico. Estos son los siguientes criterios que justifican la selección de la muestra.

En primer lugar, dado que este es un estudio internacional se acude, siguiendo un criterio de relevancia, al último informe de «GSMA Intelligence». Éste recoge las 20 empresas de telecomunicaciones con mayor volumen de conexiones móviles e ingresos en el mundo: China Mobile, Grupo Vodafone, Grupo América Móvil, Grupo Telefónica, China Unicom, Grupo Verizon Wireless, VimpelCom, Orange Group, Grupo Bharti Airtel, AT&T, China Telecom, Deutsche Telekom, Grupo MTN, Grupo Telenor, Grupo Telecom Italia, NTT DOCOMO, Sprint Nextel, Sistema Group, Telkomsel, au (KDDI) (GSMA Intelligence, 2014). Sin embargo, no todas ellas conducen ese tipo de políticas por lo que algunas han sido descartadas.

En segundo lugar, siguiendo la adecuación al objeto de investigación, de las anteriores empresas hemos analizado aquellas que hayan firmado alguno de los principales acuerdos del sector. Estos son: «CEO Coalition to make Internet a better place for kids», «European Framework for Safer Mobile use by Young Teenagers and Children», «Safer Social Networking Principles», «Pan-European Games Information System», «Mobile Alliance against Child Sexual Abuse» y «Principles for a Safer Use of Connected Devices an Online Service». Por esta razón, se han descartado estas siete: Grupo América Móvil, China Unicom, Grupo Bharti Airtel, China Telecom, Sistema Group, Telkomsel, au (KDDI).

Finalmente, se han seleccionado adicionalmente cuatro casos, por su interés en este ámbito: Yoigo y Ono, dos compañías españolas que aun con una facturación menor, están desarrollando importantes políticas dirigidas a menores; British Telecom que, sin estar incluida en el informe «Wireless Intelligence», destaca por su contribución y Telmex, multinacional mejicana que en los últimos meses ha desarrollado importantes programas educativos. En síntesis y siguiendo los tres criterios mencionados, la muestra se compone de las siguientes compañías: Orange, Vodafone, Telefónica, Deutsche Telekom, Telecom Italia, VimpelCom, Telenor, AT&T, Sprint Nextel, Verizon, NTT, China Mobile, MTN, Telmex, Yoigo, Ono y British Telecom.

La metodología empleada ha sido el análisis documental de memorias de responsabilidad social empresarial (RSE) y páginas webs corporativas durante el último año. Se analizaron los últimos informes disponibles3 2012-13 y las páginas webs4 durante el periodo de febrero hasta abril de 2014. Ambos tipos de soportes son considerados por los expertos como los más empleados para difundir información sobre responsabilidad social en las empresas (Moreno & Capriotti, 2009; Kolk & al., 1999). Gracias a su riqueza de contenidos, se obtienen datos sobre las acciones corporativas y los «stakeholders» más habituales: colegios e instituciones educativas, tipos de autoridades, las ONG más destacadas, socios comerciales, proyectos de sensibilización, etc. Esta información recoge aquello que las empresas dicen respecto a sus programas de protección, la mayor parte desde sus departamentos de RSE. El análisis documental se llevó a cabo por un conjunto de procedimientos de naturaleza analítico-sintética sobre el contenido temático de los soportes (Yin, 2011; Weber, 1990). La realización se trabajó con una lectura técnica de los documentos y las páginas webs buscando entrar en contacto con las partes que revelan mayor contenido sobre políticas de protección al menor y nuevas tecnologías. Una vez identificadas las partes temáticas más significativas, se aplicó a los materiales analizados un conjunto de categorías de contenido: 1) Líneas estratégicas de cada empresa: están relacionadas con los objetivos estratégicos que se persiguen con estas políticas. Como se ha visto en el epígrafe anterior, la relación entre menor y nuevas tecnologías implica múltiples retos para la industria desde la autorregulación hasta la colaboración con agentes sociales; 2) Acciones: dentro de las líneas estratégicas de las empresas, se desarrollan proyectos y actividades específicas que incluyen los recursos necesarios para acometerlas; 3) Grupos de interés: cada tipo de acción está dirigida a un grupo de interés concreto. Entre ellos: el propio menor, educadores (padres, profesores y hermanos), industria TIC, instituciones públicas, ONG, asociaciones civiles, periodistas y expertos.

3. Análisis y resultados

El análisis de las principales políticas del sector de telecomunicaciones en el ámbito de la protección en línea del menor incluye a las empresas ya mencionadas. El análisis se ha realizado sobre tres ejes. En cuanto al contenido, en primer lugar, se especifican las líneas estratégicas de cada compañía a corto y medio plazo. Estas directrices son una reacción a los avances sustanciales que se han producido en el campo de la tecnología y tienen por objeto evaluar las necesidades de los niños en el mundo virtual y darles respuesta. Entre ellas, cómo se puede ayudar a promover la seguridad de los menores que utilizan Internet o cualquier dispositivo conectado a la red, así como pautas para fomentar una ciudadanía digital responsable, el aprendizaje y la participación ciudadana. En segundo lugar, se detallan las acciones que cada empresa ha puesto en marcha para la consecución de las líneas estratégicas, por ejemplo: la elaboración de códigos de conducta, sistemas de notificación de contenido de riesgo, plataformas digitales de aprendizaje, etc. Por último, se señalan los grupos de interés implicados en cada línea estratégica. Esto refleja el interés por establecer alianzas que agrupen a distintos agentes sociales, incluidos gobiernos, empresas, la sociedad civil, padres y educadores. Puede visualizarse la tabla completa en el siguiente enlace: http://goo.gl/KpRkbP.

Gracias a este análisis es posible trazar cinco líneas estratégicas del sector de telecomunicaciones en relación a la protección «online» de niños y adolescentes:

1) Autorregulación. La Comisión Europea mediante la Recomendación 98/560/EC, del 24 de septiembre de 1998 alienta a «promover el establecimiento voluntario de marcos nacionales para la protección de los menores y la dignidad humana. Se trata de fomentar la participación de las partes interesadas (usuarios, consumidores, empresas y administraciones públicas) en el establecimiento, implementación y evaluación de las medidas nacionales adoptadas en este ámbito» (Comisión Europea, 2012b). Ejemplos de ello son los códigos de conducta internos sobre los servicios y contenidos comercializados bajo la marca del operador que a menudo se extienden hacia los contenidos de sus proveedores. Pero quizá sean los códigos sectoriales los que mejor guían la autorregulación de la industria. Mención aparte merece en lo que respecta a Internet la «CEO Coalition to Make Internet a Better Place for Kids» de diciembre de 2011 promovida por la Comisión Europea y en el ámbito de los móviles la «European Framework for Safer Mobile use by Young Teenagers and Children» de 2007. Otros acuerdos suscritos por la industria son: «Safer Social Networking Principles, Pan-European Games Information System», «Mobile Alliance against Child Sexual Abuse» y «Principles for a Safer Use of Connected Devices an Online Service».

2) Productos y servicios. Se refiere al desarrollo de herramientas específicas, la mayor parte dirigidas a la protección de los más jóvenes. Entre estas herramientas destacan los sistemas que restringen el acceso a ciertos contenidos inadecuados, así como limitadores de tiempo de uso, compra y aplicaciones «online» comercializadas en paquetes de productos que permiten una configuración personalizada. Además de ello, la disponibilidad de líneas de ayuda para que los clientes puedan denunciar la existencia de contenidos ilegales.

3) Sensibilización e información. Quizá sea la línea estratégica más importante en las empresas europeas mientras que en algunas compañías de EEUU y Japón dedican más esfuerzo al desarrollo de las herramientas mencionadas. La Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones (2009: 17) define el papel de industria y familias como «distinto pero complementario ya que revela la necesidad de contar con una estrategia nacional y compartida para la protección de los niños en línea que pueda influir y capacitar tanto a la industria como a las familias». Dado que los menores en ocasiones tienen mayor destreza, la industria invierte en programas de sensibilización e información dirigidos a agentes educativos. Los programas de sensibilización desean llamar la atención sobre la importancia de difundir hábitos educativos en el uso de las TIC.

4) Clasificación de contenidos. Se basa en normas nacionales aceptadas y coherentes con los métodos aplicados en medios equivalentes –por ejemplo, juegos o películas–. Tradicionalmente clasifican el contenido móvil comercial, es decir, contenido que producen los operadores móviles o en colaboración con terceros. No obstante, dados los problemas de orden práctico, algunos países se han comprometido a establecer un sistema de clasificación dual con contenidos solo para adultos y general/de otro tipo. En cuanto a contenidos ilegales (pornografía y violencia hacia niños), la mayor parte de las compañías prestan una línea telefónica para denunciarlos.

5) Colaboraciones. Si la cooperación aúna esfuerzos, buena muestra de ello son el conjunto de asociaciones y alianzas estratégicas entre empresas e instituciones. Se está asumiendo la necesidad de que distintos agentes sociales se involucren. Según Carlsson (2006: 12), «la inferioridad de condiciones del menor ante los medios de comunicación exige la implicación de todos en su protección». Las operadoras construyen puentes con distintas autoridades públicas –Ministerio, Fuerzas y Cuerpos de Seguridad, administración local, etc.–, ONG y asociaciones civiles, instituciones educativas, representantes de familias, expertos investigadores así como alianzas intersectoriales. Así pues, todas las compañías estrechan vínculos con los mismos grupos de interés: padres y profesores, instituciones públicas nacionales e internacionales, proveedores y socios comerciales, otras operadoras, ONG y asociaciones civiles, periodistas y expertos. Sin embargo, dentro de estos grandes colectivos cada firma se relaciona con unos sujetos concretos.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Se puede apreciar cómo la industria está adoptando métodos voluntarios de autorregulación que demuestran un compromiso permanente con la protección del menor. Las empresas de telecomunicaciones reconocen su especial responsabilidad para sentar las bases de un mundo virtual seguro para niños, niñas y adolescentes. En este sentido, la colaboración y asociación en la industria son claves en este proceso. Los acuerdos firmados reúnen a los principales representantes del sector con el objetivo de compartir conocimientos, iniciativas y nuevas herramientas para proteger al menor. Pero las empresas de telecomunicaciones son solo una pieza del puzzle en una industria formada además por radiodifusores, redes sociales, creadores de aplicaciones, desarrolladores de contenido y fabricantes de dispositivos.

No obstante, hasta la fecha, la mayor parte de las políticas de la industria han venido en buena medida impulsadas desde instituciones públicas como la Comisión Europea o la Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones, con acuerdos que incluyen algunas directrices que deben cumplir todas las empresas firmantes. Por esta razón, se observa una uniformidad entre las políticas de las empresas analizadas, especialmente entre las europeas, ya que se circunscriben a las líneas marcadas por la Comisión Europea.

También se pueden apreciar diferencias entre regiones. Mientras que las compañías de telecomunicaciones europeas conceden gran relevancia a las políticas de educación e información, las americanas y asiáticas objeto de análisis centran sus políticas de protección en el producto y servicio. Esto se concreta en que mientras que las primeras consideran estos programas parte de sus políticas de responsabilidad social empresarial, las segundas incluyen esta información en las áreas de negocio del cliente dentro de sus páginas webs. Sin embargo, ambas perspectivas deben darse la mano. Por un lado, hay que prestar a padres y profesores la información necesaria para entender cómo los niños utilizan los servicios TIC y prepararles para educar en el uso responsable. La literatura apunta que la educación y comunicación con los usuarios es fundamental para garantizar la experiencia digital adecuada de niños, niñas y adolescentes. Estos programas de educación dirigidos a padres abordan temas como los contenidos y servicios, contactos inapropiados y gestión de la privacidad. Sin embargo, la concienciación es solo una parte de estas políticas ya que se hace necesario el desarrollo de productos y servicios que desde su misma concepción eviten el riesgo para los menores en la medida de lo posible.

Todas las corporaciones analizadas desarrollan herramientas dirigidas a minimizar los peligros en el uso y, en menor grado, a potenciar el buen uso de las nuevas tecnologías. Este dato se puede confirmar si se compara el número de instrumentos destinados a minimizar riesgos –filtros de contenidos, restricción de acceso, bloqueadores, etc.– frente a aquellos que aprovechan las oportunidades de las nuevas tecnologías: sistemas de localización e instrumentos de apoyo escolar.

En el ámbito concreto de niños, niñas y adolescentes, retos y oportunidades crecen de un tronco común: el uso de los servicios de estas empresas. En futuras investigaciones, podría analizarse cómo se gestiona el tema dentro de las empresas. En este sentido y a priori, parecería más adecuado integrar estas políticas en las unidades organizacionales dedicadas al desarrollo de productos y servicios de manera que el uso seguro y responsable estuviera incluido en la oferta comercial. Podrían así evitarse riesgos y crear nuevas herramientas desde un área más cercana a las fases de concepción y desarrollo de servicios. Al mismo tiempo, las actuaciones en torno a la protección del menor no compartirían gestión con otras competencias del departamento de responsabilidad social empresarial como inversiones en la comunidad, programas de voluntariado entre empleados o impacto medioambiental.

El desarrollo de estas políticas favorece a la propia industria al fomentar la confianza de los usuarios. No en vano, en sus preferencias, los «stakeholders» valoran aspectos de la oferta como la calidad de la red, la cobertura y la velocidad de conexión así como el coste, pero también variables como la responsabilidad social y el compromiso empresarial con públicos como el menor.

Notas

1 La Comisión Europea define alfabetización mediática como «la capacidad de acceder a los medios de comunicación, comprender y evaluar con criterio diversos aspectos de los mismos y de sus contenidos».

2 De acuerdo con Freeman y Reed (1983: 91), «stakeholder» es «cualquier grupo o individuo identificable que pueda afectar el logro de los objetivos de una organización o que es afectado por el logro de los objetivos de una organización».

3 Informes de responsabilidad social corporativa, también denominados informes de sostenibilidad. Orange (2014a), Vodafone (2013), Telefónica (2013), ONO (2013), Yoigo (2013), Deutsche Telekom (2014a), Telecom Italia (2014a), British Telecom (2014), VimpelCom (2014a), Telenor (2014a), AT&T (2013), Sprint Nextel (2013), Verizon (2014), NTT (2014a), China Mobile (2014a), MTN (2014).

4 Páginas webs, sección dedicada a responsabilidad social, protección del menor. En el caso de compañías estadounidenses y asiáticas área de cliente. Orange (2014b), Vodafone (2014), Telefónica (2014), ONO (2014), Yoigo (2014), Deutsche Telekom (2014b), Telecom Italia (2014b), British Telecom (2014), VimpelCom (2014b), Telenor (2014b), AT&T (2014), SprintNextel (2014), Verizon (2013), NTT (2014b), China Mobile (2014b), Telmex (2014).

Referencias

Ahlert, C., Nash, V., & Marsden, C. (2005). Implications of the Mobile Internet for the Protection of Minors. L’ICT Trasforma la Societa. Milano: Forum per la Tecnologia della Informazione.

Austin, E.W., Bolls, P., Fujioka, Y., & Engelbertson, J. (1999). How and Why Parents Take on the Tube. Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, 43, 175-192.

Bringué, X., & Sádaba, C. (2008). La generación interactiva en Iberoamérica. Niños y adolescentes ante las pantallas. Barcelona: Ariel.

Bringué, X., & Sádaba, C. (2011). Menores y redes sociales. Madrid: Fundación Telefónica.

Buckingham, D., & Domaille, K. (2003). Where Are We Going and How Can We Get There? In Von Feilitzen, C., & Carlsson, U. (Eds.), Promote of Protect? Perspectives on Media Literacy and Media Regulations. Göteborg: Nordicom.

Buckinghman, D., & Rodríguez, C. (2013). Aprendiendo sobre el poder y la ciudadanía en un mundo virtual. Comunicar, 40, 49-58. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-05

Byron, T. (2008). Safer Children in a Digital World. The Report of the Byron Review. Nottingham: Department for Children, Schools and Families, and the Department for Culture, Median and Sport.

Carlsson, U. (Ed.) (2006). Regulation, Awareness Empowerment: Young People and Harmful Media Content in the Digital Age. Göteborg: Nordicom.

Castells, P., & Bofarull, I. (2002). Enganchados a las pantallas: Televisión, videojuegos, Internet y móviles. Barcelona: Planeta.

Clarke, A. (2005). Young Children and ICTs Current Issues in the Provision of ICT Technologies and Services for Young Children. Luxembourg: ETSI White Paper.

Colás, P; González, T., & De-Pablos, J. (2013). Juventud y redes sociales: Motivaciones y usos preferentes. Comunicar, 40, XX, 15-23.

Comisión Europea (2009). Recomendación 2009/625/CE de la Comisión, de 20 de agosto de 2009, sobre la alfabetización mediática en el entorno digital para una industria audiovisual y de contenidos más competitiva y una sociedad del conocimiento incluyente. (http://goo.gl/ciuXzl) (19-01-2015).

Comisión Europea (2012a). Safer Internet Progamme. (http://goo.gl/POl111) (02-02-2013).

Denzin, N.K., & Lincoln, Y.S. (1994). Handbook of Qualitative Research. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

D´Haenens, L., Vandoninck, S., & Donoso, V. (2013). How to Cope and Build Online Resilience? (http://goo.gl/aaxdWY) (21-04-2014).

EU Kids Online España (2011). Riesgos y seguridad en Internet: los menores españoles en el contexto europeo. Resultados de la encuesta de EU Kids Online a menores de entre 9 y 16 años y a sus padres y madres. (http://goo.gl/JSzzmR) (02-03-2013).

Freeman, E., & Reed, D. (1983). Stockholders and Stakeholders: A New Perspective on Corporate Governance. California Management Review, S25(3), 88-106.

García-Matilla, A. (2004). ¿Qué debería ser hoy la alfabetización en medios? Por una visión interdisciplinar, transversal, integrada, global… y también política, de la alfabetización audiovisual. New York. Media Literacy: Art or/and Social Studies.

GSMA Intelligence (2014). Operator Group Ranking. GSMA Intelligence Analysis. (http://goo.gl/b6TmMP) (03-06-2014).

Hasebrink, U., Livingstone, S., & Haddon, L. (2008). Comparing Children’s Online Opportunities and Risks across Europe: Cross-national Comparisons for EU Kids Online. London: EU Kids Online.

Huertas, A., & Figueras, M. (Eds.) (2014). Audiencias juveniles y cultura digital. Bellaterra: Institut de la Comunicació-Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. (http://goo.gl/D6jIca) (23-01-2015).

Jiménez, G., & Ramos, M. (2007). Móviles y jóvenes: estrategias de los principales operadores de España. Comunicar, 29(XV), 121-128.

Jones, C., & Shao, B. (2011). The Net Generation and Digital Natives: Implications for Higher Education. Nueva York: Higher Education Academy.

Jones, S., & Fox, S. (2009). Generations Online 2009. (http://goo.gl/KmXIjF) (10-04-2014).

Katz, J.E. (2006). Magic in the Air: Mobile Communication and the Transformation of Social Life. New Brunswick: Transaction Publishers.

Kolk, A., Tulder, R., & Welters, C. (1999). International Codes of Conduct and Corporate Social Responsibility: Can Transnational Corporations Regulate Themselves? Transnational Corporations, 8(1), 143-180.

Lenhart, A., Kahne, J., & al. (2008). Teens, Video Games, and Civics: Teens´gaming Experiences are Diverse and Include Significant Social Interaction and Civic Engagement. Washington D.C.: Pew Internet & American Life Project.

Lenhart, A., Madden, M., & Hitlin, P. (2005). Teens and Technology: Youth are Leading the Transition to a Fully and Mobile Nation. Washington DC: Pew Internet & American Life Project.

Lenhart, A., Madden, M., & Rainie, L. (2006). Teens and the Internet Findings submitted to the House Subcommittee on Telecommunications and the Internet. Washington DC: Pew Internet & American Life Project.

Ley Orgánica 2/2006, de 3 de mayo, de Educación (BOE, 4 de mayo de 2006). (http://goo.gl/ezVuZj) (30-04-2014).

Lievens, E. (2007). Protecting Children in the New Media Environment: Rising to the Regulatory Challenge? Telematics and Informatics, 24, 4, 315-330.

Livingstone, S., & Haddon, L. (2009). EU Kids Online: Final Report. LSE, London: EU Kids Online.

Livingstone, S., Haddon, L., & Görzig, A. (Eds.). (2012). Children, Risk and Safety on the Internet: Research and Policy Challenges in Comparative Perspective. Bristol: Policy Press.

Livingstone, S., Haddon, L., Görzig, A., & Ólafsson, K. (2010). Risks and Safety on the Internet: The Perspective of European Children. Initial Findings. London: EU Kids Online.

Livingstone, S., Kirwil, L., Ponte, C., & Staksrud, E. (2013). In their Own Words: What Bothers Children Online? (http://goo.gl/WJrcNM) (12-05-2014).

Llopis, R. (2004). La mediación familiar del consumo infantil de televisión: Un análisis referido a la sociedad española. Comunicación y Sociedad, 17, 2, 125-147.

Lunt, P., & Livingstone, S. (2012). Media Regulation: Governance and the Interests of Citizens and Consumers. London: Sage.

McNeal, J.U. (1987). Children as Consumers. Lexington: Lexington Books.

Middaugh, E., & Kahne, J. (2013). Nuevos medios como herramienta para el aprendizaje cívico. Comunicar, 40, XX, 99-108.

Moreno, A., & Capriotti, P. (2009). Communicating CSR, Citizenship and Sustainability on the Web. Journal of Communication Management, 13, 2, 157-175.

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants Part 1. On the Horizon, 9, 5, 1-6.

Rideout, V., Foehr, U.G. & Roberts, D.F. (2010). Generation M2: Media in the Lives of 8-18 Years-olds. Executive Summary. (http://goo.gl/EWdSud) (12-05-2014).

Rideout, V., Roberts, D.F., & Foehr, U.G. (2005). Generation M: Media in the lives of 8-18 Years-olds. Executive Summary. (http://goo.gl/v44ABR) (30-04-2014).

Sádaba, C. (2008). Los jóvenes y los nuevos espacios para la comunicación. La generación interactiva. In Martín Algarra, M., Seijas, L., & Carrillo, M. (Eds.), Nuevos escenarios de la comunicación y la opinión pública. (pp. 173-178). Madrid: Edipo.

Sádaba, C. (2014). Use of Information and Communication Technologies by Latin American Children and adolescents: The Interactive Generations Case. Media@LSE Working Papers Series, 29. London: London School of Economics. (http://goo.gl/cR7Uls) (12-10-2014).

Staksrud, E., Livingstone, S., Haddon, L., & Ólafsson, K. (2009). What do we Know about Children’s Use of Online Technologies? A Report on Data Availability and Research Gaps in Europe. London: EUKids Online.

Tolsá, J., & Bringué, X. (2012). Leisure, Interpersonal Relationships, Learning and Consumption: The Four Key Dimensions for the Study of Minors and Screens. Communication and Society, XXV, 1, 253-288.

Tolsá, J.C. (2012). Los menores y el mercado de las pantallas: una propuesta de conocimiento integrado. Madrid: Colección Generaciones Interactivas. Fundación Telefónica.

Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones (2009). Protección para la industria en línea: directrices para la industria. Ginebra: UIT.

Visauta, V.B. (1989). Técnicas de investigación social. Barcelona: PPU.

Wartella, E., O´Keefe, B., & Scantilin, R. (2000). Children and Interactive Media. A Compendium of Current Research and Directions for the Future. New York: The Markle Foundation.

Weber, R.P. (1990). Basic Content Analysis. Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications.

Yin, R. & K. (2011). Qualitative Research from Start to Finish. New York: The Guilford Press.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/06/15
Accepted on 30/06/15
Submitted on 30/06/15

Volume 23, Issue 2, 2015
DOI: 10.3916/C45-2015-19
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 1
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?