Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The increase in online audience and the development of Big Data in organizations modify the media planning activity and, consequently, the profile of the planner. Following the digital expansion, more information has become available to perform this task, but also, more complexity is observed in the work processes and in their agents’ structures. This paper analyzes the changes produced in the management of the media planner within the digital society. Through triangular research, comprising quantitative and qualitative methods, including a questionnaire that was administered to 140 media planners, and 5 interviews conducted with agency experts we examine the variations that have occurred in this professional role in terms of knowledge, the tools used and the skills they have had to maintain or update. It is noted that the adaptation to the digital context has required a substantial change in their work mechanics, the integration of off- and online strategies and digital specialization. Furthermore, with the help of current technology, immediate actions and reviews are implemented. Consequently, the media expert activity requires mastery of digital media planning tools, greater doses of innovation, analysis, business acumen and the ability to work effectively in multidisciplinary teams for multimedia environments.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Most authors agree that, with the deployment of technology, the arrival of the Internet and the consequent digitalization, the media ecosystem has been transformed in such a way that it will never again be the same (Livingstone, 1999; Salaverría & García-Avilés, 2008; Van-der-duff, 2008; Flores-Vivar, 2009; Cabrera, 2011; Cardoso, 2011; Martín-Guart & Fernández-Cavia, 2012; Perlado, 2013). In just over 20 years, the growth of the Internet in terms of audience penetration has gone from 1% (1996) to 75.7% (2017), occupying third place behind Television and Outdoor Advertising (AIMC, 2018) and second place in terms of advertising investment (Infoadex, 2018). At the same time, the arrival of the Internet involves disruptive innovation processes (Christensen, 2014) whereby new markets and values are established.

According to the global forecast, online content consumption will continue to grow. In “The State of Digital” (GroupM, 2018) it was announced that in 2018 the time dedicated to online media would exceed the time devoted to online television for the first time.

Furthermore, Zenith Media (2018) notes that the total investment in mobile advertising will grow annually by 19% until 2020, a figure that will represent over half of the online advertising investment and 29% of the entire advertising revenue. In turn, Advanced Television (US: Smartphone time to overtake TV in 2019, 2018), stresses that the combined advertising investment in desktop computers and mobile phones already exceeds the investment in television; although, some trends point to a decline in the use of smartphones due to the use of other more recent devices, such as smart speakers, portable accessories and augmented/virtual reality (AR/VR) headsets.

In television, audiences are declining, especially among young people, some of whom do not even have a traditional television set (Maheshwari & Koblin, 2018). In order to watch audiovisual content, they use an endless number of devices and applications, and everyday mobile SVOD (Subscription Video on Demand) services increase, which competes with traditional television. Indeed, for millennials, social networks have an enormous influence on their buying decisions, and many of them acquire fashion and beauty products, among other things, influenced by Instagram, giving great importance to the recommendations made by friends and influencers in these media (Pérez-Curiel & Luque, 2017).

Thus, the digital environment makes it possible to interact and innovate with new strategies not only to support the brand through advertising but also to prescribe it to other users in the networks (Del-Pino & Galán, 2010). In this sense, the social media audience ranking is published every year, and its growth continues to be remarkable. Four platforms have an audience of more than a billion users (Facebook, Twitter, Youtube, and LinkedIn) and Instagram will soon become the fifth (We are Social & Hootsuite, 2018).

At the same time, the huge supply of access to information and entertainment diversifies online audiences and leads to small segmentations (López-Vidales, 2005), opening increasingly more communicative options and imposing personalization and hyper-targeting (Ros, 2008), driven by growing information about the audience.

Technology developers and webcasting platforms enable the management of big data in order to get to know the audiences better and to optimize their content and marketing (Kantar Media, 2017; Canada Media Fund, 2018).

Consequently, changing media exposure and the technological drive stimulate reforms in all advertising communications (Schultz, 2016; Kuman & Gupta, 2016) and necessarily in the professional area that relates more closely to the media and their audiences; that of media planning.

This activity consists of a strategic decision-making process in which media formats are evaluated and selected to achieve the objectives of the advertising campaign most profitably and effectively possible (Perlado-Lamo-de-Espinosa, 2006; Papí-Gálvez, 2017), although this discipline has evolved parallel to the common mutations of the field.

The media have been losing their primary characteristics, becoming content containers (Soengas, 2013), which have affected the drafting of the media plan, which has been transformed into a global communication solution integrating traditional and online media.

The focus of campaigns according to attitudinal variables of the target audience is also a usual request among researchers and professionals (Beales, 2010, Benavides, Villagra, Alameda, & Fernández, 2010; Katz, 2017).

Moreover, agencies have had to adapt to the arrival of new actors such as intermediaries between advertisers or agencies and media (Demand Side Platform: DSP), virtual buying/selling platforms for advertising spaces (Ad exchange), advertising networks, technological platforms for result optimization in the sale of advertising space (Supply Side Platform: SSP) and data suppliers, among others (IAB Spain, 2014).

Technology defines the current profiles, and professional roles (López-García, Rodriguez-Vázquez & Pereira-Fariña, 2017; Sánchez-Sánchez & Fernández-Cavia, 2018; IAB Spain 2018) and media planners also have to conform to the parameters of the new communication model. This profile, characterized by expertise in communication media, with analytical abilities to interpret marketing and communication problems, creative aptitudes, strategic vision, market research knowledge, as well as certain attributes for presentation, argumentation and staging (González-Lobo & Carrero-López, 1999; Sissors & Baron, 2010), has had to take on the mastery of the broad universe represented by the Internet; a liquid media without barriers or borders, meta-media, as Solana (2010) describes it, that matches consumption and multi-device exposure, adjusted audience measurement systems and new integration, negotiation and buying processes.

The change is such that foreseeably this professional not only has to increase his/her knowledge of digital deployment but also of tools and the acquisition of different skills to adapt to the current strategic planning model, taking on more strategic tasks and incorporating more skills regarding research and web analytics (Papí-Gálvez, 2014).

In light of the communicational and technological challenges described, in general, this study intends to find out whether the digital media have substantially modified the advertising media planning activity as well as the skills linked to the related professional profile. In particular, the study poses the following three objectives:

O1) To identify the main changes that have taken place in recent years (2000-2015) as a result of the digital media, especially regarding media planning in advertising; in the mechanics of work, techniques and roles.

O2) To delve into the knowledge, tools and transversal skills that are considered necessary for media planners in the digital society.

O3) To explore the adaptation of these professionals for the purpose of digital communication according to their professional careers, distinguishing intervals between 3 to 5 years of experience, 6 to 10, 11 to 20 and more than 20 years working in the sector.

2. Material and methods

Methodological triangulation was used, combining questionnaires, as a quantitative technique, and open interviews with experts, as a qualitative one. The survey showed which basic aspects of media planners' activity and their profiles had been affected by the digital deployment. In the open interviews, questions were asked about the changes produced in commercial communications and in the area of media planning, going into depth on the techniques, processes, and skills of the planner's profile.

The State Collective Bargaining Convention for Advertising Companies defines the media planner as “the person who establishes the media strategy to be used in the campaigns, according to the planned objectives and according to their profitability, coverage and client’s budget” (Spanish Ministry of Employment and Social Security, 2016: 10487). Additionally, this convention includes other profiles related to media such as that of the media director/strategic media planner, planning manager, head of media buying or media buyer. In this research, the generic term "media planner" was used as an umbrella term for all the cited profiles.

2.1. Questionnaire

The universe was defined as media planners working in the Autonomous Community of Madrid and who have at least three years of experience in media agencies.

In the absence of an official registration for these professionals, the Economically Active Population Survey (EAPS) of the National Statistics Institute (INE) was used to quantify them1, as well as the study “Radiografía de la Industria Publicitaria” (X-ray of the Advertising Industry) (2009) by the General Association of Advertising Companies (AGEP) and the National Federation of Advertising Companies (FNEP)2, and the report by the Observatorio de la Publicidad (Advertising Observatory) (2016). The analysis “Best Place to Work” by Scopen (2015) was also used, in which it was stated that 44.8% of the 427 interviews conducted with professionals were planners (Scopen, 2015).

The agencies themselves were consulted to learn the percentage of planners in their organizations3, obtaining an average of 37.8%. It was determined that 41% of media agency workers in Spain could be planners, which represented 6,519 professionals. As 37.9% of the advertising companies were located in the Autonomous Community of Madrid (AGEP, 2009), this yielded a total of 2,471 professionals.

Applying the minimum age filter of 25 and 26 years, the universe was set at 2,372 planners in this Autonomous Community with a minimum of three years of experience in the sector. In order to determine the sample, standard social research criteria were used (Figure 1).

The semi-structured questionnaire was self-administered online. In order to send it, a specialized digital platform was chosen, and email was used for its dissemination, aided by the previous contact by the researchers through snowball sampling. The fieldwork for the questionnaire was carried out between November 2016 and January 2017.

The response rate was 42%, with 167 responses to the questionnaire. From these, 140 were used as valid; a representative sample of the universe assuming a final margin of error of 8%.

The questionnaire began with personal identification questions: sex, age, years of experience as a planner, a position held, professional tasks within the organization and the agency where he/she carries out his/her work. The following questions were aimed at the changes in the design and the formulation of the strategy and the media plan resulting from the emergence of digital media. It also deepened the planners’ belief about the transformation of his profile after the technological development and expansion of the Internet. The questionnaire also included changes in knowledge, tools and transversal skills.

2.2. Interviews with experts

A non-probabilistic convenience sampling technique was applied. Within the profile of the universe defined for the study, professionals with a work environment in both traditional and digital areas were sought in order to observe their approach according to this typology. Furthermore, professionals holding different positions were selected from different agencies, with a minimum experience of ten years and a vision for analyzing the evolution in the processes and skills.

In accordance with the purpose of qualitative techniques, the theoretical significance of the sample was sought through the selection of relevant traits among the professionals, which are guarantors of an adequate formulation of questionnaire items and which facilitated the explanation of the descriptive and quantitative data.

Five experts were interviewed (Table 1). The first four interviews were conducted during the month of October 2016 and the last one was carried out in June 2018, with the aim of verifying that the results were up to date.

3. Analysis and results

3.1. Changes in the processes: the activity

Almost all respondents said their work had changed since the digital deployment (94%). This transformation had been experienced in most stages of the planning process, but mainly in the definition of milestones and target audience, selection and recommendation of media/supports, purchase, monitoring and evaluation of the campaign, the latter aspect being where the greatest variation was perceived.

In relation to the knowledge acquired or updated for their usual work, those derived from new work processes (82%) and web analytics (73%) stood out. Respondents mentioned knowledge about media and audience studies to a lesser extent.

The in-depth interviews revealed the importance of transformations in work mechanics, in addition to data capture and management; both aspects closely linked to the commitment to a better integration of media in strategies, accompanied by a greater specialization in digital communication: “There has been an important change: first, with the emergence of the technology layer, and second, the data layer. This has altered the processes significantly” (Herrero). “There are indeed specialists in each medium, there are specialists in digital, but that person also sees the whole. There is increasingly more specialization (...). Now there are five or six digital disciplines, but everything is integrated within the same team” (Díaz).

Another important change was the immediacy of the Internet and technological development that enables action implementation in real time so that the timing of the processes is reduced, and as soon as information related to results is received, changes can be made: "You are able to make campaign decisions, I will not say every minute, but indeed every day (…). We are in a business that seems more like a stock market trading business of operating campaigns than buying or intermediating media (…). From the monitoring viewpoint, I believe that we have advanced considerably. Going back to the way a campaign was traditionally done in Excel (and sending it), today there are tools like Datorama, which is a dashboard model in which you are able to integrate that set of things” (Estévez). “Now one learns about what is working and, in real time, changes are made to the same plan” (Díaz).

According to the respondents, with the emergence of a greater number of actors, processes become more complex. Also, the digital boost leads to the development of new techniques used as part of the planning activity, such as programmatic buying, which experts agreed was revolutionizing digital media. In particular, they noted that it affected the online medium in the purely tactical process of purchasing within planning: “Programmatic buying has changed a lot in digital planning, more than in other media (...) because it is a more efficient way to optimize coverage” (Pérez).

In the work process, there is still a need to focus on the effectiveness and efficiency of the actions to be performed. Without losing sight of the results, big data management is presented as one of the critical aspects for econometric models, central to decision-making. This management contributes to more audience-oriented planning: “The top advertisers have their own econometric models; in the end what they do is try to anticipate knowing what works best to generate sales” (Díaz). “The data allows you to obtain a lot of information in order to make models and analyses to elicit business ‘learnings’” (Pérez). “What you do in the ‘data lake’ is structure it, in some way clean it and extract information to create qualified audiences, in order to activate them through the DMP4 in different legs of communication” (Castellanos).

3.2. Skills and specific abilities: the professionals

With regard to skills related to the mastery of tools, respondents stressed the need for better management of programs specific to digital media planning (77%). In addition, nearly half stated that data exploitation software for market studies have greater importance in the digital environment. They emphasized the use of tools to improve data analysis, visualize results or as support in the presentation of campaigns. Some examples are the Data Management Platforms that allow classification or segmentation (creation of clusters) and can facilitate the application of allocation models.

Regarding the generic skills, respondents stressed innovation capacity and the need to adapt media function to a more multidisciplinary and multimedia framework, typical of the global and digital environment (Figure 2). Within client service teams there are specialists from different disciplines of digital communication (SEO, SEM, mobile...), as well as more statistical or mathematical profiles, responsible for the data sector. Multidisciplinarity is a relevant aspect that the experts also explained during the interviews:

“We all have to become multidisciplinary, with respect to understanding and knowing how to manage different disciplines (...). The specialists in each medium are necessary, but from the brand viewpoint, it does not make sense to parcel out the recommendations, the vision, or the approach” (Herrero).

“Being multidisciplinary takes on much more relevance now, in the sense of understanding that there are people with very different training when producing a global strategy that has (...) different cases: special actions in television, special activation that unites television, radio and digital... The greater the multidisciplinary training of people, the richer the strategies and the activations that are produced (...)” (Díaz).

In addition, both survey respondents and experts insisted on the indispensable inclusion of analytical and strategic profiles, in addition to the ability to provide solutions tailored to the client's objectives: “An analytical or technology profile, that has that customer service part” (Herrero). “People who have good analytical skills (...). In addition to mathematics, I would like to find those analytical profiles with the capacity to understand the business and the customers, and who are able to transform all that knowledge into something understandable, by agency teams and by customers” (Castellanos).

Pursuant to this last statement, other experts highlighted the lack of experience of the more technical professionals in dealing with the client; although they grow rapidly in their area and professional career, they do not seem to develop a strategic approach linked to commercial objectives at the same pace. However, it would be possible to provide these professionals with specialized business training.

3.3. Disruption and professional experience

The analysis of changes produced in the planners’ profile in relation to their experience showed that the longer the career in the sector, the higher the need for broadening or updating knowledge on new processes and work methodologies.

A priority need for all the ranks studied is the need to increase web analytics knowledge, with little difference when compared to concerns about processes and working methods.

In particular, the experts also stressed the areas of analytics and programmatic advertising as specific knowledge that they must broaden as a result of the digital media : “Although I began in digital, I have changed; the entire subject of programmatic advertising and analytics reached me when I had some years of experience, when you believe you have already learned” (Herrero). "I always talk about performance and programmatic buying, which are quite technical areas, because nowadays there is a great tendency to look for this type of strategy and it seems that it has a technical part that you have to know. I have a lot to learn there”. (Perez)

Mastery of media planning tools is the most relevant specific area at all levels of practice. The greater the experience, the greater the need to manage new software related to marketing intelligence technologies (Figure 4): “for them to know other types of technologies which is what we have today, all the Salesforce environments, Adobe..”. (Castellanos).

Market study exploitation programs concerned the more junior planners, with a maximum of five years of experience, since this is when they learn to manage them.

In relation to personal skills, those professionals with a longer career track display a higher level of concern regarding the adaptation to new work processes and methodologies of the digital environment (Figure 5), while the innovative capacity and creativity, followed by strategy, are considered more necessary for those with six to ten years of experience: “this changes a lot, I consider those abilities or skills of adaptability and restlessness to be up to date more important” (Castellanos).

In junior planners, organization and time planning skills become more relevant, followed by analytical skills and adaptation to new multimedia and multidisciplinary environments.

4. Discussion and conclusions

This research delves into the identification of the main changes produced in media planning by the impact of digital media. Therefore, it deals with the competence review of one of the most prominent and interesting communicational profiles in the advertising sector of digital societies. Its results contribute to the understanding of the disruptive processes of digital transformation and can help update and guide university programs.

The empirical position is presented as one of its main strengths, by approaching the study of this reality through the experience of active professionals. The limitations that arise from the quantitative methodology applied, an online survey, are reduced with the application of quality criteria aimed at optimizing data collection, such as the delimitation of the observation to one of the communities that gathers a large number of media agencies. Likewise, the profile of the respondent confers guarantees in the completion of the questionnaire, since it constitutes a qualified group, acquainted with digital communication. Triangulation also adds value to quantitative analysis, facilitating the achievement of the three objectives pursued and offering, as a whole, conclusive results.

In light of professionals' responses, the Internet and technological progress does indeed entail substantial changes both in media planning work processes and in the update of knowledge and skills.

The digital media affect the entire known work dynamics, accelerating processes, but the essential changes are produced by the technological innovations applied to the capture and management of digital data and to the automation of space purchase; aspects that modify work team profiles and generate a corresponding demand for knowledge and skills.

On the one hand, with respect to big data, this would represent the technological component of the activity, which contributes to better audience knowledge, thereby to the design of the strategies. Companies then have their own tools, and working groups focused on research and modeling, in line with the findings of studies on digital communication of innovation in media agencies (Papí-Gálvez, 2015). Today's planners stress the importance of specialized knowledge of marketing intelligence and media management programs. The analysis and report of campaign monitoring and results also become more complex because of the availability of data, often unstructured, that needs to be processed. Everything must be measured, so current planners must master, among other aspects, the metric fundamentals of the digital environment, among which those related to web analytics stand out.

On the other hand, the emergence of new intermediaries in the digital activity, as in programmatic purchasing, requires greater conciliation of the professionals involved in the planning and purchasing processes; although it is not the most outstanding implication. The automation of these processes usually includes the possibility of displaying advertising in sync with content that is being consumed by a user. This function, which normally extends to the whole medium given its peculiarities, offers the opportunity to direct the planning towards audiences definitively and to capture them in real time, eliminating the previous selection of supports, which occupies a large part of the work of offline planning.

Thus, due to their technological profile, part of the competencies known as STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) occupy workplace positions in coexistence with the communicational ones, inherent to the activity of the advertising media planner.

Technology stimulates the creation of multidisciplinary and multimedia work teams, where planners must integrate different disciplines with a wide range of actions and formats, such as "online" media, search engines, social media, "digital signage" and "mobile”, among others, coordinated with professionals from different disciplines. Studies on digital profiles in Advertising and Public Relations also highlight this hybrid nature of the sector, through the analysis of job offers in specialized portals (Álvarez-Flores, Núñez-Gómez & Olivares-Santamaría, 2018).

A global view of the whole process is necessary. The strategic component remains a priority and defines the activity's performance, as an important part of advertising communication. The effect of digital media on the strategic phase of the media function does not, in fact, change the approach itself, but takes place in the proposals, i.e., in the design of concrete strategies, which know how to exploit the potential of the digital environment. In addition, the results of this study indicate that, in the face of this new ecosystem, it is possibly more necessary to activate the capacity for innovation that was already present in the proposal for creative media plans (Sissors & Baron, 2010), with the intention of generating value or some competitive advantage.

Consequently, while professionals in this field of specialization must now acquire knowledge of data exploration tools and techniques that optimize actions and facilitate the visualization of post-campaign results, they must also be able to provide communication solutions based on effectiveness and efficiency, adapted to the new model. The specificities of digital environments demand, in short, specialized but also connected knowledge.

According to this study, there is no doubt that the advent of the digital society substantially modifies the conditions under which traditional media planning operates; but this transformation does not entail a loss of the importance of the media function in advertising, quite the contrary. The responses of the professionals in this study support the reflections reflected in other texts (Perlado- Lamo de Espinosa & Rubio-Romero, 2009; Papí-Gálvez, 2014). The media planner profile, whose definition seemed to be anchored in the most operational part of the activity, is broadened by integrating research and analysis skills. In addition, audience orientation decreases the tactical stage in favor of the strategic phase.

However, despite the transformations that the planner's profile has already undergone, it is evident that the planner remains immersed in the process of change. The analytical capacity and the overall vision, enhanced by the ability to create and innovate, are competencies identified as priorities in current planning, which is fed by hybrid profiles, technological and communicational, to provide effective solutions.

In short, the media planner gives way to the media expert, who, while including the operational approach of the former, also highlights the knowledge and skills needed to perform this activity in today's societies.

Notes

1 The EAPS recorded 103,500 persons in the advertising sector according to the National Classification of Economic Activities of Spain CNAE 09-73 (CNAE, 2016).

2 A leading company. It carries out market analyses in communication, marketing and advertising (www.scopen.com).

3 Twenty percent of the companies registered in the National Classification of Economic Activities in Spain (CNAE) belonged to media agencies, so this percentage was applied to obtain the approximate number of employees that these companies had (Scopen 2015). In order to estimate the number of planners within them, Carat, Equmedia, Forward, Havas Media, Initiative and Maxus were consulted.

4 Data Management Platform (DMP) is a tool that allows aggregating and centralizing different types of data that are obtained from the actions in different communication vehicles.

Funding Agency

This paper is prepared with the collaboration of “Digital Communication and New Scenarios” of Innecom, from the Nebrija University of Madrid, and in E-COM, from the University of Alicante. Partially financed by “Transformation of Cultural and Creative Industries in Spain: Digital Change, Competitiveness, Employment and to Social Wellbeing Contribution in Horizon 2020” (CSO2013-42822-R) (IP Marcial Murciano) of the Ministry of the Economy and Competitiveness.


Draft Content 571501514-71783-en039.jpg


Draft Content 571501514-71783-en040.jpg


Draft Content 571501514-71783-en041.jpg


Draft Content 571501514-71783-en042.jpg


Draft Content 571501514-71783-en043.jpg


Draft Content 571501514-71783-en044.jpg

References

Advance Television (Ed.) (2018) US: Smartphone time to overtake TV in 2019. http://bit.ly/2Mg5eUk

AIMC (Ed.) (2018). Marco General de los Medios en España 2018. Madrid: Asociación para la Investigación de los Medios de Comunicación. https://bit.ly/2Dh0AET

Álvarez-Flores, E.P., Núñez-Gómez, P., & Olivares-Santamaría, J.O. (2018). Perfiles profesionales y salidas laborales para graduados en Publicidad y Relaciones públicas: de la especialización a la hibridación. El profesional de la información, 27(1), 136-147. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2018.ene.13

Asociación General de Empresas de Publicidad & Federación Nacional de Empresas de Publicidad (Eds.)(2009). Radiografía del sector publicitario. Madrid: AGEP. https://bit.ly/2RedLxG

Beales, H. (2010). The value of behavioral Targeting. Network Advertising Initiative. http://bit.ly/2wXNJ6J

Benavides-Delgado, J., Villagra-García, N., Alameda-García, D., & Fernández-Blanco, E. (2010). Spanish advertisers and the new communication context: A qualitative approach. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social 65, 159-175. https://doi.org/10.4185/rlcs-65-2010-890-159-175-en

Cabrera-González, M. (Coord. ) (2010). Evolución tecnológica y cibermedios. Sevilla: Comunicación Social.

Canada Media Fundation (Ed.) (2018). Informe de tendencias 2018. El choque del presente. http://bit.ly/2QflhoJ

Cardoso, G. (2011). Más allá de Internet y de los medios de comunicación de masas, Telos (86), 1-10. http://bit.ly/2wZEtyD

Christensen, C.M. (2014). Disruptive innovation. In M. Soegaard & R.F. Dam (Eds.), The encyclopedia of human-computer interaction (2nd ed.). Aarhus, Denmark: The Interaction Design Foundation. http://bit.ly/2oSBrrF

CNAE (Ed.) (2016). Código Nacional de Actividades Económicas. https://bit.ly/2O945jm

Del-Pino-Romero, C., & Galán-Fajardo, E. (2010). Internet y los nuevos consumidores. El nuevo modelo publicitario. Telos (84), 55-64. http://bit.ly/2wY3SJm

Flores-Vivar, J.M. (2009). New models of communication, profiles and trends in social networks. [Nuevos modelos de comunicación, perfiles y tendencias en las redes sociales]. Comunicar, 33(XVII), 73-81. https://doi.org/10.3916/c33-2009-02-007

González-Lobo, M.A. & Carrero-López, E. (1999). Manual de Planificación de medios. Madrid: ESIC.

GroupM (Ed.) (2018). The State of Digital Resport. April 2018. http://bit.ly/2N0gtWj

IAB Spain (Ed.) (2014). Libro Blanco de Compra Programática. Madrid: IAB Spain. http://bit.ly/2NuaOY4

IAB Spain (Ed.)(2018). Estudio del mercado laboral en marketing digital. Madrid: IAB Spain. https://bit.ly/2rAU9FG

Infoadex (Ed.) (2018). Estudio Infoadex de inversión publicitaria en España 2018. Madrid: Infoadex. https://bit.ly/2Iu9u14

Kantar Media (Ed.) (2017). Dimensión. Planificar en un mundo disruptivo. http://bit.ly/2oQMLo2

Katz, H. (2017). The Media Handbook. A complete guide to advertising media selection, planning, research, and buying (6th Ed.). New York: Routledge.

Kumar, V., & Gupta, S. (2016). Conceptualizing the evolution and future of advertising. Journal of Advertising, 45: 3, 302-317. https://doi.org/10.1080/00913367.2016.1199335

Livingstone, S. (1999). New media, new audience? New Media & Society, 1(1), 59-66. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444899001001010

López-García, X., Rodríguez-Vázquez, A.I. & Pereira-Fariña, X. (2017). Competencias tecnológicas y nuevos perfiles profesionales: desafíos del periodismo actual. [Technological skills and new professional profiles: present challenges for journalism]. Comunicar, 53(XXV), 81-90. https://doi.org/10.3916/C53-2017-08

López-Vidales, N. (2005). Los medios audiovisuales en el tercer milenio. Atrapados en la ‘tela de araña’. Telos 62, 72-80. http://bit.ly/2N1ThqI

Maheshwari, S. & Koblin J. (2018). May, 3. Why traditional tv is in trouble. The New York Times. https://nyti.ms/2N0IJrY

Martín-Guart, R.F., & Fernández-Cavia, J. (2012). La digitalización como eje de transformación de las agencias de medios españolas. Pensar la Publicidad, 6(2), 427-445. https://doi.org/10.5209/rev_PEPU.2012.v6.n2.41243

Ministerio de Empleo y Seguridad Social (Ed.) (2016). Boletín Oficial del Estado, 35, 10485-10487. http://bit.ly/2NvuT07

Observatorio de la Publicidad en España (Ed.) (2016). La comunicación comercial en cambio permanente. Asociación Española de Anunciantes (AEA). Madrid: ESIC.

Papí-Gálvez, N. (2014). Los medios online y la ¿crisis? de la planificación de medios publicitarios. AdComunica, 7, 29-48. https://doi.org/10.6035/2174-0992.2014.7.3

Papí-Gálvez, N. (2015). Nuevos medios y empresas innovadoras. El caso de las agencias de medios. El Profesional de la Información, 24(3), 301-309. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2015.may.10

Papí-Gálvez, N. (2017). Investigación y Planificación de medios publicitarios. Madrid: Síntesis.

Pérez-Curiel, C., & Luque-Ortiz, S. (2018). El marketing de influencia en moda. Estudio del nuevo modelo de consumo en Instagram de los millennials universitarios. adComunica,15, 255-281. https://doi.org/10.6035/2174-0992.2018.15.13

Perlado-Lamo-de-Espinosa, M. & Rubio-Romero, J. (2009). ¿Qué competencias exige el sector publicitario a los nuevos profesionales de la comunicación comercial?: Un acercamiento a las actitudes y habilidades de los titulados en Publicidad. In M. Martín-Llaguno, & A. Hernández-Ruiz (Coords.), Los límites de la comunicación comercial y la comunicación comercial al límite. Reflexiones sobre los discursos, procesos y experiencias. Madrid: Asociación Española de Agencias de Publicidad.

Perlado-Lamo-de-Espinosa, M. (2006). Planificación de medios de comunicación de masas. Madrid: McGraw Hill.

Perlado-Lamo-de-Espinosa, M. (2013). Nuevas oportunidades en la comunicación digital. Nuevos perfiles y competencias. In I. De-Salas, & E. Mira (Coords.), Prospectivas y tendencias para la comunicación en el siglo XXI. Madrid: CEU Ediciones.

Ros-Diego, V. (2008). Branding en la era Web 2.0. Actas del IX Foro de Otoño de Comunicación. Madrid: Edipo.

Salaverría, R., & García-Avilés, J.A. (2008). La convergencia tecnológica de los medios de comunicación: retos para el periodismo. Trípodos 23, 31-47. http://bit.ly/2QkEVzS

Sánchez-Sánchez, C., & Fernández-Cavia, J. (2018). Percepción de profesionales y académicos sobre los conocimientos y competencias necesarios en el publicitario actual. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 73, 228-263. https://doi.org/10.4185/RLCS-2018-1254

Schultz, D. (2016). The future of advertising or whatever we're going to call it. Journal of Advertising, 45(3), 276-285. https://doi.org/10.1080/00913367.2016.1185061

Scopen (Ed.) (2015). Best Place to Work 2015: Agencias de medios. Grupo Consultores. http://bit.ly/2CKZUcf

Sissors, J.Z., & Baron, R.B. (2010). Advertising media planning (7th ed.). New York: McGrawHill.

Soengas, X. (2013). Retos de la radio en los escenarios de la convergencia digital. adComunica, 5, 23-36. https://doi.org/10.6035/2174-0992.2013.5.3

Solana, D. (2010). Postpublicidad. Reflexiones sobre una nueva cultura publicitaria en la era digital (2ª ed.). Barcelona: Doubleyou.

Van-der-duff, R. (2008). The impact of the Internet on media content. In l. Kung, R.G. Picard & R. Towse (Eds.), The Internet and Mass Media. London: Sage. https://doi.org/10.4135/9781446216316.n4

We are Social & Hootsuite (Ed.)(2018). Digital in 2018: Essential insight into Internet, social media, mobile ans ecommerce ise aroubd the world. We are Social & Hootsuite. http://bit.ly/2O2VJJW

Zenith Media (Ed.)(2018). Advertising expenditure forecasts March 2018. Executive summar. http://bit.ly/2oVU2D3



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

El incremento de la audiencia «online» y el desarrollo del «big data» en las organizaciones modifican la actividad de la planificación de medios y, en consecuencia, el perfil del planificador. Tras el avance digital se dispone de mayor información para ejercer esta labor, pero, igualmente, se observa más complejidad en los procesos de trabajo y en las estructuras de sus agentes. Este trabajo analiza los cambios producidos en la gestión del planificador de medios en la sociedad digital. A través de una investigación triangular que incluye métodos cuantitativos y cualitativos, donde se utiliza un cuestionario aplicado a 140 planificadores de medios y la realización de 5 entrevistas a expertos de agencias, se examinan qué variaciones se han producido en este rol profesional respecto a los conocimientos, herramientas utilizadas y competencias que han tenido que mantener o actualizar. Se constata que la adaptación al contexto digital supone un cambio sustancial en las mecánicas de trabajo, la integración de estrategias «off» y «online» y la especialización en digital. Asimismo, con la ayuda de la tecnología vigente, se implementan acciones y revisiones inmediatas. En consecuencia, la actividad del experto en medios exige el dominio de herramientas de planificación de medios digitales, mayores dosis de innovación, análisis, visión comercial y trabajar eficazmente en equipos multidisciplinares para entornos multimedia.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

La mayoría de los autores coinciden en que, con el despliegue tecnológico, la llegada de Internet y la consiguiente digitalización, el ecosistema mediático se ha transformado de tal manera que no volverá a ser el mismo (Livingstone, 1999; Salaverría & García-Avilés, 2008; Van-der-duff, 2008; Flores-Vivar, 2009; Cabrera, 2011; Cardoso, 2011; Martín-Guart & Fernández-Cavia, 2012; Perlado, 2013). En algo más de 20 años, el crecimiento de Internet en penetración de audiencia ha pasado del 1% (1996) al 75,7% (2017), ocupando el tercer puesto por detrás de Televisión y de Exterior (AIMC, 2018) y el segundo en inversión publicitaria (Infoadex, 2018). Al mismo tiempo, la entrada de Internet implica procesos de innovación disruptivos (Christensen, 2014) en virtud de los cuales se establecen nuevos mercados y valores.

Según la previsión global, el consumo de contenidos «online» seguirá creciendo. En «The state of digital» (GroupM, 2018) se anunciaba que en 2018 el tiempo dedicado a los medios «online» sobrepasaría al dedicado a la televisión en línea por primera vez.

Asimismo, Zenith Media (2018) advierte que la inversión total en publicidad móvil crecerá anualmente un 19% hasta 2020, cifra que representará más de la mitad de la inversión publicitaria en Internet y el 29% de todos los ingresos publicitarios. Por su parte, en Advance Television (US: Smartphone time to overtake TV in 2019, 2018), se subraya que la inversión combinada de publicidad en ordenador de sobremesa y móvil ya supera la inversión en televisión, si bien algunas tendencias apuntan a una merma en el uso del «smartphone» por el empleo de otros dispositivos más recientes, como los altavoces inteligentes, accesorios portátiles y auriculares de realidad aumentada y virtual RA/RV.

En la televisión, las audiencias están disminuyendo, especialmente entre los jóvenes, algunos de los cuales ni siquiera tienen un aparato receptor de televisor tradicional (Maheshwari & Koblin, 2018). Para ver contenidos audiovisuales utilizan infinidad de dispositivos y de aplicaciones, y cada día aumentan los servicios móviles SVOD (Subscription video on demand) que compiten con la televisión tradicional. Precisamente, para los «millennials» las redes sociales tienen una enorme influencia en sus decisiones de compra y muchos de ellos adquieren, entre otros, productos de moda y belleza influenciados por Instagram, concediendo gran importancia a las recomendaciones que amigos e «influencers» hacen en estos soportes (Pérez-Curiel & Luque, 2017).

Así, el entorno digital posibilita interactuar e innovar con nuevas estrategias no solo para apoyar la marca publicitariamente sino para prescribirla a otros usuarios en las redes (Del-Pino & Galán, 2010). En este sentido, cada año se publica el ranking de audiencias de medios sociales y su crecimiento sigue siendo notable. Cuatro plataformas tienen una audiencia de más de mil millones de usuarios (Facebook, Twitter, Youtube y Linkedin) y pronto Instagram se convertirá en la quinta (We are Social & Hoorsuite, 2018).

Al mismo tiempo, la ingente oferta de acceso a la información y el entretenimiento diversifica las audiencias «online» y provoca pequeñas segmentaciones (López-Vidales, 2005), abriendo cada vez más opciones comunicativas e imponiéndose la personalización y el «hipertargeting» (Ros, 2008), impulsados por la creciente información acerca de la audiencia.

Precisamente, los desarrolladores de tecnologías y las plataformas de difusión «webcasting» posibilitan la gestión de grandes datos (big data) con los que conocer en mayor profundidad a los públicos. Estas informaciones refuerzan a productores y creadores a comprender mejor a las audiencias y a optimizar su contenido y marketing (Kantar Media, 2017; Canada Media Fund, 2018).

En consecuencia, la cambiante exposición mediática y el impulso tecnológico estimulan reformas en toda la comunicación publicitaria (Schultz, 2016; Kuman & Gupta, 2016) y necesariamente en el área profesional que más se relaciona con los medios y sus audiencias; la de la planificación de medios.

Esta actividad consiste en un proceso estratégico de toma de decisiones en el que se evalúan y seleccionan soportes para lograr los objetivos de la campaña publicitaria de la manera más rentable y eficaz posible (Perlado-Lamo-de-Espinosa, 2006; Papí-Gálvez, 2017), si bien esta disciplina ha evolucionado en paralelo a las propias mutaciones del sector.

Los medios han ido perdiendo sus características primarias convirtiéndose en contenedores de contenido (Soengas, 2013), lo que ha afectado a la elaboración del plan de medios que se transforma ahora en una solución de comunicación global integradora de medios tradicionales y online.

La orientación de las campañas de acuerdo a variables actitudinales del público objetivo también es una solicitud habitual entre investigadores y profesionales (Beales, 2010, Benavides, Villagra, Alameda, & Fernández, 2010; Katz, 2017).

Asimismo, las agencias han tenido que adaptarse a la llegada de nuevos actores como las intermediadoras entre anunciantes o agencias y soportes (Demand Side Platform: DSP), plataformas virtuales de compra/venta de espacios publicitarios (Ad exchange), redes publicitarias, plataformas tecnológicas de optimización de los resultados de venta de espacios publicitarios (Supply Side Plandor: SSP) y proveedores de datos, entre otros (IAB Spain, 2014).

La tecnología define a los actuales perfiles y roles profesionales (López-García, Rodriguez-Vázquez & Pereira-Fariña, 2017; Sánchez-Sánchez & Fernández-Cavia, 2018; IAB Spain, 2018) y los planificadores de medios también tienen que acomodarse a los parámetros del nuevo modelo comunicacional. Este perfil, caracterizado por ser un experto conocedor de los medios de comunicación, con capacidad analítica para interpretar los problemas de marketing y comunicación, aptitudes creativas, visión estratégica, conocimientos sobre investigación de mercados y ciertas dotes para la presentación, argumentación y puesta en escena (González-Lobo & Carrero-López, 1999; Sissors & Baron, 2010), ha debido asumir el dominio del amplio universo que representa Internet; un medio líquido sin barreras ni fronteras, un metamedio, como describe Solana (2010), que lleva aparejado consumos y exposición multidispositivo, sistemas de medición de audiencia ajustados y nuevos procesos de integración y de negociación y compra.

Tal es el cambio que previsiblemente este profesional no solo ha debido aumentar los conocimientos propios del despliegue digital, sino herramientas, y la adquisición de diferentes habilidades para adaptarse al modelo de planificación estratégica actual, asumiendo más funciones estratégicas e incorporando más competencias de investigación y analítica web (Papí-Gálvez, 2014).

A la luz de los desafíos comunicacionales y tecnológicos expuestos, con carácter general, esta investigación pretende conocer si los medios digitales han modificado sustancialmente tanto la actividad de la planificación de medios publicitarios como, por ende, las competencias vinculadas al perfil profesional relacionado. En particular, el estudio plantea los siguientes tres objetivos:

O1) Identificar los principales cambios producidos en los últimos años (2000-2015) por el efecto de los medios digitales, especialmente en el ejercicio de la planificación de medios en la publicidad; en sus mecánicas de trabajo, técnicas y roles.

O2) Indagar en los conocimientos, herramientas y competencias transversales que se consideran necesarias para los planificadores de medios en la sociedad digital.

O3) Explorar la adaptación de estos profesionales a los efectos de la comunicación digital en función de su trayectoria profesional, distinguiendo intervalos de entre 3-5 años de experiencia, de 6 a 10, de 11 a 20 y más de 20 años trabajando en el sector.

2. Material y métodos

Se empleó la triangulación metodológica combinando el cuestionario, como técnica cuantitativa, y las entrevistas abiertas a expertos, como cualitativa. La encuesta permitía conocer qué aspectos básicos de la actividad de los planificadores de medios y de sus perfiles se habían visto afectados por el despliegue digital. En las entrevistas abiertas se preguntaba acerca de los cambios producidos en la comunicación comercial y en el área de la planificación de medios, profundizando en las técnicas, procesos y competencias del perfil del planificador.

El Convenio Colectivo Estatal para las Empresas de Publicidad define al planificador de medios como «la persona que establece la estrategia de medios a utilizar en las campañas, en función de los objetivos previstos y según su rentabilidad, cobertura y presupuesto del cliente» (Ministerio de Empleo y Seguridad Social, 2016: 10487). Este convenio recoge, además, otros perfiles relacionados con los medios como el de director de medios/planificador estratégico de medios, jefe de planificación, jefe de compra de medios o comprador de medios. En esta investigación se utilizó el término genérico “planificador de medios” como expresión aglutinadora de los citados perfiles.

2.1. Cuestionario

Se delimitó como universo a los planificadores de medios que trabajasen en la Comunidad de Madrid y que tuvieran como mínimo tres años de experiencia en agencias de medios.

Ante la ausencia de registro oficial de estos profesionales, se utilizó la Encuesta de Población Activa (EPA) del Instituto Nacional de Estadística (INE) para cuantificarlos1, así como el estudio «Radiografía de la Industria Publicitaria» (2009), de la Asociación General de Empresas de Publicidad (AGEP) y de la Federación Nacional de Empresas de Publicidad (FNEP)2, y el informe del Observatorio de la Publicidad (2016). También se utilizó el estudio «Best Place to Work» de Scopen (2015) en el que referenciaba que el 44,8% de las 427 entrevistas realizadas con profesionales eran planificadores (Scopen, 2015).

Se consultó a las propias agencias para conocer el porcentaje de planificadores en sus organizaciones3, obteniendo un promedio de 37,8%. Se determinó que un 41% de los trabajadores de las agencias de medios en España podían ser planificadores, lo que representaba 6.519 profesionales. Como el 37,9% de las empresas publicitarias se localizaban en la Comunidad de Madrid (AGEP, 2009), se obtuvo un total de 2.471 profesionales.

Aplicando el filtro de edad mínima de 25 y 26 años, el universo se fijó en 2.372 planificadores en esta Comunidad con un mínimo de tres años de experiencia en el sector.

Para la determinación de la muestra se emplearon los baremos estándar de la investigación social (Figura 1).

El cuestionario semiestructurado fue autoadministrado en línea. Para su envío se eligió una plataforma digital especializada y para su difusión se utilizó el correo electrónico, facilitado previo contacto de los investigadores a través del muestreo de la bola de nieve. El trabajo de campo del cuestionario fue realizado entre noviembre de 2016 y enero de 2017.

La tasa de respuesta fue del 42%, obteniéndose 167 respuestas al cuestionario. De ellos, 140 fueron utilizados como válidos; muestra representativa del universo asumiendo un margen de error final de 8%.

El cuestionario se iniciaba con preguntas de identificación personal: sexo, edad, años de experiencia como planificador/a, puesto ocupado, labor profesional dentro de la organización y agencia donde desarrollaba su trabajo. Las siguientes preguntas se orientaban a los cambios en el diseño y la elaboración de la estrategia y el plan de medios devenidos con la aparición de los medios digitales. También se profundizaba en la creencia del planificador acerca de la transformación de su perfil tras el desarrollo tecnológico y el crecimiento de Internet. Asimismo, el cuestionario contemplaba cambios en los conocimientos (saber), instrumentos o herramientas (saber hacer) y competencias transversales.

2.2. Entrevistas a expertos

Se aplicó la técnica del muestreo no probabilístico por conveniencia. Dentro del perfil del universo definido para la investigación, se buscaron profesionales cuyo entorno de trabajo fuera tanto del área tradicional como del digital para observar su enfoque en función de esta tipología. Asimismo, se seleccionaron profesionales de diferentes agencias, que ocuparan puestos distintos, con una experiencia mínima de diez años y visión para analizar la evolución en los procesos y competencias.

De acuerdo con el propósito de las técnicas cualitativas, se buscó la significación teórica de la muestra a través de la selección de rasgos relevantes de los profesionales, que son garantes de un adecuado planteamiento de las preguntas del cuestionario y que facilitaban la explicación de los datos descriptivos del cuantitativo.

Se entrevistaron a cinco expertos (Tabla 1). Las primeras cuatro entrevistas se realizaron durante el mes de octubre de 2016 y la última se llevó a cabo en junio de 2018 con el propósito de comprobar la actualidad de los resultados.

3. Análisis y resultados

3.1. Cambios en los procesos: la actividad

Casi la totalidad de los encuestados afirmaban que su trabajo había cambiado desde el despliegue digital (94%). Esta transformación la habían experimentado en casi todas las etapas del proceso de planificación, pero fundamentalmente en la definición de hitos y del público objetivo, selección y recomendación de medios/soportes, compra, y en el seguimiento y evaluación de la campaña, siendo este último aspecto donde más mutación percibían.

En relación a los conocimientos adquiridos o renovados para su trabajo habitual, destacaban los derivados de los nuevos procesos de trabajo (82%) y la analítica web (73%). Los encuestados mencionaban en menor medida el conocimiento acerca de los estudios de medios y de audiencias.

Las entrevistas en profundidad revelaron la importancia de las transformaciones en las mecánicas de trabajo, además de la captura y gestión de datos; ambos aspectos estrechamente vinculados a la apuesta de una mayor integración de los medios en las estrategias, acompañada de una mayor especialización en comunicación digital: «Se ha dado un cambio muy importante: uno, con toda la irrupción de la capa de tecnología y dos; la capa del «data». Eso ha alterado mucho los procesos» (Herrero). «Sí que hay personas especialistas en cada medio, hay especialistas en digital, pero esa persona también ve el conjunto. Cada vez hay más especialización (…). Ahora hay 5 o 6 disciplinas digitales, pero todo se integra dentro del mismo equipo» (Díaz).

Otro de los cambios destacados fue la inmediatez suscitada por Internet y el desarrollo tecnológico que permiten implementar acciones en tiempo real de modo que la temporalidad de los procesos se reduce y, tan pronto se recibe la información de resultados, se pueden realizar cambios:

«Eres capaz de tomar decisiones de campaña, no digo cada minuto, pero sí cada día (…). Ahora estamos en un negocio que se parece más a un «trading» de bolsa, de estar operando campañas que de estar comprando o intermediando medios (…). Desde el punto de vista del seguimiento, yo creo que se ha avanzado mucho. Desde lo que históricamente era hacer una campaña en un Excel (y lo mando), hoy existen herramientas tipo Datorama, que es un modelo de «dashboards» en el que eres capaz de integrar ese conjunto de cosas» (Estévez). «Ahora se aprende sobre qué está funcionando y, en tiempo real, se hacen las modificaciones en el mismo plan» (Díaz).

Segun los entrevistados, con la aparición de un mayor número de actores, los procesos se vuelven más complejos. Asimismo, el empuje digital provoca el desarrollo de nuevas técnicas que se utilizan como parte de la actividad de la planificación, tal es el caso de la compra programática, donde los expertos coincidían en que estaba revolucionando los medios digitales. En particular, señalaban que había afectado al medio «online» en el área puramente táctica del proceso de compra de la planificación: «La compra programática ha cambiado mucho en la planificación digital, más que en el resto de medios (...) porque es una manera más eficiente de optimizar una cobertura» (Pérez).

En el proceso de trabajo sigue siendo necesaria la orientación hacia la eficacia y eficiencia de las acciones a realizar. Sin perder la mirada en los resultados, la gestión de «big data» se presenta como uno de los aspectos clave para los modelos econométricos, centrales en la toma de decisiones. Esa gestión contribuye a realizar planificaciones más orientadas a las audiencias: «Los anunciantes más punteros tienen sus propios modelos econométricos, que al final lo que hacen es intentar anticiparse a saber qué es lo que mejor les funciona para generar ventas» (Díaz). «El «data» te permite obtener mucha información para hacer modelizaciones y análisis para extraer «learnings» de negocio» (Pérez). «Lo que haces en el «data lake» es estructurarlo, de alguna forma limpiarlo y extraer información para crear audiencias cualificadas, para luego activarlas a través de los DMP4 en distintas patas de la comunicación» (Castellanos).

3.2. Competencias y capacidades específicas: los profesionales

Respecto a las competencias referidas al dominio de herramientas, los encuestados destacaron la necesidad del mejor manejo de programas propios de la planificación de medios digitales (77%). Además, casi la mitad declaraba que los softwares de explotación de datos para estudios de mercado tienen mayor importancia en el entorno digital. Destacaron el manejo de herramientas para mejorar el análisis de datos, la visualización de resultados o como apoyo en la presentación de campañas. Algunos ejemplos son las plataformas de gestión de datos («Data Management Platforms») que permiten clasificaciones o segmentaciones (creación de «clusters») y pueden facilitar la aplicación de los modelos de atribución.

Con relación a las competencias genéricas, se resaltó la capacidad de innovación y la necesaria adaptación de la función de medios a un marco más multidisciplinar y multimedia, propio del entorno global y digital (Figura 2). Dentro de los equipos de servicios al cliente hay especialistas de diferentes disciplinas de la comunicación digital (SEO, SEM, «mobile»...), además de perfiles más estadísticos o matemáticos, responsables del área de datos. La multidisciplinariedad es un aspecto relevante que también explican los expertos en las entrevistas efectuadas:

«Multidisciplinar es en lo que tenemos que convertirnos todos, en cuanto a entender y saber manejar las diferentes disciplinas (…) Los especialistas en cada medio son necesarios, pero desde el punto de vista de la marca, no tiene sentido parcelar las recomendaciones, ni la visión, ni el ‘approach’» (Herrero).

«Ser multidisciplinar toma más relevancia ahora, en sentido de entender que haya gente con muy diferente formación a la hora de aportar a una estrategia global que tiene (…) declinaciones: acciones especiales en televisión, activación especial que une televisión, radio y digital... Cuanto mayor es la formación multidisciplinar por parte de la gente, más ricas son las estrategias y las activaciones que se hacen (...)» (Díaz).

Además, tanto encuestados como expertos insistieron en la indispensable incorporación de perfiles con visión analítica y estratégica, a la que se le debe sumar la capacidad de aportar soluciones ajustadas a los objetivos del cliente: «Un perfil analítico, o de tecnología, que tenga esa parte de servicio al cliente» (Herrero). «Gente que tenga buenas capacidades analíticas (…) Además de los matemáticos a mí me gustaría encontrar esos perfiles analíticos con capacidad de entender el negocio y el de los clientes, y ser capaz de transformar todo ese conocimiento en algo entendible, por los equipos de la agencia y por los clientes» (Castellanos).

De acuerdo con esta última aportación, otros expertos destacaron la falta de experiencia de los profesionales más técnicos en el trato con el cliente, pues si bien crecen rápidamente en su ámbito y trayectoria profesional, no parecen desarrollar al mismo ritmo el enfoque estratégico vinculado a los objetivos comerciales. Con todo, sería posible dotar a estos profesionales de formación especializada en negocio.

3.3. Disrupción y experiencia profesional

El análisis de los cambios producidos en el perfil de los planificadores con relación a su experiencia mostraba que a mayor trayectoria en el sector, mayor exigencia en la ampliación o renovación de conocimientos sobre nuevos procesos y metodologías de trabajo. Una necesidad prioritaria para todos los rangos estudiados es el de incrementar los conocimientos sobre la analítica web, aunque con poca diferencia respecto a la inquietud en los procesos y métodos de trabajo.

En particular, los expertos también destacaban los ámbitos de la analítica y programática como conocimientos específicos que han debido ampliar por efecto de los medios digitales: «Aunque empiezo en digital, sí que he cambiado, todo el tema de la programática y la analítica me llega cuando ya tengo unos años de experiencia, que crees que ya has aprendido» (Herrero). «Yo siempre hablo de «performance» y de compra programática que son áreas bastante técnicas, porque se tiende mucho a día de hoy a buscar ese tipo de estrategias y me parece que tiene una parte técnica que tienes que conocer. Ahí me queda bastante por aprender» (Pérez).

El dominio de herramientas de planificación de medios es el área específica más relevante en todos los niveles de práctica. A mayor experiencia, mayor necesidad del manejo de nuevos softwares relacionados con las tecnologías del «marketing intelligence» (Figura 4): «que conozcan otro tipo de tecnologías que es lo que hay ahora, todos los entornos Salesforce, Adobe…» (Castellanos).

Los programas de explotación de estudios de mercado preocupaban a los planificadores más junior, con un máximo de cinco años de experiencia, puesto que es cuando aprenden a manejarlos.

En relación con las competencias personales, la adaptación a los nuevos procesos de trabajo y metodologías propias del entorno digital preocupan más a los profesionales de mayor trayectoria (Figura 5), mientras que la capacidad de innovación y creatividad, seguida por la estrategia, son consideradas más necesarias para los que llevan de 6 a 10 años trabajando: «esto cambia mucho, yo creo que son más importantes esas habilidades o «skills» de adaptabilidad e inquietud por estar al día» (Castellanos).

En los planificadores más jóvenes, la capacidad de organización y planificación del tiempo obtiene mayor relevancia, seguida de la capacidad de análisis y la adaptación a los nuevos entornos multimedia y multidisciplinares.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Esta investigación profundiza en la identificación de los principales cambios producidos en la planificación de medios por efecto de los medios digitales. Aborda, por tanto, la revisión de competencias de uno de los perfiles comunicacionales más sobresalientes y de interés en la publicidad de las sociedades digitales. Sus resultados contribuyen a comprender los procesos disruptivos de la transformación digital, y pueden ayudar a actualizar y orientar los programas universitarios.

El planteamiento empírico se presenta como una de sus principales fortalezas, al aproximarse al estudio de esta realidad a través de la experiencia de profesionales en activo. Las limitaciones que se desprenden de la metodología cuantitativa aplicada, encuesta en línea, se reducen con la aplicación de criterios de calidad dirigidos a optimizar la recogida de información, como es la delimitación de la observación a una de las comunidades que concentra gran número de agencias de medios. Asimismo, el perfil del encuestado confiere garantías en la cumplimentación del cuestionario, al tratarse de un grupo cualificado, familiarizado con la comunicación digital. También, la triangulación aporta valor al análisis cuantitativo, facilitando la consecución de los tres objetivos perseguidos y ofreciendo, en su conjunto, resultados concluyentes.

A la luz de las respuestas de los profesionales, Internet y el avance tecnológico efectivamente suponen cambios sustanciales tanto en los procesos de trabajo de la planificación de medios como en la actualización de conocimientos y competencias.

Los medios digitales afectan a toda la dinámica de trabajo conocida, acelerando los procesos, pero los cambios esenciales se producen por las innovaciones tecnológicas aplicadas a la captura y gestión de datos digitales y a la automatización de la compra de los espacios; aspectos que modifican el perfil de los equipos de trabajo y tienen su correspondiente demanda de conocimientos y competencias.

Por una parte, con respecto al «big data», este representaría el componente tecnológico de la actividad, que contribuye a un mejor conocimiento de las audiencias y, por ende, al diseño de las estrategias. Las empresas tienen así sus propias herramientas y grupos de trabajo centrados en investigación y modelización, en consonancia con los hallazgos de estudios sobre la comunicación digital de la innovación en las agencias de medios (Papí-Gálvez, 2015). Los planificadores actuales destacan la importancia de conocer especialmente los programas de «marketing intelligence» y de gestión de medios. El análisis y el informe del seguimiento de la campaña y de sus resultados adquieren también mayor complejidad al poder disponer de datos, en bastantes ocasiones desestructurados, que requieren ser procesados. Todo debe estar medido, por lo que los planificadores actuales deben dominar, entre otros aspectos, los fundamentos métricos del entorno digital, entre los que destacan los relacionados con la analítica web.

Por otra parte, la aparición de nuevos intermediarios en la actividad digital, como en la compra programática, exige mayor conciliación de los profesionales implicados en los procesos de planificación y compra; aunque no es la implicación más sobresaliente. La automatización de estos procesos incluyen habitualmente la posibilidad de mostrar la publicidad en sintonía con un contenido que está siendo consumido por un usuario. Esta utilidad, que se extiende normalmente a todo el medio dadas sus peculiaridades, ofrece la oportunidad de orientar la planificación definitivamente hacia las audiencias y de captarlas en tiempo real, prescindiendo de la previa selección de soportes, que ocupa gran parte del trabajo de la planificación offline.

Se observa así que, por su perfil tecnológico, una parte de las competencias conocidas como STEM (Ciencias, Tecnología, Ingeniería y Matemáticas) toman posiciones en los lugares de trabajo en convivencia con las comunicacionales, propias de la actividad del planificador de medios publicitarios.

La tecnología estimula la formación de equipos de trabajo multidisciplinares y multimedia, donde los planificadores deben integrar diferentes disciplinas con una extensa oferta en acciones y formatos, como los medios «online», motores de búsqueda, medios sociales, «digital signage» y «mobile», entre otros, coordinados con profesionales de diferentes disciplinas. Estudios sobre perfiles digitales en Publicidad y Relaciones Públicas destacan igualmente este carácter híbrido del sector, a través del análisis de las ofertas de trabajo en portales especializados (Álvarez-Flores, Núñez-Gómez, & Olivares-Santamaría, 2018).

La visión global de todo el proceso es necesaria. El componente estratégico sigue siendo prioritario y definitorio del desempeño de la actividad, como parte importante de la comunicación publicitaria. El efecto de los medios digitales en la fase estratégica de la función de medios no modifica, de hecho, el propio enfoque, sino que se produce en las propuestas, es decir, en el diseño de estrategias concretas, que sepan aprovechar el potencial del entorno digital. Además, los resultados de este estudio apuntan a que, ante este nuevo ecosistema, es posiblemente más necesario activar la capacidad de innovación que ya estaba presente en la propuesta de planes de medios creativos (Sissors & Baron, 2010), con la intención de generar valor o alguna ventaja competitiva.

En consecuencia, si bien los profesionales de este campo de especialización deben adquirir hoy en día conocimientos sobre herramientas y técnicas de exploración de datos que optimicen las acciones y faciliten la visualización de resultados postcampaña, también deben poder proporcionar soluciones de comunicación atendiendo a la eficacia y eficiencia, adecuadas al nuevo modelo. Las especificidades de los entornos digitales demandan, en definitiva, conocimientos especializados pero también conectados.

De acuerdo con el presente estudio, no cabe la menor duda de que el advenimiento de la sociedad digital modifica sustancialmente las condiciones sobre las que opera la planificación de medios clásica; pero esta transformación no conlleva una pérdida de la importancia de la función de medios en publicidad, todo lo contrario. Las respuestas de los profesionales de este estudio respaldan las reflexiones recogidas en otros textos (Perlado-Lamo-de-Espinosa & Rubio-Romero, 2009; Papí-Gálvez, 2014). El perfil del planificador de medios, cuya definición parecía estar anclada en la parte más operativa de la actividad, se amplía integrando competencias de investigación y análisis. Además, la orientación hacia las audiencias hace disminuir la etapa táctica, a favor de la fase estratégica.

Con todo, a pesar de las transformaciones que ya ha experimentado el perfil del planificador, se aprecia que continúa inmerso en un proceso de cambio. La capacidad de análisis y la visión de conjunto, potenciadas por la de creación e innovación, son competencias señaladas como prioritarias en la planificación actual, la cual se nutre de perfiles híbridos, tecnológicos y comunicacionales, para proporcionar soluciones eficaces. En definitiva, el planificador de medios estaría dando paso al experto en medios, que si bien incluye el enfoque operativo del primero, también destaca los conocimientos y competencias necesarios para el desempeño de esta actividad en las sociedades actuales.

Notas

1 La EPA registró 103.500 personas en el sector publicitario según la Clasificación Nacional de Actividades Económicas de España CNAE 09-73 (CNAE, 2016).

2 Compañía de referencia. Realiza estudios de mercado en comunicación, marketing y publicidad (www.scopen.com).

3 Un 20% de las empresas registradas en la Clasificación Nacional de Actividades Económicas de España (CNAE) correspondía a agencias de medios, por lo que se aplicó este porcentaje para obtener el número aproximado de empleados que tenían estas empresas (Scopen 2015). Para estimar el número de planificadores dentro de las mismas se consultó a Carat, Equmedia, Forward, Havas Media, Initiative y Maxus.

4 «Data Management Platform» (DMP) es una herramienta que permite agregar y centralizar distintos tipos de datos que se obtienen de las acciones en diferentes vehículos de comunicación.

Apoyos

Trabajo elaborado con la colaboración de «Comunicación digital y nuevos escenarios» de Innecom, de la Universidad Nebrija de Madrid, y en E-COM, de la Universidad de Alicante. Parcialmente financiado por «La transformación de las industrias culturales y creativas en España: cambio digital, competitividad, empleo y contribución al bienestar social en el Horizonte 2020» (CSO2013-42822-R) (IP Marcial Murciano) del Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad.


Draft Content 571501514-71783 ov-es039.jpg


Draft Content 571501514-71783 ov-es040.jpg


Draft Content 571501514-71783 ov-es041.jpg


Draft Content 571501514-71783 ov-es042.jpg


Draft Content 571501514-71783 ov-es043.jpg


Draft Content 571501514-71783 ov-es044.jpg

Referencias

Advance Television (Ed.) (2018) US: Smartphone time to overtake TV in 2019. http://bit.ly/2Mg5eUk

AIMC (Ed.) (2018). Marco General de los Medios en España 2018. Madrid: Asociación para la Investigación de los Medios de Comunicación. https://bit.ly/2Dh0AET

Álvarez-Flores, E.P., Núñez-Gómez, P., & Olivares-Santamaría, J.O. (2018). Perfiles profesionales y salidas laborales para graduados en Publicidad y Relaciones públicas: de la especialización a la hibridación. El profesional de la información, 27(1), 136-147. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2018.ene.13

Asociación General de Empresas de Publicidad & Federación Nacional de Empresas de Publicidad (Eds.)(2009). Radiografía del sector publicitario. Madrid: AGEP. https://bit.ly/2RedLxG

Beales, H. (2010). The value of behavioral Targeting. Network Advertising Initiative. http://bit.ly/2wXNJ6J

Benavides-Delgado, J., Villagra-García, N., Alameda-García, D., & Fernández-Blanco, E. (2010). Spanish advertisers and the new communication context: A qualitative approach. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social 65, 159-175. https://doi.org/10.4185/rlcs-65-2010-890-159-175-en

Cabrera-González, M. (Coord. ) (2010). Evolución tecnológica y cibermedios. Sevilla: Comunicación Social.

Canada Media Fundation (Ed.) (2018). Informe de tendencias 2018. El choque del presente. http://bit.ly/2QflhoJ

Cardoso, G. (2011). Más allá de Internet y de los medios de comunicación de masas, Telos (86), 1-10. http://bit.ly/2wZEtyD

Christensen, C.M. (2014). Disruptive innovation. In M. Soegaard & R.F. Dam (Eds.), The encyclopedia of human-computer interaction (2nd ed.). Aarhus, Denmark: The Interaction Design Foundation. http://bit.ly/2oSBrrF

CNAE (Ed.) (2016). Código Nacional de Actividades Económicas. https://bit.ly/2O945jm

Del-Pino-Romero, C., & Galán-Fajardo, E. (2010). Internet y los nuevos consumidores. El nuevo modelo publicitario. Telos (84), 55-64. http://bit.ly/2wY3SJm

Flores-Vivar, J.M. (2009). New models of communication, profiles and trends in social networks. [Nuevos modelos de comunicación, perfiles y tendencias en las redes sociales]. Comunicar, 33(XVII), 73-81. https://doi.org/10.3916/c33-2009-02-007

González-Lobo, M.A. & Carrero-López, E. (1999). Manual de Planificación de medios. Madrid: ESIC.

GroupM (Ed.) (2018). The State of Digital Resport. April 2018. http://bit.ly/2N0gtWj

IAB Spain (Ed.) (2014). Libro Blanco de Compra Programática. Madrid: IAB Spain. http://bit.ly/2NuaOY4

IAB Spain (Ed.)(2018). Estudio del mercado laboral en marketing digital. Madrid: IAB Spain. https://bit.ly/2rAU9FG

Infoadex (Ed.) (2018). Estudio Infoadex de inversión publicitaria en España 2018. Madrid: Infoadex. https://bit.ly/2Iu9u14

Kantar Media (Ed.) (2017). Dimensión. Planificar en un mundo disruptivo. http://bit.ly/2oQMLo2

Katz, H. (2017). The Media Handbook. A complete guide to advertising media selection, planning, research, and buying (6th Ed.). New York: Routledge.

Kumar, V., & Gupta, S. (2016). Conceptualizing the evolution and future of advertising. Journal of Advertising, 45: 3, 302-317. https://doi.org/10.1080/00913367.2016.1199335

Livingstone, S. (1999). New media, new audience? New Media & Society, 1(1), 59-66. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444899001001010

López-García, X., Rodríguez-Vázquez, A.I. & Pereira-Fariña, X. (2017). Competencias tecnológicas y nuevos perfiles profesionales: desafíos del periodismo actual. [Technological skills and new professional profiles: present challenges for journalism]. Comunicar, 53(XXV), 81-90. https://doi.org/10.3916/C53-2017-08

López-Vidales, N. (2005). Los medios audiovisuales en el tercer milenio. Atrapados en la ‘tela de araña’. Telos 62, 72-80. http://bit.ly/2N1ThqI

Maheshwari, S. & Koblin J. (2018). May, 3. Why traditional tv is in trouble. The New York Times. https://nyti.ms/2N0IJrY

Martín-Guart, R.F., & Fernández-Cavia, J. (2012). La digitalización como eje de transformación de las agencias de medios españolas. Pensar la Publicidad, 6(2), 427-445. https://doi.org/10.5209/rev_PEPU.2012.v6.n2.41243

Ministerio de Empleo y Seguridad Social (Ed.) (2016). Boletín Oficial del Estado, 35, 10485-10487. http://bit.ly/2NvuT07

Observatorio de la Publicidad en España (Ed.) (2016). La comunicación comercial en cambio permanente. Asociación Española de Anunciantes (AEA). Madrid: ESIC.

Papí-Gálvez, N. (2014). Los medios online y la ¿crisis? de la planificación de medios publicitarios. AdComunica, 7, 29-48. https://doi.org/10.6035/2174-0992.2014.7.3

Papí-Gálvez, N. (2015). Nuevos medios y empresas innovadoras. El caso de las agencias de medios. El Profesional de la Información, 24(3), 301-309. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2015.may.10

Papí-Gálvez, N. (2017). Investigación y Planificación de medios publicitarios. Madrid: Síntesis.

Pérez-Curiel, C., & Luque-Ortiz, S. (2018). El marketing de influencia en moda. Estudio del nuevo modelo de consumo en Instagram de los millennials universitarios. adComunica,15, 255-281. https://doi.org/10.6035/2174-0992.2018.15.13

Perlado-Lamo-de-Espinosa, M. & Rubio-Romero, J. (2009). ¿Qué competencias exige el sector publicitario a los nuevos profesionales de la comunicación comercial?: Un acercamiento a las actitudes y habilidades de los titulados en Publicidad. In M. Martín-Llaguno, & A. Hernández-Ruiz (Coords.), Los límites de la comunicación comercial y la comunicación comercial al límite. Reflexiones sobre los discursos, procesos y experiencias. Madrid: Asociación Española de Agencias de Publicidad.

Perlado-Lamo-de-Espinosa, M. (2006). Planificación de medios de comunicación de masas. Madrid: McGraw Hill.

Perlado-Lamo-de-Espinosa, M. (2013). Nuevas oportunidades en la comunicación digital. Nuevos perfiles y competencias. In I. De-Salas, & E. Mira (Coords.), Prospectivas y tendencias para la comunicación en el siglo XXI. Madrid: CEU Ediciones.

Ros-Diego, V. (2008). Branding en la era Web 2.0. Actas del IX Foro de Otoño de Comunicación. Madrid: Edipo.

Salaverría, R., & García-Avilés, J.A. (2008). La convergencia tecnológica de los medios de comunicación: retos para el periodismo. Trípodos 23, 31-47. http://bit.ly/2QkEVzS

Sánchez-Sánchez, C., & Fernández-Cavia, J. (2018). Percepción de profesionales y académicos sobre los conocimientos y competencias necesarios en el publicitario actual. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 73, 228-263. https://doi.org/10.4185/RLCS-2018-1254

Schultz, D. (2016). The future of advertising or whatever we're going to call it. Journal of Advertising, 45(3), 276-285. https://doi.org/10.1080/00913367.2016.1185061

Scopen (Ed.) (2015). Best Place to Work 2015: Agencias de medios. Grupo Consultores. http://bit.ly/2CKZUcf

Sissors, J.Z., & Baron, R.B. (2010). Advertising media planning (7th ed.). New York: McGrawHill.

Soengas, X. (2013). Retos de la radio en los escenarios de la convergencia digital. adComunica, 5, 23-36. https://doi.org/10.6035/2174-0992.2013.5.3

Solana, D. (2010). Postpublicidad. Reflexiones sobre una nueva cultura publicitaria en la era digital (2ª ed.). Barcelona: Doubleyou.

Van-der-duff, R. (2008). The impact of the Internet on media content. In l. Kung, R.G. Picard & R. Towse (Eds.), The Internet and Mass Media. London: Sage. https://doi.org/10.4135/9781446216316.n4

We are Social & Hootsuite (Ed.)(2018). Digital in 2018: Essential insight into Internet, social media, mobile ans ecommerce ise aroubd the world. We are Social & Hootsuite. http://bit.ly/2O2VJJW

Zenith Media (Ed.)(2018). Advertising expenditure forecasts March 2018. Executive summar. http://bit.ly/2oVU2D3

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/03/19
Accepted on 31/03/19
Submitted on 31/03/19

Volume 27, Issue 1, 2019
DOI: 10.3916/C59-2019-10
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Views 2
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?