Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Individuals of all ages are inevitably affected by today’s technology. The main purpose of this study is to explore the objectives of 8th grade students related to the utilization of multimedia instruments ranging from personal computers to the Internet use while they are doing their homework. Specifically, it tries to find out whether there is a significant relationship between «for what purposes 8th graders use multimedia tools» and «which personal traits are reinforced while doing homework with multimedia tools?», where gender differences were also taken into consideration in the analysis of the related items in the questionnaire form. The population of the study is made up of 435 students who were randomly selected from five secondary schools in the city of Istanbul, Turkey. As a data collection method, a questionnaire form with a set of related research questions was used. Findings from the study show that 8th graders in their use of multimedia platforms are provided with a more interactive and independent learning environment where they can find more learning aids while accomplishing their homework objectives. Gender-based evidence from the study shows that digitally, male students are more active and they exploit the fun side of homework more compared to their female counterparts.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Learning is a multi-faceted and longitudinal process. When we think of real performers and participants of a learning process from a wider perspective, we find teachers and students that are supposed to play collaborative and interactive roles in that process. The environments in which learning and teaching take place and the materials utilised should also be given a great attention. So, what about the question of homework? Often regarded as intermittent task, homework is a reinforcement or extra load on students’ shoulders that they have to take home and which they often pretend to do for the sake of their parents’ or teachers’ satisfaction.

Homework is a valuable instrument that contributes to the development of children’s education and knowledge. It can be considered as a sort of out-of-school learning. It is believed that homework has not yet received the serious attention that it deserves in the research literature. School systems have to give serious attention both to increasing awareness of homework motivation and preferences in children and in parents and to equipping both children and parents with the information and techniques necessary to accommodate homework tasks to these preferences as well as their motivation levels and sources (Milgram & Hong, 2000). It is obvious that schools should promote a better understanding of homework. In this respect, homework and its overt, essential role in the instructional process needs to be examined more closely to see whether it is located inside or outside the learning and teaching circle.

The relationship between homework and technological aids has often been neglected. Homework is often perceived as an issue that directly and solely relates to a task to be completed outside school. In that case, its process and completion are little observed. In fact, technological developments provide a wide range of means for facilitating homework completion. Whether new instructional methods change or even broaden children’s learning styles is a question often raised by technological advances. The concrete walls of old libraries have fallen and today’s libraries offer immense virtual spaces that are full of usable data for learners to prepare their homework or projects. The increasing dominance of information and communication technologies in locations such as homes and schools has also promoted students’ use of these tools for their homework. Consequently, a new approach to homework completion has been adopted and it has been affecting all the trends from past to present. This is an issue that supports significant focal points to study the relationship between technology and homework regarding students’ switching goals targeted at homework and also homework planning and organization in which innovative aids are exploited more efficiently. In addition to the importance given to homework, particular attention to young learners’ new homework trends would be of a greater concern to study where gender stands out to be more than a demographic value. It might redraw the lines in-between.

2. Literature review

2.1. Homework

Often considered to be extra-curricular activity, homework is a strong tool aiding the advancement of children’s education and knowledge. Not having yet received the merited attention in the research literature, homework is a kind of learning often completed outside school. Contrary to widespread popular beliefs, current studies point out that homework is not a single activity assigned to students, it is rather an interaction including many other factors in the process.

As stated by Marzano, Pickering and Pollock (2001), homework and similar activities are instructional techniques that teachers are quite familiar with. In presenting homework to students, teachers provide opportunities for students to deepen their understanding and improve their skills relative to the content. Appropriately used, homework can pave the way to significant improvement in academic achievement.

Yan (2003), in his study on difference of age in understanding the social complexity of the Internet, suggests that children start to understand the Internet as a complicated tool cognitively and socially between the ages of 9 and 12. As students get older, they develop more positive attitudes towards consuming new media technologies. They use especially the internet and other computer mediated tools in doing and organizing their homework. Furthermore, Kupperman and Fishman (2001) point out that as the number of K-12 students who log onto to the Internet at home and at school increases, students, families, and schools gain more potential to use this resource in new ways.

Regarding the gender differences in terms of regarding type of homework performances, findings in a study conducted by Altun (2008) demonstrate that students (70%) had positive attitudes towards online homework assignments. In addition to that, male students tend to use online homework assignments more effectively and practically than their female counterparts. On the other hand, the study also shows that female students are more attentive as far as ethical issues are concerned.

Smolira (2008) studied student perceptions concerning online homework assignments in an introductory finance class and found that, in general, students felt that compared to traditional homework assignments that are turned in to the instructor, online homework was more preferable. In addition, the study also found that homework assignments increased students’ understanding of the material and the time they spent in preparing for the class. In that context, learners’ perceptions of the role of homework and technology are changing. In addition, assignments and responsibilities adopted during this new learning process are also becoming more interconnected. Blended with technology, homework assignments are reshaped in a way that learners enjoy and exploit more aspects of a learning process taken outside school walls. Thus, thanks to multimedia tools, students are encouraged to immerse themselves in a more exploratory activity.

In most learning systems across the world, homework is meant to be a «take away» and «bring it back» task. However, homework is meant to be a positive experience motivating children to learn. Contrary to the popular belief, tasks assigned as homework should not be regarded as a punishment. Over the last ten years, studies on homework have started to concentrate on the relationship between homework and student achievement, and they have made the case much stronger and more effective for assigning homework. The question of whether homework actually enhances students’ academic achievement is often supported by various findings. A large number of teachers and parents agree that homework develops students’ initiative and responsibility and it also meets the expectations of students, parents, and the public (Milbourne & Haury, 1999). The case against homework displays some global facts. According to this, countries such as Japan, Denmark, and the Czech Republic with the highest scoring students on achievement tests have teachers who give little homework to their students. However, students in Greece, Thailand, and Iran have some of the worst average scores. Teachers from these countries assign a lot of homework (Bennett & Kalish, 2006). It seems that controversy over pros and/or cons of assigning homework will last a long time and it seems that this issue will further cause different discussions in the literature.

2.2. Technology use and homework

Developments in technology allow people to ascertain whether new teaching methods change or make children’s learning style more comprehensive. As a result of computer-assisted learning, as reported in some studies, there is a change in learning style. Students’ use of the internet and other computer-based communication tools for their homework will increase as such tools become more common in homes. The ways families make use of computer technology for educational purposes has already become an area of research. For completing their homework assignments, students have already been using computer technology such as for searching web sites and using CD-ROMs for research projects, communicating with peers and experts through the Internet, and using the computer as a tool for writing and graphs. Using computer technology systematically for homework design provides students with many other exciting possibilities for individualization.

Using technology in the classroom for increasing student achievement is a topic influencing educational literature today. However, there is little evidence for the improvement in homework assignments resulting from the use of technologies, in both the short- and long-term. In order to provide extra practice to students, regardless of individualized needs for such practices, teachers often assign homework. Homework, in turn, is often regarded by students as nothing more than «busy work» and it is therefore deemed unimportant for their learning. Technology can be used for changing these two types of homework from paper-and-pencil «chores» or «busy work» to motivating learning opportunities which extend classroom learning into the home. In the past, stressing a student’s personal abilities and interests with regard to homework has been a slightly worrying task. Most teachers had little time or energy to assign individualized homework assignments which met student needs. In fact, all the students, regardless of their individual instructional needs, were often given the same assignment to complete, which resulted in the «busy work» perception. Instructors can now have the role of «assigner and designer» of the homework rather than «facilitator» in the homework reinforcement process while they are using technology. Instead of asking that all students fulfil a specified generic assignment, the teacher can ask students to use technology to practise the skills or display the knowledge learned. When the use of technology is extended to the home by assigning meaningful homework, three goals are accomplished. Firstly, meaningful homework assignments which were designed to meet the individual reinforcement needs of students are encouraged. Secondly, practice of important technology skills helping students further than the accomplishment of the homework itself is maintained. And thirdly, students are provided with fun and engaging homework activities (Zisow, 2000). In that sense, homework can be likened to a fruitful tree with numerous branches.

For discovering varied information, the internet serves as an effective, direct, and new method. In addition, for personalizing homework and supporting the participation of families in the homework process, the internet can be accessed at the convenience of its users whom it serves as an interactive tool (Salend, Duhaney & Anderson, 2004).

Results from a study on ungraded homework versus graded homework online by Allain & Williams (2006), show that there are no significant differences in conceptual understanding. It was also reported by students that when online homework was graded, they spent more time studying course materials outside of class. As Aksut, Kankilic and Altunkaya (2008) point out in their study, students have difficulties while they do their homework at Internet cafés. Results from the study also show that their teachers do not have the full ability or the skill to use information technologies. Furthermore, as recently put forward by new regulations, school and public libraries do not fulfil the needs for «performance homework». In light of schools’ technological renovation, their study also draws attention to the fact that if intensive training on information and education technology use is given to teachers, their students’ homework performance will also be positively affected.

In their study Cakiroglu, Akkan and Kosa (2008) state that although using another person’s idea or a part of his or her work and pretending that it is your own was defined as plagiarism, students still did not hesitate to copy and paste from the internet while preparing homework and projects. Excessive and uncontrolled use of such tools carries various risks for both students and parents.

Also described in Kodippili and Senaratne’s (2008) study with some interesting findings, such risks should be considered as a failure. This was based on inferences that computer-generated interactive mathematics homework can be more influential than a conventional teacher-graded homework. These inferences can be listed as small sample size, lack of complete random assignment of participants and failure to manage indirect influences. Tutorial help from the school and the effect of gender and age as variables can be considered among such influences. Such obstacles may create doubts as to whether parents or teachers can suggest computer-generated homework preparation without any restrictions. It seems that students enjoy and consume not only innovative instruments but also ones they have fun with. Concluding the subject of online versus traditional homework, Mendicino, Razzaq and Heffernan (2009) found that when students are given computer feedback, they learned significantly more than when they are doing traditional paper-and-pencil homework. When the size of the effect is considered, giving web-based homework if students have an access to the equipment needed may be worth the cost and effort. For this, schools which implemented one-to-one computing programs can be given as a good example.

3. Material and method

In the study, a Chi-Square Independence Test was used in order to study the relationship among qualitative variables as the scale for variables is nominal. After the collection of the questionnaire data, related data for this study were analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).

3.1. Technique for data collection and the properties of the sample

Students answered a set of questions in the questionnaire which included respectively gender, for what purposes 8th graders use multimedia tools and which personal traits are reinforced while doing homework with multimedia tools; and how well, quickly and punctually they can plan, organize and do their homework. The study sample included 435 8th grade students from secondary schools in the city of Istanbul, Turkey. A more advanced grade was chosen for the study due to the fact that students in this grade are more likely to have better computer literacy. It was also assumed that such students are more likely to benefit from technological tools in a more efficient way.

In terms of gender, in the study, the percentages of male and female students were 48.7% and 51.3% respectively. For data assessment process regarding gender, this ratio is believed to maintain an equally targeted balance in the distribution of participants. The study examined which of the following six positive personality traits were reinforced through the use of multimedia tools for homework: 1) Sharing 2) Collaboration 3) Researching 4) Self-confidence 5) Creativity 6) Communication. Although not shown in tables here, the frequency for each choice has the following results: 92.2%of the students think that using multimedia tools while doing homework helps them gain self-confidence followed by 88.7% for collaboration, 82.1% for communication, 78.4% for sharing, and 75.9% for creativity. 16.1% of students reported that multimedia tools did not help them develop their research skills.

4. Results

4.1. Goals of multimedia use and personal traits reinforced

Findings related to the relationship between the questions «for what purposes do 8th graders use multimedia tools?» and «which personal traits (sharing, collaboration, self-confidence, creativity and communicativeness) are reinforced while doing homework with multimedia tools?» were given as Chi-Square Test results in table 1 below.


Draft Content 944961924-32647-en055.jpg

Table 1 shows that there is a significant relationship between chat and sharing at 5% level (sig=,006). This data shows that students are most likely to realize their sharing through chat in an interactive way. In terms of homework requirements whose guidelines were specified by their teachers, students are expected to communicate with their friends in order to exchange valuable information while completing their tasks. This would be a pre-planned conversation. Online chat tools could serve as a valuable asset for collaborative tasks. In that sense, as homework is often considered to be an individual task, the data set above yields results that refute this classical understanding of homework as a single-person task.

As for chat and collaboration, data from table 1 shows that there is significance at 5% level (sig=,007), which can be interpreted as «students tend to collaborate more during chat as they are more likely to be prepared and relaxed».

Data related to the relationship between chat and collaboration supports the data related to the relationship between chat and communicativeness in that a collaborative chat also may help students’ confidence level increase. Holding a conversation on an online chat platform might encourage students to express themselves better as there is less social and environmental pressure from their peers or teachers. Thus, gelatophobic (fear of being laughed at) effects are minimized. In other words, when students are immersed in multimedia-aided tasks, they are likely to develop, improve, and demonstrate more of their productive and reflective sides by feeling that they possess more or fuller control over what they are doing. This may result from the fact that when left alone to tackle numerous configurations, younger students are more likely to feel more confident and at ease, and challenged; as the more they explore and exploit, the more they seem to enjoy technological instruments.

As we see in table 1, students’ self-confidence increases as they feel more comfortable and liberated in producing more creative ideas during chat.

As for chat and communicativeness, data from table 1 shows that there is significance at 5% level (sig=,006). As doing homework often requires group work as assigned by their teachers, students tend to get themselves involved in interactive communication. Altogether, it can be inferred that online conversation is supportive of interactivity and creativity.

As for the relationship between gaming and personal traits such as sharing, collaboration, self-confidence, and creativity, table 2 provides the related significance levels.


Draft Content 944961924-32647-en056.jpg

In that sense, it is noticeable that there is a significant relationship between gaming and sharing at 5% level (sig=,002).This means while doing their homework online, students find it as enjoyable and as entertaining as playing games.

It is also seen that data regarding the relationship between gaming and collaboration supports the data related to the relationship between gaming and sharing in that students tend to collaborate online more as a part of their online gaming tools. Team games have become very popular among children. These make their online participation, interaction, and communication more collaborative.

As students use the internet, they happen to find more opportunities for self-realization, which reinforces self-confidence as well. The relationship for this was found significant at 5% level (sig=,002). Data for the relationship between gaming and creativity (sig=,006) show that as most games include various interactive tools that require development strategies, students’ creativity is promoted significantly. A digital game can often be as challenging, time consuming and procedural as homework itself. It is a well-known fact that homework assignments include various tasks that often require research. For that reason, to better understand the relationship between research and personal traits (collaboration, self-confidence and communication), table 3 provides the related significance levels.


Draft Content 944961924-32647-en057.jpg

As shown in table 3, data concerning the relationships between research and personal traits such as collaboration, self-confidence and communication show that using multimedia tools with the aim of research reinforces collaboration and communicativeness, which also help students build more self-confidence for group work and self-regulation as they start searching the information they have been looking for. Put into practice in the elementary classroom, multimedia-assisted homework activities help students in three ways. These are learning self-regulatory and time-management skills, developing self-efficacy, and learning to self-reflect on their performance. In addition to research and personal traits relationships, data related to the relationship between doing homework and creativity and data related to doing homework and communicativeness show that doing homework using multimedia tools requires the use of multi-skills and this enables students to reveal and improve their personal traits. Collaborative homework assignments support interactivity and creativity. Thus, communication among students is fostered in a creative way.

4.2. Goals of multimedia use and homework processing

Table 4 shows that there is a significant relationship between using multimedia for conducting research and homework at the 5% level. Those who use multimedia tools for research can plan their homework better through digital organizers such as word-processor, paint brush, PowerPoint etc. It should not be forgotten that planning is an essential part of research and exploration, as is homework.


Draft Content 944961924-32647-en058.jpg

Accordingly, students who use multimedia tools for research can plan their homework significantly better through visual and auditory tools. This is because multimedia resources offer various and numerous applications that are hardly available in traditional homework that is solely dependent on limited aids.

4.3. Relationship between use of multimedia and gender differences

Finally, gender differences often play a discriminatory role in many studies and such differences may reflect interesting results concerning the general perspective of a study.


Draft Content 944961924-32647-en059.jpg

As in table 5, overall data from the study show that male students use multimedia tools more for fun and gaming. As for personal traits improved by doing homework through multimedia tools, related data shows that male students’ collaboration and sharing skills are comparatively more developed. This also supports the finding that male students use multimedia tools predominantly for fun and gaming.

5. Discussion and conclusion

Earliest investigations show that no research found any kind and amount of benefit to assigning homework in elementary school. Furthermore, not even a positive correlation between, having younger children do some homework versus none, or more homework versus less, and any measure of achievement was found (Kohn, 2012). In this respect, multimedia-assisted homework assignment in this study is thought to serve as a new supplementary and interactive tool for young learners rather than an instrument to maintain complete and absolute achievement for the satisfaction of either parents or instructors. This draws a line between the traditional concept and understanding of homework performance and the one supported by highly interactive digital platforms. It is obvious that homework should engage students in independent learning. This could be achieved through pursuing knowledge individually and imaginatively as students investigate, research, write, design, and make. As stated by related research, either in its current format or with some changes, over 70% of students using online homework would be willing to reuse it (Brewer, 2009).

Our study produced a three-dimensional view of the issue of homework. These are young learners’ relationship with homework, learners’ autonomy and gender factors in the related process. Overall data from our study support the assertion that use of multimedia tools helps students develop their independence as a learner when they are given more responsibility for their own learning as students are generally found to be receptive to its use. Technology acts a catalyst for an interactive and collaborative accomplishment of homework. Multimedia-aided homework performance fosters communication among students through online chat and games. In addition to this, digital organizers and online tools help students both develop and improve exploratory research skills. This data is also supported in a study by Richards-Babb, Drelick and Henry (2011), where they found those students’ online homework attitudes were positive in general. A large majority of students view online homework favourably (80.2%), as worth the effort (83.5%), relevant (90.5%), challenging (83.4%), and thought provoking (79.0%). Eggers, Wooten and Childs (2008) also found that fifty-three percent of students believed that online homework use enhanced the quality of their study time and 55% believed that it led to a greater understanding of the topics and problems.

Finally, findings from our study also show that male students use multimedia tools mostly for fun and gaming. Compared to their female counterparts, male students tend to share more by using multimedia tools for doing homework.

However, as also stated in a related study, for both male and female students, online homework provides a time- and cost-effective means to enhance pedagogy in large classes (Richards-Babb & Jackson, 2011).

We have no evidence to support online homework performance over traditional hand-graded homework. However, the study suggests that in terms of traditional homework, girls do more out of school homework than boys at both 10th and 12th grade (Mau & Lynn, 2000). Therefore, it would be appropriate to remind readers that such a comparison could further highlight the basics of our study. In addition, no data was collected in this study which would provide insight into teachers’ and parents’ concerns about using online homework. It is likely that teachers and parents would have views similar to or different from those expressed by the students in this study. This study, as limited to a small group of students, was expected to provide enthusiasm and inspiration for related studies in the future from a multi-dimensional point of view.

Note

Extensive dataset as an extension of the current one can be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1097568.

References

Aksut, M., Kankilic, E.G. & Altunkaya, F. (2008). The Attitudes of Elementary and Secondary School Students towards Internet Use while they are doing their Homework. (http://goo.gl/SvqPPO) (15-03-2014).

Allain, R. & Williams, T. (2006). The Effectiveness of Online Homework in an Introductory Science Class. Journal of College Science Teaching, 35(6), 28-30 (http://goo.gl/tCJlds) (12-03-2014).

Altun, E. (2008). 6th 7th and 8th Graders’ Attitudes towards Online Homework Assignments Sites. The Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology, 7, 4, 5-17 (http://goo.gl/f2Euj1) (02-04-2014).

Bennett. S. & Kalish, N. (2006). The Case against Homework: How Homework is Hurting our Children and what we can do about it (pp. 259). New York: Crown Publishers.

Brewer, D.S. (2009). Effects of Online Homework on Achievement and Self Efficacy of College Algebra Students. (http://goo.gl/d3qORm) (23-06-2014).

Cakiroglu, Ü., Akkan, Y. & Kosa, T. (2008). The Effect of Internet about Plagiarism during Homework Preparing Period (http://goo.gl/4TA11A) (11-02-2014).

Eggers, J.D., Wooten, T. & Childs, B. (2008). Evidence on the Effectiveness of on-line Homework College. Teaching Methods & Styles Journal, 4, 5, 9-16. (http://goo.gl/sK2Oh3) (21-04-2014).

Kodippili, A. & Senaratne, D. (2008). Is Computer-generated Interactive Mathematics Homework more Effective than Traditional Instructor-graded Homework? British Journal of Educational Technology, 39, 5, 928-932. (DOI: http://doi.org/fw9f9s).

Kohn, A. (2012) Homework: New Research suggests it may be an Unnecessary Evil. (http://goo.gl/sDYaB) (25-06-2014).

Kupperman, J. & Fishman, B.J. (2001). Academic, Social, and Personal Uses of the Internet: Cases of Students from an Urban Latino Classroom. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 34, 2, 189-215 (DOI: http://doi.org/tkr).

Marzano, R.J., Pickering, D.J. & Pollock, J.E. (2001). Classroom Instruction that Works. Research-Based Strategies for Increasing Student Achievement. (pp. 60). Alexandria, VA (USA): Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development.

Mau, W. & Lynn, R. (2000). Gender differences in Homework and test scores in Mathematics, Reading and Science at Tenth and Twelfth Grade. Journal of Psychology, Evolution & Gender, 2, 2, 119-125, (DOI: http://doi.org/b2vs94).

Mendicino, M., Razzaq, R. & Heffernan, N.T. (2009). A Comparison of Traditional Homework to Computer-Supported Homework. Journal of Research on Technology in Education 41, 3, 331-359. (DOI: http://doi.org/tng).

Milbourne, L.A. & Haury, D.L. (1999). Helping Students with Homework in Science and Math (http://goo.gl/dWq6cY) (12-02-2014).

Milgram, R.M. & Hong, E. (2000). Homework Motivation & Learning Preference. (pp. 4). Westport, CT (USA): Greenwood Publishing Group, Incorporated.

Richards-Babb, M. & Jackson, J.K. (2011). Gendered Responses to Online Homework Use in General Chemistry. Journal of Chemistry Education Research and Practice, 12, 409-419 (DOI: http://doi.org/bwcd5h).

Richards-Babb, M., Drelick, J. & Henry, Z. (2011). Online Homework, Help or Hindrance? What Students Think and how they Perform. Journal of College Science Teaching, 40, 4, 81-93. (http://goo.gl/bsPo66) (15.06.2014).

Salend, J.S., Duhaney, D. & Anderson, D.J. (2004). Using the Internet to Improve Homework Communication and Completion. Journal of Teaching Exceptional Children, 36, 3, 64-73 (http://goo.gl/HYzMLO) (09-03-2014).

Smolira, C.J. (2008). Student Perceptions of Online Homework in Introductory Finance Courses Journal of Education for Business, 84, 2, 90-95. (DOI: http://doi.org/c3vm9c).

Yan, Z. (2003). Age Differences in Children’s Understanding of the Complexity of the Internet. Journal of Developmental Psychology, 26, 4, 385-396. (DOI: http://doi.org/ct239m).

Zisow, M.A. (2000). Teaching Style and Technology. Journal of Tech Trends, 44, 4, 36-38. (DOI: http://doi.org/cr5pq8).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Las personas de todas las edades se ven inevitablemente afectadas por la tecnología de hoy. El principal propósito de este estudio es analizar en los estudiantes de octavo grado la relación entre los cambios experimentados en la utilización de los instrumentos multimedia y el uso de los ordenadores personales e Internet mientras están haciendo sus deberes. En concreto, se trata de averiguar si existe una relación significativa entre «para qué fines los estudiantes de octavo grado usan herramientas multimedia» y «qué rasgos personales se refuerzan mientras hacen los deberes con herramientas multimedia», y esto, teniendo también en cuenta las diferencias de género en el análisis de las partidas recogidas en el formulario de preguntas. La población del estudio se compone de 435 estudiantes elegidos aleatoriamente de cinco escuelas secundarias en la ciudad de Estambul, en Turquía. El método utilizado para la recolección de datos consistió en un cuestionario con preguntas relacionadas con la investigación. Los hallazgos del estudio evidencian que los estudiantes de octavo nivel que utilizan las plataformas multimedia reflejan un ambiente de aprendizaje más independiente e interactivo en el que encuentran un respaldo mayor mientras realizan sus tareas. Atendiendo a la perspectiva de género, el estudio muestra que, digitalmente, los estudiantes masculinos son más activos y desarrollan más el lado divertido de las tareas que sus compañeras.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

El aprendizaje es un proceso multifacético y longitudinal. Cuando pensamos en los auténticos actores y participantes de un proceso de aprendizaje desde una perspectiva amplia, nos encontramos con profesores y estudiantes que supuestamente juegan un papel de colaboración e interacción en ese proceso. Los entornos en los que el aprendizaje y la enseñanza tienen lugar y los materiales utilizados para ello también deben recibir una gran atención. Entonces, ¿qué pasa con el tema de la tarea? A menudo considerado como un medio intermitente, la tarea es un refuerzo o carga extra sobre los hombros de los estudiantes que tienen que llevar a casa y que a menudo pretenden hacer con la ayuda de sus padres o la satisfacción de los profesores.

La tarea es un instrumento valioso que contribuye al desarrollo de la educación y el conocimiento de los niños. Se puede considerar como una especie de aprendizaje fuera de la escuela. Se cree que la tarea aún no ha recibido la atención necesaria que merece en la literatura de investigación. Los sistemas escolares tienen que prestarle una adecuada atención para concienciar a los niños y a los padres del interés por la tarea y para equiparles de la información y las técnicas necesarias para nivelar las tareas asignadas a la motivación y a los recursos con los que cuentan (Milgram & Hong, 2000). Es obvio que las escuelas deben promover una mejor comprensión de la tarea. En este sentido, la tarea y su papel esencial se manifiesta en el proceso de instrucción que debe ser estudiado con una mirada más atenta que entrelace el círculo de aprendizaje y enseñanza dentro y fuera de la escuela.

La relación entre la tarea y las ayudas de la tecnología ha sido a menudo ignorada ya que la tarea frecuentemente es percibida como una obligación que directa y únicamente se refiere a un deber a realizar fuera de la escuela, donde su proceso y culminación son poco observados. De hecho, los avances tecnológicos proporcionan una amplia gama de facilidades en el logro de la tarea. Una pregunta que a menudo se plantea es si los nuevos métodos de enseñanza cambian o incluso amplían los estilos de aprendizaje de los niños por los avances tecnológicos. Los muros de hormigón de las bibliotecas antiguas ya han caído. Las bibliotecas de hoy ofrecen inmensos espacios virtuales que están llenos de datos útiles para que los alumnos preparen sus tareas o proyectos. El dominio creciente de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación en la casa y en la escuela también ha fomentado el uso de estas herramientas por los estudiantes para que sus tareas no se incrementen en demasía. En consecuencia, el nuevo enfoque en la realización de la tarea también ha sido objeto de un cambio profundo que ha afectado a todas las tendencias del pasado hasta el momento actual. Este es un tema que sostiene los puntos focales claves para estudiar la relación entre la tecnología y la tarea en cuanto a los objetivos de cambios en los estudiantes. Y no solo en lo que se refiere a la tarea, sino también a su planificación y organización, aspectos donde las ayudas innovadoras son aprovechadas de una manera más eficiente. Pero además de la importancia atribuida al nuevo enfoque de las tareas en los estudiantes jóvenes, sería de mayor interés un estudio donde el género se destaque por ser algo más que un valor demográfico. Esto permitiría trazar puntos de unión entre los dos aspectos.

2. Revisión de la literatura

2.1. Tarea

A menudo considerada como una actividad exterior, la tarea es una herramienta fuerte que ayuda al avance de la educación y el conocimiento de los niños. Al no haber recibido todavía la atención merecida en la literatura de investigación, la tarea se considera un tipo de aprendizaje realizado normalmente fuera de la escuela. Como señalan algunos estudios, la tarea no es una sola actividad asignada a los estudiantes. Según la creencia común, es más bien una participación que incluye a muchos otros actores en el proceso.

Para Marzano, Pickering y Pollock (2001), la tarea y actividades similares son técnicas de enseñanza con las que los profesores están muy familiarizados. Al presentarlas previamente a sus estudiantes les proporcionan habilidades y oportunidades para una comprensión más profunda de su contenido. Usada de forma adecuada, la tarea puede allanar el camino para una mejora significativa en el rendimiento académico.

Yan (2003), en su estudio sobre la diferencia de edad en la comprensión de la complejidad social de Internet, sugiere que los niños comienzan a entender Internet como una herramienta complicada cognitiva y socialmente entre 9 y 12 años. Pero a medida que los estudiantes crecen, desarrollan actitudes más positivas hacia el consumo de nuevas tecnologías de los medios. Utilizan sobre todo Internet y otras herramientas computarizadas para hacer y organizar sus tareas. Además, Kupperman y Fishman (2001) señalan que, como el número de estudiantes K12 que se conectan a Internet en casa y en la escuela aumenta, los estudiantes, las familias y las escuelas adquieren más potencial para utilizar este recurso en nuevas dimensiones.

Respecto a las diferencias sexuales en relación con el tipo de rendimiento en la tarea, los hallazgos en un estudio realizado por Altun (2008) demuestran que los estudiantes (70%) tenían actitudes positivas hacia las tareas en línea. Además de eso, los estudiantes de sexo masculino tienden a utilizar las tareas en línea de manera más efectiva y práctica que sus compañeras del otro sexo. Por otro lado, el estudio también muestra que las estudiantes están más atentas en lo que concierne a los problemas éticos.

Smolira (2008), quien estudió las percepciones de los estudiantes en relación con las tareas en línea en una clase de introducción a las finanzas, encontró que, en general, los estudiantes sentían preferencia por las tareas en línea, en comparación con las tareas tradicionales asignadas por el instructor. Además, el estudio también tuvo como resultado que las tareas incrementaron la comprensión de los estudiantes en la materia y el tiempo que pasaron preparando la clase. En ese contexto, la percepción de los alumnos del papel de la tarea y la tecnología es un tema con diferentes reflexiones sobre las tareas y responsabilidades adoptadas durante el proceso de aprendizaje. Mezcladas con la tecnología, las tareas son reformuladas de manera que los alumnos disfrutan y aprovechan más aspectos de un proceso de aprendizaje llevado fuera de los muros de la escuela. Así, gracias a las herramientas multimedia, pasan a sumergirse en una actividad más exploratoria.

En la mayoría de los sistemas de aprendizaje en el mundo, la tarea pretende ser una tarea para «llevar» y «volver a traer». Sin embargo, la tarea está destinada a ser una experiencia positiva que motiva a los niños a aprender. Contrariamente a la creencia popular, las tareas asignadas como deberes en casa no deben considerarse como un castigo. Durante los últimos diez años, los estudios sobre la tarea en casa comenzaron a concentrarse en la relación entre las mismas y los logros de los estudiantes, y han contribuido en gran medida a una mayor asignación de tareas de una manera más eficaz. A pesar de ello la cuestión de si la tarea realmente mejora el rendimiento académico de los estudiantes se apoya en resultados a favor y en contra. Un gran número de maestros y padres están de acuerdo en que la tarea desarrolla la iniciativa y la responsabilidad de los alumnos y que cumple también con las expectativas de los estudiantes, los padres y la opinión pública en general (Milbourne & Haury, 1999). El caso en contra de la tarea muestra algunos datos globales. De acuerdo con ello, países como Japón, Dinamarca y la República Checa, con los estudiantes con más altos puntajes en las pruebas de rendimiento, tienen profesores que ponen pocas tareas a sus estudiantes. Sin embargo, los estudiantes en Grecia, Tailandia e Irán tienen algunos de los peores promedios de puntuación. Los profesores de estos países asignan muchas tareas (Bennett & Kalish, 2006). Parece que la controversia sobre los pros y/o contras en la asignación de tareas durará mucho y se atisba que la cuestión provocará diferentes discusiones en la bibliografía al respecto.

2.2. Uso de la tecnología y la tarea en casa

Los avances en la tecnología permiten a la gente comprobar si los nuevos métodos de enseñanza cambian o hacen el estilo de aprendizaje de los niños más comprensivo. La tarea de aprendizaje asistido por ordenador, tal como se informa en algunos estudios, supone un cambio en el estilo de aprendizaje. El uso de Internet y otras herramientas de comunicación basadas en la informática, por parte de los estudiantes en su tarea, aumentará a medida que este tipo de herramientas se vuelva más común en los hogares. Las diferentes formas del uso de la tecnología informática con fines educativos en las familias ya se han convertido en un área de investigación por explorar. Para completar sus tareas escolares, los estudiantes ya han utilizado la tecnología informática como la búsqueda de sitios web, el uso de CdRoms para proyectos de investigación, la comunicación con colegas y expertos a través de Internet y el uso de la computadora como una herramienta en la escritura y la representación gráfica. El uso sistemático de la tecnología informática para el diseño de la tarea provee a los estudiantes de muchas otras interesantes posibilidades para la individualización de sus deberes.

El uso de la tecnología en el aula para aumentar el rendimiento estudiantil es un tema de actualidad que influye en la literatura educativa vigente. Por otro lado, la literatura al respecto carece prácticamente de resultados concluyentes sobre que los usos de las tecnologías mejoren las tareas tanto a corto como a largo plazo. Con el fin de proporcionar una práctica adicional a los estudiantes, independientemente de las necesidades individualizadas para tales prácticas, los profesores a menudo asignan tareas en casa. La tarea, a su vez, es considerada frecuentemente por los estudiantes como un «trabajo pesado» y, por lo tanto, tiene poca importancia en su aprendizaje. La tecnología puede ser utilizada para el cambio de estos tres tipos de tareas: de papel y lápiz, «quehaceres», o «trabajo pesado» que, originando oportunidades de aprendizaje, extiendan el aula al hogar. En el pasado, el hacer hincapié en las habilidades e intereses personales del estudiante por la tarea en casa ha sido una labor a la que se ha dedicado escasa atención. La mayoría de los maestros disponen de poco tiempo y energías para asignar tareas individualizadas que cumplan con las necesidades del estudiante. De hecho, todos los estudiantes, independientemente de sus necesidades educativas individuales, reciben a menudo la misma tarea, lo que ha originado la percepción de «trabajo pesado». Los instructores entonces toman el papel de «asignador y diseñador» de tarea en lugar de «facilitador» en el proceso de refuerzo de la tarea mientras que están utilizando la tecnología. En lugar de pedir que todos los alumnos cumplan una tarea genérica especificada, el profesor puede pedir a los estudiantes que utilicen la tecnología para practicar sus habilidades o mostrar los conocimientos aprendidos. Cuando el uso de la tecnología se extiende en el hogar mediante la asignación de tareas significativas, se logran tres metas. En primer lugar, se alienta a la asignación de tareas significativas que han sido diseñadas para satisfacer las necesidades individuales de refuerzo de los estudiantes. En segundo lugar, se mantiene la práctica de las habilidades tecnológicas fundamentales que ayudan a los estudiantes más allá de la realización de la propia tarea. Y en tercer lugar, los estudiantes cuentan con actividades de tareas divertidas y atractivas (Zisow, 2000). En ese sentido, la tarea puede asemejarse a un árbol fructífero con numerosas ramas en las que los estudiantes pueden agarrarse en un momento oportuno.

Para comunicar información variada, Internet sirve como un método eficaz, directo y nuevo. Además, para la personalización de la tarea y para apoyar la participación de las familias en el proceso de la tarea en casa, se puede acceder a Internet de acuerdo a la conveniencia de sus usuarios que la usan como una herramienta interactiva (Salend, Duhaney & Anderson, 2004).

Los resultados de un estudio de Allain y Williams (2006), sobre una tarea desarrollada en casa frente a una tarea desarrollada en casa pero en línea, muestran que no hay diferencias significativas en la comprensión conceptual. También los estudiantes informaron que cuando se desarrolló la tarea en casa en línea, pasaron más tiempo estudiando los materiales del curso fuera de la clase. Como Aksut, Kankilic y Altunkaya (2008) señalan en su estudio, los estudiantes tienen dificultades mientras hacen sus tareas en los cibercafés. Los resultados del estudio también muestran que los maestros no tienen la capacidad suficiente o la habilidad para utilizar las tecnologías de la información. Además, como la nueva regulación ha sido presentada recientemente, las escuelas y las bibliotecas públicas no cumplen con las necesidades de «rendimiento de la tarea en casa». A la luz de la renovación tecnológica de las escuelas, el estudio también llama la atención sobre el hecho de que si se da a los profesores un entrenamiento intensivo en el uso de la información y educación tecnológica, también influirá positivamente en el desempeño de las tareas.

En su estudio Cakiroglu, Akkan y Kosa (2008) afirman que aunque el usar la idea de otra persona o de una parte de su trabajo y fingir que es propio está considerado como plagio, los estudiantes no dudan en copiar y pegar de Internet cuando preparan sus tareas y proyectos. Un uso excesivo e incontrolado de este tipo de herramientas, puede acarrear diversos riesgos a los estudiantes y a sus padres.

También se describe en un estudio de Kodippili y Senaratne (2008), con algunas conclusiones interesantes, que tales riesgos se deben considerar como un error. La tarea matemática interactiva, generada por ordenador, puede ser más determinante que una tarea desarrollada en casa con un profesor convencional. Esto se puede concluir por una muestra pequeña, por la falta de una asignación aleatoria completa de participantes, o por no tener en cuenta las influencias indirectas. El tutorial de ayuda de la escuela y el efecto del género y la edad como variables pueden ser considerados entre tales influencias. Estos obstáculos formarían un lado oscuro en cuanto a si los padres o los profesores pueden sugerir la preparación de la tarea en casa generada por ordenador sin ningún tipo de restricciones. Parece que los estudiantes disfrutan y consumen no solo los instrumentos innovadores, sino también los que incluyen diversión. Concluyendo el tema de la tarea en línea frente a la tarea en casa tradicional, Mendicino, Razzaq y Heffernan (2009) encontraron que cuando los estudiantes recibieron retroalimentación por el ordenador, aprendieron mucho más que cuando hacían la tarea tradicional en casa con papel y lápiz. Si se consideran la magnitud y valor de los efectos conseguidos cuando se mandan realizar las tareas a través del ordenador, y los estudiantes tienen acceso al material necesario, el coste y el esfuerzo merecen la pena. Por ello, las escuelas que implementaron programas de ordenadores personales pueden ser tomadas como un buen ejemplo.

3. Material y método

En el estudio, se utilizó la prueba Chicuadrado de independencia con el fin de estudiar la relación entre las variables cualitativas ya que la escala de las variables es nominal. Después de la recolección del cuestionario de datos, los datos relacionados para este estudio se analizaron usando el Paquete Estadístico para las Ciencias Sociales (SPSS).

3.1. Técnica de recolección de datos y propiedades de la muestra

Los estudiantes respondieron a un conjunto de preguntas que incluía respectivamente el sexo, los fines con los que usan las herramientas multimedia en el octavo grado, qué rasgos personales son reforzados en la realización de la tarea con herramientas multimedia, así como lo bien, rápido y puntual que pueden planificar, organizar y hacer los deberes. La muestra incluyó a 435 estudiantes de octavo grado de las escuelas secundarias de la ciudad de Estambul (Turquía), escogidos al azar. La elección de un grado avanzado para el estudio se basa en el hecho de que los alumnos de este grado tienen más probabilidades de tener un mejor conocimiento de informática en comparación con los grados más bajos. También se supone que estos estudiantes tienen mayores probabilidades de beneficiarse de las herramientas tecnológicas de una manera más eficiente.

Respecto al género, en el estudio el porcentaje de estudiantes masculinos y femeninos era similar, con el 48,7% de hombres y el 51,3% de mujeres. En el proceso de evaluación de los datos de género, se considera que esta relación mantiene el equilibrio en la distribución de los participantes. En cuanto a los rasgos personales que se refuerzan en los estudiantes al hacer la tarea con herramientas multimedia, se muestran seis opciones: 1) Intercambio; 2) Colaboración; 3) Investigación; 4) Autoconfianza; 5) Creatividad; 6) Comunicación. Aunque aquí no se muestra en las tablas, la frecuencia para cada elección tiene los siguientes resultados: el 92,2% de los estudiantes piensa que el uso de herramientas multimedia al hacer la tarea les ayuda a recuperar confianza en sí mismos, seguido por la colaboración (88,7%), la comunicación (82,1%), el intercambio (78,4%) y la creatividad (75,9%). El 16,1% de los estudiantes contestaron que las herramientas multimedia no les ayudaron a desarrollar sus habilidades de investigación.

4. Resultados

4.1. Objetivos del uso de multimedia y rasgos personales reforzados

Los resultados sobre la relación entre las preguntas «con qué propósitos los alumnos de octavo utilizan herramientas multimedia» y «qué rasgos personales (intercambio, colaboración, autoconfianza, creatividad y comunicación) se refuerzan, mientras hacen la tarea con herramientas multimedia» se muestran como resultados de la prueba Chicuadrado en la tabla 1 (página anterior).


Draft Content 944961924-32647 ov-es055.jpg

Así, la tabla 1 muestra que existe una relación significativa entre el chat y el intercambio en un nivel de 5% (sig=,006). Estos datos evidencian que los estudiantes son más propensos a desarrollar su intercambio a través del chat de una manera interactiva. En cuanto a los requisitos de la tarea cuyas líneas fueron especificadas por sus profesores, los estudiantes debían comunicarse con sus amigos con el fin de intercambiar información valiosa mientras completaban sus tareas. Se trataría de una conversación preplaneada. Las herramientas de chat en línea pueden servir como un activo valioso para las tareas de colaboración. En ese sentido, ya que la tarea es a menudo considerada como una tarea individual, los resultados de los datos indicados anteriormente refutan la noción clásica sobre que la tarea en casa es una tarea de una sola persona.

En cuanto al chat y la colaboración, los datos de la tabla 1 son significativos con un nivel del 5% (sig= ,007), que se puede interpretar como «los estudiantes tienden a colaborar más en chat, ya que son más propensos a estar preparados y relajados».

Los datos sobre la relación entre chat y colaboración apoyan los datos sobre la relación entre chat y comunicación en el sentido que una charla en colaboración también puede ayudar a aumentar el nivel de confianza de los estudiantes. El mantener una conversación en una plataforma de chat en línea podría animar a los estudiantes a expresarse mejor, ya que hay menos presión social y ambiental de sus compañeros o maestros. De este modo, se reducen al mínimo los efectos fóbicos (miedo e inseguridad). En otras palabras, cuando los estudiantes están inmersos en tareas multimedia planificadas, son propensos a desarrollar, mejorar y demostrar más sus lados productivos y reflexivos al sentir que poseen un control mejor o total sobre lo que están haciendo. Esto puede deberse a que cuando se quedan solos para hacer frente a infinitas opciones, los estudiantes más jóvenes son más propensos a sentirse más confiados, desafiantes y muestran facilidad para explorarlas y sacarles partido, ya que parece que disfrutan más de los instrumentos tecnológicos.

Como vemos en la tabla 1, la autoconfianza de los estudiantes aumenta a medida que se sienten más cómodos y libres en el chat en la producción de ideas más creativas.

En cuanto al chat y comunicación, los datos de la tabla 1 muestran que existen datos significativos al nivel del 5% (sig=,006). Como hacer la tarea a menudo requiere que el trabajo en grupo sea asignado por sus maestros, los estudiantes tienden a estar envueltos en una comunicación interactiva. En conclusión, se puede inferir que la conversación en línea es un apoyo de interactividad y creatividad.

En cuanto a la relación entre el juego y los rasgos personales tales como el intercambio, la colaboración, la autoconfianza y la creatividad, la tabla 2 ofrece niveles significativos al respecto.


Draft Content 944961924-32647 ov-es056.jpg

En ese sentido, se observa que existe una relación importante entre el juego y el intercambio al nivel del 5% (sig=,002). Esto significa que los estudiantes encuentran divertido el hacer sus tareas en línea, y se entretienen como si estuvieran realizando juegos.

También se observa que los datos que relacionan el juego y la colaboración apoyan los datos de relación entre el juego y el intercambio en que los estudiantes en línea tienden a colaborar más como parte de sus herramientas de juego. Los juegos en equipo se han vuelto muy populares entre los niños de hoy en día. Esto desarrolla su nivel de participación, interacción y comunicación de forma colaborativa.

Como los estudiantes utilizan Internet, pasan a buscar más oportunidades para la autorrealización, lo que también refuerza la autoconfianza. Esta relación fue significativa en un nivel del 5% (sig=,002). Los datos de la relación entre el juego y la creatividad (sig= ,006) muestran que como la mayoría de los juegos incluyen varias herramientas interactivas que requieren estrategias de desarrollo, la creatividad de los estudiantes se promueve de manera reveladora. Un juego digital puede a menudo ser como un desafío, consumir tiempo y desarrollarse como una tarea propia. Es un hecho bien conocido que las tareas incluyen diversos quehaceres que a menudo requieren investigación. Por esa razón, para comprender mejor la relación entre la investigación y los rasgos personales (colaboración, autoconfianza y comunicación), la tabla 3 ofrece niveles significativos.


Draft Content 944961924-32647 ov-es057.jpg

Como se ofrece en la tabla 3, los datos relativos a las relaciones entre investigación y rasgos personales tales como la colaboración, la autoconfianza y la comunicación muestran que el uso de herramientas multimedia con el objetivo de investigación refuerza la colaboración y la comunicación y que también ayudan a los estudiantes a construir más autoconfianza en un grupo de trabajo y a la autonomía personal, ya que empiezan a buscar la información que precisan. La puesta en práctica en el aula del multimedia asistido con actividades de tarea ayuda a los estudiantes en tres sentidos: el aprendizaje de habilidades de autorregulación y de gestión del tiempo, el desarrollo de la autonomía personal, y la autorreflexión sobre su trabajo. Además de las relaciones entre investigación y rasgos personales, los datos que relacionan el hacer la tarea y la creatividad y los datos relativos a hacer la tarea y la comunicabilidad muestran que hacer la tarea utilizando las herramientas multimedia requiere el uso de múltiples habilidades, lo cual permite a los estudiantes mostrar y mejorar sus características personales. Las tareas colaborativas asignadas refuerzan la interactividad y la creatividad. Por tanto, la comunicación entre los estudiantes también se fomenta de manera creativa.

4.2. Objetivos del uso de multimedia y procesamiento de tareas en casa

La tabla 4 muestra que hay una relación significativa entre el uso de multimedia para la investigación y la tarea en un nivel del 5%. Aquellos que usan herramientas multimedia para investigar pueden planificar su tarea mejor a través de los organizadores digitales como el procesador de texto, PaintBrush, PowerPoint, etc. No hay que olvidar que la planificación es una parte esencial de la investigación y la exploración.


Draft Content 944961924-32647 ov-es058.jpg

Por consiguiente, los estudiantes que utilizan herramientas multimedia para la investigación pueden planificar de manera significativa su tarea mejor a través de herramientas visuales y auditivas. Esto se debe a que los recursos multimedia ofrecen diversas y numerosas aplicaciones difícilmente disponibles en la realización de la tarea de forma tradicional que únicamente contaba con recursos limitados.

4.3. Relación entre el uso de la multimedia y las diferencias de género

Por último, las diferencias de género a menudo desempeñan un papel discriminatorio en muchos estudios; tales diferencias pueden reflejar resultados interesantes sobre la perspectiva general de una investigación.


Draft Content 944961924-32647 ov-es059.jpg

Al igual que en la tabla 5, los datos generales del estudio muestran que los estudiantes varones utilizan más las herramientas multimedia para la diversión y el juego. En cuanto a las características personales mejoradas por hacer la tarea a través de herramientas multimedia, los datos muestran que las habilidades de colaboración e intercambio de los estudiantes masculinos comparativamente se desarrollan más. Esto también apoya la conclusión de que los estudiantes varones utilizan más las herramientas multimedia para la diversión y el juego.

5. Discusión y conclusión

Las investigaciones más recientes revelan que ningún estudio ha demostrado beneficio alguno en la asignación de tareas para casa en la escuela primaria. Ni tampoco se han hallado resultados comprobables para una correlación positiva entre el tener otros hijos más jóvenes que hacen algunas tareas frente a no tener ninguno, o entre tener más tareas frente a menos (Kohn, 2012). En este sentido, en el presente estudio se cree que la tarea multimedia asignada sirve como una nueva herramienta complementaria e interactiva para jóvenes estudiantes en lugar de ser un instrumento para mantener el rendimiento total y absoluto en aras de satisfacer a los padres o educadores. Esto tiende un puente entre el concepto tradicional y la comprensión del rendimiento en la tarea, y está apoyada por las plataformas digitales altamente interactivas. Es obvio que la tarea debe involucrar a los estudiantes en el aprendizaje independiente. Esto se podría lograr a través del hallazgo del conocimiento individual e imaginativo mientras que los estudiantes investigan, buscan, escriben, diseñan, hacen. Según lo declarado por una investigación al respecto, ya sea en su forma actual o con algunos cambios, más del 70% de los estudiantes que hacen tareas en línea estarían dispuestos a volver a hacerlas (Brewer, 2009).

Nuestro estudio produjo una visión tridimensional del tema de la tarea en casa. Existe una relación de los aprendices jóvenes con la tarea, los factores de género y la autonomía de los aprendices en el proceso respectivo. Los datos globales de nuestro estudio apoyan que el uso de las herramientas multimedia ayuda a los estudiantes a desarrollar su independencia como aprendices cuando se les da más responsabilidad en su propio aprendizaje ya que los estudiantes se encuentran generalmente receptivos a su uso. La tecnología actúa como un catalizador para un logro interactivo y de colaboración en las tareas.

La multimedia dirigida al rendimiento de tareas en casa fomenta la comunicación entre los estudiantes a través del chat y los juegos en línea. Además de esto, los desarrolladores digitales y herramientas en línea ayudan a los estudiantes en el proceso y mejora de las habilidades de investigación exploratoria. Estos datos también se apoyan en un estudio realizado por RichardsBabb, Drelick y Henry (2011), donde se encontraron que las actitudes de los estudiantes con tareas en casa en línea eran en general favorables. Una gran mayoría de los estudiantes ven la tarea en línea como algo positivo (80,2%), ya que vale la pena el esfuerzo (83,5%), es algo relevante (90,5%), desafiante (83,4%) y sugerente (79%). Eggers, Wooten y Childs (2008) también encontraron que el 53% de los estudiantes cree que el uso de tareas en casa en línea ha mejorado la calidad de su tiempo de estudio y el 55% cree que consiguió una mayor comprensión de los temas y problemas. Por último, los resultados de nuestro estudio muestran también que los estudiantes varones utilizan las herramientas multimedia especialmente para la diversión y el juego. En comparación con sus compañeras, los varones tienden a compartir más al usar en mayor medida las herramientas multimedia para hacer la tarea.

Sin embargo, como también se afirma en un estudio al respecto, tanto para los estudiantes varones como para las estudiantes, las tareas en línea habitualmente generan un tiempo y un entorno eficaz que mejora la pedagogía en las clases grandes (RichardsBabb & Jackson, 2011).

No tenemos ninguna evidencia para apoyar la realización de tareas en línea por encima de las tareas tradicionales a mano en casa. Sin embargo, el estudio sugiere que en lo que se refiere a la tarea tradicional, las niñas hacen más la tarea escolar fuera que los varones, tanto en los grados 10 y 12 (Mau & Lynn, 2000). Por lo tanto, sería conveniente recordar a los lectores que dicha comparación podría subrayar con más fuerza los fundamentos de nuestro estudio. Además, no se obtuvieron datos en este estudio que reflejen la preocupación de los profesores y padres sobre el uso de las tareas en línea. Es posible que los maestros y los padres tengan puntos de vista similares o diferentes a los expresados por los estudiantes en esta investigación. Este estudio, limitado a un pequeño grupo de escolares, espera proporcionar el entusiasmo y la inspiración necesarios para futuras investigaciones desde un punto de vista multidimensional.

Nota

Una extensa base de datos como ampliación de los que aquí se muestran se puede encontrar en http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1097568.

Referencias

Aksut, M., Kankilic, E.G. & Altunkaya, F. (2008). The Attitudes of Elementary and Secondary School Students towards Internet Use while they are doing their Homework. (http://goo.gl/SvqPPO) (15-03-2014).

Allain, R. & Williams, T. (2006). The Effectiveness of Online Homework in an Introductory Science Class. Journal of College Science Teaching, 35(6), 28-30 (http://goo.gl/tCJlds) (12-03-2014).

Altun, E. (2008). 6th 7th and 8th Graders’ Attitudes towards Online Homework Assignments Sites. The Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology, 7, 4, 5-17 (http://goo.gl/f2Euj1) (02-04-2014).

Bennett. S. & Kalish, N. (2006). The Case against Homework: How Homework is Hurting our Children and what we can do about it (pp. 259). New York: Crown Publishers.

Brewer, D.S. (2009). Effects of Online Homework on Achievement and Self Efficacy of College Algebra Students. (http://goo.gl/d3qORm) (23-06-2014).

Cakiroglu, Ü., Akkan, Y. & Kosa, T. (2008). The Effect of Internet about Plagiarism during Homework Preparing Period (http://goo.gl/4TA11A) (11-02-2014).

Eggers, J.D., Wooten, T. & Childs, B. (2008). Evidence on the Effectiveness of on-line Homework College. Teaching Methods & Styles Journal, 4, 5, 9-16. (http://goo.gl/sK2Oh3) (21-04-2014).

Kodippili, A. & Senaratne, D. (2008). Is Computer-generated Interactive Mathematics Homework more Effective than Traditional Instructor-graded Homework? British Journal of Educational Technology, 39, 5, 928-932. (DOI: http://doi.org/fw9f9s).

Kohn, A. (2012) Homework: New Research suggests it may be an Unnecessary Evil. (http://goo.gl/sDYaB) (25-06-2014).

Kupperman, J. & Fishman, B.J. (2001). Academic, Social, and Personal Uses of the Internet: Cases of Students from an Urban Latino Classroom. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 34, 2, 189-215 (DOI: http://doi.org/tkr).

Marzano, R.J., Pickering, D.J. & Pollock, J.E. (2001). Classroom Instruction that Works. Research-Based Strategies for Increasing Student Achievement. (pp. 60). Alexandria, VA (USA): Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development.

Mau, W. & Lynn, R. (2000). Gender differences in Homework and test scores in Mathematics, Reading and Science at Tenth and Twelfth Grade. Journal of Psychology, Evolution & Gender, 2, 2, 119-125, (DOI: http://doi.org/b2vs94).

Mendicino, M., Razzaq, R. & Heffernan, N.T. (2009). A Comparison of Traditional Homework to Computer-Supported Homework. Journal of Research on Technology in Education 41, 3, 331-359. (DOI: http://doi.org/tng).

Milbourne, L.A. & Haury, D.L. (1999). Helping Students with Homework in Science and Math (http://goo.gl/dWq6cY) (12-02-2014).

Milgram, R.M. & Hong, E. (2000). Homework Motivation & Learning Preference. (pp. 4). Westport, CT (USA): Greenwood Publishing Group, Incorporated.

Richards-Babb, M. & Jackson, J.K. (2011). Gendered Responses to Online Homework Use in General Chemistry. Journal of Chemistry Education Research and Practice, 12, 409-419 (DOI: http://doi.org/bwcd5h).

Richards-Babb, M., Drelick, J. & Henry, Z. (2011). Online Homework, Help or Hindrance? What Students Think and how they Perform. Journal of College Science Teaching, 40, 4, 81-93. (http://goo.gl/bsPo66) (15.06.2014).

Salend, J.S., Duhaney, D. & Anderson, D.J. (2004). Using the Internet to Improve Homework Communication and Completion. Journal of Teaching Exceptional Children, 36, 3, 64-73 (http://goo.gl/HYzMLO) (09-03-2014).

Smolira, C.J. (2008). Student Perceptions of Online Homework in Introductory Finance Courses Journal of Education for Business, 84, 2, 90-95. (DOI: http://doi.org/c3vm9c).

Yan, Z. (2003). Age Differences in Children’s Understanding of the Complexity of the Internet. Journal of Developmental Psychology, 26, 4, 385-396. (DOI: http://doi.org/ct239m).

Zisow, M.A. (2000). Teaching Style and Technology. Journal of Tech Trends, 44, 4, 36-38. (DOI: http://doi.org/cr5pq8).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/14
Accepted on 31/12/14
Submitted on 31/12/14

Volume 23, Issue 1, 2015
DOI: 10.3916/C44-2015-13
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 5
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?