Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Adolescent girls and boys use online networking sites differently, and girls have a higher risk of being harmed by non-adaptive use. The aim of the study was to assess the extent to which adolescents portray themselves according to gender stereotypes on their Facebook profiles. Participants were 623 Facebook users of both sexes who responded to the Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI) and the Personal Well-being Index (PWI). In the first step, the adolescents responded to the BSRI with respect to how they view a typical adult in terms of gender stereotypes. In the second step, half of them responded to the BSRI with respect to how they view themselves and the other half responded with respect to their self-presentation on Facebook. The results show that adolescents consider themselves to be less sexually differentiated than a typical adult of their own sex, both in their self-perception and their self-portrayal on Facebook. The study confirms that the psychological well-being of girls decreases considerably with age and that it is associated with a greater degree of masculinity. We conclude that adolescents produce accurate self-representations on their Facebook profiles, and both boys and girls tend to offer a less sexually differentiated self-concept and self-portrayal than that of the typical adult, with a slight preference for masculine traits; moreover, masculinity is associated with a greaterdegree of psychological well-being.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

1.1. Psychological correlates of the use of the Internet and its applications

The development of the Internet and its application has led to an exponential increase in two-way communication channels. While oral communication has remained practically unchanged, written communication has undergone a revolution, especially through social networking sites (SNS) (Carbonell & Oberst, 2015). These means of communication are increasingly present in our daily lives and although their use is expanding throughout the population, they are especially popular among teens and young adults. SNSs offer a new information format and a new communication channel. Through registering and creating a profile, users can display aspects of their identity and connect with other users, interacting in a number of ways (such as through comments, links, photos, videos, and internal chats). Despite rumors about its possible decline and disappearance (Cannarella & Spechler, 2014), Facebook, with 1,59 billion users in 2015 (Statista, 2015), is still the most popular and most used platform in the world and also in Spain (17 million users). Age of initiation to Facebook is dropping, and in general SNSs have replaced email and instant messaging as the principal focus of teens’ online activity (Garcia, López-de-Ayala, & Catalina, 2013). It is to be expected that the widespread introduction of a means of communication would impact the habits and psychological structure of users, especially among the youngest ones. This mode of communication tends to begin in adolescence, the developmental stage in which young people construct their identities through contact with their peers.

The first studies on the use of the Internet and online social networks showed a negative effect of computer-mediated communication on the psychological health of teens and young adults, a phenomenon called the Internet Paradox (Kraut & al., 1998). Further research brought nuance to this finding (Kraut & al., 2002), as results showed that these new forms of communication could also have positive effects on psychological adjustment because they allow young people to expand their social networks and satisfy their need for affiliation and self-disclosure (Spies-Shapiro & Margolin, 2014). Only 5% of teens say that the use of social networks makes them feel depressed and only 4% say that it has had a negative effect on their relationship with friends. In contrast, 10% report that using them makes them feel less depressed and 52% say that they have helped them maintain or improve their relationships (Rideout, 2012). Nevertheless, since online social networking through Facebook, Instagram, Twitter or text messaging services has become one of the main activities of teens, studies have shown that overuse or maladaptive use of these technologies has negative effects on the well-being and psychological functioning of children and adolescents (Kross & al., 2013; Sampasa-Kanyinga & Lewis, 2015) and on their academic achievement (Kalpidou, Costin, & Morris, 2011).

The use of online social networking has been identified as a potential mental health problem (Kuss & Griffiths, 2011). Recent studies suggest that negative effects depend on how young people use the technology, on certain specific practices and on the reactions of others, for example, on whether their peers offer positive or negative feedback on their profiles (Valkenburg, Peter, & Schouten, 2006). Having many Facebook friends is associated with greater subjective well-being and with presenting a positive –and honest– image of oneself (Kim & Lee, 2011). In contrast, young people with the highest levels of falsification on their profiles have fewer social abilities, lower self-esteem, higher social anxiety and higher levels of aggression (Harman, Hansen, Cochran, & Lindsey, 2005).

An important issue of interest in research on SNS is what people disclose on these sites and how they present themselves (impression management). The degree to which social network users disclose information in their interactions depends on various factors, especially on the relationship between interlocutors (Nguyen, Bin & Campbell, 2012). Gendered presentation refers to the different patterns of males and females in their online self-presentations. Taking this as a starting point, the aim of the present study was to assess adolescents’ perception of traditional gender roles and their self-perception and self-presentation on Facebook with respect to masculinity and femininity. Taking the Facebook profile as a strategic presentation of one’s ideal self, we wanted to learn whether adolescents continue to present themselves in terms of traditional gender roles and to assess whether more intense Facebook use or higher gender typicality in one’s Facebook self-presentation correlates with lower psychological well-being.

1.2. Gender differences in the use of ICTs and SNSs

Gender is an important factor in considering the possible negative consequences of the problematic use of ICTs. Multiple studies of computer-mediated communication reveal important sex differences related to the use of Internet and new technologies in general. For two major Internet applications linked to abuse, pornography and online video games, most of the people with addictions are men. In other applications and technologies, the gender ratio is more balanced, although there are gender differences in how people use the technologies. For example, men use mobile phones primarily for work, logistical matters and entertainment, while women use them primarily for establishing and maintaining social relationships (Beranuy, Oberst, Carbonell, & Chamarro, 2009).

Studies of social networks and gender show that men’s and women’s patterns of behavior are also reproduced in this means of communication. The different motives in men and women for using online social networks are parallel to their motives for using the Internet (Bond, 2009). Young women use these pages mainly for communication and self-presentation (Barker, 2009), while men mainly use them for pragmatic reasons or entertainment (Haferkamp, Eimler, Papadakis, & Kruck, 2012). Women are also more likely than men to express emotions on these applications; to self-disclose; to post more images of themselves, friends and significant others; and to change their profile pictures more often (Strano, 2008). In contrast, men are more likely to present themselves as strong, powerful, independent and having high status. According to some authors (Magnuson & Dundes, 2008), both men and women adopt self-presentations that conform to traditional codes of masculinity and femininity. According to these norms, men have been considered more instrumental and less emotional, and women have been considered more expressive. Women’s online self-portrayals may also lead to self-objectification (de-Vries & Peter, 2013). Most authors conclude that Facebook helps identity construction while also maintaining traditional gender stereotypes (Linne, 2014). More women than men also appear to suffer from the inappropriate use of Facebook. Women are more likely to indicate that they lose sleep because of their Facebook activity, that their activity causes them stress, that images on FB cause negative self body image, and that they feel addicted (Thompson & Lougheed, 2012).

1.3. Gender stereotypes

The construction of gender identity is an ongoing process, which begins in early childhood. The influence of family members, peers and the media converge to impact young people’s self-concept (Lieper & Friedman, 2007). The process culminates in adolescence, when gender role identification is more pronounced (Galambos, Almeida, & Petersen, 1990). Unlike the biological category «sex», the term «gender» is understood and explained through social role theory (Eagly, 1987) as a social construction that emerges through a process of ongoing learning related to behaviors, perceptions and expectations that define what it means to be a man or a woman. Gender stereotypes are composed of a series of characteristics associated with women or men (López-Zafra, García-Retamero, Diekman, & Eagly, 2008). In this sense, gender roles are not simply descriptive or explanatory categories (López-Sáez, Morales, & Lisbona, 2008); rather, they are also prescriptive and they refer to what an individual perceives about how others expect him or her to behave. Therefore, men and women are subject to different normative expectations, and those factors can lead to gender differences in behavior.

Studies demonstrate that men are expected to be more agentic (task-oriented, assertive, controlling, independent and unemotional), and that women are expected to be more communicative and oriented towards interpersonal relationships (Guadagno, Muscanell, Okdie, Burk, & Ward, 2011). Nonetheless, typically masculine and typically feminine traits –that is, masculinity and femininity– have changed in recent decades, and traditional masculine and feminine roles are losing importance (Holt & Ellis, 1998; López-Zafra & al., 2008; (Martínez-Sánchez, Navarro-Olivas, & Yubero-Jiménez, 2009).

However, while women now tend to assign themselves traits considered typically masculine, adopting an androgynous self-perception, men do not do the same with feminine traits (López-Sáez & al., 2008). It seems that typically feminine characteristics are less socially desirable, while masculine traits are more socially desirable. Therefore, girls want to display more masculinity while boys do not want to display more femininity. It has also been observed that the internalization of gender stereotypes is more ingrained in adolescent boys than in adolescent girls (Colás & Villaciervos, 2007).

Gender and gender roles have important psychological correlates. While in earlier studies conduct congruent with one’s own gender was considered to be psychologically adaptive (Whitley & Bernard, 1985; Williams & D’Alessandro, 1994), later studies showed that either masculinity (Woo & Oei, 2006) or androgyny (high masculinity and high femininity) correlates positively to psychological adjustment (Williams & D’Alessandro, 1994). However, the results of other studies are not consistent with this finding (Woodhill & Samuels, 2003). Moreover, neither masculinity nor femininity presents itself as uniformly positive. In a study performed with adult participants, masculinity predicted less depression but more antisocial problems and substance use (Lengua & Stormshak, 2000). Traditional gender stereotypes are generated and maintained by social structure and an individual will conform or not to them depending on the response that he or she receives. Back & al. (2010) emphasize the fact that online social networks integrate several sources of personal information that act as a mirror of the different environments of the person, such as private thoughts, facial images, and social conduct (both their own and those of others). In this sense, the person receives and generates different displays depending on and in accordance with the peer group. Bailey, Steeves, Burkell, & Regan (2013) have argued that SNSs represent an environment of elevated public surveillance, which makes both girls and boys present themselves more in accordance with gender norms than what they would do in face-to-face contexts.

Social context shapes identity, including gender identity. And because stereotypes are a fundamental element of gender identity, it follows that Internet social networks also influence it. From the perspective of gender, the necessity of presenting oneself in a certain way may be different for girls and for boys. It is possible that gender stereotypes play a more important role in girls’ virtual self-presentation than in their self-presentation in face-to-face social contexts, and this may increase their psychological discomfort. One study found that girls on Facebook wanted to be nicer, sexier, stronger and more objective, while boys didn’t desire any change (Renau, Carbonell, & Oberst, 2012). Gender roles and stereotypes have a fundamental role in gender identity and in shaping the personality of pre-teens and teens, and SNSs have great relevance today in the identity formation of young people (Linne, 2014). For these reasons we wanted to investigate the presence of gender stereotypes on these networks and their implications for psychological well-being.

We established the following hypotheses:

• H1: As outlined before, earlier studies have shown a decrease in self-attributed gender stereotypes (Martínez-Sánchez, Navarro-Olivas, & Yubero-Jiménez, 2009). Therefore we expected participants to present themselves as less masculine or feminine than their perception of a typical male or female.

• H2: It has also been shown (Ruble & Martin, 1998) that teens’ awareness of gender roles increases with age. Therefore, we expected the participants to perceive the typical adult as increasingly more stereotyped, and we also expected their self-perception scores to increase in gender typicality.

• H3: Previous studies have shown that Facebook profiles accurately represent the personality of their users and do not display self-idealization (Back & al., 2010; Gosling, Augustine, Vazire, Holtzman, & Gaddis, 2011). Therefore, we expected adolescents’ online self-presentations to be likewise accurate in terms of gender stereotypes, i.e. there should be no difference between the scores based on self-perception and those based on self-presentation in their Facebook profiles.

• H4: As found in earlier studies (Spies Shapiro & Margolin, 2014), we expected girls to make more use of FB and have more FB friends, and also to show less psychological well-being than boys.

• H5: According to studies on gender roles (e.g. Woo & Oei, 2006), masculinity in online profiles should have a positive association with psychological well-being, whereas femininity should not.

2. Method

2.1. Participants


Draft Content 648075048-51234-en033.jpg

The participants were 623 secondary school students (331 females) aged between 12 and 16 (1st to 4th year of ESO, which are the first four years of Spanish compulsory secondary schooling), from different Spanish schools in the region of Catalonia. All participants had a personal Facebook profile under their real identity (table 1).

2.2. Instruments

Number of Facebook friends and frequency of Facebook use: participants were asked to indicate the number of Facebook friends they had as well as their frequency of FB connection, using a five-point Likert scale from 1 (once a month) to 5 (several times a day).

Sex roles: the Spanish adaptation of the Bem Sex Roles Inventory (BSRI, Páez & Fernández, 2004) was used to assess sex role stereotypes. This version of the scale consists of 18 items (adjectives or short expressions, such as «sensitive to others’ needs»), with nine in each of two dimensions corresponding to the stereotypes of masculinity and femininity in a Likert-type scale from 1 (never) to 7 (always). The BSRI offers the possibility for respondents to rate masculinity and femininity of a «typical male» and a «typical female», and then to rate the respondents self-perception of his or her gender typicality. For the «typical male», Cronbach’s a’s were =.812 for masculinity, and .817 for femininity; for the «typical female», Cronbach’s a’s were =.733 for masculinity, and .788 for femininity.

Personal well-being: the Spanish adaptation of the Personal Well-Being Index Scale (PWI; Casas & al., 2011) was used. The scale consists of seven items on a Likert scale from 1 (no satisfaction at all) to 10 (completely satisfied), each item asking for the respondent’s satisfaction in a different area in life (e.g. health, personal relationships, etc.) and yielding an overall score of personal well-being. In this study, Cronbach’s reliability index was a=.75.

2.3. Procedure

The study was approved by the funding institution and the Institutional Research Committee of the Ramon Llull University. Informed consent from school authorities and parents was obtained. Participants answered the questionnaires in a paper-and-pencil format within a classroom context. In the first step, all participants replied to the BSRI, indicating scores for what they considered to be a typical male (TM) and a typical female (TF). In a second step, half of each class answered the questionnaires in reference to themselves (condition SELF), and the other half opened their Facebook profiles on their personal computers and assessed their own profiles (condition FB) with respect to the BSRI. Finally, in the last step, all students answered the PWI.

2.4. Data analysis

The subscales for masculinity (mas) and femininity (fem) were calculated for the respondents’ perception of a typical male and a typical female (thus obtaining masTM, femTM, masTF, femTF), as well as for themselves, either in the SELF or in the FB condition (obtaining masRES, femRES). Two paired-sample t-tests were run for boys and for girls to assess the difference between the participants’ perception of themselves and a typical adult (typical female in the case of girls and typical male in the case of boys). To test the effects of gender, grade, and condition on number of Facebook friends, frequency of Facebook use, psychological well-being, masTM, femTM, masTF, femTF, masRES, femRES, a 2x4x2 MANOVA was run. Correlations between the dependent variables were calculated. As indicator of effect size, the eta-square (?2) coefficients were calculated. All data analyses were effectuated with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences SPSS version 22.


Draft Content 648075048-51234-en034.jpg

3. Results

The descriptive statistics are set out in table 2.

3.1. Results of self-presentation with respect to typical adult

Compared to their perception of a typical male, boys scored themselves as lower with respect to masculinity (t=10.718, p=.000, df=274), with respect to the typical female, girls rated themselves as lower both for masculinity (t= 7.705, p=.000, df=314) and for femininity (t=19.318, p=.000, df=318).

3.2. Effects of gender, grade and condition on the dependent variables

The results of the 2x4x2 MANOVA are shown in table 3. For the main effects, as expected, girls show higher scores in femininity, while boys rate higher in masculinity. Girls also have more Facebook friends and rate the typical female’s masculinity and femininity as higher than boys do. As for the effects of grade, the number of Facebook friends and connection time increases. Additionally, the participants’ perception of a typical female’s masculinity increases with age. For the combined effect of gender and grade, it is noteworthy that the girls’ femininity as well as their well-being decreases with age. There was no effect of the interaction of gender*condition or grade*condition, and for the interaction of all three sources there was only an effect for well-being. The finding of no combined effects for condition with respect to the respondents’ masculinity and femininity indicates that there is no difference in self-perception and self-presentation on Facebook. Therefore, for subsequent analysis, the scores of both conditions were taken together.

3.3. Correlations

Psychological well-being correlated positively with masculinity (r=.142, p<.01). Both masculinity and femininity also correlated with number of Facebook friends (r=.119, and r=.138, respectively, both with p<.01), while frequency of Facebook connection showed a correlation with femininity (r=.133, p<.01).

3.4. Additional analyses

To explore the reasons for the girls’ decreasing well-being, an additional MANOVA for gender and grade with respect to the individual items of the PWI was run. For the interaction, there were significant effects, i.e. a decrease in satisfaction in girls with respect to their health (F=3.580, p=.014, ?2=.017), to their feeling of safety (F=2.797, p=.039, ?2=.013), to their group relationships (F=4.010, p=.008, ?2=.019, and to their future (F=3.252, p=.021, ?2=.016).

4. Discussion

In this study we assessed the degree to which adolescents continue to define themselves in terms of gender stereotypes and whether their online self-presentation differs from their face-to-face self-presentation. Our results show that adolescents are aware of traditional gender stereotypes, but that they view themselves in a less stereotyped and more sexually undifferentiated way than their perception of a typical adult of their sex. These findings confirm our first hypothesis and are in line with other studies that show a change in traditional gender stereotypes among Spanish adolescents (García-Retamero, Müller, & López-Zafra, 2011; García-Vega, Robledo-Menéndez, García-Fernández, & Rico-Fernández, 2010). However, girls continue to have higher femininity scores than boys and vice versa, as found in other studies (López-Sáez & al., 2008). While García-Vega & al. (2010) found that a majority of adolescents characterized themselves as androgynous (high masculinity, high femininity), in our study there is a tendency toward a more undifferentiated profile (low masculinity, low femininity), especially for females.


Draft Content 648075048-51234-en035.jpg

The second hypothesis is partially confirmed: Participants’ perception of a typical adult also varies with sex and age: as adolescents grow older, they perceive a typical female (but not a typical male) as having more masculine attributes, i.e. it is confirmed that gender role typification increases during adolescence (Galambos, Almeida, & Petersen, 1990). Girls have a more androgynous view of a typical female than boys (higher masculinity and higher femininity). However, the girls’ own femininity decreases with age. These results suggest a tendency of girls to endorse less feminine and more masculine attributes for themselves as future adults, both in self-perception and in online self-presentation.

With respect to hypothesis 3, our results also confirm earlier findings that people present an accurate image of themselves on SNSs. The fact that there was no condition effect leads us to the conclusion that adolescents’ self-presentation on their Facebook profiles does not differ from their self-perception. This finding indicates that the participants perform honest self-presentation not only with respect to personality (Back & al., 2010), but also with respect to other dimensions related to personal attributes. We conclude that adolescents not only consider themselves to be more sexually undifferentiated with respect to gender typicality, but also want to be seen as such (Kapidzic & Herring, 2011).

Finally, the well-established finding of girls’ decreasing well-being has also been confirmed in our study, and this seems to be related to increasing concerns about their health, safety, relationships, and future (hypothesis 4). Well-being correlated positively with masculinity, whereas femininity showed no influence, a finding that confirms hypothesis 5. Thus, perceiving oneself as having more masculine (desirable?) traits is a source of well-being. The case of femininity is not so clear. It has been argued (Renau & al., 2012) that high femininity has a negative effect, i.e. a more feminine self-presentation on Facebook is related to less psychological well-being. In our study, as girls grow older they score lower in femininity but nevertheless their well-being scores also decrease.

5. Conclusions

Our results confirm tendencies in gender role changes described in earlier studies and extend these results to online profile self-presentations. Teens show congruency between their face-to-face self-perception and how they want to be seen by others online. Traditional gender stereotypes seem to blur; both sexes offer self-presentations on Facebook that are less masculine and less feminine than what they perceive to be typical people of their own sex. Our results reveal a sex difference in this area, as females’ self-presentation is even less feminine than males’ self-presentation is masculine. Also, traditional masculine attributes are more related to well-being and boys score higher for both well-being and the masculinity of their self-presentations.

Social media such as Facebook produce more opportunities for social comparison than face-to-face contexts, and thus impression management is an important aspect of online representations. SNSs foster self-promotion and narcissistic self-representation (Mehdizadeh, 2010), in addition to a need for popularity (Christofides, Muise, & Desmarais, 2009). Girls achieve these self-portrayals by strategically selecting their profile pictures (Krämer & Winter, 2008) and by displaying attractiveness (Manago & al., 2008), familial relations and emotional expressions (Tifferet & Vilnai-Yavetz, 2014).

The profile that people make public on an Internet social network acts like a mirror -a mirror that we ourselves manage- and with it we design our self-presentation (Gonzales & Hancock, 2010). Social comparison is another mechanism, since when we find ourselves in an ambiguous situation, we turn to the immediate environment for the information that we need; for example, the behavior of others. Social comparison is inevitable on online social networks. In fact, according to some authors, it is one of the reasons why users maintain profiles on such networks, because doing so helps to shape personality (Manago, Graham, Greenfield, & Salimkhan, 2008). Each time we open our profile we encounter an image of what we are projecting about ourselves, which becomes a reminder and a reaffirmation of what we are (Gonzales & Hancock, 2010). Future studies of SNSs and gender should bear this in mind. Institutional efforts, such as educational programs for promoting safer use of Facebook among adolescents in school settings (Vanderhoven, Schellens, & Valcke, 2014), should also teach adolescents about what to disclose on their profiles and how to present themselves in order to prevent possible harmful effects.

6. Limitations

This study presents some limitations. Gender stereotypes depend to a great extent on the cultural context and therefore sampling was restricted to Catalonia in order to achieve a culturally homogeneous sample. However, this might be a limitation for the generalizability of the results.

Sources of funding

This article was funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad, MINECO) with a grant for Research and Development (reference: FEM 2012-33505). No competing financial interests exist.

References

Back, M.D., Stopfer, J.M., & al. (2010). Facebook Profiles Reflect Actual Personality, not Self-idealization. Psychological Science, 21(3), 372-374. doi: http://dx.doi.org//10.1177/0956797609360756

Bailey, J.B., Steeves, V., Burkell, J., & Regan, P. (2013). Negotiating with Gender Stereotypes on Social Networking Sites: from ‘Bicycle Face’ to Facebook. Journal of Communication Inquiry, 37(2), 91-112. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0196859912473777

Barker, V. (2009). Older Adolescents’ Motivations for Social Network Site Use: The Influence of Gender, Group Identity, and Collective Self-esteem. Cyberpsychology & Behavior?: The Impact of the Internet, Multimedia and Virtual Reality on Behavior and Society, 12(2), 209-13. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cpb.2008.0228

Beranuy, M., Oberst, U., Carbonell, X., & Chamarro, A. (2009). Problematic Internet and Mobile Phone Use and Clinical Symptoms in College Students: The Role of emotional intelligence. Computers in Human Behavior, 25(5), 1.182-1.187. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2009.03.001

Bond, B.J. (2009). He Posted, She Posted: Gender Differences in Self-disclosure on Social Network sites. Rocky Mountain Communication Review, 6(2), 29-37.

Cannarella, J., & Spechler, J.A. (2014). Epidemiological Modeling of Online Social Network Dynamics. arXiv preprint arXiv:1401.4208.

Carbonell, X., & Oberst, U. (2015). Las redes sociales en linea no son adictivas. Aloma: Revista de Psicologia, Ciències de L’educació I de L’esport Blanquerna, 32(2), 13-19.

Casas, F., Coenders, G., & al. (2011). Testing the Relationship Between Parents’ and their Children’s Subjective Well-Being. Journal of Happiness Studies, 13(6), 1.031-1.051. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10902-011-9305-3

Christofides, E., Muise, A., & Desmarais, S. (2009). Information Disclosure and Control on Facebook: Are they two Sides of the Same Coin or two Different Processes? Cyberpsychology & Behavior?: The Impact of the Internet, Multimedia and Virtual Reality on Behavior and Society, 12(3), 341-345. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cpb.2008.0226

Colás, P., & Villaciervos, P. (2007). La interiorización de los estereotipos de género en jóvenes y adolescentes. Revista de Investigación Educativa, 25(1), 35-58.

De Vries, D. & Peter, J. (2013). Women on Display: The Effect of Portraying the Self Online on Women’s Self-objectification. Computers in Human Behavior, 29(4), 1.483-1.489. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2013.01.015

Eagly, A. (1987). Sex Differences in Social Behavior. A Social Role Interpretation. New Jersey: Hillsdale.

Galambos, N.L., Almeida, D.M., & Petersen, A.C. (1990). Masculinity, femininity, and sex role attitudes in early adolescence: Exploring gender intensification. Child Development, 61, 1.905-1.914. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/1130846

Garcia, A., López-de-Ayala, M.C., & Catalina, B. (2013). The Influence of Social Networks on The Adolescents’ Online Practices. [Hábitos de uso en Internet y en las redes sociales de los adolescentes españoles]. Comunicar, 41, 195-204. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C41-2013-19

García-Retamero, R., Müller, S., & López-Zafra, E. (2011). The Malleability of Gender Stereotypes: Influence of Population Size on Perceptions of Men and Women in the Past, Present, and Future. The Journal of Social Psychology, 151(5), 635-656. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00224545.2010.522616

García-Vega, E., Robledo-Menéndez, E., García-Fernández, P., & Rico-Fernández, R. (2010). Influencia del sexo y del género en el comportamiento sexual de una población adolescente. Psicothema, 22, 606-612.

Gonzales, A.L., & Hancock, J.T. (2010). Mirror, Mirror on my Facebook Wall: Effects of Exposure to Facebook on Self-esteem. Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, 14(1-2), 79-83. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2009.0411

Gosling, S.D., Augustine, A., Vazire, S., Holtzman, N., & Gaddis, S. (2011). Manifestations of Personality in Online Social Networks: Self-reported Facebook-related Behaviors and Observable Profile Information. Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, 14(9), 483-488. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2010.0087

Guadagno, R.E., Muscanell, N.L., Okdie, B.M., Burk, N.M., & Ward, T.B. (2011). Even in Virtual Environments Women Shop and Men Build: A Social Role Perspective on Second Life. Computers in Human Behavior, 27(1), 304-308. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2010.08.008

Haferkamp, N., Eimler, S.C., Papadakis, A.M., & Kruck, J.V. (2012). Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus? Examining Gender Differences in Self-presentation on Social Networking Sites. Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, 15(2), 91-8. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2011.0151

Harman, J.P., Hansen, C.E., Cochran, M.E., & Lindsey, C.R. (2005). Liar, Liar: Internet Faking but Not Frequency of Use Affects Social Skills, Self-Esteem, Social Anxiety, and Aggression. Cyberpsychology & Behavior, 8(1), 1-6. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cpb.2005.8.1

Holt, C.L., & Ellis, J.B. (1998). Assessing the Current Validity of the Bem Sex-Role Inventory. Sex Roles, 39(11/12), 929-941. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1018836923919

Kalpidou, M., Costin, D., & Morris, J. (2011). The Relationship between Facebook and the Well-being of Undergraduate College Students. Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, 14(4), 183-189. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2010.0061

Kapidzic, S., & Herring, S. C. (2011). Gender, Communication, and Self?Presentation in Teen Chatrooms Revisited: Have Patterns Changed? Journal of Computer?Mediated Communication, 17(1), 39-59. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1083-6101.2011.01561.x

Kim, J., & Lee, J.E. (2011). The Facebook Paths to Happiness: Effects of the Number of Facebook Friends and Self-presentation on Subjective well-being. Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, 14(6), 359-364. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2010.0374

Kraut, R., Kiesler, S., & al. (2002). Internet Paradox Revisited. Journal of Social Issues, 58(1), 49-74. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1540-4560.00248

Kraut, R., Patterson, M., & al. (1998). Internet Paradox. A Social Technology that Reduces Social Involvement and Psychological Well-being? The American Psychologist, 53(9), 1017-1031. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0003-066X.53.9.1017

Kross, E., Verduyn, P., & al. (2013). Facebook Use Predicts Declines in Subjective Well-being in Young Adults. PloS One, 8(8), e69841. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0069841

Krämer, N.C., & Winter, S. (2008). Impression Management 2.0. Journal of Media Psychology, 20(3), 96-106. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1027/1864-1105.20.3.96

Kuss, D.J., & Griffiths, M.D. (2011). Online Social Networking and Addiction - A Review of the Psychological Literature. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 8(9), 3.528-3.552. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph8093528

Lengua, L.J., & Stormshak, E.A. (2000). Gender, Gender Roles, and Personality: Gender Differences in the Prediction of Coping and Psychological Symptoms, Sex Roles, 43(11), 787-820. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1011096604861

Lieper, C., & Friedman, C.K. (2007). The Socialization of Gender. In J. Grusec, & P. Hastings, (Eds.), Handbook of Socialization: Theory and Research (pp. 561-587). New York: Guilford.

Linne, J. (2014). Common Uses of Facebook among Adolescents from Different Social Sectors in Buenos Aires City [Usos comunes de Facebook en adolescentes de distintos sectores sociales en la Ciudad de Buenos Aires]. Comunicar, 43(22), 189-197. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-19

López-Sáez, M., Morales, J., & Lisbona, A. (2008). Evolution of Gender Stereotypes in Spain: Traits and Roles. The Spanish Journal of Psychology, 11(2), 609–617.

López-Zafra, E., García-Retamero, R., Diekman, A., & Eagly, A. H. (2008). Dinámica de estereotipos de género y poder: un estudio transcultural. Revista de Psicología Social, 23(2), 213-219. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1174/021347408784135788

Magnuson, M.J., & Dundes, L. (2008). Gender Differences in ‘Social Portraits’ Reflected in MySpace Profiles. Cyberpsychology & Behavior?: The Impact of the Internet, Multimedia and Virtual Reality on Behavior and Society, 11(2), 239-41. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cpb.2007.0089

Manago, A.M., Graham, M.B., Greenfield, P.M., & Salimkhan, G. (2008). Self-presentation and Gender on MySpace. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 29(6), 446-458. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.appdev.2008.07.001

Martínez-Sánchez, I., Navarro-Olivas, R., & Yubero-Jiménez, S (2009). Estereotipos de Género entre los adolescentes españoles: imagen prototípica de hombres y mujeres e imagen de uno mismo. Informació Psicológica, 95, 77-86.

Mehdizadeh, S. (2010). Self-Presentation 2.0: Narcissism and Self-Esteem on Facebook. Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, 13(4), 357-364. doi: http://dx.doi.org/cyber.2009.0257

Nguyen, M., Bin, Y.S., & Campbell, A. (2012). Comparing online and offline self-disclosure: A systematic review. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 15(2), 103-111. http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2011.0277

Páez, D., & Fernández, I. (2004). Masculinidad-femineidad como dimensión cultural y del autoconcepto. In I. Fernández, S. Ubillos, E. Zubieta, & D. Páez (Eds.), Psicología social, cultura y educación (pp. 195-207). Madrid: Pearson.

Renau, V., Carbonell, X., & Oberst, U. (2012). Redes sociales on-line, género y construcción del self. Aloma: Revista de Psicologia, Ciències de l’Educació I de l’Esport Blanquerna, 30(2), 97-107.

Renau, V., Oberst, U., & Carbonell, X. (2013). Construcción de la identidad a través de las redes sociales online. Anuario de Psicología, 43(2), 159-70.

Rideout, V. (2012). Social Media, Social Life: How Teens View their Digital Lives. San Francisco: Common Sense Media.

Ruble, D.N., & Martin, C. (1998). Gender Development. In N. Eisenberg & W. Damon (Eds.), Handbook of Child Psychology: Vol. 3. Social, Emotional, and Personality Development (pp. 933–1016). New York: Wiley.

Sampasa-Kanyinga, H., & Lewis, R.F. (2015). Frequent Use of Social Networking Sites Is Associated with Poor Psychological Functioning among Children and Adolescents. Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, 18(7), 380-385. http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2015.0055

Spies-Shapiro, L.A., & Margolin, G. (2014). Growing Up Wired: Social Networking Sites and Adolescent Psychosocial Development. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 17(1), 1-18. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-013-0135-1

Statista (2015).The Statistics Portal. http://goo.gl/8fzikj (2016-02-25).

Strano, M.M. (2008). User Descriptions and Interpretatiions of Self-presentation through Facebook Profile images. Cyberpsychology: Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, 2(2), article 1.

Thompson, S.H., & Lougheed, E. (2012). Frazzled by Facebook? An Exploratory Study of Gender differences in social Network Communication among Undergraduate Men and Women. College Student Journal, 46(1), 88–98.

Tifferet, S., & Vilnai-Yavetz, I. (2014). Gender Differences in Facebook Self-presentation: An International Randomized Study. Computers in Human Behavior, 35, 388-399. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2014.03.016

Valkenburg, P., Peter, J., & Schouten, A.P. (2006). Friend Networking Sites and Their Relationship to Adolescents’ Well-Being and Social Self-Esteem. Cyberpsychology & Behavior, 9(5), 584-590. http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cpb.2006.9.584

Vanderhoven, E., Schellens, T., & Valcke, M. (2014). Educating Teens about the Risks on Social Network Sites. An Intervention Study in Secondary Education [Enseñar a los adolescentes los riesgos de las redes sociales: Una propuesta de intervención en Secundaria]. Comunicar, 22(43), 123-132. http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-12

Whitley, B.E., & Bernard, E. (1985). Sex-role Orientation and Psychological Well-being: Two Meta-analyses. Sex Roles, 12(1-2), 207-225. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00288048

Williams, W., & D’Alessandro, J.(1994). A Comparison of Three Measures of Androgyny and their Relationship to Psychological Adjustment. Journal of Social Behavior & Personality, 9(3), 469-480.

Woo, M., & Oei, T.P. (2006). The MMPI?2 Gender?Masculine and Gender?Feminine scales: Gender Roles as Predictors of Psychological Health in Clinical Patients. International Journal of Psychology, 41(5), 413-422. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00207590500412185

Woodhill, B.M., & Samuels, C.A. (2003). Positive and Negative Androgyny and their Relationship with Psychological Health and Well-being. Sex Roles, 48(11-12), 555-565. http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1023531530272



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Chicas y chicos adolescentes hacen un uso diferente de las redes sociales online, y las chicas presentan un mayor riesgo de verse perjudicadas por un uso no adaptativo. El objetivo de este estudio era investigar en qué medida los adolescentes se presentan en términos de estereotipos de género en sus perfiles de Facebook. Los participantes, 623 usuarios de Facebook de ambos sexos, contestaron el Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI) y el Personal Well-being Index (PWI). En la primera fase, respondieron sobre cómo ven a un adulto típico en términos de estereotipos de género. En la segunda fase, la mitad de ellos contestó el BSRI en relación a cómo se ven a sí mismos, y la otra mitad cómo se presentan en Facebook. Los resultados muestran que los adolescentes se consideran más sexualmente indiferenciados que un adulto típico de su mismo sexo, tanto en su auto-percepción como en su presentación en Facebook. Se confirma que el bienestar psicológico de las chicas baja considerablemente con la edad, y que está asociado a un mayor grado de masculinidad. Se concluye que los adolescentes producen representaciones verdaderas en sus perfiles de Facebook, y que existe una tendencia hacia una auto-concepción y auto-presentación más sexualmente indiferenciada con una leve preferencia por rasgos masculinos, tanto en chicos como en chicas; además, la masculinidad está asociada a un mayor grado de bienestar psicológico.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

1.1. Correlación psicológica del uso de Internet y sus aplicaciones

El desarrollo de Internet y sus aplicaciones ha supuesto un incremento exponencial de los canales de comunicación bidireccionales. Mientras que la comunicación oral prácticamente no ha cambiado, la comunicación escrita ha sufrido una revolución, especialmente gracias a los servicios de redes sociales (SNS) (Carbonell & Oberst, 2015). Estos medios de comunicación están cada vez más presentes en nuestra vida cotidiana y aunque su uso se ha expandido entre todas las edades, son especialmente populares entre los adolescentes y los jóvenes adultos. Estas SNS ofrecen un formato de información y un canal de comunicación nuevos.

A través del registro y de la creación de un perfil los usuarios pueden exhibir aspectos de su identidad y conectarse con otros usuarios, interactuando de diversas maneras (por ejemplo: mediante comentarios, links, fotos, vídeos y chats internos). A pesar de los rumores sobre un posible declive y desaparición (Cannarella & Spechler, 2014), Facebook, con 1,59 mil millones de usuarios en el 2015 (Statista, 2015), sigue siendo la plataforma más popular y más utilizada en el mundo y en España (17 millones de usuarios). La edad de iniciación en Facebook está bajando, y en general los SNS han reemplazado el correo electrónico y la mensajería instantánea como foco principal de la actividad online de los adolescentes (García, López-de-Ayala, & Catalina, 2013). Es de esperar que la introducción generalizada de un medio de comunicación tendrá un impacto en los hábitos y la estructura psicológica de los usuarios, especialmente de los más jóvenes. Este modo de comunicación tiende a comenzar en la adolescencia, la fase de desarrollo en la que los jóvenes construyen sus identidades a través del contacto con sus pares.

El primer estudio acerca del uso de Internet y de las redes sociales on-line mostró un efecto negativo de la comunicación mediante ordenadores en la salud psicológica de los adolescentes y jóvenes adultos, un fenómeno llamado la Paradoja Internet (Kraut & al., 1998). Investigaciones posteriores aportaron matices a estas conclusiones (Kraut & al., 2002), puesto que los resultados mostraron que estas nuevas formas de comunicación también podían tener efectos positivos en la adaptación psicológica porque permitían a los jóvenes a expandir sus redes sociales y satisfacer su necesidad de afiliación y auto-revelación (Spies-Shapiro, & Margolin, 2014). Solo un 5% de los adolescentes dice que el uso de las redes sociales les hace sentir deprimidos y solo un 4% dice que tiene un efecto negativo en su relación con los amigos. En cambio, el 10% comenta que su uso les hace sentir menos deprimidos y el 52% afirma que les ha ayudado a mantener o mejorar sus relaciones (Rideout, 2012). No obstante, desde que el uso de las redes sociales a través de Facebook, Instagram, Twitter o mensajería de texto se ha convertido en la actividad principal de los jóvenes, estudios han demostrado que el abuso y el uso inadaptado de estas tecnologías tiene efectos negativos en el bienestar y el funcionamiento psicológico de niños y jóvenes (Kross & al., 2013; Sampasa-Kanyinga & Lewis, 2015) y en su rendimiento académico (Kalpidou, Costin, & Morris, 2011). El uso de las redes sociales online se ha identificado como un problema potencial de salud mental (Kuss & Griffiths, 2011). Estudios recientes sugieren que el efecto negativo depende de cómo los adolescentes usan la tecnología, de algunas prácticas específicas y de la reacción de otros, por ejemplo: de si sus amigos valoran positiva o negativamente los perfiles publicados (Valkenburg, Peter, & Schouten, 2006). Tener muchos amigos en Facebook se asocia a un mayor bienestar subjetivo y a una presentación positiva –y honesta– de la imagen de uno mismo (Kim & Lee, 2011). En cambio, los jóvenes con mayores niveles de falsificación de datos en sus perfiles tienen menos habilidades sociales, una autoestima más baja, una ansiedad social más alta y niveles más altos de agresividad (Harman, Hansen, Cochran, & Lindsey, 2005).

Una importante cuestión de interés en SNS es lo que las personas revelan en estas páginas y cómo se presentan a sí mismas («impression management»). El grado en el que los usuarios de las redes sociales revelan información en la interacción depende de varios factores, especialmente en la relación entre los interlocutores (Nyugen, Bin, & Campbell, 2012). La expresión presentación de género («gendered presentation») se refiere a los distintos patrones de hombres y mujeres en su autopresentación online. Tomando esto como punto de partida, el objetivo del presente estudio fue evaluar la percepción de los adolescentes de los tradicionales roles de género al igual que su autopercepción y autopresentación en Facebook en relación a la masculinidad y feminidad. Tomando el perfil de Facebook como una presentación estratégica del ideal de uno mismo, quisimos averiguar si los adolescentes continúan presentándose a sí mismos según los tradicionales roles de género, y si un uso más intenso de Facebook o una tipicidad de género más alta en la autopresentación en Facebook está asociado a un bienestar psicológico más bajo.

1.2. Diferencias de género en el uso de las TIC y servicios de redes sociales

El género es un factor importante a la hora de considerar las posibles consecuencias negativas del uso problemático de las TIC. Múltiples estudios sobre la comunicación a través de ordenadores revelan importantes diferencias de sexo relacionadas con el uso de Internet y las nuevas tecnologías en general. En las dos mayores aplicaciones de Internet asociadas al uso excesivo, la pornografía y los videojuegos online, la mayoría de usuarios adictos son hombres. En otras aplicaciones y tecnologías el ratio de género está más equilibrado, aunque hay diferencias de género en cómo las personas usan estas tecnologías. Por ejemplo, los hombres usan los teléfonos móviles principalmente para el trabajo, cuestiones logísticas y ocio, mientras que las mujeres los usan fundamentalmente para establecer y mantener relaciones sociales (Beranuy, Oberst, Carbonell, & Chamarro, 2009).

Los estudios de redes sociales y género muestran que los patrones de comportamiento de hombres y mujeres también se reproducen en los medios de comunicación. Los diferentes motivos en hombres y mujeres para el uso de redes sociales son paralelos a los motivos para el uso de Internet (Bond, 2009). Mujeres jóvenes usan estas páginas sobre todo para comunicarse y para la autopresentación (Barker, 2009), mientras que los hombres las usan principalmente por cuestiones pragmáticas o de ocio (Haferkamp, Eimler, Papadakis, & Kruck, 2012). Además las mujeres son más propensas que los hombres a expresar emociones en estas aplicaciones; a sincerarse; a publicar imágenes de ellas mismas, de amigos y otras personas importantes; a cambiar sus fotos de perfil más a menudo (Strano, 2008). En cambio, los hombres son más propensos a presentarse a sí mismos como fuertes, poderosos, independientes y con un estatus alto. Según algunos autores (Magnuson & Dundes, 2008) tanto los hombres como las mujeres adoptan autopresentaciones que se ajustan a los códigos tradicionales de masculinidad y feminidad. De acuerdo con estas normas, los hombres han sido considerados más instrumentales y menos emocionales y a las mujeres se las ha considerado más expresivas. Los autorretratos online de las mujeres también pueden llevar a la auto-objetificación (self-objectification) (de-Vries & Peter, 2013). La mayoría de autores concluye que Facebook ayuda a la construcción de la identidad mientras que también mantiene los estereotipos tradicionales de género (Linne, 2014). También parece que las mujeres experimentan más consecuencias negativas de un uso inapropiado de Facebook que los hombres. Las mujeres indican con mayor frecuencia que pierden horas de sueño debido al uso de Facebook, que esta actividad les causa estrés, que las imágenes de Facebook les provocan una imagen negativa de su propio cuerpo y que se consideran adictas (Thompson & Lougheed, 2012).

1.3. Estereotipos de género

La construcción de la identidad de género es un proceso continuo que comienza en la primera infancia. La influencia de miembros de la familia, compañeros y los medios de comunicación convergen hasta impactar en la autoconcepción de los jóvenes (Lieper & Friedman, 2007). El proceso culmina en la adolescencia, cuando la identificación del rol de género es más pronunciado (Galambos, Almeida, & Petersen, 1990). A diferencia de la categoría biológica «sexo», el término «género» se entiende y explica a través de la teoría del rol social (Eagly, 1987) como una construcción social que emerge de un proceso de aprendizaje continuo relacionado con comportamientos, percepciones y expectativas que definen lo que supone ser un hombre o una mujer. Los estereotipos de género se componen de una serie de características asociadas con mujeres u hombres (López-Zafra, García-Retamero, Diekman, & Eagly, 2008). En este sentido, los roles de género no son simplemente categorías descriptivas o explicativas (López-Sáez, Morales, & Lisbona, 2008); más bien son prescriptivas y se refieren a lo que un individuo percibe que los otros esperan de él o ella respecto a su comportamiento. Por esto hombres y mujeres están sujetos a diferentes expectativas normativas, y estos factores pueden llevar a diferencias de género en el comportamiento.

Los estudios demuestran que se espera de los hombres que sean más agenciales (orientados a tareas, asertivos, controladores, independientes y no emocionales) y de las mujeres que sean más comunicativas y orientadas hacia las relaciones interpersonales (Guadagno, Muscanell, Okdie, Burk, & Ward, 2011). No obstante, los rasgos típicamente femeninos y masculinos –es decir la masculinidad y la feminidad– han cambiado en las últimas décadas, y los roles tradicionalmente masculinos y femeninos están perdiendo importancia (Holt & Ellis, 1998; López-Zafra & al., 2008; Martínez-Sánchez, Navarro-Olivas, & Yubero-Jiménez, 2009). A pesar de que las mujeres ahora tienden a asignarse rasgos considerados típicamente masculinos, adoptando una autopercepción andrógina, los hombres no hacen lo mismo con rasgos femeninos (López-Sáez & al., 2008). Parece que las características típicamente femeninas son menos deseables socialmente, mientras que los rasgos masculinos son más deseables a nivel social. Por esto las chicas quieren mostrar más masculinidad mientras que los chicos no quieren mostrar más feminidad. También se ha observado que la interiorización de los estereotipos de género está más arraigada en los chicos adolescentes que en las chicas (Colás & Villaciervos, 2007).

Género y roles de género tienen correlatos psicológicos importantes. Mientras que en estudios anteriores una conducta congruente con el propio género era considerada psicológicamente adaptativa (Whitley & Bernard, 1985; Whitley & Bernard, 1985; Williams & D’Alessandro, 1994), estudios posteriores mostraron que lo que correlacionaba positivamente con el ajuste psicológico era o bien la masculinidad (Woo & Oei, 2006) o bien la androginia (masculinidad alta y feminidad alta) (Williams & D’Alessandro, 1994). No obstante, los resultados de otros estudios no avalan estas conclusiones (Woodhill & Samuels, 2003). Es más, ni la masculinidad ni la feminidad se presentan como uniformemente positivas. En unos estudios llevados a cabo con participantes adultos, la masculinidad predecía menos depresión, pero más problemas antisociales y uso de sustancias (Lengua & Stormshak, 2000).

Los estereotipos tradicionales de género son generados y mantenidos por la estructura social, y un individuo se ajustará o no a ellos, dependiendo de la respuesta que él o ella reciban. Back y otros (2010) enfatizan el hecho de que las redes sociales integran diversas fuentes de información personal que actúan como un espejo de las diferentes facetas de una persona, tales como los pensamientos privados, las imágenes faciales y la conducta social (tanto las propias como las de los demás). En este sentido la persona recibe y genera diferentes muestras dependiendo de las reacciones de grupo de pares. Bailey, Steeves, Burkell y Regan (2013) argumentan que las redes sociales representan un entorno de elevada vigilancia pública, lo que supone que tanto chicas como chicos se presenten a sí mismos más acorde con las normas de género que como lo harían en un contexto cara a cara.

El contexto social moldea la identidad, incluyendo la identidad de género. Y puesto que los estereotipos son un elemento fundamental de la identidad de género, resulta que las redes sociales en Internet también influyen en ellos. Desde la perspectiva de género la necesidad de presentarse a sí mismo de una manera concreta puede ser distinta para chicas y chicos. Es posible que los estereotipos de género jueguen un papel más importante en la autopresentación virtual de las chicas que en su autopresentación en contextos cara a cara, y esto puede incrementar su malestar psicológico. Un estudio averiguó que en Facebook las jóvenes desean ser más agradables, sexis, fuertes y más objetivas, mientras que los jóvenes no desean ningún cambio (Renau, Carbonell, & Oberst, 2012). Roles de género y estereotipos tienen una papel importante en la identidad de género y en el moldeo de la personalidad de los preadolescentes y los adolescentes, y hoy en día, las redes sociales tienen una gran relevancia en la formación de la identidad de las personas jóvenes (Linne, 2014). Por estas razones quisimos investigar la presencia de estereotipos de género en estas redes sociales y su implicación en el bienestar psicológico.

Establecimos las siguientes hipótesis:

• H1: Como hemos comentado anteriormente, estudios previos han mostrado una disminución de los estereotipos de género autoatribuidos (Martínez-Sánchez, Navarro-Olivas, & Yubero-Jiménez, 2009). Por esto esperamos que los participantes se presentaran a sí mismos como menos masculinos y femeninos de lo que sería su percepción de un hombre o una mujer típicos.

• H2: También se ha demostrado (Ruble & Martin, 1998) que la conciencia de los adolescentes de los roles de género crece con la edad; por esto esperamos que la percepción estereotipada de un adulto típico aumentara con la edad; también supusimos que sus puntuaciones de autopercepción estereotipada aumentara con la edad.

• H3: Estudios anteriores han demostrado que los perfiles de Facebook, más que una auto-idealización, representan la personalidad auténtica de sus usuarios (Back & al., 2010; Gosling, Augustine, Vazire, Holtzman, & Gaddis, 2011). Por eso, en el presente estudio esperamos que las autopresentaciones online de los adolescentes fueran también auténticas en términos de estereotipos de género; por ejemplo: no esperamos encontrar diferencia entre las puntuaciones basadas en la autopercepción y aquellas basadas en los perfiles de Facebook (autopresentación).

• H4: Según encontramos en estudios anteriores (Spies, Shapiro, & Margolin, 2014) esperamos que las chicas harían un mayor uso de Facebook y que tendrían más amistades en Facebook; y que mostrarían menos bienestar psicológico que los chicos.

• H5: De acuerdo con estudios de roles de género (Woo & Oei, 2006), en los perfiles online la masculinidad debería tener una asociación positiva con el bienestar psicológico, mientras que la feminidad no.

2. Método

2.1.Participantes


Draft Content 648075048-51234 ov-es033.jpg

Los participantes fueron 623 estudiantes de secundaria (331 mujeres) con edades comprendidas entre los 12 y 16 años (1º a 4º curso de Educación Secundaria Obligatoria, que son los primeros cuatro años de la escuela secundaria obligatoria española), de diferentes escuelas españolas en la región de Cataluña. Todos los participantes tenían un perfil personal de Facebook con su verdadera identidad (véase tabla 1).

2.2. Instrumentos

Número de amigos de Facebook y frecuencia de uso de Facebook: Se pidió a los participantes que indicaran el número de amigos de Facebook que tenían, así como su frecuencia de conexión de FB, utilizando una escala Likert de cinco puntos desde 1 (una vez al mes) a 5 (varias veces un día).

• Roles sexuales: Se utilizó la adaptación española del Inventario de Roles Sexuales de Bem (BSRI, Páez, & Fernández, 2004) para evaluar los estereotipos sexuales. Esta versión de la escala consta de 18 ítems (adjetivos o expresiones cortas, como «sensible a las necesidades de otros»), con nueve en cada una de las dos dimensiones que corresponden a los estereotipos de la masculinidad y la feminidad en una escala tipo Likert de 1 (Nunca) a 7 (siempre). El BSRI ofrece la posibilidad de que los encuestados valorasen la masculinidad y la feminidad de un «hombre típico» y una «mujer típica» y, a continuación, valorasen la autopercepción de su tipicidad de género. Para el «hombre típico» el coeficiente alfa de Cronbach era a=.812 para la masculinidad, y .817 para la feminidad; para la «mujer típica», el alfa de Cronbach era a=.733 para la masculinidad y .788 para la feminidad.

• Bienestar personal: Se utilizó la adaptación española del Índice de Bienestar Personal (Personal Well-being Index, PWI; Casas & al., 2011). La escala consta de siete puntos en una escala de Likert de 1 (nada satisfecho) a 10 (completamente satisfecho); cada ítem valora la satisfacción del participante en un área diferente en la vida (por ejemplo, salud, relaciones personales, etc.) y se obtiene una valoración global de bienestar personal. En este estudio, el índice de fiabilidad de Cronbach fue de a=.75.

2.3. Procedimiento

El estudio fue aprobado por la institución financiadora y por la Comisión de Investigación de la Universidad Ramón Llull. Se obtuvo el consentimiento informado de los padres y de las autoridades escolares. Los participantes respondieron a los cuestionarios en un formato de papel y lápiz dentro de un contexto de clase. En un primer paso, todos los participantes respondieron al BSRI, otorgando puntuaciones a lo que ellos consideran un hombre típico (TM) y una mujer típica (TF). En una segunda etapa, la mitad de cada clase respondió los cuestionarios puntuándose a sí mismos en relación a masculinidad y feminidad (condición SELF), y la otra mitad abrió sus perfiles de Facebook en sus ordenadores personales y evaluó sus propios perfiles (condición FB) con respecto al BSRI. Finalmente, en el último paso, todos los estudiantes respondieron a la PWI.

2.4. Análisis de los datos

Se calcularon las subescalas de masculinidad (mas) y feminidad (fem) para la percepción del hombre típico y la mujer típica (obteniendo así masTM, femTM, masTF, femTF) de los correspondientes, así como para sí mismos, ya sea en la condición SELF o en la condición FB (obtención masRES, femRES). Se llevaron a cabo sendas pruebas t para muestras pareadas para los chicos y para las chicas para evaluar la diferencia entre la percepción de los participantes sobre sí mismos y un adulto típico (mujer típica en el caso de las niñas y hombre típico en el caso de los varones). Para probar los efectos del sexo, curso escolar y condición en el número de amigos de Facebook, la frecuencia de uso de Facebook, el bienestar psicológico, masTM, femTM, masTF, femTF, masRES, femRES, se realizó una MANOVA 2x4x2. Se calcularon las correlaciones entre las variables dependientes. Como indicador del tamaño del efecto, se calcularon los coeficientes eta-cuadrado (?). Todos los análisis de datos se efectuaron con el paquete estadístico SPSS, versión 22.


Draft Content 648075048-51234 ov-es034.jpg

3. Resultados

Las estadísticas descriptivas se muestran en la tabla 2.

3.1. Resultados de la auto-presentación con respecto al adulto típico

En comparación con su percepción de un hombre típico, los chicos se puntuaron a sí mismos más bajo con respecto a la masculinidad (t=10,718, p=0,000, df=274); las chicas, con respecto a la mujer típica se calificaron más bajo tanto para la masculinidad (t= 7,705, p=0,000, df=314) como para la feminidad (t=19,318, p=0,000, df=318).

3.2. Efectos del sexo, curso y condición sobre las variables dependientes

Los resultados del MANOVA 2x4x2 se muestran en la tabla 3. En los efectos principales, como se esperaba, las niñas muestran puntuaciones más altas en feminidad, mientras que los niños puntúan más alto en masculinidad. Las niñas también tienen más amigos en Facebook y valoran la masculinidad y la feminidad de la mujer típica mejor que los niños. En cuanto a los efectos de curso, el número de amigos de Facebook y el tiempo de conexión aumentan. Además, la percepción de los participantes sobre la masculinidad de una mujer típica aumenta con la edad. Para el efecto combinado de género y curso, hay que destacar que la feminidad de las niñas, así como su bienestar, disminuye con la edad. No hubo efecto de la interacción género*condición o curso*condición, y para la interacción de las tres variables solo había efecto sobre el bienestar. El hecho de que no se encontraran efectos combinados de género*condición con respecto a la masculinidad y la feminidad de los participantes indica que no hay diferencia entre autopercepción y autopresentación en Facebook. Por lo tanto, para los análisis posteriores las puntuaciones de ambas condiciones se tomaron conjuntamente.

3.3. Correlaciones

El bienestar psicológico correlacionó positivamente con la masculinidad (r=.142, p<.01). Tanto la masculinidad como la feminidad correlacionaron con el número de amigos de Facebook (r=.119 y r=.138, respectivamente, ambos con p<.01), mientras que la frecuencia de conexión a Facebook mostró una correlación con la feminidad (r =.133, p<.01).

3.4. Análisis adicionales

Para explorar las razones por las que disminuye el bienestar de las niñas, se realizó una MANOVA adicional para género y curso con respecto a los ítems del PWI. Para la interacción hubo efectos significativos, es decir, una disminución de la satisfacción en las niñas con respecto a su salud (F=3.580, p=.014, ?2= .017), a su sensación de seguridad (F=2.797, p=.039, ?2= .013), sus relaciones de grupo (F=4.010, p=.008, .019=?2) y su futuro (F=3.252, p=.021, ?2=.016).

4. Discusión

En este estudio evaluamos el grado en que los adolescentes continúan definiéndose en términos de estereotipos de género y si su autopresentación online difiere de su autopercepción. Nuestros resultados muestran que los adolescentes son conscientes de los estereotipos tradicionales, pero que se perciben ellos mismos de una manera menos estereotipada y más indiferenciada sexualmente de cómo perciben a un adulto de su mismo sexo. Estos resultados confirman nuestra primera hipótesis y están en línea con otros estudios que muestran un cambio en los estereotipos de género tradicionales entre los adolescentes españoles (García-Retamero, Müller, & López-Zafra, 2011; García-Vega, Robledo-Menéndez, García-Fernández, & Rico-Fernández, 2010). No obstante, las chicas continúan teniendo puntuaciones en feminidad más altas que los chicos y viceversa, igual que en otros estudios (López-Sáez & al., 2008). Mientras que García-Vega y otros encontraron que la mayoría de adolescentes se caracterizan a ellos mismos como andróginos (alta masculinidad, alta feminidad); en nuestro estudio hay una tendencia hacia unos perfiles más indiferenciados (baja masculinidad, baja feminidad), especialmente en las mujeres.


Draft Content 648075048-51234 ov-es035.jpg

La segunda hipótesis se confirma en parte; la percepción de los participantes de un adulto típico también varía con el sexo y la edad: a medida que crecen, perciben a una mujer típica (pero no a un hombre típico) como más masculina, es decir se confirma que la tipificación de roles de género aumenta durante la adolescencia (Galambos, Almeida, & Petersen, 1990). Las chicas tienen una visión más andrógina de una mujer típica que los chicos. En cambio, la propia feminidad de las chicas disminuye con la edad. Estos resultados sugieren una tendencia de las chicas a verse con atributos menos femeninos y más masculinos como futuros adultos, tanto en la autopercepción como en la autopresentación on-line.

Con respecto a la tercera hipótesis, nuestros resultados también confirman los resultados de estudios anteriores de que las personas muestran una imagen auténtica de sí mismas en los SNS. El hecho de que no había ningún efecto de condición nos lleva a la conclusión de que la autopresentación de los adolescentes en sus perfiles de Facebook no difiere de su autopercepción. Estos resultados indican que los participantes son honestos a la hora de autopresentarse, no solo en relación a su personalidad (Back & al., 2010), sino también con respecto a otras dimensiones relacionadas con sus atributos personales. Concluimos que los adolescentes no solo se consideran a sí mismos más sexualmente indiferenciados en comparación con la tipicidad de género, sino que también desean ser vistos así (Kapidzic & Herring, 2011).

Finalmente, los resultados muy establecidos de la disminución del bienestar en las chicas también han sido confirmados en nuestro estudio, y esto parece estar relacionado con las crecientes preocupaciones sobre su salud, seguridad, relaciones y futuro (hipótesis 4). El bienestar correlaciona positivamente con la masculinidad, mientras que la feminidad no muestra influencia, un resultado que confirma la hipótesis 5. Así pues, percibirse a sí mismo teniendo más rasgos masculinos (¿deseables?) es una fuente de bienestar. El caso de la feminidad no está tan claro. Se ha argumentado (Renau & al., 2012) que la alta feminidad tiene un efecto negativo, es decir, una autopresentación más femenina en Facebook está relacionada con un menor bienestar psicológico. En nuestro estudio, cuando las chicas se hacen mayores puntuan menos en feminidad, sin embargo, su bienestar también puntúa más bajo.

5. Conclusiones

Nuestros resultados confirman la tendencia de un cambio en los roles de género descrita en estudios previos y amplían estos resultados a la autopresentación en los perfiles online. Los adolescentes muestran congruencia entre su autopercepción y cómo desean ser vistos online por los otros. Los estereotipos tradicionales de género parece que se desdibujan. Ambos sexos ofrecen autopresentaciones en Facebook que son menos masculinas y menos femeninas que lo que perciben como típico para personas de su mismo sexo. Nuestras conclusiones revelan una diferencia de sexo en este área puesto que la autopresentación de las mujeres es menos femenina que masculina la autopresentación de los hombres. Además los atributos tradicionalmente masculinos están más relacionados con el bienestar y los chicos puntúan más alto tanto en el bienestar como en la masculinidad de su autopresentación.

Las redes sociales tales como Facebook ofrecen más oportunidades para la comparación social que los contextos cara a cara. Por esto el manejo de la impresión (impression management) es un aspecto importante de las presentaciones online. Los SNS fomentan la autopromoción y la autopresentación narcisista (Mehdizadeh, 2010), además de la necesidad de popularidad (Christofides, Muise, & Desmarais, 2009). Las chicas logran estos autorretratos seleccionando estratégicamente las imágenes para sus perfiles (Krämer & Winter, 2008) y mostrando atractividad (Manago & al., 2008), relaciones familiares y expresiones emocionales (Tifferet & Vilnai-Yavetz, 2014).

El perfil que las personas publican en una red social de Internet actúa como un espejo –un espejo que manejamos nosotros mismos– y con él diseñamos nuestra autopresentación (Gonzales & Hancock, 2010). La comparación social es otro mecanismo, puesto que cuando nos encontramos a nosotros mismos en una situación ambigua, nos volvemos hacia nuestro entorno inmediato buscando la información que necesitamos; por ejemplo: el comportamiento de los demás. La comparación es inevitable en las redes sociales. De hecho, de acuerdo con algunos autores, esta es una de las razones por las cuales los usuarios mantengan perfiles en estas redes, dado que haciéndolo ayuda a moldear la personalidad (Manago, Graham, Greenfield, & Salimkhan, 2008). Cada vez que abrimos nuestro perfil encontramos una imagen de lo que estamos proyectando sobre nosotros mismos, lo que supone un recordatorio y una reafirmación de lo que somos (Gonzales & Hancock, 2010). Futuros estudios de SNS y de género deberían tener esto en cuenta. Los esfuerzos institucionales, tales como programas de educación en un marco escolar para promover un uso más seguro de Facebook entre los adolescentes (Vanderhoven, Schellens, & Valcke, 2014), también deberían enseñar a los adolescentes a ser selectivos en lo que quieren mostrar en sus perfiles y cómo presentarse a sí mismos, con el fin de prevenir posibles efectos nocivos.

6. Limitaciones

Este estudio presenta algunas limitaciones. Los estereotipos de género dependen en gran medida del contexto cultural y por esto el muestreo fue restringido a Cataluña para conseguir una muestra culturalmente homogénea. Sin embargo, esto podría ser una limitación para generalizar los resultados.

Apoyos

Este artículo ha sido financiado por el Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad, MINECO, con una subvención para Investigación y Desarrollo (reference: FEM 2012-33505). No existen conflictos de interés económico.

Referencias

Back, M.D., Stopfer, J.M., & al. (2010). Facebook Profiles Reflect Actual Personality, not Self-idealization. Psychological Science, 21(3), 372-374. doi: http://dx.doi.org//10.1177/0956797609360756

Bailey, J.B., Steeves, V., Burkell, J., & Regan, P. (2013). Negotiating with Gender Stereotypes on Social Networking Sites: from ‘Bicycle Face’ to Facebook. Journal of Communication Inquiry, 37(2), 91-112. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0196859912473777

Barker, V. (2009). Older Adolescents’ Motivations for Social Network Site Use: The Influence of Gender, Group Identity, and Collective Self-esteem. Cyberpsychology & Behavior?: The Impact of the Internet, Multimedia and Virtual Reality on Behavior and Society, 12(2), 209-13. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cpb.2008.0228

Beranuy, M., Oberst, U., Carbonell, X., & Chamarro, A. (2009). Problematic Internet and Mobile Phone Use and Clinical Symptoms in College Students: The Role of emotional intelligence. Computers in Human Behavior, 25(5), 1.182-1.187. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2009.03.001

Bond, B.J. (2009). He Posted, She Posted: Gender Differences in Self-disclosure on Social Network sites. Rocky Mountain Communication Review, 6(2), 29-37.

Cannarella, J., & Spechler, J.A. (2014). Epidemiological Modeling of Online Social Network Dynamics. arXiv preprint arXiv:1401.4208.

Carbonell, X., & Oberst, U. (2015). Las redes sociales en linea no son adictivas. Aloma: Revista de Psicologia, Ciències de L’educació I de L’esport Blanquerna, 32(2), 13-19.

Casas, F., Coenders, G., & al. (2011). Testing the Relationship Between Parents’ and their Children’s Subjective Well-Being. Journal of Happiness Studies, 13(6), 1.031-1.051. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10902-011-9305-3

Christofides, E., Muise, A., & Desmarais, S. (2009). Information Disclosure and Control on Facebook: Are they two Sides of the Same Coin or two Different Processes? Cyberpsychology & Behavior?: The Impact of the Internet, Multimedia and Virtual Reality on Behavior and Society, 12(3), 341-345. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cpb.2008.0226

Colás, P., & Villaciervos, P. (2007). La interiorización de los estereotipos de género en jóvenes y adolescentes. Revista de Investigación Educativa, 25(1), 35-58.

De Vries, D. & Peter, J. (2013). Women on Display: The Effect of Portraying the Self Online on Women’s Self-objectification. Computers in Human Behavior, 29(4), 1.483-1.489. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2013.01.015

Eagly, A. (1987). Sex Differences in Social Behavior. A Social Role Interpretation. New Jersey: Hillsdale.

Galambos, N.L., Almeida, D.M., & Petersen, A.C. (1990). Masculinity, femininity, and sex role attitudes in early adolescence: Exploring gender intensification. Child Development, 61, 1.905-1.914. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/1130846

Garcia, A., López-de-Ayala, M.C., & Catalina, B. (2013). The Influence of Social Networks on The Adolescents’ Online Practices. [Hábitos de uso en Internet y en las redes sociales de los adolescentes españoles]. Comunicar, 41, 195-204. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C41-2013-19

García-Retamero, R., Müller, S., & López-Zafra, E. (2011). The Malleability of Gender Stereotypes: Influence of Population Size on Perceptions of Men and Women in the Past, Present, and Future. The Journal of Social Psychology, 151(5), 635-656. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00224545.2010.522616

García-Vega, E., Robledo-Menéndez, E., García-Fernández, P., & Rico-Fernández, R. (2010). Influencia del sexo y del género en el comportamiento sexual de una población adolescente. Psicothema, 22, 606-612.

Gonzales, A.L., & Hancock, J.T. (2010). Mirror, Mirror on my Facebook Wall: Effects of Exposure to Facebook on Self-esteem. Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, 14(1-2), 79-83. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2009.0411

Gosling, S.D., Augustine, A., Vazire, S., Holtzman, N., & Gaddis, S. (2011). Manifestations of Personality in Online Social Networks: Self-reported Facebook-related Behaviors and Observable Profile Information. Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, 14(9), 483-488. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2010.0087

Guadagno, R.E., Muscanell, N.L., Okdie, B.M., Burk, N.M., & Ward, T.B. (2011). Even in Virtual Environments Women Shop and Men Build: A Social Role Perspective on Second Life. Computers in Human Behavior, 27(1), 304-308. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2010.08.008

Haferkamp, N., Eimler, S.C., Papadakis, A.M., & Kruck, J.V. (2012). Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus? Examining Gender Differences in Self-presentation on Social Networking Sites. Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, 15(2), 91-8. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2011.0151

Harman, J.P., Hansen, C.E., Cochran, M.E., & Lindsey, C.R. (2005). Liar, Liar: Internet Faking but Not Frequency of Use Affects Social Skills, Self-Esteem, Social Anxiety, and Aggression. Cyberpsychology & Behavior, 8(1), 1-6. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cpb.2005.8.1

Holt, C.L., & Ellis, J.B. (1998). Assessing the Current Validity of the Bem Sex-Role Inventory. Sex Roles, 39(11/12), 929-941. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1018836923919

Kalpidou, M., Costin, D., & Morris, J. (2011). The Relationship between Facebook and the Well-being of Undergraduate College Students. Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, 14(4), 183-189. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2010.0061

Kapidzic, S., & Herring, S. C. (2011). Gender, Communication, and Self?Presentation in Teen Chatrooms Revisited: Have Patterns Changed? Journal of Computer?Mediated Communication, 17(1), 39-59. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1083-6101.2011.01561.x

Kim, J., & Lee, J.E. (2011). The Facebook Paths to Happiness: Effects of the Number of Facebook Friends and Self-presentation on Subjective well-being. Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, 14(6), 359-364. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2010.0374

Kraut, R., Kiesler, S., & al. (2002). Internet Paradox Revisited. Journal of Social Issues, 58(1), 49-74. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1540-4560.00248

Kraut, R., Patterson, M., & al. (1998). Internet Paradox. A Social Technology that Reduces Social Involvement and Psychological Well-being? The American Psychologist, 53(9), 1017-1031. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0003-066X.53.9.1017

Kross, E., Verduyn, P., & al. (2013). Facebook Use Predicts Declines in Subjective Well-being in Young Adults. PloS One, 8(8), e69841. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0069841

Krämer, N.C., & Winter, S. (2008). Impression Management 2.0. Journal of Media Psychology, 20(3), 96-106. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1027/1864-1105.20.3.96

Kuss, D.J., & Griffiths, M.D. (2011). Online Social Networking and Addiction - A Review of the Psychological Literature. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 8(9), 3.528-3.552. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph8093528

Lengua, L.J., & Stormshak, E.A. (2000). Gender, Gender Roles, and Personality: Gender Differences in the Prediction of Coping and Psychological Symptoms, Sex Roles, 43(11), 787-820. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1011096604861

Lieper, C., & Friedman, C.K. (2007). The Socialization of Gender. In J. Grusec, & P. Hastings, (Eds.), Handbook of Socialization: Theory and Research (pp. 561-587). New York: Guilford.

Linne, J. (2014). Common Uses of Facebook among Adolescents from Different Social Sectors in Buenos Aires City [Usos comunes de Facebook en adolescentes de distintos sectores sociales en la Ciudad de Buenos Aires]. Comunicar, 43(22), 189-197. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-19

López-Sáez, M., Morales, J., & Lisbona, A. (2008). Evolution of Gender Stereotypes in Spain: Traits and Roles. The Spanish Journal of Psychology, 11(2), 609–617.

López-Zafra, E., García-Retamero, R., Diekman, A., & Eagly, A. H. (2008). Dinámica de estereotipos de género y poder: un estudio transcultural. Revista de Psicología Social, 23(2), 213-219. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1174/021347408784135788

Magnuson, M.J., & Dundes, L. (2008). Gender Differences in ‘Social Portraits’ Reflected in MySpace Profiles. Cyberpsychology & Behavior?: The Impact of the Internet, Multimedia and Virtual Reality on Behavior and Society, 11(2), 239-41. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cpb.2007.0089

Manago, A.M., Graham, M.B., Greenfield, P.M., & Salimkhan, G. (2008). Self-presentation and Gender on MySpace. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 29(6), 446-458. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.appdev.2008.07.001

Martínez-Sánchez, I., Navarro-Olivas, R., & Yubero-Jiménez, S (2009). Estereotipos de Género entre los adolescentes españoles: imagen prototípica de hombres y mujeres e imagen de uno mismo. Informació Psicológica, 95, 77-86.

Mehdizadeh, S. (2010). Self-Presentation 2.0: Narcissism and Self-Esteem on Facebook. Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, 13(4), 357-364. doi: http://dx.doi.org/cyber.2009.0257

Nguyen, M., Bin, Y.S., & Campbell, A. (2012). Comparing online and offline self-disclosure: A systematic review. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 15(2), 103-111. http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2011.0277

Páez, D., & Fernández, I. (2004). Masculinidad-femineidad como dimensión cultural y del autoconcepto. In I. Fernández, S. Ubillos, E. Zubieta, & D. Páez (Eds.), Psicología social, cultura y educación (pp. 195-207). Madrid: Pearson.

Renau, V., Carbonell, X., & Oberst, U. (2012). Redes sociales on-line, género y construcción del self. Aloma: Revista de Psicologia, Ciències de l’Educació I de l’Esport Blanquerna, 30(2), 97-107.

Renau, V., Oberst, U., & Carbonell, X. (2013). Construcción de la identidad a través de las redes sociales online. Anuario de Psicología, 43(2), 159-70.

Rideout, V. (2012). Social Media, Social Life: How Teens View their Digital Lives. San Francisco: Common Sense Media.

Ruble, D.N., & Martin, C. (1998). Gender Development. In N. Eisenberg & W. Damon (Eds.), Handbook of Child Psychology: Vol. 3. Social, Emotional, and Personality Development (pp. 933–1016). New York: Wiley.

Sampasa-Kanyinga, H., & Lewis, R.F. (2015). Frequent Use of Social Networking Sites Is Associated with Poor Psychological Functioning among Children and Adolescents. Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, 18(7), 380-385. http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2015.0055

Spies-Shapiro, L.A., & Margolin, G. (2014). Growing Up Wired: Social Networking Sites and Adolescent Psychosocial Development. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 17(1), 1-18. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-013-0135-1

Statista (2015).The Statistics Portal. http://goo.gl/8fzikj (2016-02-25).

Strano, M.M. (2008). User Descriptions and Interpretatiions of Self-presentation through Facebook Profile images. Cyberpsychology: Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, 2(2), article 1.

Thompson, S.H., & Lougheed, E. (2012). Frazzled by Facebook? An Exploratory Study of Gender differences in social Network Communication among Undergraduate Men and Women. College Student Journal, 46(1), 88–98.

Tifferet, S., & Vilnai-Yavetz, I. (2014). Gender Differences in Facebook Self-presentation: An International Randomized Study. Computers in Human Behavior, 35, 388-399. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2014.03.016

Valkenburg, P., Peter, J., & Schouten, A.P. (2006). Friend Networking Sites and Their Relationship to Adolescents’ Well-Being and Social Self-Esteem. Cyberpsychology & Behavior, 9(5), 584-590. http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cpb.2006.9.584

Vanderhoven, E., Schellens, T., & Valcke, M. (2014). Educating Teens about the Risks on Social Network Sites. An Intervention Study in Secondary Education [Enseñar a los adolescentes los riesgos de las redes sociales: Una propuesta de intervención en Secundaria]. Comunicar, 22(43), 123-132. http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-12

Whitley, B.E., & Bernard, E. (1985). Sex-role Orientation and Psychological Well-being: Two Meta-analyses. Sex Roles, 12(1-2), 207-225. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00288048

Williams, W., & D’Alessandro, J.(1994). A Comparison of Three Measures of Androgyny and their Relationship to Psychological Adjustment. Journal of Social Behavior & Personality, 9(3), 469-480.

Woo, M., & Oei, T.P. (2006). The MMPI?2 Gender?Masculine and Gender?Feminine scales: Gender Roles as Predictors of Psychological Health in Clinical Patients. International Journal of Psychology, 41(5), 413-422. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00207590500412185

Woodhill, B.M., & Samuels, C.A. (2003). Positive and Negative Androgyny and their Relationship with Psychological Health and Well-being. Sex Roles, 48(11-12), 555-565. http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1023531530272

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/06/16
Accepted on 30/06/16
Submitted on 30/06/16

Volume 24, Issue 2, 2016
DOI: 10.3916/C48-2016-08
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 3
Views 1
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?