Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The paper presents the results of a survey of 1,552 journalism students from five public universities in Spain during academic year 2011-12. The research addresses two objectives: how students evaluate journalism as a degree subject and whether they believe they need this qualification to be a journalist. The results indicate that most students believe the journalism courses are adequate, but almost 25% consider them unnecessary. Students acknowledge the quality of the training received at the specialist faculties but the percentage in Spain is lower than in other countries in the study. A multiple linear regression was used to discover the variables that explain this evaluation. The most influential variable is the course enrolled on, followed by the functions the respondents assign to the faculty. The paper has used data from the largest sample on this subject taken so far, which also includes all courses and data on graduates completing their first university course in journalism as part of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA). This study can be a valuable starting point for further research to inform decision-making on the subject. This research is part of the «Journalism Students Project» with participants from seven countries: Australia, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, Spain, Switzerland and the United States.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction and state of the question

University courses in Journalism have been an integral part of higher education in Spain since the 1940s. At present, some 80% of working journalists in Spain have a qualification in the subject (Farias, 2011). Yet there is still controversy over the educational model and its usage, how long the course should last, the direction and quality of study programs and the end result. Courses have gradually updated to respond to market demands, professional associations and society needs in general. However, it is difficult to evaluate the success of such measures over the past decade, especially those linked to the European Higher Education Area (EHEA), due to the lack of empirical research. This study aims to provide empirical data for an assessment of the suitability of the current course model for Journalism in Spain and the quality of teaching in the faculties, based on the attitudes and perceptions of a sample of students (n>1,500) from five public universities.

1.1. Journalism at universities in Spain

There is overall consensus on the dilemma facing journalism between the type of training proposed by academics and by press corporations. The response has generated five different training options: university, a mixture of professional schools and universities, professional schools, in-house training and university courses, and other media institutions and trade unions (Deuze, 2006: 22). In Spain, Pestano, Rodríguez and Del Ponti (2011) have identified four models: traditional, company-school, totalitarian interventionism and university. The latter is studied in this research.

A ministerial decree in 1971 authorized Journalism to be incorporated as a university degree course. The Information Sciences faculty of the University of Navarra was formally recognized, and faculties in Madrid and Barcelona were established. The return of democracy in the late 1970s saw the creation of a different framework for Journalism which now required a new type of professional. In the 1980s, seven more centers opened, 12 faculties were set up in the 90s and the new millennium brought 16 more. By 2013, 37 faculties (44% private) were teaching Journalism as a degree subject (ANECA, 2013). In 2011, there were around 19,000 Journalism students, with 2,640 new graduates joining the 74,923 who had graduated between 1976 and 2011 (INE, 2013). Although the number of graduates is deemed excessive in terms of demand (Farias & Roses, 2009), it is still one of the most popular courses among undergraduates and the academic entry requirements are high.

1.2. Evolution of the teaching model

Faculties in Spain initially adopted a humanistic teaching model (Cantarero, 2002) rather than the professional approach based on practical experience, as occurs in Anglo-Saxon countries. Since the majority of teachers came from areas such as Sociology, Philology and the Political Sciences, early study plans prioritized theoretical over practical content. In the 90s, with the emergence of new faculties, these study plans were modified partly as a result of criticism from other academics. Galdón (1992: 11) mentions the «educational nonsenses generated by a positivist bureaucratic conception of education». Later, courses acquired content that was closer to the reality of professional journalism (López-García, 2010), which included practical work experience based on agreements between universities and press corporations, a development which has also been analysed (Lamuedra, 2007). This transition also had to cope with overcrowded lecture halls, low investment and the use of didactic methods that left much to be desired (Ortega & Humanes, 2000). This context only partially improved with the reforms carried out in accordance with the EHEA. A framework was established based on the recognition of professional profiles, as demanded by many academics (Real, 2005), and on learning practical skills instead of accumulating knowledge. «The White Book on University Degrees in Communication» (2005) set out two important objectives: professional competences for compiling, selecting and transmission of information in different journalistic genres and formats; and, what Reese calls, «habits of mind» (1999: 75), knowledge and the logics of thought that enable a journalist to report, analyze and interpret social and political events to contribute to citizens being well-informed. The combination of these two necessities influenced the development of study plans, which became a mixed model with faculties combining theoretical training in Communication Sciences with a practical orientation. So, current study plans enhance practical training, with the subsequent effect on content and methodologies, and are more tailored to the needs of society (Vadillo, Lazo & Cabrera, 2010; García & García, 2009). Yet, every now and then universities question the evolution of such reforms (Aunión, 2011) and point to the lack of government investment.

1.3. The point of view of students and professionals

There has been some research on the level of satisfaction among journalists regarding the training they received at communication faculties in Spain. Canel, Sánchez and Rodríguez (2000: 2) reported that 60.3% of journalists believed it was important to get a degree in the subject, yet the perception among graduates of the quality of the teaching was far from positive. The White Book (ANECA, 2005) compiled data from two studies carried out at the University of Santiago de Compostela (USC) and the Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB). Half the graduates at the USC polled from 1995 to 2002 stated that their education had been «mediocre» although 40% classified it as «good», whereas 64.7% of Journalism graduates at the UAB were moderately satisfied with their course in 2000. Although the samples were small, later studies based on bigger samples corroborated this trend. About 40% of journalists surveyed in subsequent polls (Farias, 2008-2011) classified faculty teaching in the subject as «mediocre». Gómez and Roses (2013) found similar tendencies in journalists’ assessment of their training across the generations; graduates in 2011 classified their courses in equal measure as those who left university in 1976. However, the younger journalists were less critical of their practical training than their older colleagues; so, the reform of study plans in the 90s did not improve the general outlook on training but it did reduce concerns over the diminished proportion of time given to practical work in the degree course among younger journalists.

Other studies have examined the assessments made by Journalism students during the course. Academics in Spain tend to ignore this area of empirical research, but when they have ventured to do so, they have only taken small samples or carried out particular case studies that do not allow us to generalize. A 1999 study by Ortega and Humanes found that only 39.2% of students (n=189) stated that their faculties provided them with the best possible training to become a journalist (2000: 162). A later study showed that students (n=137) defined their ideal profile of a journalist as a person with experience, with good sources of information, audacious and with an easy social manner, while the specialist knowledge and formal education provided by the faculties was deemed to be secondary. The White Book (ANECA, 2005) includes a survey of students but the sample size (n=51) (ANECA, 2005: 29) negates the validity of the results as a generalization of student beliefs (ANECA, 2005: 118). Sierra (2010) found that satisfaction with their course among final-year undergraduates in Journalism at the University of San Pablo CEU (n=40) was 6.9 out of 10, similar to another study (Sierra, Sotelo & Cabezuelo, 2010) at the Cardenal Herrera CEU University in Valencia (n=40) which scored 7.4. In the case of on-line undergraduate Journalism students (n=121) at the Rey Juan Carlos University (URJC), 65% rated their educational experience as «positive» (Gómez-Escalonilla, Santín & Mathieu, 2011). Given that previous studies neither provide sufficient nor recent empirical data, this article refers back to two basic questions: whether it is necessary to take a graduate course in Journalism in order to work as a journalist, and the evaluation of the quality of teaching.

1.4. Research questions and hypotheses

In line with trends mapped out in previous studies based on small local samples of students (ANECA, 2005; Sierra, 2010; Sierra, Sotelo & Cabezuelo, 2010) and working journalists (Canel, Sánchez & Rodríguez, 2000; Farias, 2011), we set out the following hypotheses:

• H1: Journalism students in Spain will continue the trend to rate the teaching received at the faculty favourably.

As a strategy to better interpret the results of the students’ assessments, we also need to consider the following research question:

• RQ1: Compared to other countries, do students rate the university education in Journalism received in Spain better than their foreign counterparts?

• H2: Journalism students will express their need to study Journalism in order to work as journalists.

We also analyzed student evaluation of teaching based on a search for statistical relations with a set of individual variables. No previous study in this area identified the possible individual factors that enable us to predict a positive or negative assessment of the teaching received at the faculty. So, we need to ask:

RQ2: What are the individual variables that predict a negative evaluation of the training imparted at Spanish universities? We wish to clarify if the type of profession chosen, the acquisition of practical work experience and the importance given to theoretical and practical training are factors that predict the outcome of the students’ assessment of the training received at Journalism faculties.

The identification of individual predictors is useful in that they enable us to locate the groups that are most critical, and to explain the motives for such concern about the teaching of Journalism at universities.

2. Material and method

This work is part of an investigation that compares Journalism students’ opinions in seven countries: Australia, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, Spain, Switzerland and the USA (Mellado & al., 2012). It is a cross-sectional survey, and the questionnaire includes the dependent variable «the evaluation of the teaching received at the faculty», as well as demographic information and other indicators which this study analyzes as independent variables.

The study population consisted of Journalism students in Spain who, in 2012 when the field work was carried out, numbered some 19,000. For convenience, based on our network of academic collaborators around the country, we selected the following five public universities for the survey: the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM), the Rey Juan Carlos University (URJC), the University of Sevilla1, the University of Málaga and the Jaume I of Castellón University. The characteristics of the survey mean that the results cannot be totally generalized since private universities or universities in other regions of Spain, such as Catalonia with a considerable number of Journalism students, are not represented here. Nevertheless, this is the biggest and most heterogeneous sample used for empirical studies on this topic comparing Spain to other countries (Splichal & Sparks, 1994; Sanders & al., 2008).

In order to get the biggest sample possible, we polled students in each year of the Journalism courses, and the field work was carried out in the early weeks of the first semester in 2011-12. Students were given a printed copy of the questionnaire during a timetabled class. Students who did not complete the questionnaire were either not interested in taking part or were absent on the day the survey was presented. The number of completed questionnaires was 1,552. Table 1 shows the basic characteristics of the sample.

We used descriptive statistical techniques to verify or refute H1 and H2. The dependent variable –Evaluation of teaching received– was activated from a five-point variable (1=Very bad. 5=Very good). RQ1 was resolved via the application of the ANOVA2 technique to a factor for the comparison of the dependent variable averages. Finally, we used multiple linear regression to answer RQ2. The possible predictors were added to the model in two blocks via the «Introduce» technique.

• Variables included in the first block:

Faculty. Since it was the teaching at each of these universities that was the reference point of the attitudes we studied, it was convenient to control the effect of this variable on the model to be able to examine the effect of the individual factors in an independent way. The original categorical variable came into operation in five dummy3 variables. SPSS automatically extracted one of the faculties from the equation to avoid collinearity problems.

• Variables included in the second block:

Gender. Dummy variable (1=Man).

Year. This indicates if the participant is studying4 at the (1) Start, (2) Half-way point or (3) End of the course at the time of the survey. Of those surveyed, 28.1% were at the beginning of the course, 52.5% half-way through and 19.4% were in the final or penultimate year of their studies.

Previous Studies. This dummy variable indicates whether the student had already studied for another qualification (1=Student has already got another qualification). Only 9.2% had studied for another qualification.

Professional experience. The dummy variable indicates those students who have already done paid work as journalists during their course (1=Professional experience). 10.2% had already acquired professional experience.

Reasons for studying Journalism. This categorical variable has 13 response options (1=I could not complete my studies in another subject. 2=I could not get on the degree course I wanted. 3=It is an easy degree. 4=I have journalistic talent / I like to write. 5=I like Journalism as a profession. 6=To change society. 7=For the money I can earn as a journalist. 8=The opportunity to cover scandals. 9=To be famous. 10=Because I like to travel. 11=To meet interesting people. 12=Other. 99=No answer given). This was transformed into 11 dummy variables which included only those variables that represented at least 4% of cases, in order to avoid collinearity problems. A total of 49.6% decided to study Journalism because they liked it as a profession; 24.1% took it up because they believed they had a talent for reporting or because they like to write, and 7.1% said they studied Journalism as a means to change society. The remaining options scored under 5%.

Career paths. This categorical variable has five options: 1) News media; 2) Entertainment news: 3) Teaching and Research; 4) Public relations/Corporate communication; 5) No response. This was transformed into five dummy variables, with 69.9% of students stating they would like to work in news media; 16.9% preferred entertainment news, 7.2% corporate communication and 6% teaching or scientific research. The variable «I would like to work in news media» was extracted from the equation after it was found to cause collinearity problems.

Importance attached to theory in the course. Two variables were used from a set of 20 factors that refer to teaching functions in the communication faculty (Mellado & Subervi. 2012). The first uses a five-point scale (1=Not important. 5=Very important) to indicate how important it is for the student that the faculty prioritizes theoretical training. The mathematical average (M) of the scores shows that students consider theory as no more than quite important (M=3.25. Standard Deviation [SD]=1.054). The second variable demonstrates the importance it has for the student that the faculty helps them to develop critical thought and reflection. The average score reveals that students consider this to be very important (M=4.43. SD= 0.850).

Importance attached to work practice on the course. Three variables were used to refer to teaching functions at the communication faculty (Mellado & Subervi. 2012). The first showed how important it was (1=Not important. 5=Very important) for the student that the faculty prioritized practical work experience as a fundamental tool for training them as journalists. The students considered this to be very important (M=4.33. SD=0.892). The second variable referred to the importance attributed to the fact that the faculty develops practical journalistic tasks in real settings (M=4.29. SD=0.861). The third variable indicates the importance the faculty gives to perfecting professional techniques during the course, which the students considered to be very important (M=4.03. SD=0.918).

3. Results

The students do not have a high opinion of the Journalism courses they are studying. The notion that their training is «Mediocre» is widespread in the survey (M=3.23. SD=0.855). And although the number of students who have a positive opinion of their training was almost double those who were highly critical (Table 2), the evaluation was less positive than that in previous studies (Sierra. Sotelo & Cabezuelo. 2010). On the other hand, the evaluation in our study is on a similar level, although somewhat more benevolent, to that made by graduates in the previous decade (M= 3.21. SD=0.927. n=221), according to a study by Gómez and Roses (2013). In line with the data collected, we can say that H1, which established that the students would tend to evaluate teaching at the faculty positively, is proven.

This assessment by Spanish students of Journalism can be better interpreted when compared to the evaluations of other Journalism students in foreign countries regarding their training to enter the profession. In response to RQ1, which asked if Journalism training in Spain was rated better or worse than in other countries in the study5, the ANOVA test revealed some significant differences, Welch’s F [F(5. 1244.074)= 83.29. p<0.001] representing the variances between statistically different groups. In addition, post-hoc tests confirmed that the evaluation of Spanish students was significantly more negative (p<0.001) than that in Mexico, Australia and the USA, according to data obtained from the Dunnet T3 test. The highest evaluation came from Australia (M= 3.93) followed by the USA (M=3.78) and Mexico (M=3.52), while the worst assessment was given by students in Chile (M=3.18), then Spain (M=3.23) and Brazil (3.29).

H2 is proved by a large margin, since 81.9% of students polled stated that they believed they needed a qualification in Journalism to work as a journalist.

RQ2 asked about the individual variables that would predict the rating given by Journalism students of the training they received at faculties in Spain. Regression analysis indicated that the model had only a modest predictive capability since the predictors included could explain no more than 22.1% of the variance. The final model is statistically significant in line with the ANOVA F statistic [F(21. 1450)= 20.898. p<0.001], which reveals that the relation between the evaluation of the teaching and the set of predictors tested is statistically significant (see table 3). The analysis clarified that the faculty where the student studies influences the assessment of the training received. Students at the Jaume I University had a more favourable opinion of their course than those at the other four universities in the study. With the organizational level controlled, it was shown that the individual variables included in the final model had a greater influence on the criterion variable than the faculty where Journalism was studied. The regression analysis specifically proved that the most important predictor is the course, showing that the students at the start of the course have a more positive outlook with regard to the training received. The analysis also showed that those who had decided to study Journalism because they are attracted by the profession give a higher rating to the quality of instruction received. However, those who had decided to do this degree in order to cover scandals gave it a lower rating. Another aspect was that the variable in which students expressed a preference for a certain career path also generated a negative evaluation of the training. This refers to those students who want to go into teaching or research, and those who want to develop a career in entertainment news reporting, both of whom were unimpressed by their training. The regression analysis showed that the students who attached greater importance to the development of critical thought and who emphasized the importance of theory stated they were happy with their training, whereas those for whom practical work performed within real journalistic settings was important rated their education poorly. Students who had had previous work experience were the most critical of standards at the faculties.

4. Conclusions

The examination and analysis of the study data have provided us with some clear conclusions:

• Although the majority of students state that the quality of their Journalism courses is adequate in terms of preparation for working in the profession, we note that almost a quarter consider it unnecessary to actually finish the course in order to start work as a journalist. These results are consistent with the opinions of a large number of working journalists in Spain who have a degree in the subject.

• Spanish students acknowledged the quality of the training received at Journalism faculties, but by a very small margin. So, although the average evaluation can be classified as a «pass», it is hardly a ringing endorsement. This is more significant when compared with the assessments of students of Journalism in the six other countries in the survey. Spanish faculties are rated second lowest of the seven countries, only slightly better than Chile, which should encourage debate in Spain as to why this evaluation is so low and the changes that could be made to improve study programs and teaching methods.

• The regression analysis revealed the scant explanatory capacity of the center where the student studied, which underlines the generalized nature of the students’ evaluation of the study programs they follow. Significant among the individual variables is the increasingly negative assessment given by students the longer they study the course, which had the most relevant coefficient (-.385). Equally significant was the collinearity of this variable when referring to experience gained in the working environment, as it seems that students tend to finish their academic training with a feeling of disappointment that builds up during the course.

In a similar vein, we have the data covering the importance attached to the teaching functions of the faculty. For although those who give more importance to theory and academic input look more favourably on these functions, others who demand that their study plans adapt to the needs of the current professional profile of journalists are not so positive. So, these students see that the difference between the training at university and the realities of professional journalism is still considerable, which affects the evaluation of the education they receive at the faculty. The results for Spain are similar to those in other contexts with models that resemble the Spanish model, and there are also similarities in other models of a more practical orientation (Skinner, Gasher & Compton. 2001; De-Burgh. 2003; Nolan. 2008; Vlad & al., 2013).

It is also significant that those students who want to go into teaching or do research are also negative about the quality of instruction received. Perhaps the study plans of the faculties in the survey do not match the expectations of those who wish to follow this career path.

Regarding research reach, this is the biggest survey sample taken so far, which also straddles students in each year of the course and uses data for the first graduates in Journalism within the new European Higher Education Area (EHEA). So, this could be a valuable starting point for future studies to help decision-makers in the academic setting. Two factors need to be taken into account for future research: the sample design, so that data is more representative, and the construction of new variables to improve the explanatory capacity of the multiple regression analysis.

Notes

1 The sample from the University of Sevilla was not used in the corpus of the working data of Mellado and colloborators (2013) but it was added later to the database for use in this analysis of Journalism students in Spain.

2 The ANOVA variance analysis of a factor is a type of bivariate statistical analysis for contrasting, if there are differences in the average scores in the dependent variable of the groups formed on the basis of an independent variable with more than two categories.

3 Dummy variables with dichotomic variables with values of 0 and 1, in which 1 represents the presence of a quality. They are useful for multiple regression analysis when the original variable is not dichotomic.

4 Some universities in the sample offered four-year degree courses, others five, so the course variable was recoded. In the four-year courses, the first two years were coded as «Start», the third year as «Half-way point» and the fourth year as course «End». In the five-year courses, the first two years were classified as «Start», the third and fourth year as «Half-way point» and the fifth year as «End».

5 The students in Switzerland did not answer the question on the evalation of the quality of the teaching received.

Acknowledgements

We wish to thank Kris Kodrick, Carolyn Byerly, Sallie Hughes, Claudia Lagos, Paulina Salinas, Carlos Del Valle, Rodrigo Araya, Pedro Farias, José Álvarez, Noelia García, Estefanía Vera, Andreu Casero, Enric Saperas, Joaquín López del Ramo, Kathryn Bowd, Leo Bowman, Trevor Cullen, Beate Josephi, Michael Meadows, Lousie North, Dione Oliveira, Janara Sousa, Kenia Ferreira, Sonia Moreira, Gabriel Corral and David González for their help in gathering the data which was vital for this study.


Draft Content 841022064-27266-en075.jpg


Draft Content 841022064-27266-en076.jpg


Draft Content 841022064-27266-en077.jpg

References

Agencia Nacional de la Evaluación de la Calidad y la Acreditación (ANECA) (2005). Libro Blanco de los Títulos de Grado de Comunicación. (www.aneca.es/var/media/-150336/libroblanco_comunicacion_def.pdf) (10-03-2013).

Agencia Nacional de la Evaluación de la Calidad y la Acreditación (ANECA) (2013). Qué estudiar y dónde. (http://srv.aneca.es/ListadoTitulos/busqueda-titulaciones) (10-03-2013).

Aunión, J.E. (2011). Recortes y burocracia lastran Bolonia. El País, 17-07-2011). (http://elpais.com/diario/2011/07/17/sociedad/1310853602_850215.html).

Canel, M.J., Sánchez, J.J. & Rodríguez, R. (2000). Periodistas al descubierto. Retrato de los profesionales de la información. Madrid: Centro de Investigaciones Sociológicas.

Cantarero, M.A. (2002). Formación de comunicadores sociales. Modelos curriculares, ostracismo académico, rutas sociales y esperanzas. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 52. (www.ull.es/publicaciones/latina/20025209CANTAREROxi.htm) (10-03-2013).

De-Burgh, H. (2003). Skills are not Enough. The Case for Journalism as an Academic Discipline. Journalism, 4(1), 95-112.

Deuze, M. (2006). Global Journalism Education: A Conceptual Approach. Journalism Studies, 7(1), 19-34.

Farias, P. & Roses, S. (2009). La crisis acelera el cambio del negocio informativo. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico, 15, 15-32.

Farias, P. (Dir.) (2011). Informe anual de la profesión periodística, 2008-11. Madrid: Asociación de la Prensa de Madrid.

Galdón, G. (1992). Cualidades y formación del periodista. Comunicación y Sociedad, 5(1). (www.unav.es/fcom/comunicacionysociedad/es/articulo.php?art_id=269#C02) (10-03-2013).

García-Avilés, J.A. & García-Jiménez, L. (2009). La enseñanza de Teorías de la Comunicación en España: análisis y reflexión ante la Convergencia de Bolonia. Zer, 14(27), 271-293.

Gómez, B. & Roses, S. (2013). Valoración de los profesionales sobre la enseñanza del Periodismo en España. Un Análisis intergeneracional. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico, 19, 1.

Gómez-Escalonilla, G., Santín, M. & Mathieu, G. (2011). La educación universitaria on-line en el Periodismo desde la visión del estudiante. Comunicar, 37(19), 73-80.

Instituto Nacional de Estadística (INE) (2013). Base estadística de enseñanza universitaria. (www.ine.es/jaxi/menu.do?type=pcaxis&path=/t13/p405&file=inebase) (09-012013).

Jones, D.E. (1998). Investigación sobre comunicación en España: evolución y perspectivas. Zer, 3, 13-51.

Lamuedra, M. (2007). Estudiantes de Periodismo y prácticas profesionales: el reto del aprendizaje. Comunicar, 28, 203-211.

López-García, X. (2010). La formación de los periodistas en el siglo XXI en Brasil, España, Portugal y Puerto Rico. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 65, 231-243.?(DOI: 10.4185/RLCS-65-2010-896-231-243).

Mellado, C. & Subervi, F. (2012). Mapping Educational Role Dimensions among Chilean Journalism and Mass Communication Educators. Journalism Practice, iFirst Article, 1-17. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2012.718584).

Mellado, C., Hanusch, F., Humanes, M.L. & al. (2012). The Pre-Socialization of Future Journalists. Journalism Studies, iFirst Article, 1-18. (DOI: 10.1080/1461670X.2012.746006).

Nolan, D. (2008). Journalism, Education and the Formation of Public Subjects. Journalism, 9(6), 733-749.

Ortega, F. & Humanes, M.L. (1999). Periodistas del siglo XXI. Sus motivaciones y expectativas profesionales. CIC, 5, 153-170.

Ortega, F. & Humanes, M.L. (2000). Algo más que periodistas. Sociología de una profesión. Barcelona: Ariel.

Pestano, J.M., Rodríguez, C. & Del-Ponti, P. (2011). Transformaciones en los modelos de formación de periodistas en España. El reto europeo. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico, 17(2), 401-415.

Real, E. (2005). Algunos interrogantes en torno a los estudios de Periodismo ante el nuevo Espacio Europeo de Educación Superior. Cuadernos de Información y Comunicación, 10, 267-284.

Reese, S. (1999). The Progressive Potential of Journalism Education: Recasting the Academic versus Professional Debate. The Harvard International Journal of Press/Politics, 4(4), 70-94.

Sanders, K., Hanna, M., Berganza, M.R. & Aranda, J.J. (2008). Becoming Journalists A Comparison of the Professional Attitudes and Values of British and Spanish Journalism Students. European Journal of Communication, 23(2), 133-152.

Sierra, J. (2010). Competencias profesionales y empleo en el futuro periodista. El caso de los estudiantes de Periodismo de la Universidad San Pablo CEU. Icono14, 8(2), 156-175.

Sierra, J., Sotelo, J. & Cabezuelo, F. (2010). Competencias profesionales y empleo del futuro periodista: el caso de los estudiantes de Periodismo de la UCH-CEU. @tic, Julio-Diciembre (5), 8-19.

Skinner, D., Gasher, M.J. & Compton, J. (2001). Putting Theory to Practice A Critical Approach to Journalism

Splichal, S. & Sparks, C. (1994). Journalists for the 21st Century: Tendencies of Professionalization among First-year Students in 22 Countries. Norwood, NJ: Ablex Publishing Corporation. Studies. Journalism, 2(3), 341-360.

Vadillo, N., Lazo, C.M. & Cabrera, D. (2010). Proceso de adaptación de los estudios de Comunicación al EEES. El caso de Aragón, una comunidad pionera. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 65, 187-203. (DOI: 10.4185/RLCS-65-2010-892-187-203).

Vlad, T., Becker, L.B., Simpson, H. & Kalpen, K. (2013). 2012 Annual Survey of Journalism and Mass Communication Enrollments. James M. Cox Jr. Center for International Mass Communication Training and Research Grady College of Journalism & Mass Communication, University of Georgia. (www.grady.uga.edu/annualsur-veys/Enrollment_Survey/Enrollment_2012/Enroll12Merged.pdf) (22-08-2013).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

El artículo presenta los resultados de una encuesta realizada a una muestra de 1.552 estudiantes de Periodismo de cinco universidades públicas durante el curso 2011-12. La investigación aborda dos objetivos: conocer la valoración de los estudiantes respecto a la titulación y averiguar si consideran necesarios los estudios de Periodismo para ejercer la profesión. Los resultados indican que los estudiantes creen apropiados los estudios de Periodismo, pero casi una cuarta parte los considera innecesarios. Los estudiantes valoran la calidad de la formación recibida en las facultades con un aprobado, por debajo de la opinión de la mayoría de los estudiantes de los otros países del estudio. Se ha realizado una regresión lineal múltiple para encontrar qué variables explican dicha valoración; la más influyente es el curso matriculado, seguida de las funciones que los encuestados otorgan a las facultades. El trabajo presenta la virtud de haber contado con datos a partir de la mayor muestra utilizada hasta el momento, que además incluye todos los cursos y datos para las primeras promociones de alumnos de Grado según el Espacio Europeo de En señanza Superior (EEES). Puede ser un punto de partida valioso para posteriores estudios que permitan tomar decisiones a los responsables académicos. El estudio forma parte del «Journalism Students Proyect» con estudiantes de Periodismo de Australia, Brasil, Chile, México, España, Suiza y Estados Unidos.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

Los estudios de Periodismo forman parte de la oferta académica de las universidades españolas desde hace más de 40 años. Actualmente, más del 80% de los periodistas que trabajan en España tienen la titulación universitaria (Farias, 2011). A pesar de eso, sigue existiendo controversia sobre el modelo educativo y su utilidad, el ciclo adecuado para la formación, la orientación y calidad de los programas y sobre el resultado final en el aprendizaje. Los estudios se han modificado paulatinamente para responder a las exigencias del mercado laboral, de las organizaciones profesionales y de la sociedad. Sin embargo, es difícil de evaluar el éxito de las medidas implantadas en la última década, especialmente las vinculadas al Espacio Europeo de Educación Superior (EEES), debido a la carestía de investigaciones empíricas. Este trabajo pretende aportar datos empíricos que permitan aproximar una valoración sobre la idoneidad del actual modelo de estudios de Periodismo en España y la calidad de la enseñanza impartida en las facultades a partir de las actitudes y percepciones de una muestra de estudiantes (n > 1.500) de cinco universidades públicas.

1.1. Los estudios universitarios de Periodismo en España

Globalmente, existe consenso sobre el dilema entre la formación propuesta por los académicos y las empresas periodísticas. La respuesta ha generado cinco sistemas de formación: el universitario, el mixto de escuelas profesionales y universidades, las escuelas profesionales, la formación en las empresas y cursos en universidades o en otras instituciones como medios, sindicatos (Deuze, 2006: 22). En España, Pestano, Rodríguez y Del Ponti (2011) identificaron cuatro modelos: artesanal, empresa-escuela, intervencionismo totalitario y universitario, que es el estudiado aquí.

Un decreto ministerial de 1971 dio la entrada en la Universidad a los estudios de Periodismo. Se reconocía oficialmente la facultad de Ciencias de la Información de la Universidad de Navarra y la creación de las facultades en Madrid y Barcelona. La nueva democracia generó un marco diferente para el Periodismo, que necesitaba nuevos profesionales. En los ochenta, se abrieron siete centros; en los noventa, doce facultades; en la década de 2000, dieciséis más. En 2013, 37 facultades (44% privadas) imparten la titulación de Periodismo (ANECA, 2013). En 2011, había alrededor de 19.000 matriculados y se generaron un total de 2.640 nuevos egresados que se sumaron a las 74.923 personas que completaron los estudios entre 1976 y 2011 (INE, 2013). Aunque el número de egresados ha sido considerado excesivo de acuerdo a la demanda real del mercado de empleo periodístico (Farias & Roses, 2009), es una de las titulaciones preferidas por los preuniversitarios según las altas notas de corte.

1.2. Evolución del modelo de enseñanza

Las facultades españolas adoptaron inicialmente un modelo humanístico de enseñanza (Cantarero, 2002) que se opone al modelo profesionalista, orientado a la práctica, implantado en los países anglosajones. Al proceder la mayor parte del profesorado de otras áreas de conocimiento afines como la Sociología, la Filología o las Ciencias Políticas, los primeros planes de estudio priorizaban los contenidos teóricos frente a los prácticos. En los años noventa, coincidiendo con la creación de nuevas facultades, se modificaron los planes de estudio, criticados por parte de la academia. Galdón (1992: 11) habla de «despropósitos educativos generados por una concepción positivista burocrática de la enseñanza». En los años siguientes, se dio cabida a contenidos más cercanos al ejercicio profesional (López-García, 2010), incluyendo la realización de prácticas en el marco de acuerdos universidad-empresa, cuyo desarrollo también ha sido objeto de análisis y crítica (Lamuedra, 2007). Esta transición tuvo que bregar con aulas masificadas, escasez de inversión y el uso de métodos didácticos poco convenientes para la formación de los periodistas (Ortega & Humanes, 2000). Parte de ese contexto ha seguido siendo adverso durante la implantación de la reforma acorde con el EEES. Se ha establecido un marco basado en el reconocimiento de perfiles profesionales, tal y como se demandaba desde parte de la academia (Real, 2005), y en el aprendizaje de competencias en vez de en la acumulación de conocimiento. «El Libro Blanco de Títulos de Grado en Comunicación» (2005) establece dos grandes objetivos. Por un lado, competencias profesionales de recopilación, selección y transmisión de información en los diferentes géneros y formatos periodísticos. Por otro, lo que Reese (1999: 75) ha llamado «habits of mind», conocimientos y lógicas de pensamiento que capaciten para informar, analizar e interpretar los acontecimientos sociales y políticos, para contribuir a una ciudadanía bien informada. La combinación de estas dos necesidades se ha traducido en unos planes de estudio que siguen un modelo mixto, en el que las facultades asumen la formación más teórica de las Ciencias de la Comunicación junto a la orientación práctica. Por tanto, los últimos planes de estudio han potenciado la orientación práctica y han acondicionado sus contenidos y metodologías a las necesidades de la sociedad (Vadillo, Lazo & Cabrera, 2010; García & García, 2009). En cualquier caso, las universidades han cuestionado periódicamente el devenir de la reforma (Aunión, 2011), subrayando la insuficiente inversión del Estado.

1.3. El punto de vista de profesionales y estudiantes

Algunas investigaciones se han preocupado por examinar el grado de satisfacción de los periodistas respecto a la formación recibida en las facultades de comunicación españolas. Aunque Canel, Sánchez y Rodríguez (2000: 2) informaron de que el 60,3% de los periodistas de España consideraba importante estudiar la titulación, la percepción de los egresados sobre la calidad de la enseñanza recibida no puede catalogarse del todo positiva. El Libro Blanco (ANECA, 2005) recoge los resultados de dos estudios realizados en la Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (USC) y la Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona (UAB). La mitad de los egresados de la USC del periodo 1995-2002 calificó la formación recibida de «regular» aunque un 40% la estimó como «buena». Por otra parte, el 64,7% de los licenciados en Periodismo del año 2000 de la UAB expresaron un grado de satisfacción intermedio con la carrera. Aunque las muestras empleadas eran reducidas, estudios posteriores realizados a grandes muestras de periodistas corroboraron esta tendencia. Alrededor de un 40% de los periodistas encuestados en los sucesivos informes de la profesión periodística (Farias, 2008-2011) han calificado como «regular» la labor desempeñada por las facultades. Asimismo, Gómez y Roses (2013) no hallaron diferencias en la valoración emitida por periodistas de distintas generaciones, es decir, los egresados en 2011 valoraban igual su formación que, por ejemplo, quienes terminaron en 1976. Sin embargo, los periodistas más jóvenes criticaron menos la formación práctica que los veteranos; por tanto, la reforma de los planes de estudios de los noventa no sirvió para mejorar la valoración general de la formación, pero, sí redujo la desazón sobre la reducida carga práctica de la titulación entre las generaciones más jóvenes.

Otras investigaciones han examinado las valoraciones de los estudiantes de Periodismo cuando aún están cursando la titulación. La academia española apenas ha atendido a este objeto de investigación de manera empírica y cuando lo ha hecho, se ha valido de estudios de caso y pequeñas muestras, impidiendo la generalización de los resultados. En su encuesta de 1999, Ortega y Humanes encontraron que sólo el 39,2% de los estudiantes (n=189) afirmaba que las facultades ofrecían la mejor formación para el ejercicio profesional (2000: 162). En un estudio posterior, los estudiantes (n=137) definían su tipo ideal de periodista como un individuo con experiencia, que dispone de buenas fuentes, audaz y con facilidad para las relaciones sociales, mientras que el conocimiento especializado y la educación formal en las facultades quedaban en un segundo plano. El Libro Blanco (ANECA, 2005) incluye una encuesta a los estudiantes, pero el exiguo tamaño de la muestra (n=51) (ANECA, 2005: 29) impide tomar en consideración los resultados y generalizarlos al conjunto de la población estudiantil en España (ANECA, 2005: 118). Sierra (2010) halló que la satisfacción con sus estudios de los alumnos de último curso de Periodismo de la Universidad San Pablo CEU (n=40) ascendía a 6,9 sobre 10. Idéntico planteamiento fue replicado (Sierra, Sotelo & Cabezuelo, 2010) con los estudiantes de la Universidad Cardenal Herrera CEU de Valencia (n=40), obteniendo una valoración de 7,4 sobre 10. En el caso de los alumnos on-line (n=121) del grado de Periodismo impartido en la Universidad Rey Juan Carlos (URJC), el 65% de los estudiantes valoró como «positiva» su experiencia formativa (Gómez-Escalonilla, Santín & Mathieu, 2011). Dado que los estudios previos no aportan datos empíricos suficientes ni recientes, en este artículo se han retomado dos cuestiones básicas: la necesidad de los estudios de Periodismo para ejercer la profesión y la valoración sobre la calidad de la enseñanza recibida.

1.4. Preguntas de investigación e hipótesis

De acuerdo a las tendencias halladas en los estudios previos, realizados sobre pequeñas muestras locales de universitarios (ANECA, 2005; Sierra, 2010; Sierra, Sotelo & Cabezuelo, 2010) y sobre periodistas en activo (Canel, Sánchez & Rodríguez, 2000; Farias, 2011) establecemos las siguientes hipótesis:

• H1: Los estudiantes de Periodismo tenderán a valorar positivamente la enseñanza recibida en las facultades españolas.

Como estrategia para poder interpretar mejor el resultado de la valoración emitida por los estudiantes españoles, es oportuno además plantearse la siguiente pregunta de investigación:

• RQ1: En términos comparativos con otros países, ¿recibe la formación universitaria del Periodismo impartida en España mejor o peor valoración de los estudiantes?

• H2: Los estudiantes de Periodismo manifestarán la necesidad de los estudios de Periodismo para ejercer la profesión.

Además, analizamos la valoración de la enseñanza a partir de la búsqueda de relaciones estadísticas con un conjunto de variables individuales. En ninguno de los estudios previos del área se procedió a identificar los posibles factores individuales que podrían ayudar a predecir la valoración positiva o negativa sobre la enseñanza recibida en las facultades. Por consiguiente, es oportuno preguntarse lo siguiente:

• RQ2: ¿Cuáles son las variables individuales que predicen una valoración negativa de la formación recibida en las facultades españolas? Esto es, queremos esclarecer si el tipo de salida profesional preferida, haber realizado prácticas profesionales y la importancia atribuida a la formación teórica y a la formación práctica son factores predictores de la valoración de la formación recibida en las facultades de Periodismo.

La identificación de los predictores individuales es útil en la medida en que nos permitirán localizar a los grupos más críticos, y explicar los motivos de su desazón hacia la enseñanza universitaria del Periodismo.

2. Material y método

El trabajo forma parte de una investigación comparada a estudiantes de Periodismo en siete países: Australia, Brasil, Chile, México, España, Suiza y Estados Unidos (Mellado & al., 2012). Nos servimos de una encuesta transversal. El cuestionario incluía la variable dependiente «valoración de la enseñanza recibida en la facultad»; así como información de tipo demográfico y otros indicadores, que en este trabajo se analizarán como variables independientes.

La población de estudio la constituyeron los estudiantes de Periodismo de España que en 2012, año en que se realizó el trabajo de campo, ascendía a 19.000 individuos. Usamos un criterio de conveniencia basado en nuestra red de colaboración académica para la selección de las cinco universidades públicas donde se realizó la encuesta: Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad de Sevilla1, Universidad de Málaga y Universidad Jaume I de Castellón. Debido a las características de la muestra, los resultados no son completamente generalizables al no estar representadas, por ejemplo, las universidades privadas y otros territorios del Estado, con un número importante de estudiantes de Periodismo, como Cataluña. En cualquier caso, se trata de la muestra más numerosa y heterogénea empleada en estudios empíricos sobre esta cuestión referida al caso español desde una perspectiva comparada (Splichal & Sparks, 1994; Sanders & al., 2008).

Para conseguir un mayor tamaño muestral, realizamos la encuesta a los estudiantes de todos los cursos de la titulación de Periodismo. El trabajo de campo se realizó durante las primeras semanas del primer semestre del curso 2011-12. Se suministró a los estudiantes una copia impresa de la encuesta durante una clase del horario lectivo. Los alumnos que no cumplimentaron la encuesta fueron aquellos que no estaban interesados en participar o quienes no se encontraban en la clase en el momento en que se llevó a cabo. El total de cuestionarios cumplimentados ascendió a la cifra de 1.552. La tabla 1 informa sobre las características básicas de la muestra.

Usamos técnicas de estadística descriptiva para verificar o refutar H1 y H2. La variable dependiente –Valoración de la enseñanza recibida– fue operacionalizada a partir de una variable de cinco puntos (1= Muy mala, 5=Muy buena). RQ1 fue resuelta mediante la aplicación de la técnica ANOVA2 de un factor para la comparación de las medias de la variable dependiente. Finalmente, empleamos una regresión lineal múltiple para responder RQ2. Los posibles predictores fueron añadidos al modelo en dos bloques mediante la técnica «Introducir».

• Variables incluidas en el primer bloque:

Facultad. Dado que la actividad docente realizada en cada una de las universidades estudiadas es el objeto referencial de la actitud estudiada, consideramos conveniente controlar su efecto en el modelo para poder examinar de manera independiente el efecto de los factores individuales. La variable categórica original se operacionalizó en cinco variables dummy3. SPSS extrajo automáticamente a una de las facultades de la ecuación para evitar problemas de colinealidad.

• Variables incluidas en el segundo bloque:

Sexo. Variable dummy (1=Hombre).

Curso. Indica si el estudiante estaba cursando4 el Inicio (1), Mitad (2) o Final (3) del programa de estudios al ser encuestado. El 28,1% se encontraban en un curso inicial, el 52,5% en un curso intermedio de los estudios y el 19,4%, en uno de los últimos cursos.

Estudios previos. Variable dummy que indica si el estudiante había estudiado otra titulación distinta (1= Tiene estudios previos). Solo el 9,2% había estudiado otra titulación.

Experiencia profesional. Variable dummy que distingue a los estudiantes que han realizado un trabajo periodístico pagado durante sus estudios (1=Experiencia profesional). El 10,2% contaba con experiencia profesional.

Motivos por los que decidió estudiar Periodismo. Se trataba de una variable categórica con 13 opciones de respuesta (1=No pude terminar mis estudios en otra titulación, 2=No entré en la carrera que quería, 3=Es fácil de terminar, 4=Tengo talento para ello / me gusta escribir, 5=Me gusta el Periodismo como profesión, 6=Para poder cambiar la sociedad, 7=Por el dinero que podría ganar como periodista, 8=Por la posibilidad de cubrir escándalos, 9=Para hacerme famoso, 10=Porque me gusta viajar, 11=Para conocer a gente interesante, 12=Otra, 99=No contesta). Fue transformada en 11 variables dummy. Se incluyeron sólo las variables que representaban al menos al 4% de los casos para evitar problemas de colinealidad. El 49,6% decidió estudiar la titulación porque le gustaba el Periodismo como profesión; el 24,1% lo hizo porque considera que tiene talento para ello o porque le gusta escribir, un 7,1% dijo que estudiaba Periodismo por la posibilidad de cambiar la sociedad. El resto de opciones fueron señaladas por menos del 5%.

Salida profesional. Variable categórica con cinco opciones: 1) Medios informativos; 2) Información de entretenimiento; 3) Docencia e Investigación; 4) Relaciones públicas/Comunicación corporativa; 5) No responde. Fue transformada en cuatro variables dummy. Al 69,9% le gustaría trabajar en el futuro en medios informativos, el 16,9% preferiría trabajar en contenidos de entretenimiento, el 7,2% en comunicación corporativa y el 6%, en docencia o investigación científica. La variable «Querría trabajar en medios informativos» fue extraída de la ecuación tras comprobar que generaba problemas de colinealidad.

Importancia atribuida a la teoría en la formación. Se utilizaron dos variables de un set de 20 factores referidos a las funciones docentes de las facultades de comunicación (Mellado & Subervi, 2012). La primera indica, a partir de una escala de cinco puntos (1=Nada importante, 5=Extremadamente importante), cuánto es de relevante para el estudiante que las facultades prioricen la formación teórica. La media aritmética (M) de las puntuaciones indicaba que los estudiantes consideraban la formación teórica solo algo importante (M=3,25, SD (desviación típica)=1,054). La segunda indica cuánto es de relevante para el estudiante que las facultades desarrollen el pensamiento crítico y reflexivo de los alumnos. La media apuntaba a que consideraban esta función como muy importante (M=4.43, SD=0.850).

Importancia atribuida a la práctica en la formación. Se utilizaron tres variables referidas a funciones docentes de las facultades de comunicación (Mellado & Subervi, 2012). La primera indica (1=Nada importante, 5=Extremadamente importante), cuánto es de relevante para el estudiante que las facultades prioricen la práctica como lo fundamental en la formación del periodista. Los estudiantes consideraban la formación práctica algo muy importante (M=4,33, SD= 0,892). La segunda indaga sobre la importancia atribuida a que las facultades promuevan prácticas periodísticas bajo condiciones reales (M=4,29, SD=0,861). La tercera indica la importancia atribuida a acentuar el dominio de las técnicas profesionales en el programa de la carrera, cuestión que fue considerada como muy importante (M=4,03, SD=0,918).

3. Resultados

Los estudiantes tienen una opinión modesta sobre los estudios de Periodismo que están cursando, es decir, la formación se considera «Regular» con un amplio acuerdo entre los encuestados (M=3,23, SD= 0,855). Y, aunque los que tenían una opinión positiva sobre la formación eran aproximadamente el doble que los más críticos (tabla 2), la valoración fue menos positiva que la hallada en estudios anteriores sobre estudiantes (Sierra, Sotelo & Cabezuelo, 2010). Por otra parte, la valoración hallada en nuestro estudio es coincidente, aunque sensiblemente más benévola, con la emitida por los egresados de la última década (M= 3,21, SD=0,927, n=221) según el estudio de Gómez y Roses (2013). De acuerdo a los datos recabados, podemos aceptar la H1 que establecía que los estudiantes tenderían a valorar positivamente la enseñanza en las facultades.

La valoración de los estudiantes españoles puede interpretarse mejor a partir de la comparación de las valoraciones emitidas por los estudiantes de Periodismo de otros países. En respuesta a RQ1, que preguntaba si la formación del Periodismo impartida en España recibía mejor o peor valoración que la de los otros países del estudio5, la prueba ANOVA indicó la existencia de diferencias significativas en la valoración de la formación entre los países analizados, F de Welch [F(5, 1244.074)=83,29, p<0,001], siendo las varianzas entre grupos estadísticamente diferentes. Además, las pruebas post hoc confirmaron que la valoración que recibió España era significativamente más negativa (p<0,001) que la valoración recibida por México, Australia y EEUU de acuerdo a los datos obtenidos con la prueba T3 de Dunnet. La mejor valoración la obtuvo Australia (M=3,93), seguida de Estados Unidos (M=3,78) y México (M=3,52). La peor evaluación recayó en Chile (M=3,18), seguida por España (M=3,23) y Brasil (3,29).

La H2 ha sido ampliamente confirmada, puesto que el 81,9% de los estudiantes encuestados se decantan por la necesidad de los estudios de Periodismo para ejercer la profesión.

RQ2 preguntaba por las variables de tipo individual que predecían la valoración emitida por los estudiantes de Periodismo sobre la formación recibida en las facultades españolas. El análisis de regresión indicó una modesta capacidad predictiva del modelo, ya que los predictores incluidos sólo consiguieron explicar el 22,1% de la varianza. Con todo, el modelo final resulta estadísticamente significativo de acuerdo con el estadístico F del ANOVA, [F(21, 1450)=20,898, p< 0,001], lo que indica que la relación entre la valoración de la enseñanza y el conjunto de predictores testeados es estadísticamente significativa (ver tabla 3). El análisis esclareció que la facultad donde se estudia influye en la valoración de la formación recibida, indicando que los estudiantes de la Universidad Jaume I valoran más positivamente su formación que los de las otras universidades del estudio. Una vez controlado el nivel organizativo, se demostró que las variables individuales incluidas en el modelo final influyen más en la variable criterio que la facultad donde se estudia. Concretamente, la regresión probó que el predictor más importante es el curso, indicando que los alumnos de los cursos iniciales valoran más positivamente la formación recibida. El análisis también demostró que quienes deciden estudiar la titulación porque les gusta el Periodismo como profesión valoran mejor la formación recibida. Sin embargo, los que decidieron estudiar para poder cubrir escándalos la valoran peor. Por otra parte, se evidencia que la preferencia por determinadas salidas laborales penaliza la valoración de la formación. Es el caso de los estudiantes que quieren dedicarse en el futuro a la docencia o la investigación y quienes quieren desarrollar su carrera en el ámbito del entretenimiento. Ambos grupos valoran peor la formación recibida. Finalmente, la regresión determina que los estudiantes que otorgan mayor importancia al pensamiento crítico y a que se enfatice la teoría valoran mejor la formación recibida. Por el contrario, los que atribuyen más importancia a que se promuevan prácticas en condiciones reales valoran peor la formación recibida. Los estudiantes con experiencia laboral también son más críticos con la labor de las facultades.

4. Conclusiones

Observados y analizados los datos del estudio, podemos enunciar las conclusiones más significativas:

• Aunque la mayoría de los estudiantes creen apropiados los estudios de Periodismo como formación para su futura profesión, se observa que casi una cuarta parte de los encuestados considera innecesario completar la titulación para poder ejercer la profesión. Estos resultados son coherentes con la tradición española de un alto número de periodistas en ejercicio que poseen la titulación universitaria.

• Los estudiantes españoles aprobaron por la mínima la calidad de la formación recibida en las facultades de Periodismo. Así, pese a que la valoración promedio pueda alcanzar el calificativo de «aprobado», se trata de un suficiente bajo. Este dato cobra más significado al compararlo con la valoración emitida por los estudiantes de Periodismo de los otros seis países de la muestra. Las facultades españolas reciben la segunda peor valoración, solo por detrás de las chilenas. Ello debería generar una discusión en profundidad sobre las razones que sustentan esta mala valoración y las posibles modificaciones en los programas y métodos de enseñanza.

• El análisis de regresión ha revelado en primer lugar la escasa capacidad explicativa del centro en el que el alumno estudia, lo cual da cuenta de que la valoración de los estudiantes sobre los programas que cursan expresa una opinión generalizada. Entre las variables individuales, destaca que a medida que el alumno avanza en su formación académica su valoración es más negativa, con el coeficiente de mayor peso (-.385). Como además se ha descartado la colinealidad de esta variable con la que se refiere a la experiencia en el mundo laboral, pareciera que los estudiantes completan su formación académica con cierta decepción acumulada en cada curso.

Debemos completar esta idea con los datos sobre la importancia otorgada a las funciones de las facultades. Así, quienes priorizan el carácter teórico y académico de las facultades no las perciben tan negativamente; en el lado contrario se sitúan quienes demandan que los planes de estudio se ajusten a las necesidades de la práctica profesional vigente. Por tanto, al menos a ojos de esos estudiantes, la brecha que separa la formación universitaria del mundo profesional sigue siendo grande, lo que penaliza la valoración que emiten sobre la enseñanza recibida. Los resultados para el caso español son similares en otros contextos con modelos similares al español, pero también en modelos más orientados a la práctica (Skinner, Gasher & Compton, 2001; De-Burgh, 2003; Nolan, 2008; Vlad & al., 2013).

Destaca que los estudiantes que aspiran a dedicarse a la docencia y la investigación tampoco consideren positiva la formación que reciben, quizás los planes de estudio de las facultades de la muestra no están respondiendo adecuadamente a las expectativas de quienes se plantean tales salidas laborales.

En cuanto al alcance de la investigación presentada, hemos de remarcar que se ha realizado la encuesta con la mayor muestra utilizada hasta el momento, que además incluye todos los cursos y con datos para las primeras promociones de alumnos de Grado según el Espacio Europeo. Por lo tanto, pueden ser un punto de partida valioso para posteriores estudios que permitan tomar decisiones a los responsables académicos. No obstante, han de reconsiderarse dos aspectos para futuros trabajos: el diseño muestral para mejorar la representatividad de los datos y la introducción de nuevas variables que nos permitan mejorar la capacidad explicativa de la regresión múltiple.

Notas

1 La muestra de la Universidad de Sevilla no formó parte del corpus de datos del trabajo de Mellado y colaboradores (2013), no obstante, fue incluido con posterioridad a la base para el presente análisis del caso español.

2 El análisis de la varianza ANOVA de un factor es un tipo de análisis estadístico bivariado que permite contrastar si existen diferencias en las puntuaciones medias en la variable dependiente de los grupos formados a partir de una variable independiente con más de dos categorías.

3 Las variables dummy con variables dicotómicas con valores 0 y 1, donde 1 representa la presencia de una cualidad. Son útiles para poder realizar el análisis de regresión múltiple cuando la variable de origen no es dicotómica.

4 Algunas universidades de la muestra impartían títulos de cuatro años de duración; otras, de cinco años. Por ello, la variable curso fue recodificada. En las titulaciones de cuatro años, los dos primeros cursos de codificaron en la categoría «Inicio», el tercer curso en «Mitad» y el cuarto curso en «Final». En las titulaciones de cinco años, los dos primeros cursos se codificaron en la categoría «Inicio», el tercer y el cuarto curso, en «Mitad», y el quinto curso en «Final».

5 Los estudiantes suizos no contestaron a la pregunta sobre valoración de la enseñanza recibida.

Agradecimientos

Queremos expresar nuestra gratitud hacia Kris Kodrick, Carolyn Byerly, Sallie Hughes, Claudia Lagos, Paulina Salinas, Carlos Del Valle, Rodrigo Araya, Pedro Farias, José Álvarez, Noelia García, Estefanía Vera, Andreu Casero, Enric Saperas, Joaquín López del Ramo, Kathryn Bowd, Leo Bowman, Trevor Cullen, Beate Josephi, Michael Meadows, Lousie North, Dione Oliveira, Janara Sousa, Kenia Ferreira, Sonia Moreira, Gabriel Corral, y David González por su ayuda en la recolección de los datos de los que nos valemos en este estudio.


Draft Content 841022064-27266 ov-es075.jpg


Draft Content 841022064-27266 ov-es076.jpg


Draft Content 841022064-27266 ov-es077.jpg

Referencias

Agencia Nacional de la Evaluación de la Calidad y la Acreditación (ANECA) (2005). Libro Blanco de los Títulos de Grado de Comunicación. (www.aneca.es/var/media/-150336/libroblanco_comunicacion_def.pdf) (10-03-2013).

Agencia Nacional de la Evaluación de la Calidad y la Acreditación (ANECA) (2013). Qué estudiar y dónde. (http://srv.aneca.es/ListadoTitulos/busqueda-titulaciones) (10-03-2013).

Aunión, J.E. (2011). Recortes y burocracia lastran Bolonia. El País, 17-07-2011). (http://elpais.com/diario/2011/07/17/sociedad/1310853602_850215.html).

Canel, M.J., Sánchez, J.J. & Rodríguez, R. (2000). Periodistas al descubierto. Retrato de los profesionales de la información. Madrid: Centro de Investigaciones Sociológicas.

Cantarero, M.A. (2002). Formación de comunicadores sociales. Modelos curriculares, ostracismo académico, rutas sociales y esperanzas. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 52. (www.ull.es/publicaciones/latina/20025209CANTAREROxi.htm) (10-03-2013).

De-Burgh, H. (2003). Skills are not Enough. The Case for Journalism as an Academic Discipline. Journalism, 4(1), 95-112.

Deuze, M. (2006). Global Journalism Education: A Conceptual Approach. Journalism Studies, 7(1), 19-34.

Farias, P. & Roses, S. (2009). La crisis acelera el cambio del negocio informativo. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico, 15, 15-32.

Farias, P. (Dir.) (2011). Informe anual de la profesión periodística, 2008-11. Madrid: Asociación de la Prensa de Madrid.

Galdón, G. (1992). Cualidades y formación del periodista. Comunicación y Sociedad, 5(1). (www.unav.es/fcom/comunicacionysociedad/es/articulo.php?art_id=269#C02) (10-03-2013).

García-Avilés, J.A. & García-Jiménez, L. (2009). La enseñanza de Teorías de la Comunicación en España: análisis y reflexión ante la Convergencia de Bolonia. Zer, 14(27), 271-293.

Gómez, B. & Roses, S. (2013). Valoración de los profesionales sobre la enseñanza del Periodismo en España. Un Análisis intergeneracional. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico, 19, 1.

Gómez-Escalonilla, G., Santín, M. & Mathieu, G. (2011). La educación universitaria on-line en el Periodismo desde la visión del estudiante. Comunicar, 37(19), 73-80.

Instituto Nacional de Estadística (INE) (2013). Base estadística de enseñanza universitaria. (www.ine.es/jaxi/menu.do?type=pcaxis&path=/t13/p405&file=inebase) (09-012013).

Jones, D.E. (1998). Investigación sobre comunicación en España: evolución y perspectivas. Zer, 3, 13-51.

Lamuedra, M. (2007). Estudiantes de Periodismo y prácticas profesionales: el reto del aprendizaje. Comunicar, 28, 203-211.

López-García, X. (2010). La formación de los periodistas en el siglo XXI en Brasil, España, Portugal y Puerto Rico. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 65, 231-243.?(DOI: 10.4185/RLCS-65-2010-896-231-243).

Mellado, C. & Subervi, F. (2012). Mapping Educational Role Dimensions among Chilean Journalism and Mass Communication Educators. Journalism Practice, iFirst Article, 1-17. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2012.718584).

Mellado, C., Hanusch, F., Humanes, M.L. & al. (2012). The Pre-Socialization of Future Journalists. Journalism Studies, iFirst Article, 1-18. (DOI: 10.1080/1461670X.2012.746006).

Nolan, D. (2008). Journalism, Education and the Formation of Public Subjects. Journalism, 9(6), 733-749.

Ortega, F. & Humanes, M.L. (1999). Periodistas del siglo XXI. Sus motivaciones y expectativas profesionales. CIC, 5, 153-170.

Ortega, F. & Humanes, M.L. (2000). Algo más que periodistas. Sociología de una profesión. Barcelona: Ariel.

Pestano, J.M., Rodríguez, C. & Del-Ponti, P. (2011). Transformaciones en los modelos de formación de periodistas en España. El reto europeo. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico, 17(2), 401-415.

Real, E. (2005). Algunos interrogantes en torno a los estudios de Periodismo ante el nuevo Espacio Europeo de Educación Superior. Cuadernos de Información y Comunicación, 10, 267-284.

Reese, S. (1999). The Progressive Potential of Journalism Education: Recasting the Academic versus Professional Debate. The Harvard International Journal of Press/Politics, 4(4), 70-94.

Sanders, K., Hanna, M., Berganza, M.R. & Aranda, J.J. (2008). Becoming Journalists A Comparison of the Professional Attitudes and Values of British and Spanish Journalism Students. European Journal of Communication, 23(2), 133-152.

Sierra, J. (2010). Competencias profesionales y empleo en el futuro periodista. El caso de los estudiantes de Periodismo de la Universidad San Pablo CEU. Icono14, 8(2), 156-175.

Sierra, J., Sotelo, J. & Cabezuelo, F. (2010). Competencias profesionales y empleo del futuro periodista: el caso de los estudiantes de Periodismo de la UCH-CEU. @tic, Julio-Diciembre (5), 8-19.

Skinner, D., Gasher, M.J. & Compton, J. (2001). Putting Theory to Practice A Critical Approach to Journalism

Splichal, S. & Sparks, C. (1994). Journalists for the 21st Century: Tendencies of Professionalization among First-year Students in 22 Countries. Norwood, NJ: Ablex Publishing Corporation. Studies. Journalism, 2(3), 341-360.

Vadillo, N., Lazo, C.M. & Cabrera, D. (2010). Proceso de adaptación de los estudios de Comunicación al EEES. El caso de Aragón, una comunidad pionera. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 65, 187-203. (DOI: 10.4185/RLCS-65-2010-892-187-203).

Vlad, T., Becker, L.B., Simpson, H. & Kalpen, K. (2013). 2012 Annual Survey of Journalism and Mass Communication Enrollments. James M. Cox Jr. Center for International Mass Communication Training and Research Grady College of Journalism & Mass Communication, University of Georgia. (www.grady.uga.edu/annualsur-veys/Enrollment_Survey/Enrollment_2012/Enroll12Merged.pdf) (22-08-2013).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/13
Accepted on 31/12/13
Submitted on 31/12/13

Volume 22, Issue 1, 2014
DOI: 10.3916/C42-2014-18
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 13
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?