Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This article analyses the different meanings of the citizenship concept (political, legal, social, economic, ecological and intercultural) in order to justify the current media citizenship concept, which is particularly useful and valid for media education. The ultimate goal is to rebuild the social, ethical and political dimension of educommunication on a practical and philosophical foundation. With this in mind, we have analysed two very powerful and current ap proaches, the ethics of dialogue and ability, mainly because of their links to communication and their contribution to the human development concept, which is on the media education agendas of international organizations such as UNESCO or the European Commission. From the philosophical foundation proposed, the criteria for evaluating and reconstructing the practical dimension of educommunication are: civic participation, freedom as development and critical autonomy, which are also considered goals of the educational systems in pluralistic and democratic societies, especially from a model of deliberate and participatory democracy. The paper concludes with a positive evaluation of interdisciplinary approach in the study of media education, an educational project that is crucial for the revival of civil society and the empowerment of citizens in the current communicative context.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction. The social and ethical dimension of educommunication

The theoretical framework of this investigation is directly influenced by an ethical viewpoint that is radically democratic and civic in nature, as befits the times we live in, since each time has its fundamental task (Ortega-Gasset, 2003), and ours is to provide an ethical and citizen-based explanation of the information and technology societies we live in. How can we develop a broad conception of citizenship in today’s world from a media literacy perspective?

The main statement of this article would be that educommunication cannot be understood in its entirety unless it has a civic purpose, that is, it must be endowed with an ethical, social and democratic base that empowers citizens in their dealings with the media. Citizen empowerment means strengthening freedom, critical autonomy and participation in political, social, economic, ecological and intercultural affairs based on the correct use of the media and communicative technologies. What is the true meaning and reach of this statement? The answer lies in rediscovering the various dimensions of the concept of citizenship in democratic settings and showing the close link that exists between this concept and the action made possible by the media or communication technologies. This link leads the way to an acceptance of a new notion of citizen: media citizenship. Our article is based on this double challenge as an in-depth study of the more practical (social, ethical and political) side of educommunication.

2. Civic aspects of educommunication: of political citizenship to media citizenship

The notion of citizenship has recently made a comeback in response to post-industrial society’s need to «generate among its members an identity they can recognize and which makes them feel they belong» (Cortina, 1997: 22). To talk of citizenship is more than just a reference to an administrative category related to the legal and judicial recognition of a person by the State. It is a call to a certain condition: to be an independent being in possession of freedom, acting with responsibility and as protagonist in the various spheres or dimensions of public life. It assumes liberation from the servitude and submission that can prevail in different settings in our lives in society today.

So, to live as a citizen with full rights means activating the idea of our political citizenship which first appears in Ancient Greece and which currently amounts to the active participation in public affairs, helping to shape the democratic ideal of «isegoría» (in the sense of among equals). It means defending and strengthening our legal and judicial condition as citizens, equal before the law and entitled to its protection. It also means reinforcing our social citizenship with the understanding that life in society cannot develop with dignity without the guarantee of a minimum of social justice in education and public health, a standard of living based on social rights such as the right to work, to education, health and housing (Ibíd.: 66). To be a citizen in todays’ society means making our economic citizenship a reality, that is, to be free to participate actively in our economic environment via responsible and informed consumption or via a business activity governed by a sense of social responsibility that this entails. Economic citizenship derives from «the need to redirect economic activity by means of moral parameters such as justice, responsibility and solidarity» (Conill, 2004: 28). And this immediately leads to another form of citizenship, ecological citizenship (Dobson & Bell, 2006). Ecological citizenship means assuming those civic virtues needed for a sustainable society, for an environmental sustainability which is an ethical requirement of and a responsibility towards our and future generations (Dobson, 2005: 53).

In this short summary of the current dimensions of citizenship which is unavoidable in any exploration of the ethical and civic dimension of educommunication we cannot ignore cosmopolitan citizenship (Nussbaum, 1999; Benéitez, 2010), a notion that comes from the old ideal of stoic philosophy which through philosophers like Kant emerges today with real force in the idea of interculturality. The new world context, characterized by the processes of economic globalization and communicative connections between countries, explains the reflection on the need for a globalization of human rights and in the field of ethics, in which the defence of the equality of dignity for all peoples is associated to the acknowledgment of cultural diversity, with the aim of overcoming ethnocentric tendencies and extreme multiculturalism, that is, the tendency towards cultural imposition on the one hand and radical ethical relativism on the other (Cortina, 1997: 186). Secondly, to live citizenship to the full in his day and age when so much is hypercommunicated and screened worldwide (Lipovetsky & Serroy, 2009) means emphasizing the civic use of the media, in other words, that set of media actions that citizens have to learn in a democracy in order to be valid protagonists in the political, legal, social, economic, educational and intercultural fields, and to avoid sliding into new forms of servitude within these settings. To be a citizen today is to be a media citizen, and that means cultivating and acquiring an education in those competences necessary in order to use the media and communicative technologies in their broadest and most integral sense. For example in law and politics, the Internet is being configured as a platform that enables direct citizen participation in various areas of public interest on a national and international level (Kahne, Lee & Feezell, 2012), via virtual participation in campaigns and mobilizations promoted by citizens themselves (Avaaz.org; Change.org), or via open consultations of reports on corporate crime and political corruption (transparency.org), etc. Media interaction is also an element of social citizenship in the sense that such interaction is a basic skill in the educational and work setting, just as the citizen who is informed through the media mobilizes to claim a health and educational system that is worthy of a society imbued with social justice. In the economic field, the Internet provides citizens with an infinite number of media to enable them to claim their rights in the face of abuse of those rights, for example, by financial institutions (a search for «forums against banks» on Google generated 22.3 million results, from «foroantiusura.org» to calls to mobilize those affected by the «preference shares» scandal in Spain), or as an instrument for active, demanding consumption (a search for «consumer associations» in Google found 6.08 million entries, while for English language users there were 38.6 millioni).

The civic use of the media encourages awareness of the environmental consequences of private acts of communicative consumption, for example the poor recycling of mobile phones or computers once they are discarded; media citizens also demand to be informed about and to stop the consequences of the extraction and commercialization of coltan, used to make mobile phone and computer screens…On another level, the intercultural citizen is enabled and strengthened by communicative interactions which are an authentic resource of intercultural dialogue (Pérez-Tornero & Varis, 2008) that breaks down frontiers and broadens the meaning of identity and dignity by giving voice and visibility to someone who is a stranger and from a different culture.

In sum, a reflection on the civic use of the media and communicative technologies points to a new form of citizenship: media citizenship, which is citizenship in and by the grace of the media, be they traditional or interactive (Gozálvez, 2012). If today it is important to be a citizen in the political, legal, social, economic, educational and intercultural fields then it is no less so in the media, since the media and communication dimension undoubtedly defines our age and society, and in this sense the role of educational institutions is crucial. And here, the media citizen becomes one of the goals of educommunication since it is by no means removed from the values of freedom, critical independence or solidarity in our dealings with the media. However, to talk of ethical, civic and political values in media education requires a deeper philosophical base.

3. Philosophical base of educommunication. Ethical theories for current media education

To help us in this reconstructivist task we look to various philosophical references to enable us to evaluate the ethical and social dimension of educommunication. The current ethical landscape provides philosophical models that offer a solid operational basis in theory for the pedagogical construction of media citizenship. Firstly, we have the «ethics of discourse» or «ethics of dialogue», with their roots in Kant and linked to a «hermeneutic critique». Any pedagogical program for Educommunication would need to look to the ethics of discourse for a theoretical reference point for its critical perspective, or put another way, a foundation based on the conditions of possibility for our acts of speech or communication given meaning. In recent times ethical dialogue has provided us with a broad reflection on the critical and prescriptive evaluation of all argumentation (Apel, 2007: 284); such evaluations help define communication performed in suitable settings, hence this philosophical approach is especially interesting for media education.

A key work on the ethics of discourse is Habermas’ «The theory of communicative action» (1981), which presents a critical theory of society based on its participants’ communicative relations which open up a space for intersubjectivity in the search for agreement on questions of truth, justice and social progress. In discourse ethics, the communicative action amounts to an interaction between subjects mediated by symbols, and which adjusts to the aims that the participants presuppose as the conditions of dialogue in their acts of speaking: truth in dialogues on reality, correction in dialogues on justice with a view to those interests that can be universalized, freedom to enunciate and interpret acts of speaking, equality or symmetry among the participants (in which the key lies in the force of the best argument and not in the position or privileges of the speaker), and truth or sincerity in the process of communication. These conditions of «communicative rationality» aim to provide an intersubjectively acknowledged validity which is required, out of a sense of responsibility, to resolve conflicts of action by means of consensus and to critically evaluate which acts of communication match the criteria of authentic dialogue and rational deliberation. With dialogue as a base, and in pluralist societies, it is vital to cultivate the «public use of reason»; the media can play their part as an expression of «human social activity», with legitimate goals and internal resources that help to define how a citizen uses these media, one of which would be their contribution to enabling «mature, responsible public opinion» (Cortina, 2004: 20). So, we see the connection between proposals based on the ethics of dialogue and educommunication: the latter aims to use education to promote those values of communicative rationality crucial for criticism and social progress. We refer to values such as transparency and plurality, the freedom to discuss and argue based on being well-informed, equality in dignity and the respect for others as valid interlocutors, or the effort to reach agreement following best-argued case criteria. And of course, the call to citizen solidarity as a resource for propagating calls for justice.

Secondly, and from a neo-Aristotelian tendency, the «capabilities approach» promoted by Sen (1999; 2009) and Nussbaum (2012) represents another convincing model for today for setting the foundations of the social and ethical dimension of educommunication. The key to this philosophical model (ethical, social, economic and political) is understanding that human development is based on freedom understood as the ability to carry out one’s own life project in a way that is socially and humanely compatible. Sen says that «according to this approach, the extension of freedom is both the main aim of development and its principal medium. Development consists of eliminating those restrictions on freedom that leave individuals with few options and opportunities to exercise their reasoned agenda» (Sen, 1999: 16, 223). Obviously «agency» or people’s free capability within a hypercommunicated environment requires guarantees of transparency regarding pubic information as well as access to «a free press and active political opposition».

For several years Sen (Nobel Prize for Economics, 1998) was director of the United Nations Development Program (UNPD) which published numerous development indicators for countries that went beyond the usual GDP. What interests us most here is the clear and close relationship between freedom, human development and the media especially in education. Citizen empowerment in the media arena is one of the conditions for human development and freedom in the broadest sense; freedom which is the capability to search for and select information, detect its origin and intentions and to decipher meaning in the images and understand the values and emotions behind the audiovisual world in order to produce alternative channels and messages, etc. In the end, «it is clear that we have good reason to pay attention to the creation of those conditions necessary for individuals to take better-informed decisions and promote intelligent public debate» (Sen, 1999: 336). Several UNICEF and UNESCO reports support this idea, which acts as a bridge between human development, communication, citizenship and educommunication. This link can be seen in the «Media Development Indicators» report in UNESCO’s International Program for Development of Communication (2008), UNICEF’s «Development of Capabilities for the Exercise of Citizenship» report of 2006 and the «Media as Partners in Education for Sustainable Development» report by UNESCO in 2008. These reports link media empowerment to the ecology of citizenship. The new communication technologies can also be very useful in reaching the UN’s Millennium Objectives (Del-Rio, 2010). Frau-Meigs and Torrent (2009) have analysed various international reports as references for a new global policy on media education aimed at «the well-being of its citizens, the pacific development of civic societies, the preservation of indigenous cultures, the growth of sustainable economies and the enriching of contemporary social diversity».

Definitely, the social and ethical values of educommunication are not the mere subjective preferences of a researcher or group of experts but are supported by internationally prestigious initiatives and a solid philosophical framework that justifies or legitimizes the most axiological facet of media education.

4. Educommunication and citizenship: freedom, critical autonomy and participation in media education

With this clarification of fundamental criteria, our interest now lies in reconstructing the ethical, social and political dimension of media education or educommunication as defined by international organizations such as UNESCO or the European Parliament (and by Spain, with its own Law on Audiovisual Communication). These educational proposals and recommendations declare for an education that foments reception and critical interpretation, and responsible civic production, in short, its aim is the correct use of the media. This adds value to media education as a means to social and democratic progress and human development in line with the philosophical approaches explained in the previous section.

One of the main principals is to prevent the information society from becoming, as Brey, Campàs and Mayos (2009) put it, an «ignorant society». These authors state the vast quantity of information we are constantly bombarded with can induce «an attitude of knowledge-renouncement due to lack of motivation, a surrender and a tendency to tacitly and comfortably accept prefabricated and clichéd viewpoints. A lack of critical capability is just another sign of our growing ignorance» (Brey, Campàs & Mayos, 2009: 26).

In the face of this paradoxical ignorance Brey, Moeller (2009: 66) emphasize the urgency of teaching citizens to be autonomous from a critical perspective, inviting people to «evaluate what they read, hear and see, and also to teach them to take notice of what is left unseen and unsaid». This is «crucial» to enable citizens to exercise «their own rights as citizens and have access to economic, political and social opportunities available».

In response to these challenges, international public institutions have for many years been proposing that states and social institutions adopt measures to encourage media education in their regulated educational systems and also as part of an informal and continuous education of citizens. UNESCO and the Grünwald Declaration of 1982 urge states to assume «those obligations that correspond to them to promote a critical understanding of communication phenomena among their citizens» (Grünwald Declaration, 1982: 1). The Paris Agenda of 2007 also stated that «media education helps to empower people and offers them a sense of shared responsibility in society, and as such, is an integral part of citizenship and human rights».

Recently UNESCO’s Braga Declaration (2011)# urged the development of education for the free, intelligent and critical use of the media as a necessary dimension of instruction for independent citizenship. It also emphasized the need for politicians to incorporate this aim in their action programs in order to facilitate and foment this initiative among the social actors. For Gutiérrez and Tyner (2012: 36), the call to critical thinking by UNESCO amounts to the need to provide an education in «the knowledge of personal and social values and responsibilities derived from the ethical use of information, as well as participation in cultural dialogue and the preservation of autonomy against the possible threats to this that are often hard to detect».

In 2008 the European Parliament declared that «media education is essential for achieving a high level of media literacy, which is an important part of the political education that enables people to better direct their behaviour as active citizens and to be aware of their rights and obligations». It also stated that «well-informed and politically mature citizens are the basis of a pluralist society…and by constructing their own content and media products they acquire the ability to reach a deeper understanding of the principals and values behind professionally produced media content» (European Parliament, 2008: 11).

In Spain, the General Law on Audiovisual Communication (7/2010) clearly refers to the possibilities of citizen participation via the media. For the first time in Spain, the state provides a legal framework for community media, or non-profit enterprises such as community radio. Article 32 specifies that these media’s function is to «attend to the social, cultural and communication needs of communities and social groups, as well as fomenting citizen participation and the construction of an associative network». These media can act as open microphones for citizens to air their grievances, and as such they play an important role in the media education of citizens.

Chapter 2 of Title 5 of this law includes the media education of citizens as one of the functions assigned to Spain’s State Council of Audiovisual Media (CEMA). This organization is obliged to «oversee the promotion of media literacy in the audiovisual field with the aim of fomenting the acquisition on the part of the citizen of the highest levels of media competence». Likewise, this body must also evaluate the level of media citizenship among citizens by referring to «those indicators used by the European Commission and other information that the Council deems worthy of interest». So, as stated by Gavara and Pérez-Tornero (2010: 7), this law understands educommunication and media literacy as a civic right.

However, Gavara (2013) doubts that all this can happen since a proposed law# would abolish the CEMA and replace it with the CNMC (National Market and Competition Commission). The author says that this would mean that media education would «pass from one authority, the CEMA, whose aim is to guarantee civic rights, that is, an authority based on the protection of citizens, to another centered on the audiovisual market in which the public is treated as a mere consumer or user».

Despite these problems, there is clear international recognition of the need to boost real media education among citizens as a resource for inclusion in accordance with a model of democracy that is more purposeful and participatory. This call for the reactivation of democracy leads us on to the most political dimension of educommunication. In this respect Masterman acknowledged that «in a world in which slogans are frequently taken more seriously than reasoning, and in which we all take political decisions based solely on what the media show us, audiovisual education is essential for the exercise of our democratic rights and to defend ourselves against the excesses of politically motivated media manipulation» (Masterman, 2010: 28)ii. So media education is a fundamental element in the «long march to true participatory democracy and the democratization of the institutions. Audiovisual literacy is vital if we want citizens to exercise their power, to take rational decisions, to be effective agents of change and to actively participate in the media». Similarly Sen declared that democracy must be valued in terms of the ability to enrich reasoned participation by increasing the availability of information and the opportunities for interactive debate: «Democracy must be judged not only by its institutions but also by how far the diverse voices of the various sectors of the population can be heard» (Sen, 2009: xviii).

Consequently, media education comes to be seen as a pillar of democracy, above all in its more purposeful and participative form (Macpherson, 2003). We talk of an education to achieve a form of communication that is an open, interactive and participatory process and not a one-way communication determined by the powers that be (government, religious authorities, media, business or financial corporations). As Sánchez Ruiz (2005) states, participative or purposeful democracy cannot be conceived as anything but «a multiple network of communication circuits in which public issues are discussed. The public arena is necessarily a space of communication…In modern democracies, the governed are increasingly demanding to be informed of the processes that generate political policies and about their consequences. But they also want to be heard and to openly define their problems, the issues that affect them and their priorities» (Ibíd.: 22-23).

The problem arises when the media cease to be of and for communication and become mere transmitters of messages, a vertical process that goes in one single direction. This would be the desired aim of the democratic elites (Cortina, 2010). Nevertheless, with the emergence of the Internet, Web 2.0 and the social networks, new technological and structural bases are being established to provide a more horizontal form of communication for the democratic redistribution of powers as a consequence of the redefinition of a public space that is increasingly globalized (Castells, 2008).

Education needs to respond to these new communication relations and global powers in such a way that media education for citizens converges with an education for a global and deeply democratic citizenship. The way this new space for public deliberation is configured will be the key to the future of democracy. Media education, especially in the digital sphere, can develop crucial competences for an active, committed and participatory citizenship (Mihailidis & Thevenin, 2013). To counter communication understood as mere message diffusion, society-the global network represents an opportunity for the creation of purposeful public opinion open to new forms of participation, the communication of ideas and projects.

In the words of Greppi, what is important is not to talk about democracy but to determine its quality and conditions. Democracy is about an education in the notions of participation, public commitment and social responsibility, ideas that require a communicative, dynamic and open space. Public opinion in a democracy based on quality in reality amounts to critical public opinion that is purposeful and reflective, and this requires a space for its citizens «that is endowed with sufficient resources to enable them to pronounce on the relevant political questions of the day» (Greppi, 2012: 16-36). It is easy to deduce from these proposals that educommunication in its social, ethical and political dimension is an education that makes a valid contribution to this public communicative space which is increasingly global. A space that is interconnected which welcomes a public that is attentive, committed and well-informed, a public composed of «citizens capable of understanding the ebb and flow of reasoning that constitutes the substance of the democratic process».

5. Conclusion: A media education to reactivate civil society and empower the citizen

This article analyses the theoretical link between educommunication, the ethics of dialogue and the capabilities approach in order to reconstruct a valid ethical and political base for media education. We have also investigated the keys that will empower citizens and convert them into protagonists in the media environment by extending the current theory of citizenship by means of the «media citizen». The need to empower citizens in the media setting is aimed at reactivating civic society in democracies so that they can be more purposeful and committed to human development. Not only international public institutions such as UNESCO are involved but also journals such as «Comunicar», which has provided a platform for socially committed scientific research dating back to Jacquinot (1999) and the more recent study by Culver and Jacobson (2012) and the contribution of Aguaded (2013: 7) on European recommendations for an integral media education whose aim is to «promote a citizenship that is more active, critical and participatory».

Initiatives for media education understood as a formative process through media literacy (Buckingham, 2005: 21) necessarily assume certain axiological references in their discourse. These practical and axiological references (ethical, political and civic) have been the focus of this study which is dedicated to explaining and interpreting them from the perspective of current philosophical approaches. Hence we insist on the need for interdisciplinarity in educommunication, in our case articulated as a means to legitimize this discipline from a social, civic and political viewpoint. To educate the media citizen is, reciprocally, and as we have argued throughout this article, a way of empowering citizens in plural, democratic and hyperconnected societies.

Notes

1 Searches carried out on 25-03-2013.

2 This can be consulted on www.cca.eca.usp.br/noticia/756 (26-05-2013).

3 A bill for the creation of the National Market and Competition Commission. BOCG. Congreso de los Diputados Nº. A-28-1 de 19/10/2012. This can be consulted on www.congreso.es/public_oficiales/L10/CONG/BOCG/A/BOCG-10-A-28-1.PDF (26-05-2013).

4 Originally published in 1985.

Support and acknowledgements

This article forms part of the Research and Development project «Compulsory education for competence in audiovisual communication in the digital environment» (EDU2010-21395-C03-03), whose inestimable support we greatly appreciate.

References

Aguaded, J.I. (2013). El programa «Media» de la Comisión Europea, apoyo internacional a la educación en medios. Comunicar, 40 (XX), 7-8. (DOI: 10.3916/C40-2013-01-01).

Apel, K.O. (2007). Los seres humanos están preparados para las exigencias de la ética discursiva. In Zavadivker, N. (Ed.), La ética en la encrucijada. Buenos Aires: Prometeo.

Benéitez, J.J. (2010). La ciudadanía cosmopolita de Martha Nussbaum. Revista Internacional de Filosofía, 3, 347-354.

Brey, A., Campàs, J. & Mayos, G. (2009). La sociedad de la ignorancia y otros ensayos Barcelona: Infonomia.

Buckingham, D. (2005). Educación en medios. Alfabetización, aprendizaje y cultura. Barcelona: Paidós.

Castells, M. (2008). The New Public Sphere: Global Civil Society, Communication Networks, and Global Governance. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 616 (1), 78-93. (DOI: 10.1177/0002716207311877).

Conill, J. (2004). Horizontes de economía ética. Madrid: Tecnos.

Cortina, A. (1990/2010). Ética sin moral. Madrid: Tecnos.

Cortina, A. (1997). Ciudadanos del mundo. Hacia una teoría de la ciudadanía. Madrid: Alianza.

Cortina, A. (2004). Ciudadanía activa en una sociedad mediática. In J. Conill & V. Gozálvez (Eds.), Ética de los medios. Una apuesta por la ciudadanía audiovisual. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Culver, S.H. & Jacobson, T. (2012). Alfabetización mediática como método para fomentar la participación cívica. Comunicar, 39 (XX), 73-80. (DOI: 10.3916/C39-2012-02-07).

Del Rio, O. (2010). El valor de las Tecnologías de Información y Comunicación (TIC) para el desarrollo humano: ¿oportunidad o amenaza? Folios, 24, 13-33.

Dobson, A. & Bell, D. (2006). Environmental citizenship. Cambridge: MIT Press.

Dobson, A. (2005). Ciudadanía ecológica. Isegoría, 32, 47-62.

Frau-Meigs, D. & Torrent, J. (2009). Políticas de educación en medios: Hacia una propuesta global. Comunicar, 32 (XVI), 10-14. (DOI: 10.3916/c32-2009-01-001).

Gavara, J. C. (2013). Autoridades independientes del audiovisual. Del CEMA al CNMC. Revista Catalana de Dret Públic. (http://blocs.gencat.cat/blocs/AppPHP/eapc-rcdp/2013/05/21/autoridades-independientes-del-audiovisual-del-cema-a-la-cnmc-juan-carlos-gavara) (23-05-2013).

Gavara, J.C & Pérez-Tornero, J. M. (2010) La alfabetización mediática y la Ley General de comunicación audiovisual en España. Barcelona: UOC.

Gozálvez, V. (2012). Ciudadanía mediática. Una mirada educativa. Madrid: Dykinson.

Greppi, A. (2012). La democracia y su contrario. Representación, separación de poderes y opinión pública. Madrid: Trotta.

Gutiérrez, A. & Tyner, K. (2012). Educación para los medios, alfabetización mediática y competencia digital. Comunicar, 38, 31-39. (DOI: 10.3916/C38-2012-02-03).

Habermas, J. (1992). Teoría de la acción comunicativa. Madrid: Taurus.

Jacquinot, G. (1999). Educar en los medios de comunicación para favorecer la democracia. Comunicar, 13, 29-35.

Kahne, J., Lee, N.J., & Feezell, J.T. (2012). Digital Media Lliteracy Education and Online Civic and Political Participation. International Journal of Communication, 6, 1-24. (DOI: 1932–8036/201200050001).

Ley 7/2010, de 31 de marzo, General de la Comunicación Audiovisual (BOE, 01-04-2010).

Lipovetsky G. & Serroy, J. (2009). La pantalla global. Cultura mediática y cine en la era hipermoderna. Barcelona: Anagrama.

Macpherson, C. B. (2003). La democracia liberal y su época. Madrid: Alianza.

Masterman, L. (1985/2010). La enseñanza de los medios de comunicación. Madrid: De la Torre.

Mihailidis, P. & Thevenin, B. (2013). Media Literacy as a Core Competency for Engaged Citizenship in Participatory Democracy. American Behavioral Scientist (versión pre-print). (DOI: 10.1177/0002764213489015).

Moeller, S. (2009). Fomentar la libertad de expresión con la alfabetización mediática mundial. Comunicar, 32, 65-72. (DOI: 10.3916/c32-2009-02-005).

Nussbaum, M. (2012). Crear capacidades. Propuestas para el desarrollo humano. Barcelona: Paidós.

Nussbaum, M. (Ed.) (1999). Los límites del patriotismo. Identidad, pertenencia y ciudadanía mundial. Barcelona: Paidós.

Ortega-Gasset, J. (1923/2003). El tema de nuestro tiempo. Madrid: Espasa.

Parlamento Europeo. Resolución del 16 de diciembre de 2008, sobre la alfabetización de los medios de comunicación en un mundo digital (2008/2129(INI)) (http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=oj:c:2010:045e:0009:0014:es:pdf) (17-05-2013).

Pérez-Tornero, J.M. & Varis, T. (2008). Media Literacy and New humanism. UNESCO: Institute for Information Technologies in Education. (http://iite.unesco.org/pics/-publications/en/files/3214678.pdf) (25-05-2013).

Sánchez-Ruiz, E. (2005). Medios de comunicación y democracia. Bogotá: Norma.

Sen, A. (1999). Desarrollo y libertad. Barcelona: Planeta.

Sen, A. (2009). The Idea of Justice. Cambridge: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.

UNESCO (1982). Declaración de Grünwald sobre la educación relativa a los medios de comunicación. Grünwald. (www.unesco.org/education/nfsunesco/pdf/MEDIA_S.PDF) (26-05-2013)

UNESCO (2007) Agenda de París. (www.diplomatie.gouv.fr/fr/IMG/pdf/Parisagendafin_en.pdf) (26-05-2013).

UNESCO (2008A). Indicadores de Desarrollo mediático. Marco para evaluar el desarrollo de los medios de comunicación social. (http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0016/001631/163102S.pdf) (15-05-2013).

UNESCO (2008B). Media as partners in education for sustainable development. (http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0015/001587/158787e.pdf) (12-05-2013).

UNESCO (2011). Declaración de Braga sobre alfabetización mediática. (www.cca.eca.usp.br/noticia/756) (13-08-2013).

UNICEF (2006). Desarrollo de capacidades para el ejercicio de la ciudadanía. (www.unicef.org/argentina/spanish/EDUPAScuadernillo-5.pdf) (29-04-2013).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

En el presente artículo se analiza el concepto de ciudadanía en sus diferentes significaciones (ciudadanía política, jurídica, social, económica, ecológica e intercultural), con el fin de justificar la actualidad del concepto de ciudadanía mediática, sobre todo por su validez en el ámbito de la educomunicación. El objetivo último es reconstruir la dimensión social, ética y política de la educomunicación a partir de un fundamento filosófico práctico. En esta tarea de fundamentación, cabe apelar a dos enfoques muy potentes en la actualidad como son la ética dialógica y el enfoque de las capacidades, por su vinculación con el ámbito comunicativo y por su contribución a la noción del desarrollo humano, presente en los programas de educación mediática de organismos internacionales como la UNESCO o la Comisión Europea. A partir de la fundamentación filosófica ofrecida, los criterios para evaluar y reconstruir la dimensión práctica de la educomunicación son la participación cívica, la libertad como desarrollo y la autonomía crítica, consideradas asimismo como fines de los sistemas educativos en sociedades plurales y democráticas, sobre todo desde un modelo deliberativo y participativo de democracia. Tras esta argumentación, el artículo concluye a favor de la interdisciplinariedad en el estudio de la educación mediática, un proyecto educativo que es crucial para la reactivación de la sociedad civil y el empoderamiento de la ciudadanía en el actual contexto comunicativo.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción. La dimensión ética y social de la educomunicación

El marco teórico de esta investigación tiene que ver directamente con la ética cívica, radicalmente democrática, a la altura de nuestro tiempo, pues cada época tiene su tarea (Ortega-Gasset, 2003) y la nuestra pasa entre otras cosas por dar adecuadamente con las claves éticas y cívicas de sociedades de la información y la comunicación. ¿En qué sentido cabe desarrollar una concepción amplia de la ciudadanía a la altura de la actualidad desde la educación mediática?

La afirmación central de este artículo podría expresarse como sigue: la educomunicación no se entiende de modo completo sin su finalidad cívica, es decir, sin su trasfondo ético, social y democrático relacionado con el empoderamiento de la ciudadanía en cuestiones mediáticas. Y empoderar a la ciudadanía a este respecto significa reforzar la libertad, la autonomía crítica y la participación de los ciudadanos en cuestiones políticas, sociales, económicas, ecológicas e interculturales a partir del buen uso de los medios y la tecnología comunicativa. ¿Cuál es el significado y el alcance de esta afirmación? La respuesta pasa por redescubrir las diferentes dimensiones del concepto de ciudadanía en entornos democráticos, y por desvelar el vínculo estrecho entre tal concepto y la acción posibilitada por medios o tecnologías de la comunicación, vínculo que alumbra de paso una nueva acepción en la noción de ciudadanía: la ciudadanía mediática. Partiendo de este doble reto, el presente artículo profundiza en el lado más práctico (social, ético y político) de la educomunicación.

2. Aspectos cívicos de la educomunicación: de la ciudadanía política a la ciudadanía mediática

La noción de ciudadanía resurge actualmente a partir de la necesidad, en las sociedades postindustriales, de «generar entre sus miembros una identidad en la que se reconozcan y que les haga sentirse pertenecientes a ellas» (Cortina, 1997: 22). Hablar de ciudadanía es algo más que apelar a una categoría administrativa en relación con el reconocimiento jurídico y legal que un Estado otorga a una persona. Es apelar a una condición: la de ser autónomo, libre desde la responsabilidad y protagonista en relación con diferentes esferas o dimensiones de la vida pública. Supone superar las formas de vasallaje o sometimiento que pueden darse en diferentes ámbitos de nuestra vida en sociedad.

Así, vivir como ciudadano de pleno derecho supone poner en marcha nuestra ciudadanía política, idea que aparece en la Grecia clásica y que actualmente significa participar activamente en la cosa pública, dando cuerpo al ideal democrático de «isegoría» (hacer uso de la palabra de igual a igual). Significa defender y reforzar nuestra ciudadanía jurídica o legal, referida a nuestra condición de ciudadanos iguales ante la ley y merecedores de toda su protección. Supone igualmente reforzar nuestra ciudadanía social, entendiendo que una vida digna en sociedad no puede desarrollarse sin que ésta garantice a las personas unos mínimos de justicia social como son la educación o la sanidad públicas, sin unos estándares mínimos de vida civilizada que se concretan en derechos sociales como el derecho al trabajo, la educación, la vivienda o la salud (Ibíd.: 66). Ser ciudadano en nuestras sociedades significa también hacer realidad nuestra ciudadanía económica, es decir, nuestra condición libre, participativa y activa en el ámbito económico a través del consumo responsable e informado, o a través de la acción empresarial sensible a la responsabilidad social que conlleva tal acción. La ciudadanía económica deriva de «la necesidad de reorientar la actividad económica por parámetros morales como justicia, responsabilidad y solidaridad» (Conill, 2004: 28). Desde aquí, la ciudadanía económica abre las puertas de inmediato a otra forma de ciudadanía, la ecológica (Dobson & Bell, 2006). La ciudadanía ecológica supone asumir las virtudes cívicas necesarias para una sociedad sostenible, para la sostenibilidad medioambiental, considerada como exigencia ética responsable con las actuales y las futuras generaciones (Dobson, 2005: 53).

En este brevísimo repaso por las dimensiones actuales de la ciudadanía, ineludible a la hora de explorar la dimensión ética y cívica de la educomunicación, no podemos olvidarnos de la ciudadanía cosmopolita (Nussbaum, 1999; Benéitez, 2010), que recoge el viejo ideal de la filosofía estoica y que, a través de filósofos como Kant, llega a nuestros días con fuerza por medio de la noción de interculturalidad. El nuevo contexto mundial, caracterizado por los procesos de globalización económica y la conexión comunicativa entre países, explica la reflexión acerca de la necesidad de una globalización de los derechos, de una globalización en el plano ético, en donde la defensa de la igual dignidad de las personas se asocia al reconocimiento de la diversidad cultural, con el propósito decidido de superar tanto las tendencias etnocéntricas como las del multiculturalismo extremo, es decir, la tendencia a la imposición cultural por un lado y al relativismo ético radical por el otro (Cortina, 1997: 186).

En segundo lugar, vivir la ciudadanía a la altura de nuestro tiempo, un tiempo hipercomunicado y de pantalla global (Lipovetsky & Serroy, 2009), supone sacar a la luz el uso cívico de los medios de comunicación, es decir, el conjunto de acciones mediáticas que ha de aprender la ciudadanía en democracia para hacer valer su protagonismo en el terreno político, jurídico, social, económico, ecológico e intercultural, entre otras cosas para no sucumbir a nuevas formas de vasallaje en tales ámbitos. Ser ciudadano hoy es ser ciudadano en lo mediático. Y ello exige cultivar y educar en las habilidades necesarias para un uso amplio e íntegro de los medios y tecnologías comunicativas. Por ejemplo, en el terreno político y jurídico, Internet se está configurando como plataforma que permite una participación directa y ciudadana en diferentes temas de interés público nacional e internacional (Kahne, Lee & Feezell, 2012), a través de la participación virtual en campañas o movilizaciones promovidas por los mismos ciudadanos (Avaaz.org; Change.org), o por medio de la consulta de informes acerca de crímenes corporativos y corrupción política (transparency.org), etc. La interacción mediática es asimismo un elemento de la ciudadanía social en tanto que tal interacción constituye una competencia básica en el ámbito educativo y laboral, o en la medida en que a través de los medios la ciudadanía se informa y se moviliza para reclamar un sistema educativo y sanitario digno de sociedades con justicia social. En el plano económico, Internet pone a disposición del ciudadano infinidad de medios para hacer valer sus derechos frente a abusos, por ejemplo, de entidades financieras (la entrada «foros contra bancos» generó en el buscador Google aproximadamente 22.300.000 resultados, desde el «foroantiusura.org» hasta convocatorias de movilizaciones de afectados por las «participaciones preferentes» en España); o como instrumento útil para un consumo activo y reivindicativo (la entrada «asociaciones de consumidores y usuarios» generó en el mismo buscador 6.080.000 resultados, aunque en lengua inglesa este número aumenta significativamente: la entrada «consumer associations» produjo 38.600.000 resultados)1. El uso cívico de los medios invita, asimismo, a la concienciación acerca de las consecuencias medioambientales de los actos privados de consumo comunicativo, por ejemplo los derivados de la mala gestión de terminales de telefonía móvil o de instrumentos informáticos una vez éstos se desechan; la ciudadanía mediática exige también conocer y frenar las consecuencias de la extracción y comercialización del coltán empleado en las pantallas de terminales y ordenadores... En otro plano, la ciudadanía intercultural se ve posibilitada y potenciada en virtud de las interacciones comunicativas, auténtico resorte para el diálogo intercultural (Pérez-Tornero & Varis, 2008), diálogo que rompe fronteras y amplía el sentido de la identidad y de la dignidad al hacer visible y convertir en interlocutor válido al otro lejano, culturalmente diferente.

En suma, la reflexión acerca del uso cívico de medios y tecnología comunicativa apunta a una nueva forma de ciudadanía: la ciudadanía mediática, es decir, la ciudadanía en y gracias a los medios de comunicación, tanto los tradicionales como los interactivos (Gozálvez, 2012). Si hoy importa ser ciudadano en el terreno político, jurídico, social, económico, ecológico o intercultural, no lo es menos serlo en relación con los medios, pues la dimensión comunicativa y mediática indudablemente define nuestras sociedades y nuestro tiempo, y en este punto es crucial el papel de las instituciones educativas. La ciudadanía mediática es, desde esta perspectiva, una de las metas de la educomunicación, pues ésta no es en absoluto ajena a valores como la libertad, la autonomía crítica o la solidaridad en nuestro trato con los medios. Sin embargo, hablar de los valores éticos, cívicos y políticos de la educación mediática reclama mayor fundamentación filosófica.

3. Fundamento filosófico de la educomunicación Teorías éticas para la educación mediática actual

En nuestra tarea reconstructiva, hemos de acudir necesariamente a unos referentes filosóficos para evaluar la dimensión social y ética de la educomunicación. Atendiendo al panorama ético actual, estos son, a nuestro entender, los modelos filosóficos que ofrecen un sustento teórico sólido y operativo para la construcción educativa de la ciudadanía mediática. En primer lugar, la «ética del discurso» o «ética dialógica», de raíces neokantianas y unida a una «hermenéutica crítica». El programa pedagógico de la educomunicación necesitaría, acudiendo pues a la ética del discurso, un referente teórico para la crítica o, dicho de otro modo, una fundamentación basada en las condiciones de posibilidad de nuestros actos de habla o nuestros actos comunicativos con sentido. La ética dialógica ha aportado en las últimas décadas una reflexión amplia acerca de los presupuestos normativos y críticos de todo argumentar (Apel, 2007: 284), presupuestos que ayudan a definir la comunicación celebrada en buenas condiciones, motivo por el cual este enfoque filosófico es especialmente interesante para la educación mediática.

Una obra clave en la ética del discurso es el libro de Habermas (1981), «Teoría de la acción comunicativa», en donde presenta una teoría crítica de la sociedad a partir de las relaciones comunicativas de los participantes, los cuales abren un espacio de intersubjetividad en la búsqueda de acuerdos acerca de cuestiones de verdad, de justicia o de progreso social. Para la ética discursiva, la acción comunicativa es una interacción entre sujetos mediada por símbolos, y que se ajusta a pretensiones que los participantes presuponen en sus actos de habla como condiciones del diálogo: la verdad en los diálogos acerca de la realidad, la corrección en los diálogos acerca de la justicia atendiendo a intereses universalizables, la libertad a la hora de enunciar e interpretar los actos de habla, la igualdad o simetría entre los participantes (en donde la clave está en la fuerza del mejor argumento y no en la posición o privilegios del hablante), y la veracidad o sinceridad en el proceso comunicativo. Estas condiciones de la «racionalidad comunicativa» son las pretensiones de validez intersubjetivamente reconocidas, las cuales son necesarias, desde la responsabilidad, para resolver los conflictos de acción de un modo consensuado y para valorar críticamente qué actos comunicativos se ajustan a los criterios del auténtico diálogo y la deliberación racional. Desde el diálogo y en sociedades pluralistas, es fundamental cultivar el «uso público de la razón», y a este empeño pueden servir los medios de comunicación como expresión de una «actividad social humana», con unas metas legítimas y unos bienes internos que ayudan a definir un uso ciudadano de tales medios, entre los que destaca su contribución a una «opinión pública madura y responsable» (Cortina, 2004: 20). Por estas razones, podemos ver la necesaria conexión entre las propuestas de la ética del diálogo y la educomunicación: esta última trata de extender educativamente aquellos valores de una racionalidad comunicativa que son cardinales en la crítica y el progreso social. Nos referimos a valores como la transparencia y la pluralidad, la libertad argumentativa desde la adecuada información, la igualdad en dignidad y el respeto al otro como interlocutor válido, o el esfuerzo por alcanzar acuerdos siguiendo el criterio del mejor argumento. Y por supuesto, la llamada a la ciudadanía solidaria como resorte para extender las reclamaciones de justicia.

En segundo lugar, y desde una corriente neoaristotélica, el «enfoque de las capacidades» de Sen (1999; 2009) y Nussbaum (2012) representa otro modelo de gran potencia en la actualidad para fundamentar la dimensión social y ética de la educomunicación. Según este modelo filosófico (ético, social, económico, político), la clave para entender el desarrollo humano es la libertad, entendida como capacidad para llevar adelante el propio proyecto de vida de un modo social y humanamente compatible. Como afirma Sen, «según este enfoque, la expansión de la libertad es tanto el fin primordial del desarrollo como su medio principal. El desarrollo consiste en la eliminación de algunos tipos de falta de libertad que dejan a los individuos pocas opciones y escasas oportunidades para ejercer su agencia razonada» (Sen, 1999: 16, 223). Obviamente, la «agencia» o capacidad libre de las personas en un entorno hipercomunicado pasa por asegurar las garantías de transparencia en las informaciones públicas, así como el acceso a «una prensa libre y una oposición política activa».

Sen (Premio Nobel de Economía en 1998) fue director durante unos años del PNUD (Programa de Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo), estableciendo múltiples indicadores del desarrollo de un país más allá de su Producto Interior Bruto. Lo que más nos interesa es que hay una clara y estrecha relación entre libertad, desarrollo humano y medios de comunicación, sobre todo en el aspecto educativo. El empoderamiento de la ciudadanía en el ámbito mediático es una de las condiciones para el desarrollo humano y la libertad en sentido amplio, libertad que implica la capacidad para buscar y seleccionar la información, para detectar su procedencia y sus intenciones, para descifrar el significado de las imágenes, para desvelar los valores y emociones que están detrás del mundo audiovisual, para producir canales y mensajes alternativos, etc. Al fin y al cabo, «es evidente que tenemos buenas razones para prestar especial atención a la creación de las condiciones necesarias para que los individuos puedan tomar decisiones más documentadas y para favorecer el debate público ilustrado» (Sen, 1999: 336).

Hay numerosos estudios e informes de UNICEF o la UNESCO que refuerzan esta idea, y que desde luego suponen un punto de conexión entre desarrollo humano, comunicación, ciudadanía y educomunicación. Tal conexión puede observarse, por ejemplo, en el informe «Indicadores de Desarrollo Mediático», del Programa Internacional para el Desarrollo de la Comunicación (PIDC) de la UNESCO (2008); en el Informe «Desarrollo de capacidades para el ejercicio de la ciudadanía», de UNICEF (2006), o en el informe «Media as partners in education for sustainable development», de la UNESCO (2008), en donde se vincula el empoderamiento mediático con la ciudadanía ecológica. Las nuevas tecnologías comunicativas pueden igualmente ser muy valiosas en el acercamiento a los Objetivos del Milenio de Naciones Unidas (Del-Rio, 2010). Frau-Meigs y Torrent (2009) han analizado diversos informes internacionales como referentes de una nueva política global de educación en medios, destinada al «bienestar de sus ciudadanos, el desarrollo pacífico de las sociedades cívicas, la preservación de las culturas aborígenes, el crecimiento de las economías sostenibles y el enriquecimiento de la diversidad social contemporánea». En definitiva, los valores sociales y éticos de la educomunicación no son simple preferencia subjetiva de un investigador o de un grupo de expertos, sino que se sostienen en prestigiosas iniciativas internacionales y en un potente entramado filosófico que justifica o legitima el lado más axiológico de la educación mediática.

4. Educomunicación y ciudadanía: libertad, autonomía crítica y participación en la educación mediática

Tras la aclaración de los criterios fundamentales, nos interesa ahora reconstruir la dimensión ética, social y política de la educación mediática o educomunicación tal y como es definida por organismos internacionales como la UNESCO o el Parlamento Europeo (a los que se suma España con la Ley de la Comunicación Audiovisual). Tales propuestas y recomendaciones educativas abogan, en este sentido y como veremos, por la educación para una recepción e interpretación crítica, por una producción responsable y cívica, en suma, por el buen uso de los medios. Y con ello presuponen el valor de la educación mediática de cara al progreso social y democrático, y de cara al desarrollo humano en sintonía con los enfoques filosóficos expuestos en el anterior apartado.

Uno de los objetivos principales es el de evitar que la sociedad de la información se convierta, como afirman Brey, Campàs y Mayos (2009), en una «sociedad de la ignorancia». Y es que, según estos autores, ante la ingente cantidad de información a la que estamos permanentemente sometidos surge «una actitud de renuncia al conocimiento por desmotivación, por rendición, y una tendencia a aceptar de forma tácita la comodidad que nos proporcionan las visiones tópicas prefabricadas. Un falta de capacidad crítica, al fin y al cabo, que no es más que otra cara de nuestra creciente ignorancia» (Brey, Campàs & Mayos, 2009: 26).

Ante esa paradójica ignorancia apuntada, Moeller (2009: 66) hace hincapié en la urgencia de enseñar a ser autónomos desde la crítica, invitando a las personas «a evaluar lo que leen, oyen y ven, y enseñarles a notar qué es lo que no se está diciendo y qué es lo que no se muestra». Entiende que, además, lo anterior es «crucial» para que el ciudadano ejerza de manera eficaz «sus propios derechos ciudadanos y su propio acceso a las oportunidades económicas, políticas y sociales».

Como respuesta a estos retos, las instituciones públicas internacionales llevan años realizando recomendaciones para que los estados y las instituciones sociales adopten medidas que favorezcan la educación mediática en sus programas educativos reglados y también en el ámbito de la educación permanente e informal. En concreto, la UNESCO, en su Declaración de Grunwald (1982: 1), ya instaba a los sistemas políticos a asumir «las obligaciones que les incumben para promover entre los ciudadanos una comprensión crítica de los fenómenos de la comunicación». Igualmente en la Agenda de París (2007), promovida por esta misma organización, se afirma que «la educación en medios contribuye al empoderamiento de la gente y un sentido compartido de responsabilidad en la sociedad y, como tal, forma parte de la ciudadanía y los derechos humanos».

Más recientemente, la UNESCO a través de la Declaración de Braga (2011)2 insta a fomentar una educación para el uso libre, inteligente y crítico de los medios de comunicación, ya que ésta ha de ser una dimensión de la educación para la ciudadanía autónoma. Destaca igualmente la necesidad de que los responsables políticos adopten este objetivo en sus programas de acción, con el fin de facilitar y fomentar la iniciativa de los actores sociales. Para Gutiérrez y Tyner (2012: 36), la llamada al pensamiento crítico realizada por la UNESCO se traduce en la necesidad de educar en «el conocimiento de los valores personales y sociales y de las responsabilidades derivadas del uso ético de la información, así como la participación en el diálogo cultural y la preservación de la autonomía en un contexto con posibles y difícilmente detectables amenazas a dicha autonomía».

El Parlamento Europeo, por su parte, apuntaba en 2008 que «la educación mediática es esencial para lograr un alto nivel de alfabetización mediática, que es una parte importante de la educación política que ayuda a las personas a fortalecer su comportamiento como ciudadanos activos y la conciencia de sus derechos y deberes», al tiempo que incide en que «los ciudadanos bien informados y políticamente maduros constituyen la base de una sociedad pluralista» por lo que entiende que «mediante la elaboración de contenidos y productos mediáticos propios se adquieren capacidades que hacen posible una comprensión más profunda de los principios y valores de contenidos mediáticos elaborados profesionalmente» (Parlamento Europeo, 2008: 11).

En el caso de España, si nos acercamos a la Ley General de Comunicación Audiovisual (7/2010) aprobada en 2010, hay una clara referencia a las posibilidades de participación ciudadana a través de los medios de comunicación. Por primera vez en España se regula la existencia de los medios comunitarios o sin ánimo de lucro (por ejemplo, radios comunitarias). En el art. 32 se especifica que estos medios tendrán la función de «atender las necesidades sociales, culturales y de comunicación específicas de comunidades y grupos sociales, así como para fomentar la participación ciudadana y la vertebración del tejido asociativo». Estos medios pueden ejercer así como altavoces de la ciudadanía, desempeñando por tanto un papel fundamental en la educación mediática ciudadana.

En cuanto a la formación de la ciudadanía en el ámbito mediático, esta ley la incluye dentro de las funciones del Consejo Estatal de Medios Audiovisuales (CEMA), recogidas en el capítulo II del Título V. El CEMA tiene la obligación así de «velar por la promoción de la alfabetización mediática en el ámbito audiovisual con la finalidad de fomentar la adquisición de la máxima competencia mediática por parte de la ciudadanía». Igualmente, se hace explícita en la norma que este consejo debe evaluar el nivel de alfabetización mediática de la ciudadanía ayudándose de «los indicadores de medición utilizados por la Comisión Europea u otros indicadores que el propio Consejo Estatal de Medios Audiovisuales pueda considerar de interés». Por tanto, como afirman Gavara y Pérez-Tornero (2010: 7), esta ley entiende como un derecho ciudadano la educomunicación y la alfabetización mediática.

Sin embargo, el propio Gavara (2013) duda de que todo lo anterior se pueda aplicar, teniendo en cuenta la aparición del proyecto de ley# de supresión del CEMA y su sustitución por la CNMC (Comisión Nacional de los Mercados y la Competencia). Según Gavara (2013), esto implicaría que «se pase de una autoridad, el CEMA, cuya principal función recaía en la garantía de los derechos del público (es decir, una autoridad centrada en la protección de sujetos), a una autoridad centrada en el mercado audiovisual en la que el público es un mero consumidor o usuario».

A pesar de estas dificultades, existe un claro reconocimiento internacional de la necesidad de potenciar una verdadera educación mediática para la ciudadanía, como resorte para la participación de acuerdo con un modelo de democracia más deliberativo o participativo. Esta apuesta por una reactivación de la democracia nos conduce a la dimensión más política de la educomunicación. Al respecto, Masterman ya reconocía que «en un mundo en el que los eslóganes con frecuencia cuentan más que los razonamientos, y en el que todos tomamos decisiones políticas con la única base de lo que muestran los medios, la educación audiovisual resulta esencial no sólo para el ejercicio de nuestros derechos democráticos, sino también para defendernos de los graves excesos de la manipulación en los medios con fines políticos» (Masterman, 2010: 28)3. De este modo, la educación mediática es un elemento fundamental en la «larga marcha hacia una verdadera democracia participativa y en la democratización de las instituciones. La alfabetización audiovisual generalizada es esencial si queremos que todos los ciudadanos ejerzan el poder, tomen decisiones racionales, sean agentes efectivos del cambio y participen activamente en los medios». De modo similar, Sen declara que la democracia debe ser valorada en términos de la capacidad de enriquecer la participación razonada a través de la mejora de la disponibilidad de información y la posibilidad de debates interactivos: «La democracia tiene que ser juzgada no sólo por las instituciones que existen formalmente sino en la medida en que las diferentes voces de diversos sectores de la población pueden ser realmente escuchadas» (Sen, 2009: 18).

En consecuencia, la educación mediática se nos aparece como pilar de la democracia, sobre todo en su versión participativa o deliberativa (Macpherson, 2003). Hablamos de educación para una comunicación como proceso interactivo, abierto, participativo, y no unidireccional o determinado por los poderes clásicos (gobierno, poderes religiosos y corporaciones mediáticas, empresariales o financieras). Como afirma Sánchez-Ruiz (2005: 22-23), la democracia participativa o deliberativa no se puede concebir sin «un tejido múltiple de circuitos de comunicación, donde se discuten los asuntos públicos. La esfera pública es por necesidad un espacio de comunicación. En las democracias modernas los gobernados exigen cada día más ser informados de los procesos de generación de políticas públicas y sus resultados. Pero también exigen ser escuchados en la definición de los problemas, los temas y las prioridades».

El problema surge cuando en vez de ser medios de y para la comunicación, éstos devienen simplemente en medios de difusión de mensajes, en un proceso vertical y sólo en una dirección. En democracias elitistas (Cortina, 2010), éste sería el destino de los medios de comunicación. No obstante, con la irrupción de Internet, con la Web 2.0 y las redes sociales se están sentando las bases estructurales y tecnológicas para una comunicación más horizontal y para la redistribución democrática de poderes, a partir de una redefinición de un espacio público cada vez más globalizado (Castells, 2008).

Frente a las nuevas relaciones de comunicación y de poder globales, cabe responder adecuadamente desde el ámbito educativo, de modo que la educación para la ciudadanía mediática confluya en una educación para la ciudadanía global, profundamente democrática. El modo en que se configure este nuevo espacio para la deliberación pública será clave en el devenir de la democracia. Al respecto, la educación mediática, sobre todo en su vertiente digital, puede desarrollar una competencia clave para una ciudadanía activa, comprometida y participativa (Mihailidis & Thevenin, 2013). Frente a la comunicación entendida como mera difusión de masas, la sociedad-red global supone una oportunidad para la creación de una opinión pública deliberativa, abierta a nuevas formas de participación, de comunicación de ideas y proyectos.

En palabras de Greppi, lo importante no es sólo hablar de democracia, sino indagar en cuál es su calidad y cuáles son las condiciones para la misma. De este modo, en democracia se trata de educar en las nociones de participación, de compromiso público y responsabilidad social, nociones que requieren de ese espacio comunicativo dinámico y abierto. La opinión pública, en una democracia de calidad, es en realidad opinión pública crítica, deliberativa y reflexiva, para la cual se requiere de un espacio en donde la ciudadanía «cuente con recursos suficientes para pronunciarse sobre las cuestiones políticamente relevantes» (Greppi, 2012: 16-36). Es fácil deducir desde estos planteamientos que la educomunicación, en su dimensión social, ética y política, es una educación para contribuir adecuadamente a este espacio comunicativo público, cada vez más global. Un espacio interconectado que favorece la aparición de un público atento, comprometido y bien informado, un público compuesto «por ciudadanos capaces de comprender el ir y venir de razones que constituye la sustancia del proceso democrático».

5. Conclusión: Una educación mediática para reactivar la sociedad civil y empoderar a la ciudadanía

En el presente artículo hemos analizado la vinculación teórica entre la educomunicación, la ética del diálogo y el enfoque de las capacidades, con el fin de reconstruir un fundamento ético y político válido para la educación mediática. Asimismo, hemos investigado las claves para el empoderamiento y el protagonismo de la ciudadanía en el ámbito mediático, ampliando la actual teoría de la ciudadanía con el concepto de «ciudadanía mediática». Por otra parte, la necesidad de empoderar a la ciudadanía en el terreno mediático tiene como fin reactivar a la sociedad civil en el seno de democracias deliberativas comprometidas con el desarrollo humano. No sólo organismos públicos internacionales como la UNESCO se han implicado en este sentido. Publicaciones científicas como «Comunicar» han actuado como plataforma de investigación científica socialmente comprometida, desde el trabajo de Jacquinot (1999) hasta el estudio de Culver y Jacobson (2012) o la aportación de Aguaded (2013: 7) acerca de las recomendaciones europeas para una alfabetización mediática íntegra, «con el objetivo de impulsar una ciudadanía más activa, crítica y participativa».

Las iniciativas a favor de la educación mediática, entendida como el proceso formativo cuya realización es la alfabetización mediática (Buckingham, 2005: 21), presuponen necesariamente en su discurso unos referentes axiológicos determinados. Estos referentes prácticos y axiológicos (éticos, políticos y cívicos) han sido el centro de interés del presente estudio, dedicado a hacerlos explícitos y a interpretarlos desde la óptica de enfoques filosóficos actuales. Con ello insistimos en la necesidad de la interdisciplinariedad en educomunicación, en nuestro caso articulada para legitimar esta disciplina desde un punto de vista social, ciudadano y político. Educar para la ciudadanía mediática es, recíprocamente y como hemos argumentado, un modo de empoderar a la ciudadanía en sociedades plurales y democráticas hipercomunicadas.

Notas

1 Búsquedas realizadas el 25-03-2013.

2 Se puede consultar en línea en www.cca.eca.usp.br/noticia/756 (26-05-2013).

3 Proyecto de Ley de creación de la Comisión Nacional de los Mercados y la Competencia. BOCG. Congreso de los Diputados núm. A-28-1 de 19/10/2012. Se puede consultar en línea en www.congreso.es/public_oficiales/L10/CONG/BOCG/A/BOCG-10-A-28-1.PDF (26-05-2013).

4 Publicado originalmente en 1985.

Apoyo y agradecimientos

Este artículo se enmarca dentro del Proyecto I+D «La enseñanza obligatoria ante la competencia en comunicación audiovisual en un entorno digital» (EDU2010-21395-C03-03), al cual agradecemos su inestimable apoyo.

Referencias

Aguaded, J.I. (2013). El programa «Media» de la Comisión Europea, apoyo internacional a la educación en medios. Comunicar, 40 (XX), 7-8. (DOI: 10.3916/C40-2013-01-01).

Apel, K.O. (2007). Los seres humanos están preparados para las exigencias de la ética discursiva. In Zavadivker, N. (Ed.), La ética en la encrucijada. Buenos Aires: Prometeo.

Benéitez, J.J. (2010). La ciudadanía cosmopolita de Martha Nussbaum. Revista Internacional de Filosofía, 3, 347-354.

Brey, A., Campàs, J. & Mayos, G. (2009). La sociedad de la ignorancia y otros ensayos Barcelona: Infonomia.

Buckingham, D. (2005). Educación en medios. Alfabetización, aprendizaje y cultura. Barcelona: Paidós.

Castells, M. (2008). The New Public Sphere: Global Civil Society, Communication Networks, and Global Governance. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 616 (1), 78-93. (DOI: 10.1177/0002716207311877).

Conill, J. (2004). Horizontes de economía ética. Madrid: Tecnos.

Cortina, A. (1990/2010). Ética sin moral. Madrid: Tecnos.

Cortina, A. (1997). Ciudadanos del mundo. Hacia una teoría de la ciudadanía. Madrid: Alianza.

Cortina, A. (2004). Ciudadanía activa en una sociedad mediática. In J. Conill & V. Gozálvez (Eds.), Ética de los medios. Una apuesta por la ciudadanía audiovisual. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Culver, S.H. & Jacobson, T. (2012). Alfabetización mediática como método para fomentar la participación cívica. Comunicar, 39 (XX), 73-80. (DOI: 10.3916/C39-2012-02-07).

Del Rio, O. (2010). El valor de las Tecnologías de Información y Comunicación (TIC) para el desarrollo humano: ¿oportunidad o amenaza? Folios, 24, 13-33.

Dobson, A. & Bell, D. (2006). Environmental citizenship. Cambridge: MIT Press.

Dobson, A. (2005). Ciudadanía ecológica. Isegoría, 32, 47-62.

Frau-Meigs, D. & Torrent, J. (2009). Políticas de educación en medios: Hacia una propuesta global. Comunicar, 32 (XVI), 10-14. (DOI: 10.3916/c32-2009-01-001).

Gavara, J. C. (2013). Autoridades independientes del audiovisual. Del CEMA al CNMC. Revista Catalana de Dret Públic. (http://blocs.gencat.cat/blocs/AppPHP/eapc-rcdp/2013/05/21/autoridades-independientes-del-audiovisual-del-cema-a-la-cnmc-juan-carlos-gavara) (23-05-2013).

Gavara, J.C & Pérez-Tornero, J. M. (2010) La alfabetización mediática y la Ley General de comunicación audiovisual en España. Barcelona: UOC.

Gozálvez, V. (2012). Ciudadanía mediática. Una mirada educativa. Madrid: Dykinson.

Greppi, A. (2012). La democracia y su contrario. Representación, separación de poderes y opinión pública. Madrid: Trotta.

Gutiérrez, A. & Tyner, K. (2012). Educación para los medios, alfabetización mediática y competencia digital. Comunicar, 38, 31-39. (DOI: 10.3916/C38-2012-02-03).

Habermas, J. (1992). Teoría de la acción comunicativa. Madrid: Taurus.

Jacquinot, G. (1999). Educar en los medios de comunicación para favorecer la democracia. Comunicar, 13, 29-35.

Kahne, J., Lee, N.J., & Feezell, J.T. (2012). Digital Media Lliteracy Education and Online Civic and Political Participation. International Journal of Communication, 6, 1-24. (DOI: 1932–8036/201200050001).

Ley 7/2010, de 31 de marzo, General de la Comunicación Audiovisual (BOE, 01-04-2010).

Lipovetsky G. & Serroy, J. (2009). La pantalla global. Cultura mediática y cine en la era hipermoderna. Barcelona: Anagrama.

Macpherson, C. B. (2003). La democracia liberal y su época. Madrid: Alianza.

Masterman, L. (1985/2010). La enseñanza de los medios de comunicación. Madrid: De la Torre.

Mihailidis, P. & Thevenin, B. (2013). Media Literacy as a Core Competency for Engaged Citizenship in Participatory Democracy. American Behavioral Scientist (versión pre-print). (DOI: 10.1177/0002764213489015).

Moeller, S. (2009). Fomentar la libertad de expresión con la alfabetización mediática mundial. Comunicar, 32, 65-72. (DOI: 10.3916/c32-2009-02-005).

Nussbaum, M. (2012). Crear capacidades. Propuestas para el desarrollo humano. Barcelona: Paidós.

Nussbaum, M. (Ed.) (1999). Los límites del patriotismo. Identidad, pertenencia y ciudadanía mundial. Barcelona: Paidós.

Ortega-Gasset, J. (1923/2003). El tema de nuestro tiempo. Madrid: Espasa.

Parlamento Europeo. Resolución del 16 de diciembre de 2008, sobre la alfabetización de los medios de comunicación en un mundo digital (2008/2129(INI)) (http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=oj:c:2010:045e:0009:0014:es:pdf) (17-05-2013).

Pérez-Tornero, J.M. & Varis, T. (2008). Media Literacy and New humanism. UNESCO: Institute for Information Technologies in Education. (http://iite.unesco.org/pics/-publications/en/files/3214678.pdf) (25-05-2013).

Sánchez-Ruiz, E. (2005). Medios de comunicación y democracia. Bogotá: Norma.

Sen, A. (1999). Desarrollo y libertad. Barcelona: Planeta.

Sen, A. (2009). The Idea of Justice. Cambridge: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.

UNESCO (1982). Declaración de Grünwald sobre la educación relativa a los medios de comunicación. Grünwald. (www.unesco.org/education/nfsunesco/pdf/MEDIA_S.PDF) (26-05-2013)

UNESCO (2007) Agenda de París. (www.diplomatie.gouv.fr/fr/IMG/pdf/Parisagendafin_en.pdf) (26-05-2013).

UNESCO (2008A). Indicadores de Desarrollo mediático. Marco para evaluar el desarrollo de los medios de comunicación social. (http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0016/001631/163102S.pdf) (15-05-2013).

UNESCO (2008B). Media as partners in education for sustainable development. (http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0015/001587/158787e.pdf) (12-05-2013).

UNESCO (2011). Declaración de Braga sobre alfabetización mediática. (www.cca.eca.usp.br/noticia/756) (13-08-2013).

UNICEF (2006). Desarrollo de capacidades para el ejercicio de la ciudadanía. (www.unicef.org/argentina/spanish/EDUPAScuadernillo-5.pdf) (29-04-2013).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/13
Accepted on 31/12/13
Submitted on 31/12/13

Volume 22, Issue 1, 2014
DOI: 10.3916/C42-2014-12
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 29
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?