Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The growing expansion of Internet access and mass-scale usage of social networking platforms and search engines have forced digital newspapers to deal with challenges, amongst which are the need to constantly update news, the increasing complexity of sources, the difficulty of exercising their function as gatekeepers in a fragmented environment in which the opinions, biases and preconceptions of pundits, their followers, Twitter users, etc. has taken on a new and decisive weight and the mounting pressure to publish certain news items simply because they sell. They must also share audiences with aggregators devoted to the business of disseminating content produced by digital news publishers, blogs and RSS feeds, which is chosen on the basis of search engine algorithms, the votes of users or the preferences of readers. The fact that these computerized systems of news distribution seldom employ the criteria upon which journalism is based suggests that the work of gatekeeping is being reframed in a way that progressively eliminates journalists from the process of deciding what is newsworthy. This study of these trends has entailed a 47 point assessment of 30 news aggregators currently providing syndicated content and eight semi-structured interviews with editors of quality mass-distribution digital newspapers published in the U.S., Spain and Portugal.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Journalism today entails handling a constant flow of information, taking advantage of opportunities that arise, adapting to new ways of working using tools, techniques and assumptions that weren’t even possible 10 years ago, “adapting to a world where the newsmakers, the advertisers, the start-ups, and, especially, the people formerly known as the audience have all been given new freedom to communicate, narrowly and broadly, outside the old strictures of the broadcast and publishing models” (Anderson, Bell, & Shirky, 2014), and figuring out ways to engage the highly fragmented audiences (Lee-Wright, Phillips, & Witschge, 2013; Pavlik, 2008) of the post-PC era in which “if you put something in the net it actually may be easier to manage, and the PC is simply a way station along that path” (Clark, 1999). For a very long time, media outlets and journalists wielded the undisputed power to influence how audiences mentally pictured the world around them (McCombs, 2006) via messages that succinctly conveyed what matters should be perceived by the public as having overriding importance. Both have routinely operated under the assumption that their primary mission was “to provide citizens with the information they need to be free and self-governing” (Kovach & Rosenstiel, 2014). Journalism has nevertheless evolved into a service rendered to an informed public (Jarvis, 2013) accustomed to accessing information via electronic devices that may function well as vehicles for delivering and accessing news content, but they also induce readers to spend more and more time in a commercially charged environment that reduces their capacity to reflect and think critically and whose potentially anesthetizing effect (Brottman, 2005) may even alter their cognitive processes (Carr, 2010).

The popularization of the Internet and the public’s extensive use of social networking platforms and search engines on a massive scale have forced digital newspapers to deal with the challenges posed by: the need to update content; the increasing complexity of sources; the difficulty of exercising their function as gatekeepers in a fragmented environment; and the mounting pressure to publish certain news items merely because they sell (Boczkowski, 2004; Deuze, 2006, 2007; Domingo, Quandt, Heinonen, Paulussen, Singer, & Vujnovic, 2008; Kapuscinski, 2005; Pavlik, 2001) in a fragmented and increasingly competitive market that everyone seems determined to enter (Holzer & Ondrus, 2011). Pavlik (2013) asserts that the survival of news agencies during this period of upheaval hinges on their commitment to innovation and rigorous adherence to four basic principles: intelligence or research, a commitment to freedom of speech, a dedication to the pursuit of truth and accuracy in reporting, and ethics, whereas other authors such as Kunelius (2006) or Kovach and Rosenstiel (2007) stress the importance of maintaining the self-critical perspective crucial to ensuring the content they offer continues to be relevant in the eyes of the public.

Given the impossibility of accurately predicting the mid- and long-term future of journalism, this study attempted to determine whether news aggregator apps used by readers to create smart, personalized magazines are useful or detrimental to the values of journalism (McBride & Rosenstiel, 2013; Kunelius, 2006; Kovach & Rosenstiel, 2003). Studies published about mobile devices have tended to approach them from technological angles (Lavin, 2015; Enck, Gilbert, Chun, Cox, Jung, …Sheth, 2010; Aguado, Feijóo, & Martínez, 2013; Yang, Xue, Fang, & Tang, 2012; Falaki, Mahajan, Kandula, Lymberopoulos, Govindan, & Estrin, 2010; Canavilhas, 2009; Law, Fortunati, & Yang, 2006; Souza e Silva, 2006), but less scholarly attention has been paid to apps, which offer new opportunities but may or may not prove to be the silver bullet in terms of distribution that many have predicted they will be. Much of the research conducted on the impact that aggregator giants such as Google and Yahoo have had on journalism has focused on the “business-stealing effect” often associated with them (Lee & Chyi, 2015; Jeon & Nasr, 2014; Quinn, 2014; Dellarocas, Katona, & Rand, 2012; Isbell, 2010) and paid less attention to smaller sector players channelling syndicated content to millions of readers via apps-enterprises that are causing far fewer problems for the production end of the news industry and fall neatly in line with the theory of disruptive innovation developed at the Harvard Business School (Christensen, & Skok, 2012). The majority of these companies use software to scan and index Internet news systematically, and though a few also employ human editors, the content they vet is determined by algorithms (Diakopoulos, 2014).

These smaller news aggregators, whose approach has different characteristics from others of larger dimensions such as Google (Athey, Mobius, & Pal, 2017) or Facebook (De-Corniere & Sarvary, 2017), offer a transversal reading of the informative landscape of the internet that facilitates adaptation to different user profiles (Aguado & Castellet, 2015). And they select news by means of algorithms related to the search systems of the browsers with choice or voting by the users or by the customized thematic selection of the readers. They are not included in large groups such as Google News, Apple News, Snapchat Discover, Kakao Channel or Line News, but they are independent products from the business perspective (Newman, Fletcher, Kalogeropoulos, Levy, & Nielsen, 2017). They collect information from cyber media, blogs, and subscriptions to feeds (channels or RSS feeds) of Twitter, Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn, Instagram, Flickr or YouTube, and their business consists of generating value among readers and media. However, as yet their financing model is unclear, and it is still rare for users to pay for access. They usually offer a link to the original article with the added advantage that they can sell that information and publicize themselves without having to produce their own content. At the same time, however, in many cases, they prevent those who produced the content from obtaining the corresponding benefits. Thus, they have a negative aspect: they can limit access to the original website by the aforementioned business-stealing effect, but there is also another positive aspect as they increase visibility and traffic exponentially through the market-expansion effect; and both can be calculated quantitatively using the number of visits by users (Nars & Jeon, 2014). Media ascertains that with this second effect, news traffic increases and, from the readers’ perspective, there is a greater diversification of contents (De Corniere & Sarvary, 2017). If we look at the market substitution effect though, it can be shown that a large number of these readers never look at the original article, or they do not go into any depth (Chiou & Tucker, 2017), and consider the information in the aggregators to be sufficient, which then become unfair competitors of news producers and may even offer their content in a biased manner (Hamborg, Meuschke, Aizaba, & Gipp, 2017).

Jeon and Nasr factored an additional consideration drawn from a previous study conducted by Dellarocas, Katona and Rand (2016) into their analysis of the relative strengths of market expansion and market substitution effects, which was the way in which hyperlinking may raise or lower digital publications’ incentives to produce quality content –an issue worth exploring given the possibility that the boon aggregators offer consumers may constitute a bane for content producers–. The difference between loyal, paying news consumers and others looking for free, quality content via aggregator sites should also be taken into account. As the number of people cruising the Internet for free news content continues to grow, and the number of individuals demanding quality grows with it, aggregators may need to adjust their strategies in order to satisfy readers in search of both quantity and quality (Rutt, 2011). Authors who have found the market-expansion effect to be the most pervasive have concluded that news aggregators complement the news sources they draw content from (Athey & Mobius, 2017; Chiou & Tucker, 2012). Others have observed that, in the context of two-sided media markets, the presence of news aggregators drives up the number of multi-homing readers, and overall sector advertising revenues tend to be lower in environments in which a large percentage of news consumers are single-homing readers (George & Hogendorn, 2012, 2013). Jeon and Nasr have also focused on the dynamics of two-sided markets (2014).

Perhaps, the real clash between aggregation and journalism lies not only in the work of one or the other, nor in the possibility that each one defines the other as a kind of pathological doppelganger, but also in the type of elements with which they build their stories and in the criteria they use for fact-checking Anderson (2013) and “the great conflict over journalism may be centred around the things of journalism in addition to the work of journalism or their definition”. This is, beyond questions related to audience share and dominant models of consumption, there is the pressing need to determine the validity of assertions made by authors such Mills, Egglestone, Rashid and Vaastäjä (2012) that the trivialization of news is becoming progressively more evident. The fact that journalistic criteria play no part in the processes by which most aggregators select and display news content leads one to suspect that journalism’s role as the gatekeeper of news is being seriously compromised or may already be a thing of the past. As Christensen and Skok (2012) have pointed out, BuzzFeed has started to produce its own branded content. Gatekeeping has long been a critical part of journalism’s identity (Bordieu, 2005), and journalists have always claimed to have a unique responsibility and capacity for deciding what constitutes news –a longstanding notion that soon may need to be renegotiated given the shaky foundations on which it currently stands– (Vos & Finneman, 2016). In any case, the competitive relationship between news producers and aggregators needs to be examined in depth, for as Lee and Chyi (2015) have pointed out, “content aggregation is here to stay”.

2. Material and methods

In light of the complexity of the situation described above, we posed the following research questions concerning the smaller app-driven aggregators serving the market today: Q1: Do they organize the content they offer in terms of established journalistic practice or in a way that may confuse readers?; Q2: Are the selection criteria that they employ transparent, or do they correspond to marketing interests?; Q3: Do they employ journalists as fact-checkers or curators, or do they shun the role of gatekeeper?

The primary objective of the research reported here is to gauge if the expansive contribution of these aggregators offers a professionalized journalistic selection of the news, or does it have a merely quantitative approach. This is important to understand given the pressing need to defend models of journalism based on excellence against the encroachment of others that place a higher value on traffic over the relevance of content published. In journalistic and academic fields, it is already considered that a growing emphasis on audience capture is one of the main factors contributing to the gradual decline in the quality of news content so evident today, but “pleasing the audience might be compatible with producing excellent journalism” (Costera, 2013) and the entrance of the aggregators raises a new academic and professional discussion. There are ethical parameters such as linking to the original material, attributing the content to the author, verifying information and providing added value (Buttry, 2012). Others stress that responsible aggregation should not confuse readers, but it should identify the origin, link to the publisher and include only a paragraph to encourage the search for the original (Friedman, 2014). There are also positive opinions that consider them a way to achieve higher quality content (Jeon & Nars, 2016), and others that distinguish between symbiotic aggregators and parasites, using four evaluative elements: attribution, limited use, added value and right of rejection by the publishers (Bailey, 2015).

In this context, we posed two hypotheses: 1) App-driven aggregators deliver vast quantities of content that they nevertheless fail to organize and prioritize in a manner that could be considered professional from a journalistic point of view. 2) Aggregators would have a greater value for the increasing well-informed and demanding reader-users of today if they placed a higher priority on the quality of the content they offered instead of focusing all their energy on identifying audiences most likely to be best targets in terms of monetization.

To carry out the research on these new proposals, quantitative and qualitative aspects have been taken into account, which are reflected in the analysis sheet that has been applied to each of the selected samples and we have compiled different models of aggregator apps that seem stable at the moment, but assuming the impossibility of offering an exhaustive list since some have a short life, new ones emerge immediately and many act from the web and do not have an app. There are different types of horizontal or generalist social bookmarkers to store and share information in different languages, frequently operating from their own website and some are inspired by the Anglo-Saxon “Digg” (2004), which we selected for study as besides being a pioneer in this field it offers news and has an app. Other examples are “Delicious” (2003), “Blogmarks” (2003), “Menéame” (2005), “Bitácoras” (2010) and “StumbleUpon” (2010). Vertical and specialized social bookmarking systems include the video-sharing site “Vimeo” (2004); “TechCrunch” (2005), which offers tech news; “Mktfan” (2009), specializing in marketing and digital technology; “Imgur” (2009), a photo sharing site chosen for the study sample; “Tech News Tube” (2011); “Divúlgame” (2011); “iGeeky” (2011), which is focused on RSS feeds; “Tech News by Newsfusion” (2012), which offers news about Apple, Facebook and startups; “AppyGeek” (2012), a highly popular tech news app; “Product Hunt” (2013), which focuses on new tech products; and “TechPort” (2013), which also offers tech-focused content.

Personalized social magazines make up another large group of aggregators that offer news and social network content in a magazine format that users can customize and which are active or passive depending on the levels of selection allowed to the reader. Their business is based on monetizing user data, which is not sold to third parties but is used in processes related to advertising, and they accept both conventional and sponsored advertising. Aggregators of this type include “Feedly” (2008), “NewsBlur” (2009), “Flipboard” (2010), “Reeder 3” (2010), “Inoreader” (2012), “News App” (2012), and “Play Kiosko” (2013). Others, which tend to pursue a paid content model, work with syndicated content services, include “Popurls” (2005), “Newsify” (2012), “LinkedIn Pulse” (2013), “Feed Wrangler” (2013), “Unread” (2014) and “News Republic” (2014). “Fark” is launched in 1999 that released an app in 2012 that was most recently updated in 2017. A more recent generation that has improved the concept includes “Scoop.it!” a Web curation platform launched in English in 2011 that has since added Spanish; “Smart News” (2012); “Blendle” (2013), a Dutch pay-as-you-go news platform described as “iTunes for news”; “Paper.li” (2009), an app that reconfigures Twitter and Facebook streams into a newspaper format; “News360” (2010), a personalized news aggregator app that “learns” to detect content of interest to users; and “UpDay” (2015), an app developed by Axel Springer and Samsung. Others are “inkl” (2015), which offers a curated selection of news content; “Feedbin” (2015); “NewsBot” (2015), originally named Telme John); “Mosaiscope” (2012), a comprehensive news aggregator/reader; “Readzi” (2016); “Nuzzel” (2016), a personalized news app classified as one of best apps of 2016 and “Read Across the Aisle” (2017), an app designed to help readers escape from their personal filter bubbles. Other options worth noting are “Reddit” (2005); “Pocket” (2007) that is useful for storing website content; “Instapaper” (2008), which was acquired by Pinterest in 2016; “JimmyR” (2006), which could be considered more of a mashup; “Diigo” (2014); “Revoat” (2015), which is similar to Reddit but offers more opportunities for user engagement and is less strict about politically incorrect content; website aggregator “Netvibes” (2005) and “StumbleUpon” (2001), a discovery engine acquired by eBay in 2007 that searches for and recommends news and other types of content of interest to users. Some of these can be considered fusions between bookmarking services and aggregators.

For the purposes of this study, we examined a sample of thirty aggregator apps selected from the almost endless list being marketed today. Data related to the business model is not what we consider most relevant, and if taken into account, it can be seen that, for the most part, they are not journalistic companies nor is their purpose quality of information. They rely on technology to generate traffic and a volume of unknown users who do not generate advertising revenue or subscribers and which hurt publishers. Although our main inclusion criterion was that an app is devoted entirely (or at least partially) to news content, we also took into consideration other points such as the size of their user bases, level of interactivity, user-friendliness, novelty and the frequency with which they were updated. In light of the fact that newspapers generate the content aggregators use, in addition to working with data obtained from an analysis of this sample, we also conducted a series of semi-constructed interviews with the editors of “The Washington Post”, “The Wall Street Journal” (U.S.), “El País”, “El Mundo”, “ABC”, “El Confidencial” (Spain), “Público”, and “Jornal de Noticias” (Portugal). In order to better examine the structure and models of the aggregators selected for the study sample, once our review of the existing literature was complete, we prepared an analysis sheet containing 47 evaluation parameters related to four key areas of inquiry (see Table 1).

3. Results

Description: They are companies that never exceed 50 employees, and with free apps that have paywalls. They usually publish in English but also in other languages. There are two categories: a) Aggregators with a predominance of marking feeds based on the preferences of users and which focus investment on technological development in order to make an automatic selection using algorithms. They have between two and five employees; b) Aggregators with editing teams that select information for more personal consumption, employing from ten to fifty people.

Navigation and structure: Those that select based on the of users votes have a linear, minimalist, scroll structure with information in steps for an unbroken visualization. Others, such as “Flipboard” or “Feedly”, are Custom Social Journals with a design similar to that of printed magazines, very visual and with page flipping. In the majority the user personalizes and determines the list of media, the user experience is usually easy, and they are very intuitive, with exceptions such as “Mosaiscope”.

Contents: The presentation of information is done as on the web, without covering and ranking the latest news, except “Flipboard”. There is no daily edition, the number of items of news is updated continuously, and the number of links is also undefined. Most are horizontal and connect with conventional media, but others use social networks, entities, and blogs vertically. The selection is based on the date of entry, the relevance of the contacts or thematic selection; and content is added by vote of the users and the frequency of feeds and algorithms of the site.

Interactivity: There are many similarities with minimal differences. The technological tools are practically similar in all the apps, and they vary in functionalities, such as giving opinions, commenting or contributing, which are usually done through Facebook or Twitter. All have the option of sharing and including profiles on social networks.

The Table 2 provides data for the primary objectives of this study.

Findings indicate that the content selection processes employed by most app-based aggregators are algorithmically driven, quantitatively oriented and unprofessional from the perspective of journalistic standards. The newspaper editors and executives interviewed for this study all complained that aggregators make unfair use of the content they produce, and they believed that a more equitable arrangement needed to be negotiated. All of them reflect, with the exception of “El Confidencial”, two attitudes: they assume that they must inevitably accept the new situation but, at the same time, they state that aggregators do not support or favour news publishers without whom their business would cease to exist. If these platforms bring them more readers, they are not against them. But they consider that the current model means they will lose profitability and that if an adequate method of collaboration is not reached, audiences may assume that information is free when the reality is that it requires good professionals, ethical and deontological guarantees and considerable economic investment.

Emilio García-Ruiz, managing editor of “The Washington Post”, asserted that everything has changed; and refusing to work with Google is bucking a revolution. While he has no problem with small-scale aggregators that generate new readers, he considers their prospects dim in a sector in which only enterprises capable of attracting mass audiences survive. Constance Mitchell-Ford, a veteran “The Wall Street Journal” editor, asserted that digital newspapers who are unhappy with the fact that aggregators provide free content need to develop similar distribution mechanisms that readers are willing to pay for. “There are many readers who just want to read headlines and general, superficial news and don’t ask for anything more. They get that for free. But there are lots of others that expect quality and need analysis and coverage that requires investigative work, which is something that must be paid for. Free news is a really nice idea, but somebody along the line has to pay what it costs to produce it”.

Referring to the love-hate relationship that exists between newspapers and aggregators, Bernardo Marín García, deputy director of digital operations at “El País”, reflects, “It’s true that they cherry pick our work. But they also allow us to reach many more readers”. “El Mundo’s” deputy director Rafael Moyano is less optimistic. “We are now in their hands”, he laments. “Newspapers do the work, and they take a free ride. For the moment they need us, and they’re beginning to realize that they can’t go on doing what they’re doing indefinitely”. Montserrat Lluis, deputy director of “ABC” feels that the methods app-based aggregators use to select news content are rigged to “rob us of the greatest number and best news stories possible”. From her perspective, “This is a travesty driven by an obsession with winning an ever-greater slice of a readership pie that should be more equally distributed between aggregators and newspapers so as to ensure the quality of journalism going forward. Letting the public become accustomed to the notion that news is free and professional and ethical standards are irrelevant is dangerous”. Nacho Cardero, the editor of “El Confidencial”, who takes the position that aggregators allow his paper to reach a larger audience, describes them as “our allies, not our enemies”. As far as he is concerned, the problem lies with editors “who haven’t yet learned how to monetize their newspapers or stubbornly cling to bloated, completely anachronistic operational structures”.

While Domingos de Andrade, executive director of “Jornal de Notícias”, worries that aggregators could well be the death sentence for newspapers, he also recognizes that without them newspapers would find it harder to connect with audiences. According to him, “The question is how we newspapers can become profitable on the basis of the simple fact they are using content we produce”. As Amílcar Correia, the executive editor of “Público”, sees it, “Aggregators are unjustifiably distributing free content to more and more readers and they should be paying to do that. They may have funded research projects in Europe to clear their conscience, but even the smallest of them siphon off-market segments that could be crucial to given news publications. In any case, newspapers are free to prevent them from aggregating their content”.

4. Discussion and conclusions

News aggregation is a complicated and competitive business in which very few players manage to survive, and most have only short-term viability. It is equally controversial in the light of assertions made by newspapers in numerous countries that aggregators should have to pay for the snippets of news articles they feature. Good journalism is expensive to produce, and without the quality content that newspapers generate, news aggregators would have nothing of value to “sell”. Although these businesses may be competing with newspapers, and despite the fact that they make their money from the content they do not produce themselves, the two must coexist and eventually arrive at some mutually acceptable modus vivendi.

Aggregators have various points in their favour: a) They make a vast quantity of news and information easily accessible and offer a high level of personalization; b) They allow busy, active users interested in staying constantly up to date to set their own personal news agendas; c) They allow local and specialized publications that would otherwise remain below the radar to reach vast new audiences; d) They dramatically improve the national and international visibility of and access to a broad spectrum of digital publications and their content; e) They open up new business opportunities for news organizations that generate rapid revenue for those that learn how to exploit them successfully.

They nevertheless have their downsides as well: a) As it is impossible to wade through the vast volume of content they offer, and this unmediated surfeit of news can quickly devolve into a dearth of information, users must spend time learning how to organize their feeds and reduce their sources to a manageable number if they don’t want to be perpetually overwhelmed; b) Aggregators’ methods of content selection, most of which are focused on automated, random searches and based on user preferences and advertising considerations, are not professional from a journalistic perspective; c) Their modus operandi disrupts the relationship between readers and news organizations; d) The proliferation of these increasingly technologically advanced platforms is causing ever-deeper fractures in a saturated market in which fragmented audiences use various products simultaneously.

Findings support our starting hypotheses. Generally speaking, the aggregators analysed disseminate content via apps that allow them to offer a vast quantity of new items that they nevertheless fail to organize and prioritize in accordance with journalistic standards. In light of the quantitatively oriented content selections examined, which in certain instances fell into the category of superficial eye candy, we believe that their model of news distribution needs to be reoriented towards higher quality content and that gatekeeper competences in what is now a diverse and changing sector must be reformulated. Aggregators would have a higher value for the increasing well-informed and demanding readers of today if they used journalistic methods of content selection and prioritization instead of focusing their energy on identifying which audiences are likely to be the best targets in terms of monetization. Although these services offer easy access to a wide range of news stories and a high level of personalization, their failure to organize content professionally contributes to fragmentation that impedes users from localizing specific sources and gaining a comprehensive understanding of issues and events. All should, therefore, make a more significant effort to impose a hierarchy on the content they offer. It is also time to bring our concept of what a gatekeeper is and needs to do in line with the circumstances of today’s technology, journalistic practices, communications, and current news models.

Funding Agency

This article reports on work carried out as part of a larger research project (“Keys to the redefinition and survival of journalism and challenges in the post-PC era”) funding by the Ministry of Industry, Economy and Competitiveness of the Government of Spain through the National R+D+i Plan within the State Program of Research, Development and Innovation Oriented to the Challenges of the Society (CSO2016-79782-R).


Draft Content 702021215-71775-en004.jpg


Draft Content 702021215-71775-en005.jpg

References

Aguado, J.M., Feijóo, C., & Martínez, I.J. (2013). La comunicación móvil. Madrid: Gedisa.

Anderson, C., Bell, E., & Shirky C. (2014). Post-Industrial journalism. Adapting to the present. Columbia University Library. Series: Tow Center for Digital Journalism Publications. https://doi.org/10.7916/D8N01JS7

Anderson, C.W. (2013). What aggregators do: Towards a networked concept of journalistic expertise in the digital age. Journalism 14(8), 1008-1023. https://doi.org/10.1177/1464884913492460

Athey, S., Mobius, M., & Pal, J. (2017). The impact of news aggregators on Internet news consumption. Working paper 3353. Graduate School of Stanford Business. https://stanford.io/2QVYyhj

Bailey, J. (2015). A Brief Guide to Ethical Aggregation. Plagiarism Today. https://bit.ly/1Ql1g9l

Boczkowski, P. (2004). Digitizing the news. Innovation in online newspapers. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press. https://doi.org/10.7551/mitpress/2435.001.0001

Bourdieu, P. (2005). The political field, the social science field, and the journalistic field. In R. Benson, & E. Neveu (Eds.), Bourdieu and the journalistic field (pp. 29-47). Cambridge: Polity Press.

Brottman, M. (2005). High theory / Low culture. New York: Palgrave MacMillan. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781403978226

Buttry, S. (2012). Aggregation guidelines: Link, attribute, add value. The Buttry Diary. https://bit.ly/1C1qalT.

Carr, N. (2010). The shallows: How the Internet is changing the way we think, read and remember. London: Atlantic Books.

Castellet, A., & Aguado, J.M. (2015). Innovar cuando todo cambia. El valor disruptivo de la tecnología móvil en la industria de la información. Sur le Journalisme, About Journalism, Sobre Jornalismo (En ligne) 3(2), 26-39. https://bit.ly/2PG9Epi

Chiou, L., & Tucker, C. (2012). Copyright, digitization, and aggregation, discussion paper, NET Institute Working Paper, 11-18. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1864203

Chiou, L., & Tucker, C. (2017). Content aggregation by platforms: The case of the news media. Journal of Economics Management Strategy, 26(4), 782-805. https://doi.org/10.3386/w21404

Christensen, Clayton & Skok, David (2012). Be the disruptor. Nieman Reports, 66(3). https://bit.ly/2Eshhhl

Clark, D. (1999). Post-PC Internet. MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. Talk at the LCS 35th celebration, April 13. https://bit.ly/2UOUdyV

Costera, I. (2013). Valuable journalism: A search for quality from the vantage point of the user. Journalism. 14(6), pp. 754-770. https://doi.org/10.1177/1464884912455899

De Corniere, A., & Sarvary, M. (2017). Social media and the news industry. NET Institute Working Paper 17-07. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3049358

Dellarocas, C., Katona, Z., & Rand, W. (2012). Media, aggregators and the link economy: Strategic hyperlink formation in content networks. Working Papers 10-13, NET Institute. https://doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.2013.1710

Deuze, M. (2006). O jornalismo e os novos meios de comunicação social. Comunicação e Sociedade, 9(10), 15-37. https://doi.org/10.17231/comsoc.9(2006).1152

Diakopoulos, N. (2014). Algorithmic accountability. Journalistic investigation of computational power structures. Digital Journalism, 3(3), 398-415. https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2014.976411

Domingo, D., Quandt, T., Heinonen, A., Paulussen, S., Singer, J.B., & Vujnovic, M. (2008). Participatory journalism practices in the media and beyond. Journalism Practice, 2(3), 326-342. https://doi.org/10.1080/17512780802281065

Enck, W., Gilbert, P., Chun, B.G., Cox, L., Jung, J., … Sheth, A. (2014). TaintDroidt: An information-flow tracking system for realtime privacy monitoring on smartphones. ACM Trans. Comput. Syst. (TOCS) 32(2), 5. https://doi.org/10.1145/2619091

Falaki, H., Mahaja, R., Kandula, S., Lymberopoulos, D., Govindan, R., & Estrin, D., (2010). Diversity in smartphone usage. MobiSys ’10. Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Mobile Systems, Applications and Services, pp. 179-194. San Francisco. https://doi.org/10.1145/1814433.1814453

Friedman, A. (2014). We’re all aggregators now. So we should be ethical about it. Columbia Journalism Review. May, 23. https://bit.ly/2EpH7Cq

George, L., & Hogendorn, C. (2012). Aggregators, search and the economics of new media institutions, Information Economics and Policy, 24(1), 40-51. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.infoecopol.2012.01.005

Hamborg, F., Meuschke, N., Aizawa, A., & Gipp, B. (2017). Identification and analysis of media Biasin News Articles. In M. Gäde, V. Trkulja, & V. Petras (Eds.), Everything changes, everything stays the same? Understanding information spaces. Proceedings of the 15th International Symposium of Information Science (ISI 2017), Berlin, 13th-15th March 2017. Glückstadt: Verlag Werner Hülsbusch, pp. 224-236. https://doi.org/10.1163/9789004319523_015

Holzer, A., & Ondrus, J. (2011). Mobile application market: A developer’s perspective. Telematics and Informatics 28, 22-31. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tele.2010.05.006

Jarvis, J. (2013). There are no journalists. Buzz machine. https://bit.ly/2fWEdoX

Jeon, D.S., & Nasr, N. (2016). News aggregators and competition among newspapers in the Internet. american economic journal: Microeconomics, 8(4), 91-114. https://doi.org/10.1257/mic.20140151

Kapuscinki, R. (2005). Los cinco sentidos del periodista. Colombia, Spain: Fundación Nuevo Periodismo Iberoamericano, Asociación de la Prensa de Madrid.

Kovach, B., & Rosentiel, T. (2014). The Elements of Journalism. New York: Three Rivers Press. Crown Publishing Group. Random House LLC.

Kunelius, R. (2006). Good journalism. Journalism Studies, 7(5), 671-690. https://doi.org/10.1080/14616700600890323

Lavin, A., & Gray, S. (2016). Fast algorithms for convolutional neural networks. IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR). https://doi.org/10.1109/cvpr.2016.435

Law, P., Fortunati, L., & Yang, S. (2006). New technologies in global societies. River Edge, NJ, USA: World Scientific Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1142/9789812773555

Lee, A., & Chyi, H. (2015). The rise of online news aggregators: Consumption and competition. The International Journal on Media Management, 17(1), 3-24. https://doi.org/10.1080/14241277.2014.997383

Lee-Wright, P., Phillips, A., & Witschge, T. (2013). Changing Journalism. USA: Routledge.

McBride, K., & Rosenstiel, T. (Eds.) (2014). The new ethics of journalism: A guide for the 21st century. Los Angeles: SAGE.

McCombs, M. (2006). Estableciendo la agenda. El impacto de los medios en la opinión pública y el conocimiento. Barcelona: Paidós.

Mills, J., Egglestone, P., Rashid, O., & Väätäjä, H. (2012) MoJo in action: The use of mobiles in conflict, community and cross platform Journalism. Continuum, 26(5), 669-683. https://doi.org/10.1080/10304312.2012.706457

Nasr, N., & Jeon, D.S. (2014). News aggregators and competition among newspapers in the Internet. TSE. 12-20. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2164396

Newman, N., Fletcher, R., Kalogeropoulos, A., Levy, D., & Nielsen, R. (2017). Reuters Institute digital news report 2017. Oxford: Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. https://bit.ly/2R3kNVS

Pavlik, J. (2001). Journalism and new media. New York: Columbia University Press. https://doi.org/10.7312/pavl11482

Pavlik, J. (2008). Media in the digital age. New York: Columbia University Press.

Pavlik, J. (2013). Innovation and the future of journalism. Digital Journalism, 1(2), 181-193. https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2012.756666

Rosentiel, T., Jurkowitz, M., & Ji, H. (2012). The Search for a new business model. Pew Research Center. Journalism & Media. https://pewrsr.ch/2R0TOdD

Rutt, J. (2011). Aggregators and the News Industry: Charging for access to content. NET Institute. Working Paper 11-19. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1958028

Souza-e-Silva, A. (2006). Mobile technologies as interfaces of hybrid spaces. Space and Culture, 9(3), 261-278. https://doi.org/10.1177/1206331206289022

Stivers, C. (2012). Aggregated assault. Whose work is it, anyway? A plea for standards. Columbia Journalism Review, may-june. https://bit.ly/2rGwX90

Vos, T.P., & Finneman, T. (2017). The early historical construction of journalism’s gatekeeping role. Journalism, 18(3), 265-280. https://doi.org/10.1177/1464884916636126

Yang, D., Xue, G., Fang, X., & Tang, J. (2012). Crowdsourcing to smartphones: Incentive mechanism design for mobile phone sensing. 18th Annual International Conference on Mobile Computing and Networking, August 22, 2012 / August 26, 2012, Istanbul, Turkey, pp. 173-184. https://doi.org/10.1145/2348543.2348567



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

La creciente expansión del acceso a Internet y el uso masivo de las plataformas de redes sociales y los motores de búsqueda han obligado a los medios digitales a enfrentarse a desafíos como la necesidad de actualizar constantemente las noticias, la creciente complejidad de las fuentes, la dificultad de ejercer su función de «gatekeeper» en un entorno fragmentado en el que las opiniones, los prejuicios y las ideas preconcebidas de los expertos y sus seguidores, los usuarios de Twitter, etc. han adquirido un peso nuevo y decisivo, y la creciente presión para publicar ciertas noticias simplemente porque venden. Tienen además que compartir audiencias con agregadores cuyo negocio consiste en difundir contenido producido por editores de noticias digitales, blogs y «feeds» RSS, que hacen la selección basándose en algoritmos de búsqueda, en los votos de los usuarios o en las preferencias de los lectores. El hecho de que estos sistemas computarizados de distribución de noticias rara vez tienen en cuenta criterios periodísticos sugiere que ese trabajo de selección se está replanteando de tal manera que se va eliminando progresivamente a los periodistas del proceso de decidir lo que tiene interés periodístico. Este estudio sobre las tendencias descritas se ha llevado a cabo mediante la evaluación de 47 parámetros en 30 agregadores de noticias que actualmente ofrecen contenido sindicado, y se ha completado con ocho entrevistas semiestructuradas con editores de medios digitales de calidad y de difusión elevada publicados en los EEUU, España y Portugal.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

El periodismo es hoy un flujo contínuo de información, oportunidades y diferentes modos de trabajar que tiene que adaptarse a técnicas, herramientas y situaciones impensables hace diez años, en «un mundo donde los editores de noticias, los anunciantes, las empresas emergentes y la gente que antes llamábamos público tienen una nueva libertad para comunicarse de forma ilimitada sin las restricciones de las estructuras comunicativas tradicionales» (Anderson, Bell, & Shirky, 2014), y descubrir además la manera de involucrar a las audiencias altamente fragmentadas (Lee-Wright, Phillips, & Witschge, 2013; Pavlik, 2008) de la era post-PC, en la que «lo que subes a la red es más fácil de manejar y el ordenador es simplemente un sitio de paso» (Clark, 1999).

Los medios y los periodistas han tenido durante mucho tiempo la capacidad de influir en la imagen del mundo asumida por sus audiencias (McCombs, 2006), a las que han transmitido un mensaje claro sobre cuáles eran los asuntos más importantes en cada momento, y su cometido principal ha sido habitualmente proporcionar a los ciudadanos la información que necesitan para ser libres y capaces de gobernarse a sí mismos (Kovach & Rosentiel, 2012). Pero el periodismo es hoy un servicio que se dirige a un público informado (Jarvis, 2013) que accede a esa información sobre todo a través de dispositivos electrónicos integrados en la vida diaria que son un punto de encuentro entre la audiencia y la información, interactúan con los mercados, van ocupando más y más espacio a la vez que reducen la reflexión y el sentido crítico y pueden llegar a tener un efecto anestésico (Brottman, 2005) que cambie nuestra percepción (Carr, 2010).

La generalización de Internet, el uso masivo de las redes sociales y los motores de búsqueda han hecho que el modelo informativo se vea amenazado por la necesidad de actualizar continuamente las noticias, la complejidad de las fuentes, la dificultad de ejercer la función de «gatekeeper» en un entorno disperso, la fuerza de la opinión sobre la información o la consideración de la noticia como un producto de marketing (Boczkowski, 2004; Deuze, 2006, 2007; Domingo, Quandt, Heinonen, Paulussen, Singer, & Vujnovic, 2008; Kapuscinski, 2005; Pavlik, 2001) en un mercado dividido y cada vez más competitivo en el que todos quieren estar (Holzer & Ondrus, 2011).

Pavlik (2013) afirma que la supervivencia de las empresas informativas durante este período convulso depende de su compromiso con la innovación y de su rigurosa adhesión a cuatro principios básicos: la investigación, el compromiso con la libertad de expresión, la búsqueda de la verdad y el rigor de los datos en los reportajes, y la ética (Pavlik, 2013). Pero otros autores, como Kunelius (2006) o Kovach y Rosenstiel (2007), destacan que es imprescindible la perspectiva autocrítica para garantizar que el contenido que ofrecen siga siendo importante a los ojos del público y el periodismo mantenga su relevancia en la sociedad.

En este contexto, en el que nadie sabe con exactitud cómo será el periodismo a medio y largo plazo, nuestra investigación aborda el desafío de los agregadores de noticias vinculados a aplicaciones (apps) como revistas sociales personalizadas, para determinar si son útiles o contribuyen a disminuir los valores del periodismo (McBride & Rosentiel, 2013; Kunelius, 2006; Kovach & Rosentiel, 2003). Se han publicado diferentes estudios sobre los dispositivos electrónicos desde enfoques más o menos tecnológicos (Lavin, 2015; Enck, Gilbert, Chun, Cox, Jung… Sheth, 2010; Aguado, Feijóo, & Martínez, 2013; Yang, Xue, Fang, & Tang, 2012; Falaki, Mahajan, Kandula, Lymberopoulos, Govindan, & Estrin, 2010; Canavilhas, 2009; Law, Fortunati, & Yang, 2006; Souza & Silva, 2006), pero las aplicaciones han abierto nuevas perspectivas en la producción y edición de noticias aunque todavía no está demostrado que sean la panacea para el futuro. Gran parte de la investigación realizada sobre el impacto que los agregadores gigantes como Google y Yahoo han tenido en el periodismo se ha centrado en el «business-stealing effect» o efecto de robo de negocio que a menudo se asocia con ellos (Lee & Chyi, 2015; Jeon & Nasr, 2014; Quinn, 2014; Dellarocas, Katona, & Rand, 2012; Isbell, 2010). Pero otros de menor tamaño, menos estudiados y a los que las empresas periodísticas prestan menos atención, tienen audiencias millonarias en sus apps y hacen la sindicación de contenidos sin tantos problemas con los productores de noticias, confirmando la teoría de la disrupción de Harvard (Christensen & Skok, 2012). Rastrean e indexan automáticamente noticias de Internet y, aunque algunos de los de última generación cuentan con un editor humano, los algoritmos desvían su atención hacia determinadas informaciones (Diakopoulos, 2014).

Estos agregadores de noticias más pequeños, cuyo enfoque tiene características diferentes a las de los masivos Google (Athey, Mobius, & Pal, 2017) o Facebook (De-Corniere & Sarvary, 2017), ofrecen una lectura transversal del panorama informativo de Internet que facilita la adaptación a diferentes perfiles de usuario (Aguado & Castellet, 2015). Y seleccionan las noticias mediante algoritmos relacionados con los sistemas de búsqueda de los navegadores, con la elección o la votación de los usuarios o mediante la selección temática personalizada de los lectores. No están incluidos en grandes grupos como Google News, Apple News, Snapchat Discover, Kakao Channel o Line News, pero son productos independientes desde la perspectiva del negocio (Newman, Fletcher, Kalogeropoulos, Levy, & Nielsen, 2017). Recogen informaciones de los cibermedios, de blogs y de las suscripciones a «feeds» (canales o fuentes RSS) de Twitter, Facebook, Google+, Linkedin, Instagram, Flickr o You Tube, y su negocio consiste en generar valor entre lectores y medios. Pero todavía no está claro el modelo de financiación y es aún poco frecuente que los usuarios paguen por el acceso. En ocasiones ofrecen el enlace al artículo original, con la ventaja añadida de que pueden vender esa información y conseguir publicidad sin tener que producir contenidos propios. Pero a la vez impiden, en muchos casos, que quienes los producen puedan obtener los correspondientes beneficios. Tienen pues un aspecto negativo: pueden limitar el acceso a la web original en el ya citado «business-stealing effect» o robo de negocio, pero también existe otro positivo ya que aumentan exponencialmente la visibilidad y el tráfico mediante el «market-expansion effect» o efecto de expansión de mercado, y ambos se pueden calcular cuantitativamente por el número de visitas de los usuarios (Nars & Jeon, 2014).

Los medios de comunicación comprueban que con este segundo efecto aumenta el tráfico de noticias y, desde la perspectiva de los lectores, hay una mayor diversificación de los contenidos (De Corniere & Sarvary, 2017). Sin embargo, si observamos el efecto de sustitución de mercado, se puede demostrar que una gran cantidad de esos lectores no accede al artículo original (Chiou & Tucker, 2017) y considera suficiente la información de los agregadores, que se convierten así en competidores desleales de los productores de noticias e incluso pueden ofrecer su contenido de manera sesgada (Hamborg, Meuschke, Aizaba, & Gipp, 2017).

Ante la cuestión acerca de cuál de estos dos efectos –expansión de mercado o sustitución– se impone y basándose en estudios previos, Jeon y Nasr se refieren a las interacciones entre la elección de la calidad y las decisiones sobre los enlaces, ya que el agregador beneficia a los consumidores pero puede perjudicar a los proveedores de contenido (Dellarocas, Katona, & Rand, 2012). Por otra parte, cuando se cuenta con modelos de pago hay dos tipos de consumidores: los leales, que leen su medio preferido, y los buscadores que utilizan el agregador para buscar información de calidad gratuita. Y como el sector de los buscadores aumenta, los medios gratuitos eligen una mayor calidad, de forma que los agregadores pueden llegar a cambiar la estrategia informativa (Rutt, 2011).

Hay autores que consideran predominante el «market-expansion effect» (Athey & Mobius, 2012; Chiou & Tucker, 2012), y su conclusión es que los agregadores y los medios se complementan. En esa misma línea, otros se refieren al aumento de accesos a las noticias online (George & Hogendorn, 2013) o consideran un modelo bilateral del mercado en el que los agregadores de noticias aumentan los lectores «multi-homing» y en el que los ingresos publicitarios se reducen cuando existe un porcentaje elevado de lectores exclusivos (George & Hogendorn, 2012; 2013). Y también Jeon y Nars hacen hincapié en un espacio de mercados bilaterales (2014).

Tal vez, el verdadero choque entre los agregadores y el periodismo no radique solo en el trabajo de uno u otro, ni en la posibilidad de que se definan entre sí como una especie de «doppelganger» patológico, sino también en el tipo de elementos con los que construyen las historias y los criterios que utilizan para verificar los hechos, y «el gran conflicto sobre el periodismo puede centrarse en lo que constituye su objeto, además del trabajo que conlleva o su definición» (Anderson, 2013). Porque más allá de las preguntas relacionadas con la participación de la audiencia y los modelos de consumo dominantes, existe la urgente necesidad de determinar la validez de las afirmaciones hechas por autores como Mills, Egglestone, Rashid y Vaastäjä (2012) de que la trivialización de las noticias es cada vez más evidente. El hecho de que los criterios periodísticos no se tengan en cuenta en los procesos mediante los cuales la mayoría de los agregadores seleccionan y muestran las noticias lleva a sospechar que el rol del periodismo como «gatekeeper» de las noticias está siendo seriamente comprometido o puede haberse convertido en algo del pasado.

Como han señalado Christensen y Skok (2012), BuzzFeed ya ha comenzado a producir su propio contenido de marca. Durante muchos años el «gatekeeping» ha sido un aspecto clave de la identidad del periodismo (Bordieu, 2005) y los periodistas siempre han asumido la responsabilidad y la capacidad de decidir qué constituye una noticia, pero da la impresión de que podría ser necesario renegociar este aspecto en vista de los inestables cimientos sobre los que se mantiene en la actualidad (Vos & Finneman, 2016). En cualquier caso, la relación competitiva entre los productores de noticias y los agregadores debe examinarse en profundidad ya que, como han señalado Lee & Chyi (2015), «los agregadores de contenidos están aquí para quedarse».

2. Material y métodos

En este complejo marco informativo, nuestras preguntas acerca de estos agregadores de menor tamaño a los que se accede mediante apps son: Q1: ¿Jerarquizan los contenidos con criterios profesionales periodísticos o desinforman a los lectores?; Q2: ¿Son transparentes los criterios de selección de noticias o responden a intereses de marketing?; Q3: ¿Cuentan con periodistas «fact-chekers-content curators» o eliminan definitivamente el papel del «gatekeeper»?

El objetivo principal de esta investigación es evaluar si la propuesta de estos agregadores ofrece una selección periodística profesionalizada de las noticias o si tiene un enfoque meramente cuantitativo. Es esta una cuestión importante ante la necesidad apremiante de defender modelos de periodismo basados ??en la excelencia frente a la invasión de otros que dan mayor valor al tráfico que a la relevancia del contenido publicado. Y en ámbitos periodísticos y académicos ya se considera la creciente atención al incremento de las audiencias como una de las causas de la pérdida gradual de calidad del periodismo (Costera, 2013) y la entrada de los agregadores plantea un nuevo debate ético. Existen normas de actuación sobre las que hay consenso como enlazar siempre al material original, atribuir el contenido al autor, verificar la información y aportar valor añadido propio (Buttry, 2012). Otras propuestas inciden en que la agregación responsable no debe confundir a los lectores sobre lo que están leyendo y recomiendan identificar el origen, enlazar directamente al editor e incluir solo un párrafo para animar a buscar el original (Friedman, 2014). Hay también opiniones positivas acerca de los agregadores que los consideran una vía para llegar a contenidos de mayor calidad (Jeon & Nars, 2016) y otras que distinguen entre agregadores simbióticos y parásitos, utilizando cuatro elementos evaluativos: atribución, uso limitado, valor agregado y derecho de rechazo por parte de los editores (Bailey, 2015).

Este contexto descrito nos lleva a plantear dos hipótesis: 1) Los agregadores que publican mediante aplicaciones permiten una mayor difusión de las noticias, pero se percibe una falta de jerarquización profesional que, en un espacio con tan elevado número de noticias, podría relacionarse con una pérdida de profesionalidad en la información periodística; 2) En un entorno de lectores-usuarios cada vez más informados y exigentes podrían suponer una aportación positiva si se dieran las condiciones adecuadas de selección informativa y de valoración de los productores de noticias, poniéndolas por delante del empeño en localizar «targets» de público para convertirlos en objetivos de monetización que priorizan el consumo por encima de la información de calidad.

Para llevar a cabo la investigación sobre estas nuevas propuestas se han tenido en cuenta aspectos cuantitativos y cualitativos que se reflejan en la ficha de análisis que se ha aplicado a cada una de las muestras seleccionadas. Y hemos recopilado diferentes modelos de aplicaciones de agregadores que parecen tener estabildad, pero asumiendo la imposibilidad de ofrecer un elenco exhaustivo ya que algunos tienen una vida efímera, surgen otros nuevos de inmediato y muchos actúan desde la web y no tienen una aplicación. Existen diferentes tipos de marcadores sociales horizontales o generalistas para almacenar y compartir información en diferentes idiomas, que a menudo operan desde su propio sitio web y algunos están inspirados en el anglosajón «Digg» (2004), que hemos seleccionado para el análisis porque, además de ser pionero en este espacio, ofrece novedades y cuenta con una aplicación. Otros ejemplos son «Delicious» (2003), «Blogmarks» (2003), «Menéame» (2005), «Bitácoras» (2010) y «StumbleUpon» (2010). Y como marcadores sociales verticales o especializados podemos incluir el sitio para compartir videos «Vimeo» (2004); «TechCrunch» (2005), que ofrece noticias de tecnología; «Mktfan» (2009), especializado en marketing y tecnología digital; «Imgur» (2009), un sitio para compartir fotos elegido para la muestra del estudio; «Tech News Tube» (2011); «Divúlgame» (2011); «iGeeky» (2011), que se centra en los canales RSS; «Tech News by Newsfusion» (2012), que ofrece noticias sobre Apple, Facebook y nuevas empresas; «AppyGeek» (2012), una aplicación de noticias de tecnología muy popular o «Product Hunt» (2013), que se centra en las nuevas tecnologías, como también ocurre con «TechPort» (2013).

Las revistas sociales personalizadas constituyen otro gran grupo de agregadores que ofrecen noticias y contenido de redes sociales en un formato de revista que los usuarios pueden personalizar y que son activos o pasivos, según los niveles de selección permitidos al lector. Su negocio se basa en la información que obtienen de los usuarios y su compromiso es no vender estos datos a terceros, aunque sí que los utilizan con fines publicitarios. Aceptan tanto informaciones patrocinadas como publicidad convencional. Se pueden citar, entre otros, «Feedly» (2008), «NewsBlur» (2009), «Flipboard» (2010), «Reeder 3» (2010), «Inoreader» (2012), «News apps» (2012) y «Play Kiosko» (2013). En otros casos ofrecen presentaciones diferentes, enlazan con servicios de sindicación y suelen ser de pago como «Popurls» (2005), «Newsify» (2012), «LinkedIn Pulse» (2013), «Feed Wrangler» (2013), «Unread» (2014) y «News Republic» (2014). «Fark» comienza en 1999 pero no como app y se actualiza en 2012 y en 2017. Y los de nueva generación mejoran la oferta de contenidos como «Scoop.it!», nativo en inglés pero que busca posteriormente el mercado hispano y permite configurar «feeds», cuentas en Twitter o perfiles de Slideshare; «Smart News» (2012); «Blendle» (2013), una plataforma de noticias holandesa de pago por uso que se describe como «iTunes para noticias»; «Paper.li» (2009), que recopila «links» de Twitter y Facebook y les da forma de diario; «News360» (2010), un servicio de agregación y personalización de noticias que «aprende» de la nube del lector; «UpDay» (2015), una aplicación desarrollada por Axel Springer y Samsung; «inklNews» (2015), que hace una selección realmente periodística de las noticias; «Feedbin» (2015); «NewsBot» (2015), originalmente llamado Telme John; «Mosaiscope» (2012), un completo agregador/lector de noticias; «Readzi» (2016); «Nuzzel» (2016), una aplicación de noticias personalizada clasificada como una de las mejores ese año, y «Read Across the Aisle» (2017), diseñada para ayudar a los lectores a escapar de sus burbujas de filtro personal. Otras opciones que vale la pena mencionar son «Reddit» (2005); «Pocket» (2007) que permite guardar contenido de páginas web; «Instapaper» (2008), que fue adquirido por Pinterest en 2016; «JimmyR» (2006), que podría considerarse más bien como un «mashup»; «Diigo» (2014); «Revoat» (2015), en la línea de «Reddit», pero con más libertad de participación y aportaciones alejadas de lo políticamente correcto; el agregador de sitios web «Netvibes» (2005) y «StumbleUpon» (2001), un motor de búsqueda comprado por eBay en 2007 que busca y recomienda noticias y también otros contenidos que puedan tener interés para los usuarios. Algunos pueden considerarse una fusión de marcadores y agregadores.

Entre las decenas de apps de agregadores que se pueden encontrar en la web hemos seleccionado treinta. Los datos relacionados con el modelo de negocio no son los que consideramos más relevantes, y si se tienen en cuenta en la selección de los parámetros de análisis de las fichas es para que quede a la vista que, mayoritariamente, no son empresas periodísticas, ni su propósito es la calidad informativa. Se apoyan en la tecnología para generar tráfico y dan lugar a un número elevado de usuarios desconocidos que no generan ingresos publicitarios ni suscriptores y perjudican a los editores. El principal criterio de selección ha sido para nosotros que ofrezcan contenidos periodísticos total o, al menos, parcialmente. Pero también se han tenido en cuenta el nivel de audiencia, la interactividad, la usabilidad, la novedad y la frecuencia de actualización. Además, hemos completado los resultados con entrevistas semi-estructuradas a directivos de «The Washington Post», «The Wall Street Journal» (EEUU), «El País», «El Mundo», «ABC», «El Confidencial» (Spain), «Publico» y «Jornal de Noticias» (Portugal), ya que los medios tienen en sus manos los contenidos que dan valor a estos nuevos actores. Y para estudiar la estructura y el modelo de trabajo de las aplicaciones hemos elaborado, una vez finalizada la revisión bibliográfica, una ficha para el análisis con cuarenta y siete parámetros valorativos repartidos en los cuatro apartados que se especifican en la Tabla 1 (página anterior).

3. Análisis y resultados

• Descripción: Son empresas que nunca superan los 50 empleados, y con aplicaciones gratuitas que tienen muros de pago. Publican generalmente en inglés, pero también en otros idiomas. Hay dos categorías: 1) Agregadores con predominio de marcación de «feeds» a partir de las preferencias de los usuarios que centran la inversión en el desarrollo tecnológico para hacer una selección automática mediante algoritmos y tienen entre dos y cinco empleados; 2) Agregadores con equipo de edición que selecciona informaciones para un consumo más personal, y de 10 a 50 empleados.

• Navegación y estructura: Los que seleccionan en función de los votos de los usuarios tienen una estructura lineal, minimalista y en «scroll» con las informaciones en escalera para una visualización sin dispersiones. Otros como «Flipboard» o «Feedly» son revistas sociales personalizadas con un diseño parecido al de las revistas impresas, muy visuales y con efecto de paso de páginas. En la mayoría el usuario personaliza y determina la lista de medios, la experiencia de uso suele ser fácil, y son muy intuitivas, con excepciones como «Mosaiscope».

• Contenido: La presentación de las informaciones se hace como en una web, sin portada y jerarquizando la última noticia, excepto «Flipboard». No hay edición del día, el número de noticias depende de la actualización constante, y el número de enlaces es también indefinido. La mayoría son horizontales y conectan con medios convencionales, pero otros van a redes sociales, entidades y blogs como los verticales. La selección se basa en la fecha de entrada, la relevancia de los contactos o la selección temática, y se añaden contenidos a partir del voto de los usuarios y la frecuencia de «feeds» y algoritmos del «site».

• Interactividad: Hay muchas semejanzas con diferencias mínimas. Las herramientas tecnológicas son prácticamente similares en todas las aplicaciones y varían funcionalidades como opinar, hacer comentarios o participar con aportaciones propias, que suelen hacerse a través de Facebook o Twitter. Todas tienen la opción de compartir y la de incluir perfiles en redes sociales. La Tabla 2 (página anterior) proporciona los datos directamente relacionados con los objetivos de este estudio.

Como se comprueba estudiando los datos, la selección que hacen los agregadores que difunden información a través de aplicaciones es mayoritariamente automática, cuantitativa y no profesionalizada desde la perspectiva del periodismo de calidad. Las actitudes de los directivos de los medios que producen las noticias de las que se benefician los agregadores coinciden en la queja de que se aprovechan de su trabajo, pero también en que se hace necesaria una negociación que equilibre el espacio informativo.

Todos reflejan, con la excepción de «El Confidencial», dos actitudes: asumen que es inevitable aceptar la nueva situación, pero, al mismo tiempo, manifiestan que los agregadores no apoyan ni favorecen a los editores de noticias sin los que su negocio dejaría de existir. Si estas plataformas les traen más lectores, no están en contra. Pero consideran que con el modelo actual pierden rentabilidad y que si no se llega a un método adecuado de colaboración las audiencias pueden asumir que la información es gratis cuando la realidad es que requiere buenos profesionales, garantías éticas y deontológicas y una inversión económica considerable.

Para Emilio García-Ruiz, editor de «The Washington Post», todo ha cambiado y negarse a trabajar con Google es combatir la revolución. Si estas plataformas de menor tamaño les traen lectores no está en contra, pero ve muy difícil la supervivencia de agregadores de pequeño volumen porque en el espacio digital solo se sobrevive con grandes audiencias. Constance Michelle-Ford, veterana editora de «The Wall Street Journal», dice que los agregadores proporcionan una gran información con carácter gratuito y que eso no gusta a los medios, pero hay que buscar otro tipo de opciones informativas relacionadas con lo que el lector valora. «Hay muchos lectores a los que les bastan los titulares, las informaciones más superficiales, más generales y no piden más. Y pueden conseguirlo gratis. Pero también son muchos los lectores que esperan calidad, necesitan análisis y artículos que requieren investigación por la que hay que pagar. La idea de la información libre está muy bien, pero no es posible sin financiación».

Bernardo Marín García, subdirector de canales digitales de «El País», asegura tener una relación de amor-odio con los agregadores: «Es verdad que canibalizan en parte nuestro trabajo. Pero también nos permiten llegar a muchos más lectores». Rafael Moyano, director adjunto de «El Mundo», es menos optimista: «Ahora mismo estamos en sus manos: los medios hacemos el trabajo y ellos se aprovechan. De momento nos necesitan, y se están dando cuenta de que no pueden seguir ahogándonos».

Montserrat Lluis, subdirectora de «ABC», considera que fagocitan la información y además imponen el modo de presentarla «para que nos quiten más y mejores noticias. Es una perversión impulsada por la obsesión por ganar audiencias que deberá ser racionalizada mediante la colaboración entre los grandes medios, que hemos de garantizar el mejor periodismo. Es peligroso que cale en la sociedad que la información es gratis, que no requiere profesionalidad, ni garantías éticas y deontológicas». Nacho Cardero, director de «El Confidencial», asume que los agregadores permiten llegar a mayor número de lectores: «No son nuestros enemigos sino nuestros cómplices». Ve el problema en los editores, «que todavía no saben monetizar sus medios a través del Big Data o se obcecan en mantener estructuras elefantiásicas totalmente anacrónicas».

Domingos de Andrade, director-ejecutivo del «Jornal de Notícias», teme que puedan ser la sentencia de muerte de los medios, pero admite que sin ellos pierden fuerza ante su público. «La cuestión es cómo podemos los medios obtener rentabilidad por el simple hecho de que usan contenidos que producimos nosotros». Y según explica Amílcar Correia, editor ejecutivo de «Público», «los agregadores distribuyen la información y la hacen llegar a más y más lectores injustamente gratis, pues debían pagar para hacerlo. Han financiado en Europa proyectos de investigación para estar bien con su conciencia, pero hasta los más pequeños alcanzan segmentos de mercado, nichos que pueden ser importantes para el posicionamiento de determinados proyectos editoriales periodísticos. En cualquier caso, los medios de comunicación son libres de bloquear la lectura de sus contenidos».

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Nos encontramos frente a un modelo de negocio competitivo y complicado en el que solo unos pocos consiguen mantenerse y su duración es, en muchos casos, limitada. Por otra parte, es también polémico porque en muchos países los medios se quejan y consideran que los «snippets» o extractos de noticias deben pagarse. Producir buena información es caro y sin ese contenido de calidad los motores de búsqueda no tendrían material valioso para «vender». Pero aun admitiendo esa competencia con los cibermedios, necesariamente tienen que convivir unos y otros a pesar de lo alejados del periodismo que puedan estar determinados agregadores y encontrar una vía de acuerdo.

Se puede concluir que tienen aspectos positivos: a) Ofrecen a los lectores una gran cantidad de información de fácil acceso y una personalización casi total; b) Facilitan la selección de noticias y la creación de una «agenda setting» propia a usuarios ocupados y activos que quieren estar continuamente informados; c) Sobre todo los locales y especializados acceden a una audiencia impensable para un medio aislado; d) Aumentan exponencialmente la visibilidad, la internacionalización y la posibilidad de acceder a un número mayor de cibermedios y a su oferta; e) Abren posibilidades de negocio para los medios, y las empresas que tienen éxito obtienen beneficios económicos con rapidez.

Pero también consecuencias negativas: a) El ingente número de noticias que ofrecen es inabarcable, y ese exceso de información sin una jerarquización profesionalizada puede convertirse en falta de información y obliga a un aprendizaje por parte del usuario, que debe organizar sus «feeds» y restringir el número de fuentes para no saturarse con las búsquedas; b) Desde la perspectiva del periodismo, la selección que hacen los agregadores no es profesional sino automática y aleatoria en la mayor parte de los casos, y está en función de los gustos de las audiencias y de la publicidad; c) Se rompe así la relación personal entre usuario y producto, entre lector y medios; d) Y se produce una gran dispersión por el exceso de plataformas de este tipo, cada vez más avanzadas tecnológicamente, en un mercado saturado con audiencias fragmentadas que utiliza varias opciones a la vez.

Finalmente, parece evidente la pertinencia de las hipótesis de partida. Se percibe una falta de jerarquización profesional que, en un espacio con tan elevado número de noticias, podría relacionarse con una pérdida de calidad en la información periodística. Estamos ante una propuesta de selección cuantitativa que, en algunos casos, es estética y superficial, por lo que consideramos que es importante reajustar este modelo informativo para alcanzar mayores cotas de calidad y estudiar las nuevas competencias del «gatekeeper» en un espacio múltiple y cambiante. Y podría, efectivamente, suponer una aportación positiva en un entorno de lectores-usuarios cada vez más informados y exigentes si se dieran las condiciones adecuadas de selección informativa por delante del empeño en localizar targets de público para convertirlos en objetivos de monetización.

Son esos lectores los que mejor pueden utilizar estas apps con eficacia. Pero junto al aspecto positivo que suponen la facilidad de acceso y las múltiples posibilidades de personalizar la información, pueden diluirse la selección cualitativa de las noticias y la localización precisa de las fuentes. Además, se facilita la dispersión informativa que disminuye la eficacia comprensora de la realidad. Es importante incorporar algún modelo de jerarquización profesional, encontrar el sistema adecuado de «gatekeeping», necesario para garantizar la calidad informativa que solo alguno de los agregadores analizados lleva a cabo con criterios periodísticos. Pero también es necesario actualizar el concepto y el modo de trabajar del «gatekeeper» a las condiciones tecnológicas, periodísticas y comunicativas actuales e inmediatas y a los nuevos modelos informativos.

Apoyos

Este artículo forma parte de los trabajos llevados a cabo en el marco del proyecto «Claves para la redefinición y la supervivencia del periodismo y retos en la era post-PC», financiado por el Ministerio de Economía, Industria y Competitividad (MINECO) a través del Plan Nacional de I+D+i dentro del Programa Estatal de Investigación, Desarrollo e Innovación Orientado a los Retos de la Sociedad (CSO2016-79782-R), y del Grupo de investigación y análisis de Internet en el periodismo de la Universidad Complutense.


Draft Content 702021215-71775 ov-es004.jpg


Draft Content 702021215-71775 ov-es005.jpg

Referencias

Aguado, J.M., Feijóo, C., & Martínez, I.J. (2013). La comunicación móvil. Madrid: Gedisa.

Anderson, C., Bell, E., & Shirky C. (2014). Post-Industrial journalism. Adapting to the present. Columbia University Library. Series: Tow Center for Digital Journalism Publications. https://doi.org/10.7916/D8N01JS7

Anderson, C.W. (2013). What aggregators do: Towards a networked concept of journalistic expertise in the digital age. Journalism 14(8), 1008-1023. https://doi.org/10.1177/1464884913492460

Athey, S., Mobius, M., & Pal, J. (2017). The impact of news aggregators on Internet news consumption. Working paper 3353. Graduate School of Stanford Business. https://stanford.io/2QVYyhj

Bailey, J. (2015). A Brief Guide to Ethical Aggregation. Plagiarism Today. https://bit.ly/1Ql1g9l

Boczkowski, P. (2004). Digitizing the news. Innovation in online newspapers. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press. https://doi.org/10.7551/mitpress/2435.001.0001

Bourdieu, P. (2005). The political field, the social science field, and the journalistic field. In R. Benson, & E. Neveu (Eds.), Bourdieu and the journalistic field (pp. 29-47). Cambridge: Polity Press.

Brottman, M. (2005). High theory / Low culture. New York: Palgrave MacMillan. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781403978226

Buttry, S. (2012). Aggregation guidelines: Link, attribute, add value. The Buttry Diary. https://bit.ly/1C1qalT.

Carr, N. (2010). The shallows: How the Internet is changing the way we think, read and remember. London: Atlantic Books.

Castellet, A., & Aguado, J.M. (2015). Innovar cuando todo cambia. El valor disruptivo de la tecnología móvil en la industria de la información. Sur le Journalisme, About Journalism, Sobre Jornalismo (En ligne) 3(2), 26-39. https://bit.ly/2PG9Epi

Chiou, L., & Tucker, C. (2012). Copyright, digitization, and aggregation, discussion paper, NET Institute Working Paper, 11-18. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1864203

Chiou, L., & Tucker, C. (2017). Content aggregation by platforms: The case of the news media. Journal of Economics Management Strategy, 26(4), 782-805. https://doi.org/10.3386/w21404

Christensen, Clayton & Skok, David (2012). Be the disruptor. Nieman Reports, 66(3). https://bit.ly/2Eshhhl

Clark, D. (1999). Post-PC Internet. MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. Talk at the LCS 35th celebration, April 13. https://bit.ly/2UOUdyV

Costera, I. (2013). Valuable journalism: A search for quality from the vantage point of the user. Journalism. 14(6), pp. 754-770. https://doi.org/10.1177/1464884912455899

De Corniere, A., & Sarvary, M. (2017). Social media and the news industry. NET Institute Working Paper 17-07. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3049358

Dellarocas, C., Katona, Z., & Rand, W. (2012). Media, aggregators and the link economy: Strategic hyperlink formation in content networks. Working Papers 10-13, NET Institute. https://doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.2013.1710

Deuze, M. (2006). O jornalismo e os novos meios de comunicação social. Comunicação e Sociedade, 9(10), 15-37. https://doi.org/10.17231/comsoc.9(2006).1152

Diakopoulos, N. (2014). Algorithmic accountability. Journalistic investigation of computational power structures. Digital Journalism, 3(3), 398-415. https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2014.976411

Domingo, D., Quandt, T., Heinonen, A., Paulussen, S., Singer, J.B., & Vujnovic, M. (2008). Participatory journalism practices in the media and beyond. Journalism Practice, 2(3), 326-342. https://doi.org/10.1080/17512780802281065

Enck, W., Gilbert, P., Chun, B.G., Cox, L., Jung, J., … Sheth, A. (2014). TaintDroidt: An information-flow tracking system for realtime privacy monitoring on smartphones. ACM Trans. Comput. Syst. (TOCS) 32(2), 5. https://doi.org/10.1145/2619091

Falaki, H., Mahaja, R., Kandula, S., Lymberopoulos, D., Govindan, R., & Estrin, D., (2010). Diversity in smartphone usage. MobiSys ’10. Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Mobile Systems, Applications and Services, pp. 179-194. San Francisco. https://doi.org/10.1145/1814433.1814453

Friedman, A. (2014). We’re all aggregators now. So we should be ethical about it. Columbia Journalism Review. May, 23. https://bit.ly/2EpH7Cq

George, L., & Hogendorn, C. (2012). Aggregators, search and the economics of new media institutions, Information Economics and Policy, 24(1), 40-51. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.infoecopol.2012.01.005

Hamborg, F., Meuschke, N., Aizawa, A., & Gipp, B. (2017). Identification and analysis of media Biasin News Articles. In M. Gäde, V. Trkulja, & V. Petras (Eds.), Everything changes, everything stays the same? Understanding information spaces. Proceedings of the 15th International Symposium of Information Science (ISI 2017), Berlin, 13th-15th March 2017. Glückstadt: Verlag Werner Hülsbusch, pp. 224-236. https://doi.org/10.1163/9789004319523_015

Holzer, A., & Ondrus, J. (2011). Mobile application market: A developer’s perspective. Telematics and Informatics 28, 22-31. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tele.2010.05.006

Jarvis, J. (2013). There are no journalists. Buzz machine. https://bit.ly/2fWEdoX

Jeon, D.S., & Nasr, N. (2016). News aggregators and competition among newspapers in the Internet. american economic journal: Microeconomics, 8(4), 91-114. https://doi.org/10.1257/mic.20140151

Kapuscinki, R. (2005). Los cinco sentidos del periodista. Colombia, Spain: Fundación Nuevo Periodismo Iberoamericano, Asociación de la Prensa de Madrid.

Kovach, B., & Rosentiel, T. (2014). The Elements of Journalism. New York: Three Rivers Press. Crown Publishing Group. Random House LLC.

Kunelius, R. (2006). Good journalism. Journalism Studies, 7(5), 671-690. https://doi.org/10.1080/14616700600890323

Lavin, A., & Gray, S. (2016). Fast algorithms for convolutional neural networks. IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR). https://doi.org/10.1109/cvpr.2016.435

Law, P., Fortunati, L., & Yang, S. (2006). New technologies in global societies. River Edge, NJ, USA: World Scientific Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1142/9789812773555

Lee, A., & Chyi, H. (2015). The rise of online news aggregators: Consumption and competition. The International Journal on Media Management, 17(1), 3-24. https://doi.org/10.1080/14241277.2014.997383

Lee-Wright, P., Phillips, A., & Witschge, T. (2013). Changing Journalism. USA: Routledge.

McBride, K., & Rosenstiel, T. (Eds.) (2014). The new ethics of journalism: A guide for the 21st century. Los Angeles: SAGE.

McCombs, M. (2006). Estableciendo la agenda. El impacto de los medios en la opinión pública y el conocimiento. Barcelona: Paidós.

Mills, J., Egglestone, P., Rashid, O., & Väätäjä, H. (2012) MoJo in action: The use of mobiles in conflict, community and cross platform Journalism. Continuum, 26(5), 669-683. https://doi.org/10.1080/10304312.2012.706457

Nasr, N., & Jeon, D.S. (2014). News aggregators and competition among newspapers in the Internet. TSE. 12-20. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2164396

Newman, N., Fletcher, R., Kalogeropoulos, A., Levy, D., & Nielsen, R. (2017). Reuters Institute digital news report 2017. Oxford: Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. https://bit.ly/2R3kNVS

Pavlik, J. (2001). Journalism and new media. New York: Columbia University Press. https://doi.org/10.7312/pavl11482

Pavlik, J. (2008). Media in the digital age. New York: Columbia University Press.

Pavlik, J. (2013). Innovation and the future of journalism. Digital Journalism, 1(2), 181-193. https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2012.756666

Rosentiel, T., Jurkowitz, M., & Ji, H. (2012). The Search for a new business model. Pew Research Center. Journalism & Media. https://pewrsr.ch/2R0TOdD

Rutt, J. (2011). Aggregators and the News Industry: Charging for access to content. NET Institute. Working Paper 11-19. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1958028

Souza-e-Silva, A. (2006). Mobile technologies as interfaces of hybrid spaces. Space and Culture, 9(3), 261-278. https://doi.org/10.1177/1206331206289022

Stivers, C. (2012). Aggregated assault. Whose work is it, anyway? A plea for standards. Columbia Journalism Review, may-june. https://bit.ly/2rGwX90

Vos, T.P., & Finneman, T. (2017). The early historical construction of journalism’s gatekeeping role. Journalism, 18(3), 265-280. https://doi.org/10.1177/1464884916636126

Yang, D., Xue, G., Fang, X., & Tang, J. (2012). Crowdsourcing to smartphones: Incentive mechanism design for mobile phone sensing. 18th Annual International Conference on Mobile Computing and Networking, August 22, 2012 / August 26, 2012, Istanbul, Turkey, pp. 173-184. https://doi.org/10.1145/2348543.2348567

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/03/19
Accepted on 31/03/19
Submitted on 31/03/19

Volume 27, Issue 1, 2019
DOI: 10.3916/C59-2019-03
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?