Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

We have studied the construct of flexibility in higher education for many years, as researchers and practitioners. In this context we define flexibility as offering the student choices in how, what, where, when and with whom he or she participates in learning-related activities while enrolled in a higher education institution. In a textbook we wrote on the topic in 2001 we identified options that could be available to students in higher education to increase the flexibility of their participation. We studied these from the perspective not only of the student but also in terms of their implications for instructors and for higher-education institutions and examined the key roles that pedagogical change and technology play in increasing flexibility. Now is it nearly a decade later. We will revisit key issues relating to flexibility in higher education, identify in broad terms the extent to which increased flexibility has become established, is still developing, or has developed in ways we did not anticipate directly a decade earlier. We will also review our scenarios for change in higher education related to flexibility and contrast these with a more-recent set from the UK. Our major conclusion is that flexibility is still as pertinent a theme for higher education in 2011 as it was in 2001.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

For many reasons –political, social, philosophical, economic as well as educational– there has long been an interest in increasing the flexibility of participation in higher education. Rapid developments in computer and network technology, particularly the escalation in Internet use during the latter decades of the 20th century and the emergence of the World Wide Web in the mid-1990s not only intensified the motivation of institutions and governments to offer more flexible forms of participation in higher education but also led to a surge in experimentation with new pedagogical methods and new forms of digital learning resources and interactions. In this context we wrote a book about flexible learning in higher education which was published in 2001 (Collis & Moonen, 2001). The purpose of this reflection in 2010 is to revisit the concept of flexible learning in higher education a decade after our book was published, and consider the extent to which our conceptualizations and expectations have been realized or need to be re-examined. The questions we will address are:

- Conceptual: Has the concept of flexibility in higher education evolved since 2000 and if so in what ways? Is increased flexibility still a major characteristic of change in higher education? What are the key scenarios in describing a university’s position with respect to flexibility?

- Realization-oriented: To what extent have our expectations about flexibility been realized? In what ways would we alter our expectations in the 2010 context? What factors constrain the possibilities for flexibility in higher education?

2. Flexible learning in higher education revisited

In the 2001 book we conceptualized flexible learning in terms of four key perspectives: institutional, implementation, pedagogy, and technology as well as combinations of these perspectives. In this section we will compare the emphasis on flexibility in 2001 and 2010 in terms of these perspectives and their 2010 updates. We will also contrast scenarios for universities in terms of flexibilization in our 2001 book with other scenario suggestions that have occurred in the past 10 years.

2.1. Flexibility from the institutional perspective

During 1999 and 2000 decisions makers in universities were confronted with a wave of threats to their core businesses and identities. Newspapers and magazines routinely were making comments such as: «Traditional universities and colleges face a bleak future unless they significantly alter their instructional methods to keep pace with development spurred by the Internet» (Financial Times, 2000), and «Undergraduates are as interested in a college’s Net resources as its curriculum (Bernstein, 2000: 114). The demographics of the student body were expected to alter dramatically, away from the traditional undergraduate entering university directly after secondary school toward uncharted numbers of post entry-level learners, such as those whose work situations require them to update themselves or prepare themselves for new careers. The possibility for learners, via technology, to participate in units or programmes from higher-education institutions where they would have little or no physical presence was seen as a threat to traditional enrolment patterns. Increased flexibility was seen as a key to the operations if not survival of higher-education institutions and flexibility required technology investments. The term «virtual university» began to be used in the mid 1990s to describe an institution where some amount of its services and interactions took place on-line, via network technologies and associated software applications (for a review, see Schreurs, 2009). Our main conclusion in 2001 based on interviews with decision makers in a number of European but also North American, Australian, and Asian universities was «You can’t not do it»: Institutions had to make heavy investments in technology and explore strategies for change in their methods of operations in order to increase flexibility of participation.

In 2010 institutions have made substantial investments in network technology (see Section 2.2). However the extent to which they have become virtual universities with a new demographic of student is not clear although certainly there is much on-line activity. In an analysis of virtual universities worldwide carried out by the Re.ViCa Project supported by the European Union (Schreurs, 2009: 15-16) a conclusion is that «the virtual campus concept has changed since it first came into use, because now more and more universities see the possibilities inherent in offering courses off campus. We see an increasing number of universities offering courses themselves on a virtual campus basis... While there are some institutions adopting fully on-line courses, it is now most common for courses to be blended. In the last few years there has been an apparent decline in usage of the term ‘virtual campus’, but a continuing growth in the phenomenon... Every campus becomes a virtual campus. (However) ‘blended models’ gain more and more interest and attention».

This is reflected in a survey in the USA of more than 2,500 higher-education institutions (Allen & Seaman, 2007). In this survey an on-line course was defined as one in which at least 80% of course content is delivered on-line, thus including blended variations. With this definition more than 3.4 million students, nearly 20% of all higher-education students, were taking at least one on-line course during the 2006 academic year, an increase of approximately 10% over the previous academic year. This 9.7 % growth rate for on-line enrolments is much more than the 1.5% growth rate of the overall student population (Allen & Seaman, 2007).

However, despite the availability of some courses or programmes in on-line (blended) form, a conclusion of a UK review (Jameson, 2002: 32) gives a more nuanced view of overall change in higher education: It is not uncommon for institutions to make a commitment to new technologies in their strategy documents but in reality they are watching the field and hope they are ready to ‘switch on’ quickly if and when necessary. In a very person-to-person oriented learning system (e.g. Oxford/Cambridge) technology has a limited impact on teaching and learning, but it does make resources available.

Thus the move many predicted for higher-education institutions in terms of increasing flexibility by offering (some) courses or programmes on-line has been modestly accomplished but the fact that many of these courses are in fact blended with some element of physical presence required means that the degree of flexibility of location offered by traditional higher-education institutions is still constrained. This relates to an institutional trend related to flexibility that we did not anticipate in 2001 but which has emerged strongly during the last decade: a growing interest and level of expenditure on on-campus physical learning spaces. In the UK and also Australia there has been a substantial redesign of physical learning spaces at many universities. In a summary (2006) by HEFCE, the Higher Education Funding Council for England, the point is made that «Increasing investment in estate and learning technologies, combined with the need for more cost-effective space utilisation, is making it increasingly important for senior managers and decision-makers to keep abreast of new thinking about the design of technology-rich (physical) learning spaces» (p. 2)

Physical buildings need to be designed so that their individual spaces are flexible — to accommodate both current and evolving pedagogies and changing needs (HEFCE, 3). Technologies that are as far as possible mobile and wireless will make spaces more easily re-purposed (p. 5). In addition to the practical value of flexible physical learning spaces supported by technology individual universities report positive results of redesigned physical learning space relating to learning. At the University of Brighton «the strongest finding to emerge so far has been an almost unanimous agreement from facilitators and learners alike that the flexibility of the space has had a very positive effect on the learning process» (Martin, 2008). At Canterbury Christ Church University also in the UK extensive research has taken place as to what learners do and where they go (their «learning footprints» (Collis, 2010) in a new technology-rich physical learning centre where learning flexibility is enhanced by the fact that «learners can borrow notebook computers with full Wifi network connectivity as easily as picking a book from a shelf» (Steadman, 2010: 2) and thus move about the facility as they wish while maintaining on-line network contact. The initiative, the first in higher education successfully to introduce on a large scale, self-service thin client notebooks on loan for student use, also involved location-tracking software within the notebooks, providing on-going data on the numbers, time and duration of use, and location of the notebooks. The tracking data coupled with other data sources such as interviews, surveys, and observations, gave empirical evidence of different learning interactions than took place in the previous physical learning centres of the university library and classrooms (Collis, 2010; Steadman, 2010). Parallel to this in the USA, there is the acknowledgement that «campuses should develop an interrelated strategy that takes into account a range of types of learning spaces, including virtual spaces, and a range of support services (Brown & Lippincott, 2003: 16).

Thus rather than moving toward the 2001 conception of increasingly virtual universities it is our observation that provision for technology-rich flexible physical learning spaces has become a major focus for many university decision makers. Some learning may be taking place partially or fully on-line but enhancing the flexibility, and attractiveness, of on-campus learning spaces is a larger focus, at least in countries including the UK, Australia, and the USA.

2.2. Flexibility from the technological perspective

In our 2001 analysis we indicated a variety of ways that technology could enhance the flexibility of learning in higher education, ways related to the logistics of engagement in a higher-education institution (including accessing course materials and organisational information on-line, submitting assignments and getting feedback on-line) and also ways related to new forms of learning. We saw the emergence of course-management systems (called by different names in different contexts, including virtual campus environments, VLEs (virtual learning environments) or ELO (electronic learning environments) as offering many possibilities to increase flexibility. In later research (De Boer, 2004) we noted that the logistic aspects of flexibility were being enhanced, but not the pedagogic aspects.

In 2010 this has remained the case: Web-based course-management systems (VLEs) are now common in the majority of universities, but tend to be used primarily for logistic flexibility. In terms of the technology systems with which students interact universities are gradually moving away from the current generation of proprietary course-management systems toward open source systems or even more-personalisable digital desktop environments, making use of portals, customisable interfaces, and user-selected combinations of tools and applications (generally related to the so-called Web 2.0; Hermans & Verjans, 2008). Such combinations include possibilities for individual or collaborative creation and sharing of content (via Weblogs, bookmarks, photos, or other resources); for the support of social networks both within the learning context and outside; for presence-related services that take into account where the users are and who they will allow into their virtual space; and aggregators and mash-up tools to help users know about new sources of input and to organise these for personal needs. Although prototypes of this sort of Personal Learning Environment (PLE) are beginning to emerge in technology-related research projects in higher education, user-adaptable functionality is already common in the personal digital environments of many higher-education students (Atwell, 2007). Students indicate that «technologies used in their (university) courses are much less adequate than their personal technologies (Heo, 2009: 295).

The Web 2.0 applications that have emerged in the last several years were beyond what we discussed in our 2001 book. The use of Wikis (see for example Anzai’s account of Wiki use in Japanese higher education, 2009) and of social networks (Anderson, 2009) are examples of what in the US has been predicted as key emerging technologies for learning in higher education (New Media Consortium, 2008). This Consortium, which every year produces a report on key emerging technologies for higher education, indicates «collective intelligence» and «social operating systems» as follow ups to the now already present «collaboration webs» could have a major impact on learning in higher education by somewhere around 2013.

But will they? In our 2001 book we noted that the potential of technology to enhance the learning experience in higher education depends on whether it is being used as a core or a complementary technology. A core technology involves the major artefacts around which a course is designed. These are institutionally embedded. In much of higher education the core technologies remain as they have been prior to 2001: lectures, classrooms, written examinations in physical, monitored situations, and textbooks. An addition has become the course-management system, used to provide resources and information and manage some forms of interaction (typically submission of assignments and provision of feedback and marks). Other sorts of technologies, such as the Web 2.0 applications, are what we call complementary technologies: some instructors choose to use them as supplements or enrichments but they are not mainstreamed nor are they essential to overall academic progress for the student. Collectively we still are far from the «learning web» view of technology use in higher education, where «the role of information technology is modelled as one of providing knowledge support systems that expedite the processes of knowledge formation and dissemination» (Gaines, Norrie & Shaw, 1996) or what we called «technology as a learning workbench» (Collis & Moonen, 2005).

2.3. Flexibility from the teaching and learning perspective

Teaching and learning involves instructors, learners, and the pedagogy of instruction, particularly learning activities. The perspective also includes those who support instructors and learners in higher education institutions.

2.3.1. Pedagogy and learning activities

In our 2001 book we elaborated a pedagogical model for course and learning-activity design based on two key principles: learning situations should be designed for flexibility and thus options for the student, and learning situations should involve not only acquisition of skills and concepts but also opportunities to participate in and contribute to a learning community. This «contributing-student» pedagogical approach fits well with the affordances of Web 2.0 technology which have emerged since 2001 and is indirectly reflected in many of the studies and projects involving Web 2.0 technologies and new forms of learning activities that have emerged in the literature in the last decade. Hall and Conboy (2009: 232) for example describe exploratory projects involving blogging as a reflective learning activity, student development of course Wikis as social knowledge-building, and the use of a social network that learners could customise and use for the management of their group learning activities. Their conclusion is that «the learner can be empowered to make effective decisions about their learning where read/write Web tools are used to catalyse pedagogic innovation». At the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore a pedagogical and organisational model called University 2.0 has been implemented with an emphasis on learner engagement (»teach less, learn more», Tan, Lee, Chan & Lu, 2009) and on empowering students to take charge in shaping their own learning experiences. Learning activities such as self/peer evaluation, project work management, student construction of questions for peer learning, and on-line portfolio creation are examples of the emphasis on student engagement. Even during self study, learners are encouraged to link up with other classmates for learning support using a locally made application (aNTUna Connect) for the support of virtual learning communities. In addition, and still unusual in higher-practice, «students are involved and also consulted in a decision-making process about learning focus and assessment outcomes» (p. 517). From a conceptual perspective Conole, Dyke, Oliver & Seale (2004) show how different learning activities (brainstorming, gathering resources for a particular task, and self assessment of level of competence) can be made flexible by offering students options relating to individual or social participation, as well as reflective or skill-oriented orientations, and information-based versus experience-based emphases.

Thus supported by Web 2.0-type technologic developments the potential for pedagogic flexibility is even stronger in higher education than it was in 2001. However, in our more-recent analyses (Collis & Moonen, 2008) we have identified many barriers to the realisation of this potential. A major set of barriers relates to the willingness of instructors in higher education to change their teaching practices.

2.3.2. Instructors and support staff

There is no widespread evidence that mainstream higher-education instructors are any more likely to be incorporating innovative pedagogies in their course designs in 2010 than was the case in 2001. As before, the instructor is the key figure in pedagogic change. And as before instructors lack sufficient time, motivation, and support to move beyond their level of tolerance for innovation and use of technologies in learning. As noted by Collis and Messing in 2001 instructors make personal decisions about how much time and effort they can make available for important elements of interaction-oriented pedagogies such as feedback and individualisation and thus set their own limits for time commitment. In 2005 Gervedink Nijhuis analysed the many time- and labour-intensive implications for instructors of offering more flexibility to students in learning activities and concluded that the time burden for instructors of managing flexibility in learning activities is too much for many instructors in balance with the many other burdens on their time and effort. Simons (2002) feels part of the problem is that instructors lack insight into «digital didactics» and thus are reluctant about or resistant to pedagogical change through lack of understanding as to what it can offer or how to proceed with its implementation.

As has been the case with previous generations of technologies and their potential for learning the need for more effective and efficient professional development of instructors is still acknowledged and the importance of support staff for teaching and learning remains high. Support staff include persons in university teaching- and learning centres who focus on curriculum- and pedagogical innovations in teaching, technical staff who support instructors and students in their uses of technology, and also other staff such as librarians who may be involved in supporting instructors, for example with issues relating to digital information access and management relevant to their teaching activities. On-demand support for instructors, thus highly flexible and contextualised, was one of the major components of improved learning and cost reduction in a series of case studies in course redesign in the USA (Twigg, 2004). Simons (2002) calls for new methods of professional development and guidance for instructors and thus in turn new methods and skills for support staff. A new method of staff development, based on flexibility and contextualisation, that has shown good promise is that of Canterbury Christ Church University in the UK (Westerman & Barry, 2009). Instructors can choose which of more than 20 types of technologies they wish to become familiar with and for each of the types different sorts of self-study learning methods were developed. While each instructor had a personalised approach emphasising gaining technical literacy before attempting pedagogic changes, social interaction among the instructors and the support staff was also an important form of learning and attitude change.

Despite their importance support services are particularly vulnerable to internal reorganisations and budget cuts when universities face economic challenges. Jameson (2002: 33) notes that «In the UK a number of universities have felt the need to re-organise their teaching and learning support services. In some cases these services have been broken up and removed to other parts of the administration, e.g. placed in the «Estates» division. This is a dangerous move as these support services have a special role in teaching and learning and they will find themselves in competition for resources with services supplying general institutional requirements».

Unfortunately this is happening in many universities and constitutes a serious constraint to enhanced pedagogic flexibility.

2.3.3. Learners

In our 2001 book we did not have a specific chapter relating to the learner’s perspective on flexibility. This was because we considered the entire analysis to be grounded on the learner and the desirability of making more options available for him or her in terms of participation in learning-related activities. In the subsequent decade however a new cycle of interest in learner experiences as a key component of transformation of institutional practices has evolved. Sharpe (2009) indicates that there is a shift occurring to research on the learner experience that is «more holistic, including that which examines the impact on the pervasive use of technology in learners’ lives...with attempts to conceptualise the observed variation in learners’ experience» (p. 178). Learner-experience research now goes beyond institutional technology provision but also considers the influence of the rise of personal ownership of technology and use of on-line tools and applications. For example at the University of Bradford in the UK the awareness of students’ substantial use of on-line social networks has led to new and highly flexible approaches to on-line support to help learners during their period of transition into higher education (see the tool at www.brad.ac.uk/developme). At Oxford Brookes University a personalised learner-centric model of technology-enriched education based on the belief that students should be skilled at handling information, managing human interactions, and knowledge building using digital tools is being developed and personalised also per academic study programme (Benfield, Ramanau, & Sharpe, 2009). Because students are competent technology users does not necessarily mean they are critical users, with information-literacy levels necessary for the learning goals of higher education. Comrie, Smyth and Mayes (2009: 210) note that at the three Scottish universities involved in the TICEP project (Transforming and Enhancing the Student Experience through Pedagogy, see www2.napier.ac.uk/transform) priority is given to scaffolding learners’ «self-regulation and what is being increasingly referred to as learning (or academic) literacy...with institutions...focusing their resources on preparing their learners rather than on their ‘provision’». These and other learner-experience studies suggest that the learner’s personal experiences with technology and more importantly his or her critical maturity with dealing with information and diverse human opinions are important components of his or her response to increased flexibility relating to learning in higher education. This leads to the conclusion that preparing students to respond effectively to flexibility is as important as flexibility provision itself.

Thus, in summary, there is mixed progress in terms of increasing flexibility in learning and teaching in the decade since our 2001 analysis. Personal and socially oriented technologies have become common in the personal worlds of many students in higher education and there is experimentation with pedagogies that build on sharing, collaborating, and contributing to the learning of one’s peers. But beyond exploratory projects there does not appear to be widespread changes in pedagogical methods. The reasons remain those which have been the case whenever innovation in teaching practices are being considered: instructors do not have time, skills, or incentives to make substantial changes in their familiar approaches to instruction. In parallel to this support staff who could stimulate such innovation are under resource constraints themselves.

2.4. Scenarios for universities

In 2001 we identified four scenarios for higher education and flexible learning for «2005 and beyond». These scenarios emerged from the combination of two key dimensions, one relating to the location of learning provision (with two extremes, where local and face-to-face transactions are highly valued and the other where network-mediated transactions are the heart of the learning setting) and a second related to quality control (with two extremes, one where the expert at the university is responsible for the quality control of the learner’s experience and the other where the learner himself becomes increasingly responsible for the quality of his own learning decisions). These gave rise to four scenarios:

- Back to the Basics: Where local and face-to-face transactions are highly valued and the institution determines its curricula and programmes and ensures their quality

- The Global Campus: Where the university maintains quality control but programmes and learning are increasing available via network technology, not a physical campus

- Stretching the Mould: Where the learner still focuses on the local campus and face-to-face transactions but gradually makes more personal choices and thus assumes more responsibility for the quality of his or her experience

- The New Economy: Where individuals pick and choose their own learning combinations, via global and network-mediated transactions, from a number of sources of learning resources

As we predicted in 2001, the New Economy option has not moved beyond the informal-learning setting. Traditional universities are still primarily positioned in the Back to the Basics scenario but with institution-supported options for some courses in a Global Campus setting, and with a gradual increased presence in a Stretching-the-Mould scenario. What is interesting is that the latter is occurring generally outside a specific institutional strategy; the Stretch occurs in an organic way as more options for flexible participation are available for learners.

In the ensuing decade other scenarios have been suggested. A particularly interesting set of scenarios emerged from a 2008 study under assignment from Universities UK, a membership association of the executive heads of all the UK university institutions and some colleges of higher education (www.universitiesuk.ac.uk/AboutUs/WhoWeAre/Pages/default.aspx). The study focused on the size and shape of the higher-education sector in the UK in 20 years’ time (Brown & al, 2008). Based on an analysis of key uncertainties and drivers of demand and the recognition that funding cuts are likely to be the context for any future scenario three scenarios were developed:

- Slow adaptation to change: Few significant new sources of student demand are expected, only modest investments in e-learning will be made so that it remains a relatively small part of the total learning experience for most students. Some institutions will merge or close due to decreasing funding.

- Market driven and competitive: Increased competition in all student markets between and among traditional higher-education institutions and new providers, more widespread investment in e-learning particularly by larger institutions in partnership with the private sector, and a major reconfiguration of the sector with fewer large multi-mission institutions and a larger number of small, specialist higher-education institutions.

- Employer-driven flexible learning: Employer demand for accreditation of work-related experiences and co-funding of programmes by groups of employers and their supply chains, most students study part-time on a virtual basis while they continue to work, leading to a highly stratified higher-education sector with a small number of elite institutions, some major regional centres, some predominantly virtual institutions, some traditional local universities for undergraduates, and some institutions offering programmes franchised from regional centres (summarised from Brown & al, 2008: 5-13)

In the second and third scenarios flexibility mediated by technology will play a major role. It is interesting that this UK scenario exercise did not seem to explicitly refer to the experience of the Open University of the UK. It, like other large-scale distance-education institutions (including the Open University of The Netherlands and the Open University of Catalonia) have long been offering flexible forms of course participation, particularly to non-entry level learners, with large numbers of students selecting this model of higher education. However, given the changing landscape of the higher-education sector as envisaged by the Universities UK study perhaps the mega distance-education providers will be challenged to offer their students options with regard to blends of face-to-face and on-line learning rather than only a distance model in order to compete with the sorts of new situations suggested in the second and third scenarios of the UK future analysis.

3. Conclusion

We believe that flexibility is still as pertinent a theme for higher education in 2010 as it was in 2001. We affirm our position from 2001 that flexibility relates to making choices available to the learners, choices that they need to be able to make use of and use wisely. We see a change in the momentum for flexibility in traditional universities in 2010 compared to 2001: less emphasis on «global campus» opportunities for participation (beyond those already established) and more attention to enhancing the flexibility of learning spaces, as a blend of on-campus and technological spaces and the support that students can call on as they make use of the flexible spaces. The motivation for this attention is partially as incentive for new and continuing students, partially for the new learning opportunities that can be realised, but also for economic reasons—to make more flexible (i.e., cost-effective) use of physical facilities. Advances in technology since 2001, particularly Web 2.0 tools and applications, mobile technologies, Wifi networks, different forms of group and individual work-support systems and personalisable digital environments to simultaneously support learning, work, and private activities, have changed the landscape of how learners (and instructors) communicate and share outside of formal educational situations. The extent to which these new flexibilities will be translated for use in formal settings for learning is still to be seen. The risk is always there that a «lowest common denominator» of usage will settle in for these new technologies during the next decade as it did for Web-based course-management systems over the last decade. For flexibility to move beyond logistic- and personal-usage options to more-fundamental aspects of higher-education participation and pedagogic change will continue to require strategic incentives and appropriate support. In a time of financial constraint, the resources needed for appropriate support will be increasingly hard to allocate.

References

Allen, I.E. & Seaman, J. (2007). Online Nation: Five Years of Growth in Online Learning. Needham (MA, EE UU). Sloan-Consortium. (http://sloanconsortium.org/publications/survey/pdf/online_nation.pdf) (01-08-2010).

Anderson, T. (2009). Social Networking in Education. Draft chapter STRIDE Handbook, Indira Gandhi National Open University. (http://terrya.edublogs.org/2009/04/28/social-networking-chapter) (01-08-2010).

Anzai, Y. (2009). Digital Trends among Japanese University Students: Podcasting and Wikis as Tools for Learning. International Journal on E-Learning, 8, 4; 453-468.

Attwell, G. (2007). The Personal Learning Environments - The Future of eLearning? eLearning Papers 2, 1. (www.elearningeuropa.info/files/media/media11561.pdf). (01-08-2010).

Benfield, G.; Ramanau, R. & Sharpe, R. (2009). «Student learning Technology Use: Preferences for Study and Contact». Brookes eJournal of Learning and Teaching, 2, 4. (http://bejlt.brookes.ac.uk/article/student_learning_technology_use_preferences_for_study_and_contact) (01-08-2010).

Bernstein, R. (2000). America’s 100 most wired collages. Yahoo! Internet Life; 114-119.

Bologna Working Group on Qualifications Frameworks (2004). A Framework for Qualifications of the European Higher Education Area. Bruselas: Comisión Europea. Sócrates. Dirección General de Educación y Cultura. (http://info.uu.se/uadm/dokument.nsf/enhet/8bfc63d6148defc4c1256ee0003d63c1/$file/QF%20of%20EHEA2.pdf) (01-08-2010).

Brown, M.B. & Lippincott, J.K. (2003). Learning Spaces: More than Meets the Eye. EDUCAUSE Quarterly, 1; 14-16.

Brown, N.; Bekhradnia, B.; Boorman, S.; Brickwood, A.; Clark, T. & Ramsden, B. (2008). The Future Size and Shape of the Higher Education Sector in the UK: Threats and Opportunities. London: Report prepared for Universities UK. (www.universitiesuk.ac.uk/Publications/Documents/Size_and_shape2.pdf) (01-08-2010).

Collis, B. & Messing, J. (2001). Usage, attitudes and Workload Implications for a Web-Based Learning Environment. Journal of Advanced Learning Technologies, 9, 1; 17-25.

Collis, B. & Moonen, J. (2001). Flexible Learning in a Digital World: Experiences and Expectations. London: Routledge.

Collis, B. & Moonen, J. (2005). An On-going journey: Technology as a Learning Workbench. Universidad de Twente: Enschede; 96. (www.BettyCollisJefMoonen.nl/rb.htm) (01-08-2010).

Collis, B. & Moonen, J. (2008). Web 2.0 Tools and Processes in Higher Education: Quality Perspectives. Educational Media International, 45, 2; 93-106.

Collis, B. (2010). Studying Learning Spaces in the Iborrow Context. Project Report. iBorrow, Canterbury Christ Church University. Canterbury (UK): Universidad de Christ Church. (www.canterbury.ac.uk/projects/¬iborrow/-documents/iBorrow-Pedagogic-Research-Reflections.pdf) (01-08-2010).

Comrie, A.; Smyth, K. & Mayes, T. (2009). Learners in Control: The TESEP Approach. In: Mayes, T.; Morrison, D.; Mellar, H.; Bullan, P. & Oliver, M. (Eds.). Transforming higher education through technology-enhanced learning. York (UK): The Higher Education Academy; 208-219.

Conole, G.; Dyke, M.; Oliver, M. & Seale, J. (2004). Mapping Pedagogy and Tools for Effective Learning Design. Computers & Education, 43; 17-33.

De Boer, W.F. (2004). Flexibility Support for a Changing University. Phd dissertation, Faculty of Behavioural Sciences. Universidad de Twente: Enschede; 208-219. (http://doc.utwente.nl/41410/1/¬DissertatieWdeBoerITBE-.pdf) (01-08-2010).

Financial Times (Ed.) (2000) Business education». Financial Times; 13; 03-04-2000.

Gaines, B.R.; Norrie, D.H. & Shaw, M.L. (1996). Foundations for the Learning Web. (http://citeseerx.-ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.33.4846) (01-08-2010).

Gervedink Nijhuis, G. (2005). Academics in Control: Supporting Personal Performance for Teaching-Related Managerial Activities. Phd dissertation, Faculty of Behavioural Sciences. Universidad de Twente: Enschede.

Hall, R. & Conboy, H. (2009). Scoping the Connections between Emergent Technologies and Pedagogies for Learner Empowerment. In: Mayes, T.; Morrison, D.; Mellar, H.; Bullan, H. & Oliver, H. (Eds.). Transforming Higher Education through Technology-enhanced Learning. York (UK): The Higher Education Academy; 220-234.

HEFCE (2006). Designing Spaces for Effective Learning. Bristol (Reino Unido): Higher Education Funding Council for England. (www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/elearninginnovation/learningspaces.aspx) (01-08-2010).

Heo, M. (2009). Design considerations for today’s online learners: A study of personalized, relationship-based social awareness information. International Journal of E-Learning, 8, 3; 293-311.

Hermans, H. & Verjans, S. (2008). Van WWW naar een persoonlijk kennisweb [De la WWW a una web personal del conocimiento]. Onderwijsinnovatie, 10, 2; 37-39.

Jameson, D.G. (2002). Impact of Educational Technology on Higher Education. Internal Report. London: Multimedia Support and Communications Centre, University College London.

Martin, P. (2008). Learning and Learning Spaces for the 21st Century. Educational Developments, 9.4. London: SEDA (Staff and Educational Development Association). (www.seda.ac.uk/?p=5_4_1&pID=9.4) (01-08-2010).

New Media Consortium (2008). The Horizon Report: 2008 edition. Report by The New Media Consortium and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative. Boulder (USA): EDUCAUSE. (http://net.educause.edu/ir/-library/pdf/CSD5320.pdf) (01-08-2010).

Schreurs, B. (Ed.). (2009). Reviewing the Virtual Campus Phenomenon. The Rise of Large-scale E-learning Initiatives Worldwide. Re.ViCa Project, Reviewing (traces) of European Virtual Campuses. EuroPACE. Heverlee (Bélgica). (http://revica.europace.org/Re.ViCa%20Online%20Handbook.pdf) (01-08-2010).

Sharpe, R. (2009). The Impact Of Learner Experience Research On Transforming Educational Practices. In: Mayes, T.; Morrison, D.; Mellar, H.; Bullan, P. & Oliver, M. (Eds.). Transforming Higher Education Through Technology-Enhanced Learning. York (UK): The Higher Education Academy; 178-190.

Simons, P.R. (2002). Digitale Didactiek: Hoe (Kunnen) Academici Leren ICT Te Gebruiken in Hun Onderwijs [Didáctica digital: cómo pueden aprender los académicos a usar las TIC en su labor]. Universidad de Utrecht (home.tiscali.nl/robertjansimons/.../Digitale%20didactiek%20thema.doc) (01-08-2010).

Steadman, S. (2010). iBorrow laptop borrowing scheme. Easier than borrowing a book: External evaluation-final report. Report submitted to JISC at the completion of the iBorrow Project. Canterbury (Reino Unido): Universidad de Christ Church. (www.canterbury.ac.uk/projects/iborrow/documents/iBorrow-External-Eva-luation-Report.pdf) (01-08-2010).

Tan, D.T.; Lee, C.S.; Chan, L. K. & Lu, A.D. (2009). University 2.0: A View from Singapore. International Journal on E-Learning, 8, 4; 511-526.

Twigg, C.A. (2004). Improving Learning and Reducing Costs: Lessons Learned from Round II of the Pew Grant Program in Course Redesign. Troy (USA): Center for Academic Transformation, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. (www.thencat.org/PCR/RdIILessons.pdf) (01-08-2010).

Westerman, S. & Barry, W. (2009). Mind the Gap: Staff Empowerment through Digital Literacy. In: Mayes, T.; Morrison, D.; Mellar, H.; Bullan, P. & Oliver, M. (Ed.). Transforming Higher Education through Technology-Enhanced Learning. York (Reino Unido): The Higher Education Academy; 122-133.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Llevamos bastantes años estudiando la construcción de la flexibilidad en la educación superior, tanto desde la óptica de la investigación como de la práctica. Entendemos por flexibilidad la opción de ofrecer a los estudiantes la posibilidad de elegir cómo, qué, dónde, cuándo y con quién participan en las actividades de aprendizaje mientras están en una institución de educación superior. En el libro que escribimos sobre esta temática en 2001 identificamos opciones posibles para los estudiantes de educación superior con la finalidad de incrementar la flexibilidad de su participación. Lo estudiamos no solo desde la perspectiva del estudiante sino también desde las implicaciones para los profesores y para las instituciones de educación superior, y examinamos el papel fundamental que desempeñan el cambio pedagógico y la tecnología en el aumento de la flexibilidad. Ahora, diez años después, revisamos los temas clave relacionados con la flexibilidad en la educación superior e identificamos, en términos generales, hasta qué punto se ha ido estableciendo el incremento de la flexibilidad, si todavía está evolucionando o si ha evolucionado de una forma que no pudimos prever hace diez años. Revisamos también nuestros escenarios para el cambio en la educación superior relacionados con la flexibilidad y los contrastamos con un estudio más reciente llevado a cabo en el Reino Unido. Nuestra conclusión principal es que la cuestión de la flexibilidad en la educación superior sigue siendo tan pertinente en 2010 como lo era en 2001.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Son muchos los motivos (políticos, sociales, filosóficos, económicos y también educativos) por los que hace tiempo que existe un interés por incrementar la flexibilidad de la participación en la educación superior. La rapidez con la que ha evolucionado la tecnología informática y de redes, en especial la intensificación del uso de Internet durante las últimas décadas del siglo XX y la aparición del World Wide Web a mediados de la década de los noventa, por un lado intensificó la motivación de instituciones y gobiernos por ofrecer formas más flexibles de participación en la educación superior, y por otro lado impulsó una serie de experimentos con nuevos métodos pedagógicos y nuevas formas de interacción y recursos para el aprendizaje digital; en este contexto, escribimos un libro sobre el aprendizaje flexible en la educación superior (Collis & Moonen, 2001). El objetivo de la presente reflexión consiste en revisar el concepto de aprendizaje flexible en la educación superior diez años después de la publicación de nuestro libro y evaluar hasta qué punto se han materializado o debemos modificar nuestras conceptualizaciones y expectativas. En este artículo trataremos las cuestiones siguientes:

- Desde el punto de vista conceptual: ¿Ha evolucionado el concepto de flexibilidad en la educación superior desde el año 2000? Y, en caso afirmativo, ¿de qué manera? ¿Sigue siendo el aumento de la flexibilidad una característica de cambio importante en la educación superior? ¿Cuáles son los escenarios clave para describir la posición de una universidad por lo que respecta a la flexibilidad?

- Desde el punto de vista de su materialización: ¿Hasta qué punto se han materializado nuestras expectativas relativas a la flexibilidad? ¿Qué cambios realizaríamos en nuestras expectativas en el contexto del año 2010? ¿Qué factores restringen los potenciales de flexibilidad en la educación superior?

2. Nuevo análisis del aprendizaje flexible en la educación superior

En el libro de 2001, conceptualizamos el aprendizaje flexible en torno a cuatro perspectivas fundamentales: marco institucional, implementación, pedagogía y tecnología, así como combinaciones de estas perspectivas. En este apartado, compararemos el peso de la flexibilidad en 2001 y 2010 desde estas perspectivas, y lo que éstas actualmente arrojan en 2010. Asimismo, contrastaremos los escenarios de flexibilización para las universidades recogidos en nuestro libro de 2001 con otros escenarios sugeridos que han ido apareciendo desde aquel año.

2.1. Flexibilidad desde la perspectiva institucional

Durante los años 1999 y 2000, los órganos de decisión de las universidades tuvieron que hacer frente a una oleada de ideas que suponían un riesgo para su negocio y su identidad principalmente. Era frecuente encontrar en los periódicos y revistas comentarios como: «A las universidades y demás centros de estudios superiores tradicionales les espera un futuro nada halagüeño a no ser que cambien radicalmente sus métodos pedagógicos para mantener el ritmo de los desarrollos impulsados por Internet» (Financial Times, 2000), y «Los estudiantes universitarios otorgan la misma importancia a los recursos de Internet de una universidad que a los planes de estudios que ofrece» (Bernstein, 2000: 114). Se esperaba un cambio espectacular en el panorama demográfico del alumnado, que se alejaría del estudiante tradicional que inicia sus estudios universitarios directamente tras finalizar la secundaria, para acercarse a un número desconocido de estudiantes que acceden a la universidad más tarde, como aquellos que, por su situación laboral, necesitan reciclarse o prepararse para nuevos enfoques profesionales. La posibilidad de que los estudiantes, gracias a la tecnología, participaran en módulos o programas de instituciones de educación superior en los que su presencia física fuera escasa o nula suponía una amenaza para los modelos tradicionales de matriculación. Se consideraba que el incremento de la flexibilidad era fundamental para el funcionamiento (e incluso la supervivencia) de las instituciones de educación superior, y esa flexibilidad exigía que se invirtiera en tecnología. El término «universidad virtual» comenzó a utilizarse a mediados de la década de los noventa para describir una institución en la que una parte de los servicios y las interacciones se llevaban a cabo en línea, mediante tecnologías de redes y aplicaciones de software relacionadas (Schreurs, 2009). En 2001, a partir de consultas con órganos de decisión de una serie de universidades europeas, norteamericanas, australianas y asiáticas, llegamos a la conclusión de que «nadie podía dejar pasar el tren»: las instituciones tenían que realizar grandes inversiones en tecnología y explorar estrategias de cambio en sus modos de funcionamiento para incrementar la flexibilidad de la participación.

Hasta el año 2010 las instituciones han invertido grandes sumas en tecnologías de redes (véase el apartado 2.2). Sin embargo, no queda claro hasta qué punto se han convertido en universidades virtuales con un nuevo panorama demográfico del alumnado, aunque lo cierto es que sí hay mucha más actividad en línea. En un análisis de las universidades virtuales a escala mundial llevado a cabo por el Proyecto Re.ViCa, con el apoyo de la Unión Europea (Schreurs, 2009: 15-16), se llegó a la conclusión de que «el concepto de campus virtual ha cambiado desde que se acuñó el término, ya que ahora son cada vez más las universidades que se dan cuenta de las posibilidades que supone ofrecer cursos no presenciales. Observamos un número creciente de universidades que ofrecen cursos a través de un campus virtual. Aunque algunas instituciones ofrecen cursos que se realizan totalmente en línea, lo más habitual en estos momentos es que los cursos sean «mixtos» y combinen ambos métodos. Parece que en los últimos años se ha reducido el uso del término «campus virtual» y, sin embargo, se ha producido un crecimiento continuo del fenómeno. Todos los campus se han convertido en campus virtuales. No obstante, aumenta el interés por los ‘modelos mixtos’, que están captando cada vez más atención».

Esta realidad queda reflejada en un estudio realizado en EE UU en más de 2.500 instituciones de educación superior (Allen & Seaman, 2007). Ese estudio definía los cursos en línea como aquellos en los que como mínimo un 80% del contenido se impartía en línea, de modo que incluía las variaciones mixtas. Con esta definición, más de 3,4 millones de estudiantes, casi un 20% de todos los estudiantes de educación superior, realizó como mínimo un curso en línea durante el año académico de 2006, un incremento de aproximadamente el 10% frente al año académico anterior. Esta tasa de crecimiento del 9,7% en la matriculación en cursos en línea es muy superior a la tasa de crecimiento del 1,5% de la población total de estudiantes (Allen & Seaman, 2007).

No obstante, pese a la disponibilidad de varios programas o cursos en línea (mixtos), una conclusión de un análisis británico (Jameson, 2002: 32) ofrece una visión más matizada del cambio general registrado en la educación superior: es habitual que las instituciones expresen su compromiso de adoptar las nuevas tecnologías en sus documentos de estrategia pero, en realidad, están observando qué sucede, con la esperanza de ser capaces de «conectarse» con rapidez si es necesario y solo cuando lo sea. En un sistema de aprendizaje muy orientado al enfoque persona a persona (por ejemplo, Oxford o Cambridge), la tecnología tiene una escasa repercusión en la docencia y el aprendizaje, pero pone los recursos a su disposición.

Por consiguiente, la tendencia que tantos especialistas habían pronosticado, a saber, que las instituciones de educación superior incrementarían la flexibilidad ofreciendo todos o parte de sus cursos o programas en línea, solo se ha materializado de una forma modesta. Pero el hecho de que muchos de esos cursos sean mixtos y se ofrezcan combinados con algún elemento de presencia física obligatoria implica que siguen existiendo limitaciones del grado de flexibilidad de ubicación ofrecido por las instituciones tradicionales de educación superior. Este hecho está relacionado con una tendencia institucional asociada a la flexibilidad que no anticipamos en 2001, y que ha surgido con fuerza durante la última década: un interés y un nivel de gasto cada vez mayores en los espacios de aprendizaje físicos en el campus. Tanto en el Reino Unido como en Australia se ha llevado a cabo un rediseño considerable de los espacios físicos de aprendizaje en numerosas universidades. En un resumen elaborado por el Consejo de Financiación de la Educación Superior en Inglaterra (HEFCE, 2006: 2) se señala que «la mayor inversión en bienes inmuebles y tecnologías de aprendizaje, combinada con la necesidad de utilizar el espacio de forma más rentable, hacen que sea cada vez más importante que los ejecutivos y los órganos de decisión se mantengan al día de las nuevas ideas sobre el diseño de espacios de aprendizaje (físicos) bien dotados tecnológicamente».

Es necesario diseñar los edificios físicos de modo que sus espacios individuales sean flexibles, para alojar tanto los métodos pedagógicos actuales y en evolución como las necesidades que van surgiendo con el tiempo (HEFCE, 2006: 3-5). Las tecnologías que sean, dentro de lo posible, móviles e inalámbricas permitirán readaptar los espacios de una forma más sencilla. Además del valor práctico de contar con espacios de aprendizaje físicos flexibles respaldados por tecnología, varias universidades han obtenido resultados positivos de los espacios de aprendizaje físicos rediseñados en materia de aprendizaje. En la Universidad de Brighton, «la principal conclusión hasta la fecha ha sido la opinión casi unánime, tanto de docentes como de estudiantes por igual, de que la flexibilidad del espacio ha favorecido en gran medida el proceso de aprendizaje» (Martin, 2008). En la Universidad de Christ Church, en Canterbury, también en el Reino Unido, se ha realizado una investigación exhaustiva sobre qué hacen los estudiantes y adónde van sus «huellas de aprendizaje» (Collis, 2010) en un centro de aprendizaje físico bien dotado tecnológicamente en el que la flexibilidad de aprendizaje es mayor, ya que a los «estudiantes les resulta tan sencillo pedir portátiles en préstamo con total conectividad de red WiFi como coger un libro de un estante» (Steadman, 2010: 2) y, por lo tanto, pueden moverse por el centro como quieran al tiempo que mantienen el contacto en línea. Esta iniciativa, la primera en educación superior que ha logrado introducir de forma satisfactoria y a gran escala ordenadores ultraportátiles de autoservicio en préstamo para uso de los estudiantes, también conllevaba la instalación de software de localización y seguimiento en los portátiles que proporciona datos continuos sobre la cantidad de equipos en uso, la hora, el lugar y la duración de cada conexión. Los datos de seguimiento, contrastados con otras fuentes de información como entrevistas, estudios y observaciones, proporcionaron datos empíricos acerca de las distintas interacciones de aprendizaje que tienen lugar en los centros de aprendizaje físicos fuera de la biblioteca y las aulas de la universidad (Collis, 2010; Steadman, 2010). Al mismo tiempo, en EEUU se constata que los «campus deberían desarrollar una estrategia interrelacionada que tenga en consideración varios tipos de espacios de aprendizaje, incluidos los espacios virtuales, y todo un abanico de servicios de apoyo» (Brown & Lippincott, 2003: 16).

Por consiguiente, en lugar de tender hacia una universidad cada vez más virtual, como constatamos en 2001, observamos ahora que la mayoría de los órganos de decisión de las universidades dedica mayor atención a proporcionar espacios de aprendizaje físicos flexibles bien dotados tecnológicamente. Gran parte o la totalidad del aprendizaje puede que ya se realice en línea pero hoy, por lo menos en países como el Reino Unido, Australia y EEUU, se ha convertido en una gran prioridad potenciar la flexibilidad, y el atractivo, de los espacios de aprendizaje de los campus.

2.2. Flexibilidad desde la perspectiva tecnológica

En nuestro análisis de 2001, indicamos que la tecnología podía mejorar la flexibilidad de aprendizaje en la educación superior de varias maneras: unas relacionadas con la logística que supone participar en una institución de educación superior (incluido el acceso a los materiales de los cursos y la información organizativa en línea, la presentación de trabajos y la recepción de correcciones en línea) y otras relacionadas con nuevas formas de aprendizaje. Creíamos que la aparición de los sistemas de gestión de cursos (denominados de diferentes formas en distintos contextos como entornos de campus virtuales, entornos de aprendizaje virtuales [VLE, por sus siglas en inglés] o entornos de aprendizaje electrónicos [ELO, por sus siglas en inglés]) ofrecía muchas posibilidades para incrementar la flexibilidad. En una investigación más reciente (De Boer, 2004), nos dimos cuenta de que estaban potenciándose los aspectos logísticos de la flexibilidad, pero no sucedía lo mismo con los aspectos pedagógicos.

Y así sigue siendo en 2010: ahora están muy extendidos los sistemas de gestión de cursos basados en Web (VLE) en la mayoría de las universidades, pero suelen utilizarse fundamentalmente para ganar flexibilidad en la logística. Por lo que respecta a los sistemas tecnológicos con los que interactúan los estudiantes, las universidades están dejando atrás progresivamente la actual generación de sistemas propios de gestión de cursos para abrazar los sistemas de código abierto, o incluso entornos de escritorio digital más personalizables, haciendo uso de portales, interfaces personalizables y combinaciones de herramientas y aplicaciones seleccionadas por los usuarios (en general, relacionadas con la denomina Web 2.0; Hermans y Verjans, 2008). Esas combinaciones incluyen opciones para crear y compartir contenido de forma individual o en colaboración (mediante blogs, marcadores, fotografías y otros recursos), para apoyar redes sociales tanto dentro del contexto de aprendizaje como fuera, para ofrecer servicios relacionados con la presencia física que tengan en cuenta dónde se encuentran los usuarios y a quién permitirán entrar en su espacio virtual, y para utilizar agregadores de noticias y herramientas de combinación de recursos (mash up) que permitan a los usuarios conocer nuevas fuentes de información y organizarlas para satisfacer sus necesidades personales. Aunque están comenzando a aparecer prototipos de este tipo de entornos de aprendizaje personal (PLE, por sus siglas en inglés) en proyectos de investigación relacionados con la tecnología en la educación superior, las funciones adaptables al usuario ya son habituales en los entornos digitales personales de muchos estudiantes de educación superior (Atwell, 2007). Los estudiantes señalan que «las tecnologías utilizadas en sus cursos (universitarios) son mucho menos adecuadas que sus tecnologías personales» (Heo, 2009: 295).

Las aplicaciones Web 2.0 que han aparecido en los últimos años van más allá de lo que presentamos en nuestro libro de 2001. El uso de los wikis (véase, por ejemplo, cómo describe Anzai el uso de los wikis en la educación superior en Japón, 2009) y las redes sociales (Anderson, 2009) son ejemplos de lo que en EE UU se anuncia como las tecnologías emergentes clave para el aprendizaje en la educación superior (New Media Consortium, 2008). El Consortium, que cada año publica un informe sobre tecnologías emergentes clave para la educación superior, señala que las «webs colaborativas» actuales evolucionarán para convertirse en «inteligencia colectiva» y «sistemas operativos sociales», que podrían tener una gran repercusión en el aprendizaje en la educación superior alrededor de 2013.

¿Seguro? En nuestro libro de 2001 señalábamos que el potencial de la tecnología para mejorar la experiencia del aprendizaje en educación superior dependía de si se utilizaba como tecnología de base o complementaria. Una tecnología de base tiene en cuenta los aspectos principales alrededor de los cuales se articula un curso, que son inherentes a cada institución. En gran parte de la educación superior, las tecnologías de base siguen siendo las que existían antes de 2001: clases, aulas, exámenes escritos en situaciones físicas supervisadas y libros de texto. Una de las novedades introducidas es el sistema de gestión de cursos, que se utiliza para proporcionar recursos e información y para gestionar algunas formas de interacción (por regla general, la presentación de trabajos y la entrega de correcciones y notas). Otros tipos de tecnologías, como las aplicaciones Web 2.0, son lo que consideramos tecnologías complementarias: algunos docentes deciden utilizarlas como complementos o mejoras, pero no son ni mayoritarias ni esenciales para el progreso académico general del estudiante. En conjunto, todavía estamos lejos de la idea de la «web de aprendizaje» en relación con el uso de la tecnología en la educación superior, donde «el papel que desempeñan las tecnologías de la información es el de proporcionar sistemas de apoyo al conocimiento que aceleren los procesos de formación y difusión del conocimiento» (Gaines, Norrie y Shaw, 1996) o lo que denominamos «tecnología como entorno integrado de apoyo al aprendizaje» (Collis y Moonen, 2005).

2.3. Flexibilidad desde la perspectiva de la docencia y el aprendizaje

En la docencia y el aprendizaje se tienen en consideración los profesores, los estudiantes y la pedagogía de la enseñanza, en especial las actividades de aprendizaje. Esta perspectiva también incluye al personal que ayuda a los docentes y estudiantes en las instituciones de educación superior.

2.3.1. Pedagogía y actividades de aprendizaje

En nuestro libro de 2001 elaboramos un modelo pedagógico para el diseño de cursos y actividades de aprendizaje que se basaba en dos principios fundamentales: las situaciones de aprendizaje deberían diseñarse para ofrecer flexibilidad y, por tanto, opciones para el estudiante; y las situaciones de aprendizaje deberían incluir tanto la adquisición de aptitudes y conceptos como oportunidades para participar y contribuir en una comunidad de aprendizaje. Este enfoque pedagógico de «estudiante-contribuyente» encaja bien con las posibilidades que ofrecen las tecnologías de la Web 2.0 que han aparecido desde 2001, y se refleja de forma indirecta en muchos de los estudios y proyectos sobre las tecnologías de la Web 2.0 y la forma de las nuevas actividades de aprendizaje que han aparecido en la literatura especializada en los últimos diez años. Hall y Conboy (2009: 232), por ejemplo, describen proyectos piloto en los que se utilizan los blogs como actividad de aprendizaje reflexivo, el desarrollo de wikis del curso por parte de los estudiantes como creación de conocimiento social, y el uso de una red social que los estudiantes pueden personalizar y utilizar para gestionar sus actividades de aprendizaje en grupo. Concluyen que «se puede emplazar al estudiante para que tome decisiones eficaces sobre su aprendizaje en aquellos entornos en los que se utilizan herramientas web de lectura y escritura para catalizar la innovación pedagógica». En la Universidad Tecnológica de Nanyang, en Singapur, se ha implantado un modelo pedagógico y organizativo llamado University 2.0 que pone el acento en la implicación del estudiante («enseñar menos, aprender más», Tan, Lee, Chan & Lu, 2009: 517) y en hacer que los estudiantes asuman la tarea de modelar sus propias experiencias de aprendizaje. Las actividades de aprendizaje como la autoevaluación o la evaluación de compañeros, la gestión del trabajo en proyectos, la formulación de preguntas por los estudiantes para el aprendizaje entre compañeros, y la creación de portafolios digitales son ejemplos del acento en la implicación de los estudiantes. Incluso durante el autoestudio, se anima a los estudiantes a estar en contacto con otros compañeros de clase para apoyarse mutuamente durante el aprendizaje utilizando una aplicación creada por la misma universidad (aNTUna Connect) para dar apoyo a las comunidades de aprendizaje virtuales. Además se da algo que todavía no es muy habitual en la educación superior: «se implica y consulta a los estudiantes en el proceso de toma de decisiones sobre las prioridades de aprendizaje y los resultados de las evaluaciones». Desde una perspectiva conceptual, Conole, Dyke, Oliver y Seale (2004) demuestran cómo pueden flexibilizarse distintas actividades de aprendizaje (lluvias de ideas, recopilación de recursos para una tarea concreta, y autoevaluación del nivel de competencia) ofreciendo a los estudiantes opciones relacionadas con su participación individual o social, orientaciones hacia la reflexión o las aptitudes, y enfoques basados en la información frente a enfoques basados en la experiencia.

Por consiguiente, con el apoyo de avances tecnológicos del tipo Web 2.0, el potencial para ofrecer flexibilidad pedagógica en la educación superior es incluso mayor de lo que era en 2001. Sin embargo, en nuestros análisis más recientes (Collis & Moonen, 2008) hemos identificado numerosos escollos que impiden que ese potencial se materialice. Gran parte de esos escollos están relacionados con la disposición de los profesores de educación superior a cambiar sus prácticas docentes.

2.3.2. Profesores y personal no docente

No existe una evidencia generalizada de que, entre 2001 y 2010, hayan aumentado las probabilidades de que los docentes de educación superior incorporen pedagogías innovadoras en el diseño de sus cursos. Como siempre, el docente es la figura clave en el cambio pedagógico. Y, como siempre, los docentes no tienen tiempo, motivación ni apoyo suficientes para ir más allá de su nivel de tolerancia a la innovación ni al uso de tecnologías en la enseñanza. Tal como afirmaron Collis y Messing en 2001, los docentes toman decisiones personales sobre cuánto tiempo y esfuerzo pueden dedicar a los elementos importantes de las pedagogías orientadas a la interacción, como las correcciones y la individualización, y por ende establecen sus propios límites en cuanto al compromiso de tiempo. En 2005, Gervedink Nijhuis analizó cuánto suponía para los docentes, en tiempo y trabajo, ofrecer más flexibilidad a los estudiantes en las actividades de aprendizaje, y llegó a la conclusión de que la carga de tiempo que representa para los docentes gestionar la flexibilidad en las actividades de aprendizaje es exagerada en muchos casos si se compara con muchas otras cargas a las que dedican tiempo y esfuerzo. Simons (2002) considera que parte del problema es que a los docentes les falta conocimiento sobre la «didáctica digital», por lo que son reacios o muestran resistencia al cambio pedagógico mediante una falta de comprensión de lo que puede ofrecerles o cómo pueden implementarse.

Al igual que ha sucedido con generaciones anteriores de tecnologías y su potencial para el aprendizaje, se sigue admitiendo que es necesario que los docentes se desarrollen profesionalmente de una forma más eficaz y eficiente, mientras que la importancia del personal no docente de apoyo a la enseñanza y el aprendizaje continúa siendo elevada. Entre el personal no docente se encuentran todas aquellas personas de los centros universitarios que se dedican a la innovación curricular y pedagógica en la enseñanza, el personal técnico que ayuda a los docentes y los estudiantes a usar la tecnología, y también otro personal como los bibliotecarios, que pueden ayudar a los docentes, por ejemplo, en cuestiones relacionadas con el acceso a la información digital y su gestión que pueden ser pertinentes para sus actividades de enseñanza. El apoyo ofrecido a petición de los docentes, por lo tanto mucho más flexible y contextualizado, fue uno de los principales componentes para mejorar el aprendizaje y reducir los costes en una serie de estudios de caso para rediseñar cursos en EEUU (Twigg, 2004). Simons (2002) aboga por aplicar nuevos métodos de desarrollo y orientación profesional para los docentes, lo que a su vez supone nuevos métodos y aptitudes para el personal de apoyo. Un nuevo método de desarrollo del personal, basado en la flexibilidad y la contextualización, que promete buenos resultados es el de la Universidad de Christ Church, en Canterbury, en el Reino Unido (Westerman & Barry, 2009). Los docentes pueden elegir entre más de 20 tipos con qué tecnología desean familiarizarse, y se han desarrollado diferentes métodos de aprendizaje mediante autoestudio para cada uno de dichos tipos. Aunque todos los docentes tenían su propio punto de vista personal que priorizaba la alfabetización técnica antes de intentar realizar cambios pedagógicos, la interacción social entre los docentes y el personal de apoyo también fue una importante forma de cambio en el aprendizaje y las actitudes.

A pesar de su trascendencia, los servicios de apoyo son especialmente vulnerables a las reorganizaciones internas y los recortes presupuestarios cuando las universidades afrontan dificultades económicas. Jameson (2002: 33) indica que «en el Reino Unido, varias universidades se han visto obligadas a reorganizar sus servicios de apoyo a la enseñanza y el aprendizaje. En algunos casos, esos servicios se han desmantelado y se han destinado a otras secciones de la administración. Es una estrategia peligrosa, ya que esos servicios de apoyo desempeñan un papel especial en la enseñanza y el aprendizaje, y tienen que competir por los recursos con servicios encargados de satisfacer necesidades institucionales de carácter más general».

Por desgracia, está sucediendo en muchas universidades y constituye una gran limitación para la potenciación de la flexibilidad pedagógica.

2.3.3. Estudiantes

En nuestro libro de 2001 no incluimos ningún capítulo específico que tratara la perspectiva de los estudiantes sobre la flexibilidad. Este hecho se debe a que considerábamos que todo el análisis se basaba en el estudiante y en el deseo de poner a su disposición más opciones de participación en las actividades de aprendizaje. Sin embargo, en los diez años siguientes a su publicación se ha desarrollado un nuevo interés en la experiencia del estudiante como componente fundamental de la transformación de las prácticas institucionales. Sharpe (2009: 178) indica que se está produciendo un cambio de rumbo en la investigación sobre la experiencia del estudiante; dicha investigación es «más holística, incluida la que examina la repercusión que tiene el uso omnipresente de la tecnología sobre la vida de los estudiantes […] con intentos de conceptualizar la diversidad observada en la experiencia de los estudiantes». Hoy, la investigación sobre la experiencia de los estudiantes no se limita a la oferta tecnológica institucional, sino que tiene en cuenta la influencia del aumento de la tecnología en propiedad del estudiante y del uso de herramientas y aplicaciones en línea. Por ejemplo, en la Universidad de Bradford, en el Reino Unido, la conciencia del gran uso que hacen los estudiantes de las redes sociales en línea se ha traducido en nuevos enfoques muy flexibles sobre el apoyo en línea para ayudar a los estudiantes durante su periodo de transición a la educación superior (la herramienta está disponible en www.brad.ac.uk/developme). En la Universidad Brookes de Oxford se está desarrollando y adaptando para cada plan de estudios un modelo de educación bien dotada tecnológicamente, personalizado y centrado en el estudiante, y que se basa en la idea de que los estudiantes deben estar capacitados para manipular la información, gestionar las interacciones humanas y crear conocimiento usando herramientas digitales (Benfield, Ramanau & Sharpe, 2009). El hecho de que los estudiantes sean usuarios competentes de las tecnologías no implica necesariamente que sean usuarios críticos y posean los niveles de alfabetización informativa necesarios para alcanzar los objetivos de aprendizaje de la educación superior. Comrie, Smyth y Mayes (2009: 210) señalan que tres de las universidades escocesas que participaron en el proyecto TICEP (Transformación y mejora de la experiencia del estudiante a través de la pedagogía, véase www2.napier.ac.uk/transform) conceden mayor prioridad a «cimentar la autorregulación de los estudiantes y lo que ahora se denomina la alfabetización académica […] y las instituciones […] dedican sus recursos a preparar a sus estudiantes para responder a la flexibilidad en lugar de ofrecerles flexibilidad». Éste y otros estudios sobre la experiencia de los estudiantes sugieren que la experiencia personal de los estudiantes con la tecnología y, lo que es más relevante, su madurez crítica frente a la información y las diversas opiniones humanas son componentes importantes de su respuesta a una mayor flexibilidad en relación con el aprendizaje en la educación superior. Eso nos lleva a concluir que preparar a los estudiantes para que respondan de manera eficaz a la flexibilidad es tan importante como proporcionarles dicha flexibilidad.

En resumen, pues, se ha producido un avance dispar en cuanto al incremento de la flexibilidad en el aprendizaje y la enseñanza en los diez años que han transcurrido desde nuestro análisis de 2001. Las tecnologías orientadas al ámbito personal y social están muy difundidas en la vida personal de muchos estudiantes de educación superior, y existen experimentos con pedagogías que se construyen sobre la base de compartir, colaborar y contribuir al aprendizaje de los compañeros. No obstante, aparte de los proyectos piloto, no parece que se hayan producido cambios generalizados en los métodos pedagógicos. Los motivos siguen siendo los mismos que en todos los casos en los que se ha pretendido aplicar innovaciones en las prácticas de la enseñanza: los docentes no disponen del tiempo, las aptitudes o los incentivos para realizar cambios de gran calado en los métodos de enseñanza con los que se sienten cómodos. Al mismo tiempo, el personal de apoyo que podría estimular esa innovación está sumido en restricciones de recursos.

2.4. Escenarios para la universidad

En 2001 identificamos cuatro escenarios para la educación superior y el aprendizaje flexible de cara a «2005 y después». Esos escenarios aparecieron a partir de la combinación de dos dimensiones clave, una primera relacionada con la ubicación de la oferta de aprendizaje (con dos extremos, uno que da un gran valor a las transacciones locales cara a cara y otro en el que el aprendizaje se concibe alrededor de transacciones a través de la red), y una segunda asociada al control de calidad (también con dos extremos, uno en el que el experto de la universidad es responsable del control de calidad de la experiencia del estudiante, y otro en el que es el estudiante el que asume cada vez más responsabilidad sobre la calidad de sus propias decisiones de aprendizaje). Todo ello dio lugar a cuatro escenarios:

- Vuelta a los orígenes: se otorga un gran valor a las transacciones locales cara a cara, y la institución determina sus planes y programas de estudios y garantiza su calidad.

- Campus global: la universidad mantiene el control de calidad, pero cada vez hay más programas y aprendizajes disponibles a través de la tecnología de redes en lugar de un campus físico.

- Ampliación del molde: el estudiante todavía se centra en el campus local y las transacciones cara a cara, pero va tomando de forma progresiva más decisiones personales y, por tanto, asume más responsabilidad sobre la calidad de su propia experiencia.

- Nueva economía: cada persona elige sus propias combinaciones de aprendizaje, por medio de transacciones globales a través de la red y a partir de una serie de fuentes de recursos de aprendizaje.

Tal como predijimos en 2001, la opción de la Nueva Economía se ha circunscrito al aprendizaje informal. Las universidades tradicionales continúan posicionadas, en su mayoría, en el escenario de la vuelta a los orígenes, pero cuentan con opciones, respaldadas a escala institucional, de algunos cursos que siguen el modelo de campus global y van aumentando gradualmente su presencia en un escenario de ampliación del molde. Lo que resulta interesante es que, en general, esto último se está dando al margen de una estrategia institucional específica; la Ampliación del molde se produce de forma orgánica a medida que van poniéndose a disposición de los estudiantes más opciones de participación flexible.

En los diez años transcurridos se han propuesto otros escenarios. A raíz de un estudio de 2008 encargado por Universities UK, una asociación de altos cargos de todas las instituciones universitarias del Reino Unido y de otros centros de educación superior, apareció un conjunto de escenarios particularmente interesantes (www.universitiesuk.ac.uk/AboutUs/WhoWeAre/Pages/default.aspx). El estudio se centró en el tamaño y la forma del sector de la educación superior en el Reino Unido durante un periodo de 20 años (Brown & al., 2008). A partir de un análisis de las incertidumbres y los motores clave de la demanda, y del convencimiento de que es posible que los recortes en la financiación definan el contexto de cualquier escenario futuro, se desarrollaron tres escenarios:

- Adaptación lenta al cambio: se esperan pocas fuentes nuevas y significativas de demanda de los estudiantes; solo se realizarán inversiones modestas en e-learning, por lo que seguirá representando una parte relativamente pequeña de la experiencia total de aprendizaje para la mayoría de los estudiantes. Algunas instituciones se fusionarán o cerrarán por el recorte de la financiación.

- Entorno competitivo impulsado por el mercado: incremento de la competitividad en todos los mercados de estudiantes entre las instituciones de educación superior tradicionales y los nuevos proveedores; inversión más generalizada en e-learning, en especial por parte de instituciones de mayor tamaño en asociación con el sector privado; y una importante reconfiguración del sector, con menos instituciones grandes con oferta múltiple y una mayor cantidad de pequeñas instituciones de educación superior especializadas.

- Aprendizaje flexible impulsado por las empresas: demanda por parte de las empresas de acreditación de experiencias relacionadas con el mundo laboral y cofinanciación de programas por parte de grupos de empresas y sus cadenas de suministro; la mayoría de los estudiantes estudian a media jornada de forma virtual mientras siguen trabajando, lo que da lugar a un sector de educación superior muy estratificado con unas pocas instituciones de elite, algunos centros regionales grandes, algunas instituciones fundamentalmente virtuales, algunas universidades locales tradicionales para estudiantes de grado, y algunas instituciones con una oferta de programas adscritos a centros regionales (Brown & al., 2008: 5-13)

En los escenarios segundo y tercero, la flexibilidad lograda gracias a la tecnología desempeñará un papel fundamental. Resulta interesante que este ejercicio de posibles escenarios en el Reino Unido no parezca hacer referencia explícita a la experiencia de la Open University del Reino Unido. Esta institución, al igual que otras grandes instituciones de educación a distancia (incluida la Open Universiteit de los Países Bajos y la Universitat Oberta de Catalunya), lleva mucho tiempo ofreciendo formas flexibles de participación en sus cursos, en especial a los estudiantes que no proceden de secundaria, y son numerosos los estudiantes que optan por este modelo de educación superior. Sin embargo, dados los cambios en el panorama del sector de la educación superior que anticipa el estudio de Universities UK, es posible que los grandes centros de educación a distancia se vean obligados a ofrecer a sus estudiantes nuevas opciones con propuestas mixtas de aprendizaje cara a cara y en línea en lugar de ceñirse únicamente al modelo de enseñanza a distancia con el fin de competir con las nuevas situaciones que sugieren los escenarios segundo y tercero del análisis del futuro educativo en el Reino Unido.

3. Conclusión

Creemos que la cuestión de la flexibilidad en la educación superior sigue siendo tan pertinente en 2010 como lo era en 2001. Reafirmamos nuestra posición de 2001 en cuanto a que la flexibilidad está relacionada con poner a disposición de los estudiantes diversas opciones que estos deben ser capaces de utilizar y que deben usar de forma inteligente. Observamos un cambio en el dinamismo de la flexibilidad en las universidades tradicionales en 2010 en comparación con 2001: menos énfasis en las oportunidades de participación en el «campus global» (además de las ya establecidas), y más atención a mejorar la flexibilidad de los espacios de aprendizaje, en forma de combinación mixta de espacios físicos y tecnológicos y el apoyo que los estudiantes pueden precisar a medida que utilizan esos espacios flexibles. La motivación para esta atención nace en parte como incentivo para los estudiantes nuevos y los que ya cursan estudios, y en parte para que puedan materializarse las nuevas oportunidades de aprendizaje, pero también existen motivos económicos (para hacer un uso más flexible, es decir, rentable, de las instalaciones físicas). Los avances tecnológicos que se han producido desde 2001, en especial las herramientas y las aplicaciones Web 2.0, las tecnologías móviles, las redes WiFi, la forma de los diferentes sistemas de apoyo al trabajo en grupo e individual y los entornos digitales personalizables para apoyar de forma simultánea las actividades de aprendizaje, de trabajo y personales, han transformado el panorama de cómo se comunican y comparten los estudiantes (y los docentes) fuera del contexto de la educación formal. Todavía no sabemos en qué medida estas nuevas flexibilidades acabarán utilizándose en situaciones formales de aprendizaje. Siempre existe el riesgo de que se establezca un «mínimo común denominador» de uso para estas nuevas tecnologías durante la próxima década, como sucedió durante los diez años anteriores con los sistemas de gestión de cursos basados en web. Para que la flexibilidad pase de estar anclada en las opciones de uso logístico y personal a formar parte de aspectos más fundamentales de la educación superior, seguirá siendo necesario aplicar incentivos estratégicos y dar el apoyo adecuado al cambio participativo y pedagógico. En una época de dificultades económicas como la actual, cada vez resultará más difícil asignar los recursos necesarios para obtener el apoyo adecuado.

Referencias

Allen, I.E. & Seaman, J. (2007). Online Nation: Five Years of Growth in Online Learning. Needham (MA, EE UU). Sloan-Consortium. (http://sloanconsortium.org/publications/survey/pdf/online_nation.pdf) (01-08-2010).

Anderson, T. (2009). Social Networking in Education. Draft chapter STRIDE Handbook, Indira Gandhi National Open University. (http://terrya.edublogs.org/2009/04/28/social-networking-chapter) (01-08-2010).

Anzai, Y. (2009). Digital Trends among Japanese University Students: Podcasting and Wikis as Tools for Learning. International Journal on E-Learning, 8, 4; 453-468.

Attwell, G. (2007). The Personal Learning Environments - The Future of eLearning? eLearning Papers 2, 1. (www.elearningeuropa.info/files/media/media11561.pdf). (01-08-2010).

Benfield, G.; Ramanau, R. & Sharpe, R. (2009). «Student learning Technology Use: Preferences for Study and Contact». Brookes eJournal of Learning and Teaching, 2, 4. (http://bejlt.brookes.ac.uk/article/student_learning_technology_use_preferences_for_study_and_contact) (01-08-2010).

Bernstein, R. (2000). America’s 100 most wired collages. Yahoo! Internet Life; 114-119.

Bologna Working Group on Qualifications Frameworks (2004). A Framework for Qualifications of the European Higher Education Area. Bruselas: Comisión Europea. Sócrates. Dirección General de Educación y Cultura. (http://info.uu.se/uadm/dokument.nsf/enhet/8bfc63d6148defc4c1256ee0003d63c1/$file/QF%20of%20EHEA2.pdf) (01-08-2010).

Brown, M.B. & Lippincott, J.K. (2003). Learning Spaces: More than Meets the Eye. EDUCAUSE Quarterly, 1; 14-16.

Brown, N.; Bekhradnia, B.; Boorman, S.; Brickwood, A.; Clark, T. & Ramsden, B. (2008). The Future Size and Shape of the Higher Education Sector in the UK: Threats and Opportunities. London: Report prepared for Universities UK. (www.universitiesuk.ac.uk/Publications/Documents/Size_and_shape2.pdf) (01-08-2010).

Collis, B. & Messing, J. (2001). Usage, attitudes and Workload Implications for a Web-Based Learning Environment. Journal of Advanced Learning Technologies, 9, 1; 17-25.

Collis, B. & Moonen, J. (2001). Flexible Learning in a Digital World: Experiences and Expectations. London: Routledge.

Collis, B. & Moonen, J. (2005). An On-going journey: Technology as a Learning Workbench. Universidad de Twente: Enschede; 96. (www.BettyCollisJefMoonen.nl/rb.htm) (01-08-2010).

Collis, B. & Moonen, J. (2008). Web 2.0 Tools and Processes in Higher Education: Quality Perspectives. Educational Media International, 45, 2; 93-106.

Collis, B. (2010). Studying Learning Spaces in the Iborrow Context. Project Report. iBorrow, Canterbury Christ Church University. Canterbury (UK): Universidad de Christ Church. (www.canterbury.ac.uk/projects/¬iborrow/-documents/iBorrow-Pedagogic-Research-Reflections.pdf) (01-08-2010).

Comrie, A.; Smyth, K. & Mayes, T. (2009). Learners in Control: The TESEP Approach. In: Mayes, T.; Morrison, D.; Mellar, H.; Bullan, P. & Oliver, M. (Eds.). Transforming higher education through technology-enhanced learning. York (UK): The Higher Education Academy; 208-219.

Conole, G.; Dyke, M.; Oliver, M. & Seale, J. (2004). Mapping Pedagogy and Tools for Effective Learning Design. Computers & Education, 43; 17-33.

De Boer, W.F. (2004). Flexibility Support for a Changing University. Phd dissertation, Faculty of Behavioural Sciences. Universidad de Twente: Enschede; 208-219. (http://doc.utwente.nl/41410/1/¬DissertatieWdeBoerITBE-.pdf) (01-08-2010).

Financial Times (Ed.) (2000) Business education». Financial Times; 13; 03-04-2000.

Gaines, B.R.; Norrie, D.H. & Shaw, M.L. (1996). Foundations for the Learning Web. (http://citeseerx.-ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.33.4846) (01-08-2010).

Gervedink Nijhuis, G. (2005). Academics in Control: Supporting Personal Performance for Teaching-Related Managerial Activities. Phd dissertation, Faculty of Behavioural Sciences. Universidad de Twente: Enschede.

Hall, R. & Conboy, H. (2009). Scoping the Connections between Emergent Technologies and Pedagogies for Learner Empowerment. In: Mayes, T.; Morrison, D.; Mellar, H.; Bullan, H. & Oliver, H. (Eds.). Transforming Higher Education through Technology-enhanced Learning. York (UK): The Higher Education Academy; 220-234.

HEFCE (2006). Designing Spaces for Effective Learning. Bristol (Reino Unido): Higher Education Funding Council for England. (www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/elearninginnovation/learningspaces.aspx) (01-08-2010).

Heo, M. (2009). Design considerations for today’s online learners: A study of personalized, relationship-based social awareness information. International Journal of E-Learning, 8, 3; 293-311.

Hermans, H. & Verjans, S. (2008). Van WWW naar een persoonlijk kennisweb [De la WWW a una web personal del conocimiento]. Onderwijsinnovatie, 10, 2; 37-39.

Jameson, D.G. (2002). Impact of Educational Technology on Higher Education. Internal Report. London: Multimedia Support and Communications Centre, University College London.

Martin, P. (2008). Learning and Learning Spaces for the 21st Century. Educational Developments, 9.4. London: SEDA (Staff and Educational Development Association). (www.seda.ac.uk/?p=5_4_1&pID=9.4) (01-08-2010).

New Media Consortium (2008). The Horizon Report: 2008 edition. Report by The New Media Consortium and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative. Boulder (USA): EDUCAUSE. (http://net.educause.edu/ir/-library/pdf/CSD5320.pdf) (01-08-2010).

Schreurs, B. (Ed.). (2009). Reviewing the Virtual Campus Phenomenon. The Rise of Large-scale E-learning Initiatives Worldwide. Re.ViCa Project, Reviewing (traces) of European Virtual Campuses. EuroPACE. Heverlee (Bélgica). (http://revica.europace.org/Re.ViCa%20Online%20Handbook.pdf) (01-08-2010).

Sharpe, R. (2009). The Impact Of Learner Experience Research On Transforming Educational Practices. In: Mayes, T.; Morrison, D.; Mellar, H.; Bullan, P. & Oliver, M. (Eds.). Transforming Higher Education Through Technology-Enhanced Learning. York (UK): The Higher Education Academy; 178-190.

Simons, P.R. (2002). Digitale Didactiek: Hoe (Kunnen) Academici Leren ICT Te Gebruiken in Hun Onderwijs [Didáctica digital: cómo pueden aprender los académicos a usar las TIC en su labor]. Universidad de Utrecht (home.tiscali.nl/robertjansimons/.../Digitale%20didactiek%20thema.doc) (01-08-2010).

Steadman, S. (2010). iBorrow laptop borrowing scheme. Easier than borrowing a book: External evaluation-final report. Report submitted to JISC at the completion of the iBorrow Project. Canterbury (Reino Unido): Universidad de Christ Church. (www.canterbury.ac.uk/projects/iborrow/documents/iBorrow-External-Eva-luation-Report.pdf) (01-08-2010).

Tan, D.T.; Lee, C.S.; Chan, L. K. & Lu, A.D. (2009). University 2.0: A View from Singapore. International Journal on E-Learning, 8, 4; 511-526.

Twigg, C.A. (2004). Improving Learning and Reducing Costs: Lessons Learned from Round II of the Pew Grant Program in Course Redesign. Troy (USA): Center for Academic Transformation, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. (www.thencat.org/PCR/RdIILessons.pdf) (01-08-2010).

Westerman, S. & Barry, W. (2009). Mind the Gap: Staff Empowerment through Digital Literacy. In: Mayes, T.; Morrison, D.; Mellar, H.; Bullan, P. & Oliver, M. (Ed.). Transforming Higher Education through Technology-Enhanced Learning. York (Reino Unido): The Higher Education Academy; 122-133.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/09/11
Accepted on 30/09/11
Submitted on 30/09/11

Volume 19, Issue 2, 2011
DOI: 10.3916/C37-2011-02-01
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 16
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?