Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This article focuses on a review of both literature and practical experiences concerning MOOCs. The literature analyzed was published in peer-reviewed journals between 2007 and 2013. 268 items were selected for this study, of which 100 were analyzed in detail. The issues raised by this analysis were used as the criteria for the analysis of 10 current empirical MOOC experiences. The literature study highlighted the rapid growth in interest in understanding MOOCs and seeking to understand the pedagogic frameworks most relevant to their adoption and the importance of the concept of openness embodied within them. More recently a new emphasis has been emerging where institutional factors, particularly those concerned with financial viability, certification and retention have been highlighted. The analysis of current practice showed that many of the concerns in the academic literature were absent from not only the practices embodied in current MOOC-based learning experiences but seem to have been ignored in the conceptual phase of implementing a MOOC-based teaching model. In practice therefore, most of the current MOOC offer is only a pale reflection of the conceptualization that gave them rise and has been shown to be significant in the literature. In particular the true essence encapsulated in the concept described as Openness has been largely lost in practice.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

One of the emerging international trends in the context of Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) is the adoption of the principles of the «Open Educational Movement» (Montoya & Aguilar, 2012). This movement is built on principles that assume that knowledge is a common good (Ehlers, 2011), that belongs to humanity as a whole. In principle, therefore education is considered an engine of social development that should tend to encourage the construction and universal dissemination of knowledge, using multiple channels, including of course, those which are supported by ICT (Dans, 2009; Wiley & Hilton, 2009).

The construction of knowledge and its socialization in this context implies extensive collaboration, reuse, remixing, redistributing, inclusion, adaptation, free access and other concepts and processes associated with the notion of «openness» in education (Downes, 2013; McAuley, Stewart, Siemens & Cormier, 2010; Pirani, 2013).

Openness in education, or open education, whilst an evolving phenomenon, is not new, but has its roots in the early twentieth century. A couple of milestones mark the beginning of the movement towards open education: the creation of the International Council for Open and Distance Education in Canada in 1938, and the beginning of the Open University in the UK in 1969. Based on these early initiatives and the emerging literature on the topic, it is evident that the issue of openness has been considered seriously in the field of education for over 70 years (Barth, 1972; Walberg & Thomas, 1972).

Subsequently, adaptation, sharing, remixing and collaboration have emerged within the conceptual framework of open education, drawing on the principles and global influences of the free software movement in the late ‘70s and ‘80s and the current Open Educational Movement (Baraniuk, 2007; Wiley, 2008; D’Antoni, 2009; Ramirez, 2013).

As a consequence during the last decade multiple and diverse initiatives concerned with openness in education worldwide have emerged, most of them based on promoting access to Open Educational Resources (OER) leading to the creation, use and cataloguing of digital educational materials such as reusable learning objects, which are a type of OER (Campbell, 2004). Large numbers of teachers worldwide have been trained in these principles and a number of repositories of these materials have been created, accompanied by an equal number of outreach and familiarization strategies within the academic community (Lehman, 2007).

This activity has been built on the expectation that this strategy will bring significant benefits through resource sharing and shared expertise within the academic community and even promote innovation within education. However, a look at the daily life of educational institutions in general (and of course with a few significant exceptions) indicates that the resultant changes in educational practices is minimal (Parrish, 2004). This has resulted in considerable reflection on the situation and it has been recognized that producing and using OERs is not sufficient to generate educational innovation, nor is enough to implement or manage repositories and give them visibility.

A possible alternative solution is move from OER production to Open Educational Practices (Ehlers, 2011). The idea, whilst in principle simple, is apparently very difficult to implement in practice: rather than focusing on the «openness» of the content the emphasis is on making the practices more open. From this perspective, we could identify one particular and very interesting open educational practice: Open Teaching, which finds a contemporary implementation in the form of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses).

Recent research shows that MOOCs are becoming a widely-discussed new phenomenon in education (Martin, 2012). Discussions highlight aspects such as the models of staff/student and student/student interactions and quality assurance related to the current online education practices based in tracking, supporting and personalized feedback may not apply to an open and massive method of learning and teaching (Marcelo, 2008; Jung, 2011). Interestingly, however, whilst many educational institutions debated the effect that MOOCs might have on their practices, the considerations seem generally to have little to do with the pedagogy. At the same time, however, the growth of academic research on the MOOCs in recent years is a clear indication of the interest in the phenomenon and perhaps a sense that there is a need to map what is known about existing distance education practices, looking for incomplete knowledge in this area and to deepen the theoretical and practical implications of adopting the new practices.

2. Method

In order to review the academic progress in exploring MOOCs, an Integrative Review (Whittemore & Knafl, 2005) method was adopted, including two separate but closely-related processes of literature review and data analysis. The review process was carried out using the approach of Conn et al. (2003). This approach prescribes the creation of the documentary corpus review based on an appropriate selection of databases, establishing criteria for the selection and rejection of texts leading to a process of document reduction and a final reading and re-reading process.

To ensure reliability in the review process, some actions were carried out according to Dennis et al. (1995) where the first action was to explicitly define the purpose of the review. In this case, therefore, the primary purpose of this study was to deepen understanding of MOOCs and distinguish what makes them so interesting and different for the current educational landscape, at least as far as is evident from the academic research that has taken place to date. More deeply then, the review sought to glean various theoretical and practical approaches being applied to MOOC and track the evolution of the conceptual understanding as it has occurred over time.

A consistent strategy intended to constrain the review to the stated objective was developed to include and exclude texts in the review process. Within this strategy it was considered appropriate to include texts and search terms or descriptors in both English and Spanish. A documentary corpus universe was defined which included papers published in scientific journals indexed in the main academic databases: Scopus, ISI web of Knowledge, SciELO, EBSCOhost, ScienceDirect and DOAJ. Google Scholar was used to detect relevant texts derived from blog posts and other secondary sources, published by recognized scientists and academics (Liyanagunawardena, Adams & Williams, 2013). This approach yielded a document corpus of 268 texts, from which a random set of 100 items was selected that covered a period of 7 years (2007 to 2013), corresponding to the first appearance of MOOCs in 2008 up to the year of the completion of this review.

These documents were read and topics or concepts that were proposed as categories of analysis related to MOOCs were identified. The following search descriptors were used: «MOOC», «massive+open +course», «open+course», «massive+course» (in English and Spanish).

To minimize the level of bias in the evaluation of the items, the reading was conducted by two different observers, who separately identified key topics or concepts presented in each text which were compared using the Cohen´s Kappa coefficient (Cohen, 1968) from which observational consistency was established (Gordillo & Rodríguez, 2009). In this case the coincidence of this two records was 89% and non-coincidence was 11%. Comparison of such observations obtained a kappa coefficient of 0,67, which represents a reliable process.

The analysis of the texts was performed following the guidelines of Thematic Analysis Method (Fereday & Muir-Cochrane, 2006; Tuckett, 2005) which consist of the following: familiarization with data, initial codification, patterns search (themes), reviewing patterns, and writing an interpretation as a final report.

Familiarization with the data was performed by reviewing entries in a field diary in which the MOOC and the titles and abstracts of the selected texts were discussed. Initial coding consisted of attributing labels to emerging patterns in the data to construct the initial categories of analysis and identify others from complementary data. The search and review of patterns was conducted as a process of selection, combination and elimination based on a preliminary analysis of the data. The process ended with the description of the final categories and the writing of the results.

In addition to the review of the academic literature, an additional follow-up study took place to gain a broader picture of this phenomenon where 10 MOOCs offered on different platforms were studied to determine if what is stated in the literature really is expressed in the current offer of MOOCs.

3. Analysis and results

The initial results emerged from the literature review. This was used in the subsequent analysis and yielded insights corresponding to the use of MOOCs in practice.

3.1. Overview of literature

The key characteristic that emerged from the review of the literature was that the analysis of the uptake of MOOCs exposes two broad perspectives, one that characterizes the conceptual evolution of MOOCs and another that describes their pedagogical implications.

3.1.1. A chronological point of view

A first aspect emerging from the analysis was the significant increase in papers published in 2013 (82%), compared to the previous 5 years (18%). This phenomenon was considered to be so marked that further analysis of the a limited search of Scopus involving title, abstract and keywords was conducted in March 2014 which showed that in the first three months of the year 25 papers were registered compared with 103 in the whole of 2013, 9 in 2012, and an average of 3 papers from 2011-2008.

The analysis of the content in the literature shows that conceptions about MOOCs are rapidly changing through time. 75% of the papers written in the early years of the existence of MOOCs describe them as learning experiences emphasizing their open components. Openness was the main and most important feature of a MOOC and massiveness was a second level of importance. Downes (2009), Siemens (2009) and Peter & Farrell (2013), show at least five attributes of openness as essential components of MOOCs: free access, adaptation, remixing, sharing and collaboration with these aspects being reiterated in later work by Wiley (2012) and Siemens (2013) and Downes (2013). As an example, Siemens (2009) refers to this as a «course ecology», an alternative perspective to a single and non-modifiable course content or way to interact. No predetermination from a teacher beyond initial guidelines encourages students to create their own networks, their own content, their own learning. A number of other authors highlighted these aspects in their work (Kop, Fournier & Mak, 2011; Anderson & Dron, 2012; Anderson & McGreal, 2012). On the other hand, there was a strong emphasis in the early papers (2008 to 2010) in addressing openness from a technological point of view (Downes, 2009; Fini, 2009; Groom & Lamb, 2009). This was to seek to ensure that openness was genuinely achievable by addressing topics such as service and system interaction, practices and tools for content creation and remixing, through to content aggregation. For example: «Many people are using blogs, wikis, social networks, messaging systems, etc. The underlying idea is that people are comfortable with tools they consider to be their own, and they may wish to continue to use them when engaged in learning activities» (Fini, 2009: 2). «The central course aggregator listed 170 separate weblogs or similar RSS feeds contributed by students, each of whom used their own blog or website to participate in discussion. […]Additionally, thousands of comments were contributed to the central Moodle forum, three separate areas in Second Life were contributed, Google Groups were created, a Ning was created, and more. In fact, student contributions to the course continue to this day even though the course was completed in December, 2008» (Downes, 2009).

It is quite interesting to note that in recent years (2011 onwards), there is a shift from studying MOOCs usage behavior to other practical considerations such as their financial viability, sustainability and issues about student retention. Examples of this approach are in Mackness, Mak & Williams, 2010; Koller, Ng, Do & Chen, 2013; Miguel, Caballe & Prieto, 2013. These follow initial work by Schmidt, Geith, Håklev & Thierstein (2009) who explored the institutional relevance of this topic and opened the discussion in the field of open education. The subsequent discussion focuses primarily on the free nature of this type of learning experiences, an aspect that causes great concern for educational institutions that traditionally support its activities from the revenue generated by the value of the material in the programs they offer.

Another major discussion of practical aspects of MOOCs focuses on the alarming retention statistics, as only a minimal percentage of those who start a MOOC end it (Koller & al., 2013; Yang, Sinha, Adamson & Rose, 2013).

Certification was another topic whose incidence has been growing in recent years, with few examples in the publications from the period between 2008 and 2010 appearing consistently between 2011 to 2013 and early 2014 (Bragg, 2014; Miranda, Mangione, Orciuoli, Gaeta & Loia, 2013). It emerged that a large proportion of the MOOC student cohort are not interested in any kind of certificate or gaining academic credits; a topic explored in detail by Gibson (2014) and Pirani (2013). From the institution perspective, the focus on certification is on the risks associated with plagiarism and academic identity substitution (North, Richardson & North, 2014; Young, 2012).

3.1.2. A pedagogical point of view

72% of the papers studied make allusion to MOOCs as a disruptive concept from a pedagogical perspective. Due to the special massive and open nature of MOOCs there is a consistent call to propose a different theoretical scenario to that used to currently support online education or blended learning. As a result, connectivism and peer learning, openness and the relationship between MOOCs and content reuse have emerged as topics for additional attention from the theoretical perspective.

a) Connectivism is presented as related to the very origin of the MOOCs themselves, as the first instances were developed from originators who originally formulated the theoretical principles of connectivism (Nerantzi, 2012; Saadatmand & Kumpulainen, 2014) leading to various discussions about the embodiment of connectivism in the principles underpinning MOOCs (Aguaded, 2013; Clarà & Barberà, 2013; George Siemens, 2013).

However, although the initial foundation of MOOCs is closely related to their connectivist principles, their massiveness necessitated the adoption of peer learning principles because of the implicit difficulties of generating customized facilitation and feedback from teachers within a massive group of students. From this perspective, students play a dual role of learner and teacher within he small workgroup style interactions that may explicitly be structured within the cohort or may arise spontaneously. This perspective suggests that the role of educator is not the exclusive property of the teacher and can therefore move to other people, even to the students themselves, which is clearly a manifestation of its educational foundation located in peer-learning and connectivism (Conole, 2013; Siemens, 2006).

b) Literature shows that the attributes of openness that were explicit and fundamental to the original conceptualization virtually disappear in the recent literature except where it is explicitly mentioned that they are not being taken into account (Gil-Jaurena, 2013; Knox, 2013; Rodriguez, 2013). However, open attributes are still presented as factors with strong potential to cause change in teaching practices. Specifically, the aspect of openness that is not being exploited as originally conceived is the «adaptation», the openness to repurpose and reuse content. According to the above, one of the most important elements behind the idea of «Openness» is «Adaptation» (Hilton III, Wiley, Stein & Johnson, 2010). This aspect, taking into account elements such as remixing, collaboration and open access will inevitably impact on pedagogical practices such as teaching, assessment or feedback.

c) Another topic that consistently appeared in the literature about MOOCs is Open Educational Resources (OER). It seems from the way these resources are related with MOOCs that they are identified as a factor that ensures openness in these learning experiences. The use of OER is associated with adaptation as the main attribute of openness. Since the content can be modified by the student (adaptation of OER), the relationship between them and the content begins to change. Examples of this approach are in (Daradoumis, Bassi, Xhafa & Caballé, 2013; Pantò & Comas-Quinn, 2013)

3.2. Overview of experiences

This second phase of the review focused on testing whether both the pedagogical aspects such as handling attributes found in the literature review are found or effectively expressed in selected MOOCs.

3.2.1. The MOOCs designs are platform oriented

One finding from the study has to do with the similarities found in the design of these learning experiences in relation to the platforms through which they are published. This means that most MOOCs offered on the same platform end up looking similar with similar content on cross-wise paths and learning behaviors. This may be because most of the platforms have generated templates or course models that course providers follow when constructing courses. Designs, however, are repeatedly and consistently failing to consider many of the basic principles of connectivism or peer learning. Most of the proposed activities are designed to be resolved individually and little peer interaction is required to learn. Moreover, neither the content or the structure of activities involve the construction or establishment of connections as a main basis for learning.

In most cases, these structures are predetermined and sequential and the student is limited to following obediently the proposed sequence. Only two of the analyzed MOOCs structure the interaction in activities requiring small working groups as the main channel of learning and gaining feedback.

In fact, it can observed in practice that somehow «mass» has become so important in the MOOC idea that this phenomenon has begun to create course factories (courses very similar to each other). A clear example of this is Coursera (http://coursera.org) a «provider» of MOOCs that three years ago had two courses in their portfolio and now offers more than 530 which largely obey the logic proposed by Horton (2006) called WAVWAVWAVAAQ: Watch a Video Watch a Video Watch a Video AND Attempt a Quiz.

3.2.2. Almost total absence of open attributes

The analysis also showed that all MOOCs in the study offer free access and 80% of them have this feature as the main marketing attribute. At the same time though, they are almost entirely devoid of other essential attributes of openness, such as adaptation, remixing, redistributing and collaboration. This suggests «free» can be assumed to imply «open», ignoring fundamental principles of Free Software Movement, according to which there is a clear difference between «free of charge» and «free access». In the first «free» is more oriented to free as a gift, which can be used at no cost in its embodied form. The second (which is derived from the open as to open source) has to do with the possibilities of doing more, within prescribed limits, with an open item.

So, whilst access is free, being able to access their content at no cost does not imply the possibility of being able to reuse content in other contexts, modify or combine them with other digital products to create new educational resources.

On further analysis of this point, it emerged that 60% of the MOOCs studied refer to the use of OER as the basis and philosophy of access to the course content. The OER principle is reinforced by explicitly citing that access to the resources is through creative commons licensing. Whilst this is implicit in the labeling of content as OER there is no evidence or suggestion as to how it can be reused. This confirms that both the content and courses suffer from the same defect: the assimilation of the concept of free to only mean free access. Thus what purports to be open content is not in fact open in the OER sense.

4. Discussion and conclusions

A growing level of discussion seems to be taking place within academic and social networks about «the MOOC phenomenon». As a result, numerous initiatives in this area have been spawned at an almost industrial level where previously the model had been institutional.

4.1. A difficult step to take

A rich, original idea that started strongly, with high expectations based on the innovative potential of openness, has, over the years, gradually becoming a mechanical formula with little genuine creativity but more focused on reaching global audiences rather than delivery through traditional academic institutions. It is worrying to see the great difficulty the academy has in transforming the pedagogical discourse around MOOCs to an educational offering and practices that clearly express and demonstrate best practice. In particular there seems to be great difficulty in moving from open content towards open educational practices, as accurately described by Ehlers (2011). In particular, the emphasis is still largely on the importance of organizing and constructing to the educational content into prescribed learning experiences. We have not yet realized that by explicitly applying the attributes of the openness to educational practices it is possible to create more interesting spaces that foster true innovation that change the way in which learners and teachers can interact and relate. This may be due in part to the fact that «openness» is still a poorly understood concept. In fact, «openness» is an emerging issue with scant knowledge about it within the educational community and with a small amount of practical experience evident in this area.

Also, part of its emerging nature presents itself because its theoretical evolution as an object of study places many of its principles in a position of permanent searching for validation and discussion and practical experience that feed back into theoretical constructs. In short: it’s a little known issue that raises many questions and interesting things to discover.

A second element that contributes to this discussion is that «openness» in education today is a topic related to the use of ICT. In the past, content reuse and repurposing was much less feasible and possible than it is today with electronic versions of content. The emergence of MOOCs is raising awareness of this issue in a way that has previously not been happening.

4.2. The pale reflection of the MOOC

At the very beginning, the MOOC concept and the first practical experiences were developed on a restricted set of open pillars. These pillars served as the core of this concept and were characterized by reuse, remixing, collaboration and sharing in a freely-accessible environment.

In that sense, what can be observed today about the prevalent MOOCs offered through the main specialized portals are a pale reflection of what a MOOC should be. In fact it would not be an exaggeration to suggest that most of the current MOOCs are not MOOCs anymore as few of the open principles survive. This reality confirms David Wiley´s concern about the meaning disfiguration of this acronym (Wiley, 2012).

Consideration of the full meaning of the MOOC acronym is really important when designing a course consistent with its principles in order to address the concerns raised in this paper. Of the four letters that make it up, it is perhaps the first of the «Os» (open) that is the most important to understanding its meaning and implications.

The «C» (course) generates an interesting differentiation from other learning delivery models. Being a course separates them from free access self-learning video tutorials available through the Internet. A course not only has a clear pedagogical purpose but also has provided a curricular structure to achieve its educational purpose, and has constituent components (people, resources, content, assessment, feedback, interaction spaces, etc.). All this is present in a MOOC, but is manifested and related in a very different way to that of a «typical» e-learning experience.

The second «O» (online) assumes that all the learning experience is realized through the Internet.

The «M» (Massive) seems to be the most popular feature of this concept but perhaps the most circumstantial. Being one of components that identify them, it may or may not be present. This means that a massive course may have been thought, designed and implemented to address a very large group of students, but the actual existence of such students may be due to factors beyond their design, such as those related to marketing or visibility. In other words, a MOOC is massive not because it has many students, but it was designed in case it might have many students.

In conclusion, therefore, this study has revealed that there is a growing divergence from the concept of a MOOC as defined by the acronym and the principles explored in the academic literature, and the emerging MOOC offerings. This divergence is characterized by practices that are not founded on the pedagogies upon which MOOCs were designed, with the implied danger that the student experiences are likely to be less than optimal. Perhaps this insight goes some way to explain the alarmingly high drop-out rate reported consistently from MOOC providers and should form the basis for an urgent review of the practices associated with MOOCs before they become unjustly discredited.

References

Aguaded, I. (2013). The MOOC Revolution: A New Form of Education from the Technological Paradigm? Comunicar, 21(41), 07-08. (DOI: http://doi.org/tnh).

Anderson, T. & Dron, J. (2012). Learning Technology through Three Generations of Technology Enhanced Distance Education Pedagogy. European Journal of Open, Dis-tance and E-Learning, (2), 1-14.

Anderson, T. & McGreal, R. (2012). Disruptive Pedagogies and Technologies in Universities. Educational Technology & Society, 15(4), 380-389.

Baraniuk, R.G. (2007). Challenges and Opportunities for the Open Education Movement: A Connexions Case Study. In T. Liyoshi & M.S. Vijay-Kumar (Eds.), Opening up Education: The Collective Advancement of Education through Open Technology, Open Content, and Open Knowledge. (pp. 116-132). Cambridge: MIT Press.

Barth, R.S. (1972). Open Education and the American School. New York: Agathon Press, Inc.

Bragg, A.B. (2014). MOOC: Where to from Here? Training & Development, 41(1), 20-1.

Campbell, L. (2004). Engaging with the Learning Object Economy. In A. Littlehorn (Ed.), Reusing online resources: A Sustainable Approach to E-learning (pp. 35-45). London: Routledge. (http://goo.gl/303GCK) (16-04-2014).

Clarà, M. & Barberà, E. (2014). Three Problems with the Connectivist Conception of Learning. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 30: 197-206. (DOI: http://doi.org/tpg).

Cohen, J. (1968). Weighted Kappa: Nominal Scale Agreement Provision for Scaled Disagreement or Partial Credit. Psychological bulletin, 70(4), 213-220. (DOI: http://doi.org/dpbw5f).

Conn, V.S., Isaramalai, S., Rath, S., Jantarakupt, P., Wadhawan, R. & Dash, Y. (2003). Beyond MEDLINE for Literature Searches. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 35(2), 177-182. (DOI: http://doi.org/ccpwcg).

Conole, G. (2013). MOOC as Disruptive Technologies: Strategies for Enhancing the Learner Experience and Quality of MOOC. (http://goo.gl/B13K1c) (04-03-2014).

Dans, E. (2009). Online Education: Educational Platforms and the Openness Dilemm. RUSC. Universities and Knowledge Society Journal, 6(1), 22-30. (DOI: http://doi.org/tpj).

Daradoumis, T., Bassi, R., Xhafa, F. & Caballé, S. (2013). A Review on Massive E-learning (MOOC). Design, Delivery and Assessment. In Proceedings - 2013 8th International Conference on P2P, Parallel, Grid, Cloud and Internet Computing, 3PGCIC 2013 (pp. 208-213). (DOI: http://doi.org/tpk).

Dennis, R., Ruiz, J.G., Ruiz, A., Rodríguez, N. & Lozano, J.M. (1995). Estándares metodológicos para revisiones de la literatura biomédica. Acta Med Colomb, 20(6), 262-263. (http://goo.gl/Yv2uVh) (12-05-2014).

Downes, S. (2009). Half an Hour: New Technology Supporting Informal Learning. Half an Hour. (http://goo.gl/YboZHe) (09-03-2014).

D’Antoni, S. (2009). Open Educational Resources: Reviewing Initiatives and Issues. Open Learning: The Journal of Open, Distance and e-Learning, 24(1), 3-10. (DOI: http://doi.org/fwfdc2).

Ehlers, U.D. (2011). Extending the Territory: From Open Educational Resources to Open Educational Practices. Journal of Open, Flexible and Distance Learning, 15(2), 1-10.

Fereday, J. & Muir-Cochrane, E. (2006). Demonstrating Rigor Using Thematic Analysis: A Hybrid Approach of Inductive and Deductive Coding and Theme Development. International Journal Of Qualitative Methods, 5(1), 1-11. (http://goo.gl/P5sNe5) (08-03-2014).

Fini, A. (2009). The Technological Dimension of a Massive Open Online Course: The Case of the CCK08 Course Tools. The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 10(5). (http://goo.gl/3XdMmL) (08-03-2014).

Gibson, R. (2014). Four Strategies for Remote Workforce Training, Development, and Certification. In S. Hai-Jew (Ed.), Remote Workforce Training: Effective Technologies and Strategies (pp. 1-16). Hershey, PA: Business Science Reference. (DOI: http://doi.org/tpp).

Gil-Jaurena, I. (2013). Openness in Higher Education. Open Praxis, 5(1), 3-5. (DOI: http://doi.org/tpq).

Gordillo, J.J. & Rodríguez, V.H. (2009). Cálculo de la fiabilidad y concordancia entre codificadores de un sistema de categorías para el estudio del foro online en e-learning. Revista de Investigación, 27(1), 89-103.

Groom, J. & Lamb, B. (2009). The Un-education of the Technologist. RUSC. Uni-versities and Knowledge Society Journal, 6(1). (DOI: http://doi.org/tpr).

Hilton III, J., Wiley, D., Stein, J. & Johnson, A. (2010). The Four «R»s of Openness and ALMS Analysis: Frameworks for Open Educational Resources. Open Learning, 25(1), 37-44. (DOI: http://doi.org/fr6msj).

Jung, I. (2011). The dimensions of e-learning quality: from the learner’s perspective. Educational Technology Research and Development, 59(4), 445-464. (DOI: http://doi.org/bbp6fg).

Knox, J. (2013). The Limitations of Access Alone: Moving towards Open Processes in Education Technology. Open Praxis, 5(1), 21-29. (DOI: http://doi.org/fr6msj).

Koller, D., Ng, A., Do, C. & Chen, Z. (2013). Retention and Intention in Massive Open Online Courses: In Depth. Educause Review. (http://goo.gl/DEJzxZ) (05-04-2014).

Kop, R., Fournier, H. & Mak, J.S. (2011). A Pedagogy of Abundance or a Pedagogy to Support Human Beings? Participant Support on Massive Open Online Courses. The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 12(7), 74-93. (http://goo.gl/TFOzfB) (10-05-2014).

Lehman, R. (2007). Learning Object Repositories. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, 113, 57-66. (DOI: http://doi.org/dfx2fb).

Liyanagunawardena, T.R., Adams, A.A. & Williams, S.A. (2013). MOOC: A Systematic Study of the Published Literature 2008-2012. The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 14(3), 202-227. (http://goo.gl/CwyhSW) (12-05-2014).

Mackness, J., Mak, S. & Williams, R. (2010). The Ideals and Reality of Participating in a MOOC. En L. Dirckinck-Holmfeld, V. Hodgson, C. Jones, M. De-Laat, D. McConnell & T. Ryberg (Eds.), Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Networked Learning 2010?: (pp. 266-275). Lancaster: University of Lancaster. (http://goo.gl/4plqWf) (09-05-2014).

Marcelo, C. (2008). Evaluación de la calidad para programas completos de formación docente a través de estrategias de aprendizaje abierto y a distancia. RED, VII, 1-6.

Martin, F.G. (2012). Will Massive Open Online Courses Change How we Teach? Communications of the ACM, 55(8), 26-28. (DOI: http://doi.org/h4v).

McAuley, A., Stewart, B., Siemens, G. & Cormier, D. (2010). The MOOC Model for Digital Practice. University of Prince Edward Island. (http://goo.gl/NtFZCt) (08-04-2014).

Miguel, J., Caballe, S. & Prieto, J. (2013). Providing Information Security to MOOC: Towards Effective Student Authentication (pp. 289-292). IEEE. (DOI: http://doi.org/tps).

Miranda, S., Mangione, G.R., Orciuoli, F., Gaeta, M. & Loia, V. (2013). Automatic Generation of Assessment Objects and Remedial Works for MOOC (pp. 1-8). IEEE. (DOI: http://doi.org/tpt).

Montoya, M.S. & Aguilar, J.V. (2012). Movimiento Educativo Abierto. México: CIITE-ITESM. (http://goo.gl/4F6KWA) (11-03-2014).

Nerantzi, C. (2012). A Case of Problem Based Learning for Cross Institutional Collaboration. Electronic Journal of E-Learning, 10(3), 277-285.

North, S., Richardson, R. & North, M.M. (2014). To Adapt MOOC, or Not? That is No Longer the Question. Universal Journal of Educational Research, 2(1), 69-72. (http://goo.gl/kiMsVG) (10-03-2014).

Pantò, E. & Comas-Quinn, A. (2013). The Challenge of Open Education. Journal of E-Learning and Knowledge Society, 9(1), 11-22.

Parrish, P.E. (2004). The Trouble with Learning Objects. Educational Technology Re-search and Development, 52(1), 49-67. (DOI: http://doi.org/dcf4gz).

Peter, S. & Farrell, L. (2013). From Learning in Coffee Houses to Learning with Open Educational Resources. E-Learning and Digital Media, 10(2), 174-189. (DOI: http://doi.org/tqb).

Pirani, J. (2013). A Compendium of MOOC Perspectives, Research, and Resources. Educause Review. (http://goo.gl/tVImJd) (06-03-2014).

Ramírez, M. (2013). Retos y perspectivas en el movimiento educativo abierto de educación a distancia: estudio diagnóstico en un proyecto del SINED. RUSC, 10(2), 170-186 (http://doi.org/vgd).

Rodriguez, O. (2013). The Concept of Openness behind c and x-MOOC (Massive Open Online Courses). Open Praxis, 5(1), 67-73.

Saadatmand, M. & Kumpulainen, K. (2014). Participants' Perceptions of Learning and Networking in Connectivist MOOC. MERLOT (Journal of Online Learning and Teaching), 10(1), 16-30. (http://goo.gl/jyJrKb) (05-05-2014).

Schmidt, J.P., Geith, C., Håklev, S. & Thierstein, J. (2009). Peer-To-Peer Recognition of Learning in Open Education. The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 10(5). (http://goo.gl/jNroFM) (05-05-2014).

Siemens, G. (2006). Knowing Knowledge. US/Canada: Lulu Press, Inc.

Siemens, G. (2009). Socialization as Information Objects. (http://goo.gl/PRh4YU) (01-03-2014).

Siemens, G. (2013). Massive Open Online Courses: Innovation in Education? In R. McGreal, W. Kinuthia, S. Marshall & T. McNamara (Eds.), Open Educational Resources: Innovation, Research and Practice (pp. 5-16). Vancouver: Commonwealth of Learning and Athabasca University. (http://goo.gl/KHuoSf) (02-02-2014).

Tuckett, A.G. (2005). Applying Thematic Analysis Theory to Practice: A Researcher’s Experience. Contemporary Nurse, 19(1-2), 75-87. (DOI: http://doi.org/dhmwc8).

Walberg, H.J. & Thomas, S.C. (1972). Open Education: An Operational Definition and Validation in Great Britain and United States. American Educational Research Journal, 9(2), 197-208. (DOI: http://doi.org/czcqr6).

Whittemore, R. & Knafl, K. (2005). The Integrative Review: Updated Methodology. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 52(5), 546-553. (DOI: http://doi.org/dhbpb8).

Wiley, D. (2012). The MOOC Misnomer. Iterating toward Openness. (http://goo.gl/IlZwv1) (28-01-2014).

Yang, D., Sinha, T., Adamson, D. & Rose, C.P. (2013). Turn On, Tune in, Drop Out: Anticipating Student Dropouts in Massive Open Online Courses. (http://goo.gl/FyZjlX) (10-04-2014).

Young, J.R. (2012). Coursera Adds Honor-Code Prompt in Response to Reports of Plagiarism. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 24. (http://goo.gl/mxdZh3) (10-05-2014).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Este artículo se enfoca en una revisión tanto de literatura como de experiencias prácticas acerca de los MOOC. Los textos analizados fueron publicados en revistas entre los años 2007 y 2013. Se seleccionaron 268 artículos para este estudio, de los cuales 100 se analizaron en detalle. Los asuntos encontrados en la revisión se utilizaron posteriormente como criterios de análisis de 10 experiencias empíricas sobre MOOC. La literatura estudiada resalta el rápido crecimiento en el interés por comprender los MOOC, sus fundamentos pedagógicos así como la importancia del concepto de lo abierto que se encuentra en ellos. Un nuevo énfasis ha surgido recientemente en la literatura donde los factores institucionales, particularmente aquellos concernientes con la viabilidad financiera, la certificación y la deserción se encuentran resaltados. El análisis de la prácticas actuales muestra que muchos de los temas relevantes expresados en la literatura académica están ausentes no solo de las prácticas relacionadas con las experiencias de aprendizaje basadas en los MOOC sino que se han ignorado como sustento de la implementación de un modelo de enseñanza basada en ellos. Del análisis realizado se concluye que buena parte de la actual oferta de MOOC es tan solo un pálido reflejo de la conceptualización que les dio origen y que se muestra significativa en la literatura. En síntesis, la verdadera esencia del concepto de lo abierto se ha perdido en la práctica.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Una de las tendencias internacionales emergentes en el contexto del Aprendizaje Apoyado en Tecnología (AAP) es la adopción de los principios del «Movimiento Educativo Abierto» (Montoya & Aguilar, 2012). Este movimiento ha sido construido sobre la base de principios en los que se asume que el conocimiento es un bien común (Ehlers, 2011), que pertenece a la humanidad en su conjunto. En ese sentido, se considera a la educación como un motor de desarrollo social que debe tender a incentivar la construcción y diseminación universal del conocimiento, usando múltiples canales, incluyendo aquellos que están soportados por las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación (TIC) (Dans, 2009).

La construcción de conocimiento y su socialización en este contexto implica procesos amplios de colaboración, reutilización, remezcla, redistribución, inclusión, adaptación, libre acceso y otros conceptos y procesos asociados a la noción de «lo abierto» en educación (McAuley, Stewart, Siemens & Cormier, 2010; Pirani, 2013).

La educación abierta está siendo un fenómeno emergente, aunque no es nueva y tiene ya sus raíces en los inicios del siglo XX. Un par de hitos marcan los inicios de este movimiento que apunta hacia la educación abierta: la creación del Concejo Internacional para la Educación Abierta y a Distancia en Canadá en 1938, y el inicio de la Universidad Abierta en el Reino Unido en 1969. Basados en estas primeras iniciativas y en la literatura emergente que se ha escrito sobre este tema, es evidente que la apertura ha sido considerada en el campo de la educación por más de 70 años (Barth, 1972; Walberg & Thomas, 1972).

La adaptación, el compartir, la remezcla y la colaboración se han introducido dentro del marco conceptual de la educación abierta, basándose en los principios e influencias globales del movimiento de software libre de finales de los 70 y 80, lo cual ha contribuido a la configuración del actual Movimiento Educativo Abierto (Baraniuk, 2007; Wiley, 2008; D’Antoni, 2009; Ramirez, 2013).

Como consecuencia, durante la década pasada, múltiples y diversas iniciativas relacionadas con la apertura en educación han surgido en todo el mundo, la mayoría de ellas basadas en promover el acceso a Recursos Educativos Abiertos (REA), sobre todo enfocados a la creación, uso y catalogación de materiales educativos digitales como los objetos de aprendizaje reutilizables, los cuales son un tipo de REA (Campbell, 2004). Una gran cantidad de profesores han sido formados en todo el mundo en estos temas y una gran cantidad de repositorios de estos materiales han sido creados acompañados de igual número de estrategias de divulgación y familiarización entre la comunidad académica (Lehman, 2007).

Todas estas actividades han sido construidas bajo la expectativa según la cual esta estrategia traerá beneficios significativos mediante el compartir recursos y experticia entre la comunidad académica, lo cual permitirá generar innovación educativa. Sin embargo, una mirada cotidiana a las instituciones educativas en general (con algunas excepciones significativas) indica que los cambios en las prácticas educativas han sido mínimos (Parrish, 2004). Esto ha generado muchas reflexiones al respecto y se ha considerado que producir y usar REA no es suficiente para generar innovación educativa, al igual que tampoco es suficiente generar y gestionar repositorios y darles visibilidad.

Una posible solución al respecto es transitar de los REA hacia las prácticas educativas abiertas (Ehlers, 2011). La idea, que parece simple, es aparentemente muy difícil de implementar en la práctica: en vez de enfocarse en «lo abierto» del contenido, el énfasis habría que hacerlo en hacer más abiertas las prácticas educativas. Desde esta perspectiva es posible identificar una muy interesante práctica educativa abierta: la enseñanza abierta, la cual ha encontrado una manera contemporánea de implementación en forma de lo que se conoce como MOOC (Massive Open Online Courses).

Investigaciones recientes muestran que los MOOC se han convertido en un nuevo y ampliamente discutido fenómeno en la educación (Martin, 2012). Las discusiones al respecto señalan con relevancia aspectos como los modelos de interacción profesor/estudiante y estudiante/estudiante y el aseguramiento de la calidad relacionada con las actuales prácticas educativas en línea, las cuales se basan en el acompañamiento, soporte y realimentación personalizadas, que, por cierto, no aplican a un modelo masivo de enseñanza y aprendizaje (Marcelo, 2008; Jung, 2011). Es interesante, sin embargo, observar que mientras que muchas instituciones educativas están debatiendo el efecto que los MOOC puedan tener sobre sus prácticas educativas, las consideraciones al respecto parecieran que generalmente no tienen mucho que ver con aspectos de tipo pedagógico. Al mismo tiempo, el crecimiento de la investigación académica sobre los MOOC en los años recientes es un claro indicador del interés que despierta este fenómeno y tal vez del sentido que tiene la necesidad de «mapear» lo que se sabe sobre las prácticas de educación a distancia, buscando conocimiento incompleto en esta área y así mismo profundizar en las implicaciones teóricas y prácticas relacionadas con la adopción de estas prácticas abiertas.

2. Método

Para efectos de la revisión del progreso académico con respecto a los MOOC se adoptó un método de Revisión Integrativa (Whittemore & Knafl, 2005), el cual incluyó dos procesos separados pero estrechamente relacionados de revisión de literatura y análisis de datos. Dicha revisión se llevó a cabo usando el método de Conn y colaboradores (2003). Esta aproximación indica la necesidad de creación de un corpus documental para la revisión basada en una apropiada selección de bases de datos, el establecimiento de criterios para la selección y rechazo de textos, lo cual deberá conducir a un proceso de reducción de los documentos y un proceso final de relectura.

Para asegurar la confiabilidad del proceso de revisión, algunas acciones se llevaron a cabo de acuerdo a lo que mencionan Dennis y colaboradores (1995), en donde la primera de dichas acciones tuvo que ver con definir explícitamente el propósito de la revisión. En este caso, el propósito primario de este estudio fue profundizar en la comprensión de los MOOC y distinguir aquello que los hace tan interesantes y diferentes para el escenario educativo actual, al menos dentro de lo que es evidente a partir de la actual producción de investigación en esta materia. En ese sentido, de manera más profunda, la revisión busca recoger varias aproximaciones teóricas y prácticas que están siendo aplicadas a los MOOC y seguir la evolución de sus conceptualizaciones a través del tiempo.

Para el efecto, se desarrolló una estrategia coherente con el fin de limitar la revisión al objetivo declarado en la misma y así incluir y excluir adecuadamente los textos durante el proceso. Dentro de esta estrategia se consideró pertinente incluir textos, descriptores o palabras clave de búsqueda tanto en inglés como en español. Además, se definió un corpus documental que incluyó artículos publicados en revistas científicas indexadas en la principales bases de datos académicas: Scopus, ISI Web of Knowledge, SciELO, EBSCOhost, ScienceDirect y DOAJ. Google Scholar se utilizó para identificar textos relevantes extraídos de publicaciones en blogs y otras fuentes secundarias relacionadas con reconocidos académicos y científicos expertos en la materia (Liyanagunawardena, Adams & Williams, 2013). Este enfoque produjo un corpus de documentos, compuesto por 268 textos, dentro de los cuales se seleccionaron aleatoriamente un conjunto de 100 de ellos de tal manera que cubrieran un período de siete años (2007 a 2013), correspondiente al período de aparición del primer MOOC en 2008 hasta la fecha de terminación de esta revisión.

Dichos documentos se leyeron y a partir de allí se identificaron las categorías de análisis relacionadas con los MOOC. Por otra parte, los descriptores de búsqueda que se utilizaron fueron: «MOOC», «curso+abierto+masivo», «curso+abierto», «curso+masivo» (tanto en inglés como en español).

Para minimizar el nivel de sesgo en la evaluación de los textos seleccionados, la lectura de los mismos se llevó a cabo por dos observadores distintos, quienes de manera separada identificaron los tópicos o conceptos clave en cada texto, los cuales fueron comparados utilizando el coeficiente Kappa de Cohen (Cohen, 1968) para efectos de establecer el nivel de consistencia de ambas lecturas (Gordillo & Rodríguez, 2009). En este caso los niveles de coincidencia fueron del 89% y por consiguiente los de no coincidencia fueron del 11%. La comparación de ambas lecturas obtuvo un coeficiente de 0,67, lo cual representa un alto nivel de confiabilidad para dicho proceso.

El análisis de estos textos fue conducido siguiendo los lineamientos del Método de Análisis Temático (Fereday & MuirCochrane, 2006; Tuckett, 2005) el cual consiste en los siguientes procesos: familiarización con los datos, codificación inicial, búsqueda de patrones (temas), revisión de patrones y escritura e interpretación en un informe final.

La familiarización con los datos se adelantó mediante la revisión de entradas de diario de campo en el cual tanto los MOOC como los títulos y los resúmenes de los textos seleccionados fueron discutidos. La codificación inicial consistió en atribuir etiquetas a los patrones emergentes en los datos para construir las categorías de análisis iniciales e identificar otras a partir de datos complementarios. La búsqueda y revisión de los patrones se condujo como un proceso de selección, combinación y eliminación basado en un análisis preliminar de los datos. Este proceso terminó con la descripción de las categorías finales de análisis y la escritura de los resultados.

Adicionalmente a la revisión de literatura académica, se llevó a cabo un estudio para ampliar el panorama de este fenómeno, en el cual se estudiaron diez MOOC publicados en diversas plataformas para determinar si lo que se encontró en la literatura realmente se expresaba en la oferta actual de MOOC.

3. Análisis y resultados

Los primeros resultados emergieron de la revisión de literatura, que fueron usados en un análisis posterior a partir del cual se produjeron distintas percepciones en cuanto al uso práctico de los MOOC.

3.1. Revisión general de la literatura

Los resultados de la revisión de literatura acerca de los MOOC se han dividido en dos perspectivas diferentes, una en la que caracteriza la evolución conceptual de los MOOC y la otra en la que se describen sus implicaciones pedagógicas.

3.1.1. Un punto de vista cronológico

Un primer aspecto encontrado a partir del análisis fue el significativo incremento en la publicación de artículos en 2013 (82%), en comparación con los cinco años anteriores (18%). Este fenómeno es de remarcar ya que en un análisis posterior de publicaciones en Scopus, buscando en los títulos, resumen y palabras clave a fecha de Marzo de 2014 se encontró que en los primeros tres meses del año ya se habían publicado 25 artículos en comparación con los 103 publicados durante todo el año 2013, y con un promedio de 3 artículos para el período 200811.

El análisis de contenido de la literatura mostró que las concepciones alrededor de los MOOC han cambiado rápidamente a través del tiempo. El 75% de los artículos escritos en los primeros años de existencia de los MOOC los describen como experiencias de aprendizaje en las cuales se hace énfasis en sus componentes abiertos. Lo abierto era la principal y más importante característica de los MOOC siendo la masividad la segunda característica en cuanto al nivel de importancia. Downes (2009), Siemens (2009), y Peter y Farrell (2013), muestran al menos cinco atributos de lo abierto como componentes esenciales de los MOOC: acceso libre, adaptación, remezcla, el compartir y la colaboración, siendo estos aspectos reiterados en trabajos posteriores de Wiley (2012) y Siemens (2013). Como un ejemplo, Siemens (2009) se refiere a ello como una «ecología de curso», una perspectiva alternativa a un único y no modificable contenido de un curso o de una manera de interactuar. Ninguna predeterminación por parte de un profesor más allá de unos lineamientos iniciales que invitan a los estudiantes a crear sus propias redes, su propio contenido, su propio aprendizaje. Al respecto, diversos autores resaltan estos aspectos en sus trabajos (Kop, Fournier & Mak, 2011; Anderson & Dron, 2012; Anderson & McGreal, 2012). Por otra parte, hubo un fuerte énfasis en los primeros artículos (2008 a 2010) en abordar esta apertura desde un punto de vista tecnológico (Downes, 2009; Fini, 2009; Groom & Lamb, 2009). Esto se produjo con el fin de asegurar que lo abierto era genuinamente alcanzable abordando tópicos como el servicio y la interacción del sistema, prácticas y herramientas para la creación y remezcla de contenido, a través de procesos de agregación. Por ejemplo: «Muchas personas están usando blogs, wikis, redes sociales, sistemas de mensajería, etc. La idea subyacente es que muchas personas se sienten cómodas con el uso de herramientas que consideran como propias, de tal manera que sea posible que continúen usándolas cuando se encuentren en medio de actividades de aprendizaje» (Fini, 2009: 2). «El agregador central del curso registró 170 weblogs separados o fuentes RSS similares propuestos por los estudiantes, quienes usaron su propio blog o sitio web para participar de las discusiones […]. Adicionalmente, miles de comentarios fueron colocados en el foro central de Moodle, igualmente tres áreas separadas dentro de Second Life, se crearon grupos de Google, un espacio en Ning fue generado, y más. De hecho, las contribuciones de los estudiantes al curso continuaron día tras día hasta que el curso se completó en Diciembre, 2008» (Downes, 2009).

Es bastante interesante anotar que en los años recientes (2011 en adelante), hay un cambio al estudiar los MOOC desde los comportamientos de uso hacia otras implicaciones prácticas como la viabilidad financiera, sostenibilidad y asuntos relacionados con la retención o deserción de estudiantes. Ejemplos de esta aproximación se encuentran en Mackness, Mak y Williams (2010), Koller, Ng, Do y Chen (2013), y Miguel, Caballe y Prieto (2013). Lo anterior se muestra también en los trabajos de Schmidt, Geith, Håklev y Thierstein (2009) quienes exploraron la relevancia institucional de estos tópicos y propusieron la discusión en el campo de la educación abierta. La discusión posterior se enfocó en la naturaleza abierta de este tipo de experiencias de aprendizaje, un aspecto que causa grandes preocupaciones en las instituciones educativas que tradicionalmente soportan sus actividades con los ingresos generados por el valor del material en los programas que ofrecen.

Otra discusión de gran importancia alrededor de los aspectos prácticos de los MOOC se enfoca en las alarmantes estadísticas de deserción, en donde solo un porcentaje mínimo de aquellos que inician un MOOC lo terminan (Koller & al., 2013; Yang, Sinha, Adamson & Rose, 2013).

La certificación es otro de los temas que ha venido creciendo en importancia en los años recientes con algunos ejemplos en las publicaciones dentro del período entre 2008 y 2010 apareciendo consistentemente entre 2011 a 2013 y en los primeros meses del 2014 (Bragg, 2014; Miranda, Mangione, Orciuoli, Gaeta & Loia, 2013). Un asunto especial para reconocer es que una buena parte de los estudiantes de los MOOC no están interesados en ningún tipo de certificación o en ganar créditos académicos, tópico explorado en detalle por Gibson (2014) y Pirani (2013). Desde la perspectiva de la institución educativa el foco en la certificación se relaciona con los riesgos asociados al plagio y a la sustitución de la identidad académica (North, Richardson & North, 2014; Young, 2012).

3.1.2. Un punto de vista pedagógico

El 72% de los artículos estudiados hacen alusión a los MOOC como un concepto disruptivo desde una perspectiva pedagógica. Debido a la naturaleza masiva y abierta de los MOOC hay un consistente llamado a proponer un escenario teórico diferente al que hasta la actualidad se ha venido teniendo en cuenta para soportar la educación en línea o el aprendizaje híbrido. Como resultado, el conectivismo y el aprendizaje por pares así como la apertura y la relación entre los MOOC y la reutilización de contenido han surgido como tópicos de especial atención dentro de esta perspectiva teórica.

a) En cuanto al conectivismo, este se ha presentado como relacionado con el origen mismo de los MOOC, de hecho, las primeras iniciativas al respecto fueron desarrolladas siguiendo los principios teóricos del conectivismo (Nerantzi, 2012; Saadatmand & Kumpulainen, 2014), dando lugar a varios debates acerca de su real influencia en los fundamentos de los MOOC (Aguaded, 2013; Clarà & Barberà, 2013; Siemens, 2013).

Sin embargo, aunque la fundamentación inicial de los MOOC esté íntimamente relacionada con los principios conectivistas, su masividad ha requerido la adopción de otros principios pedagógicos como los del aprendizaje por pares debido a las dificultades implícitas de generar seguimiento o realimentación de parte de un profesor para un grupo masivo de estudiantes. Desde esta perspectiva, los estudiantes juegan un doble rol de aprendices y enseñantes dentro de pequeños grupos de trabajo estructurados dentro de la totalidad de la cohorte u organizados de manera espontánea. Lo anterior sugiere que el rol del educador no es propiedad exclusiva del profesor y puede en consecuencia transitar a otras personas, inclusive a otros estudiantes, lo cual es una clara manifestación de su fundamentación educativa basada en el aprendizaje por pares y en el conectivismo (Conole, 2013; Siemens, 2006).

b) La literatura muestra que los atributos de la apertura que eran explícitos y fundamentales en la conceptualización original virtualmente desaparecen en la literatura reciente, excepto cuando se menciona explícitamente que no están siendo tenidos en cuenta (GilJaurena, 2013; Knox, 2013; Rodríguez, 2013). Sin embargo, los atributos de apertura se presentan todavía como factores con gran potencial para generar cambio en las prácticas de enseñanza. Específicamente, uno de los aspectos de lo abierto que no ha sido explotado como originalmente se había concebido es la «adaptación», entendida como la apertura para ajustar los propósitos y reutilizar el contenido. De acuerdo a lo anterior, uno de los más importantes elementos detrás de la ideas de «lo abierto» es la «adaptación» (Hilton III, Wiley, Stein & Johnson, 2010). Este aspecto, el cual tiene en consideración elementos como la remezcla, la colaboración y el acceso libre, impactará inevitablemente en algunas prácticas pedagógicas tales como la enseñanza, la evaluación y la realimentación.

c) Otro tema que apareció consistentemente en la literatura sobre los MOOC tiene que ver con los Recursos Educativos Abiertos (REA). Parece por la forma en que estos recursos se relacionan con los MOOC que se identifican como un factor que asegura la naturaleza abierta en estas experiencias de aprendizaje. El uso de los REA se asocia con la adaptación como un atributo principal de apertura. Debido a que el contenido puede ser modificado por el estudiante (adaptación del REA) la relación entre ellos y el contenido empieza a cambiar. Ejemplos de esta aproximación se encuentran en Daradoumis, Bassi, Xhafa y Caballé (2013) y Pantò y ComasQuinn (2013).

3.2. Revisión general de experiencias

La segunda fase de la revisión se enfocó en verificar si los aspectos pedagógicos y los atributos de lo abierto hallados en la literatura efectivamente se expresaban en los MOOC seleccionados.

3.2.1. Los diseños de los MOOC se orientan a las plataformas

Un hallazgo de este estudio tuvo que ver con la similitud del diseño de estas experiencias de aprendizaje con relación a las plataformas en donde se encuentran publicadas. Esto significa que la mayoría de los MOOC que se ofrecen en la misma plataforma terminan pareciéndose entre sí, con contenidos que se presentan de manera similar y con rutas o comportamientos de aprendizaje muy parecidos. Esto sucede debido a que la mayoría de las plataformas han generado plantillas sobre un curso modelo para que los proveedores de los cursos los construyan. Estos diseños, sin embargo, fallan consistente y repetidamente en contemplar los principios básicos del conectivismo o del aprendizaje por pares. La mayoría de las actividades de aprendizaje propuestas han sido diseñadas para ser resueltas de manera individual y muy poca interacción con los pares estudiantes es necesaria para generar aprendizaje. Es más, tanto el contenido como la estructura de las actividades no involucra la construcción o establecimiento de conexiones como parte de la base para aprender.

En la mayoría de los casos, estas estructuras son predeterminadas y secuenciales y el estudiante se limita a seguirlas obedientemente. Solo en dos de los MOOC estudiados, su estructura contemplaba procesos de interacción en actividades dentro de pequeños grupos de trabajo, como el canal principal para generar aprendizaje y recibir realimentación.

De hecho, se puede observar en la práctica que de alguna manera «lo masivo» se ha vuelto tan importante en los MOOC que este fenómeno ha empezado a generar «fábricas de cursos» (muy similares a cualquier otro). Un claro ejemplo es Coursera (http://coursera.org), un «proveedor» de MOOC que en tres años en su portafolio ha pasado a ofrecer más de 530, que obedecen a la lógica propuesta por Horton (2006), llamada «WAVWAVWAVAAQ: Watch a Video Watch a Video Watch a Video AND Attempt a Quiz».

3.2.2. Ausencia casi total de los atributos de apertura

El análisis también mostró que todos los MOOC estudiados ofrecen acceso libre y el 80% de ellos utiliza esta característica como su principal atributo de mercadeo. Al mismo tiempo, sin embargo, están casi del todo desprovistos de otros atributos esenciales de apertura, como la adaptación, la remezcla, la redistribución y la colaboración. Esto sugiere que «lo libre» se puede asumir para implicar «lo abierto», ignorando algunos principios fundamentales del Movimiento de Software Libre, de acuerdo a los cuales hay una gran diferencia entre «libre de cargo» y «libre acceso». En la primera, «libre» se orienta más hacia libre como regalo, el cual puede usarse sin costo en la forma en que se consigue. La segunda, (la cual deriva de lo abierto como fuente de código abierta) tiene más que ver con las posibilidades de hacer más, dentro de los límites preestablecidos para ello con algo que es abierto.

En la medida en que el acceso es libre y se pueda llegar al contenido sin costo alguno, esto no implica la posibilidad de ser capaz de reutilizar dicho contenido en otros contextos, modificarlos o combinarlos con otros productos digitales para crear nuevos recursos educativos.

En un análisis posterior a este punto, se encontró que el 60% de los MOOC estudiados se refieren al uso de REA como la base y filosofía para acceder a los contenidos del curso. Los principios asociados a los REA se refuerzan mediante la citación explícita a que el acceso a estos recursos se da a través de su licenciamiento por Creative Commons. Ahora bien, mientras que explícitamente se menciona el uso de contenidos a manera de REA no hay evidencia alguna acerca de cómo pueden reutilizarse. Esto confirma que tanto el contenido como los cursos que los usan sufren del mismo defecto: la asimilación del concepto «libre» solo significa libre de costo. Por lo tanto, lo que pretende ser contenido abierto no es, de hecho, abierto en el sentido de los REA.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Un creciente nivel de discusión está tomando lugar dentro de las redes académicas y sociales acerca de «el fenómeno MOOC». Como resultado, numerosas iniciativas en esta área se han generado a un nivel casi industrial donde previamente el modelo se ha impregnado institucionalmente.

4.1. Un paso difícil de dar

Una idea rica que comenzó con fuerza, con grandes expectativas basadas en el potencial innovador de lo abierto se ha convertido, a lo largo de los años, en una fórmula mecánica con muy poca creatividad genuina más enfocada en lograr audiencias globales que en ser parte de un proceso entregado por instituciones académicas tradicionales. Es preocupante ver la gran dificultad que tiene la academia en transformar el discurso pedagógico acerca de los MOOC en unas prácticas y una oferta educativa que claramente se muestren como buenas prácticas. En particular parece haber una gran dificultad en moverse del contenido abierto hacia las prácticas abiertas, tal como lo describe precisamente Ehlers (2011).

Al respecto, el énfasis sigue estando ampliamente en la importancia de construir y organizar contenido educativo dentro de experiencias de aprendizaje predeterminadas. En ese orden de ideas, no se ha podido encontrar aún de manera concreta que por medio de la aplicación de los atributos de lo abierto a las prácticas educativas sea posible crear espacios más interesantes que fomenten verdadera innovación que cambie la manera en la que aprendices y maestros interactúan y se relacionan. Esto se puede deber al hecho de que «lo abierto» es todavía un concepto pobremente entendido. De hecho, «lo abierto» es un tema emergente con escaso conocimiento acerca de ello dentro de la comunidad académica y con poca cantidad de experiencias prácticas evidentes en esta área. Además, parte de su naturaleza emergente se presenta de esa manera debido a que su evolución teórica como objeto de estudio coloca muchos de sus principios teóricos y experiencias prácticas en búsqueda permanente de espacios de validación, discusión y realimentación. En síntesis: es un tema poco conocido que plantea muchas preguntas y cosas interesantes por descubrir.

Un segundo elemento que contribuye a esta discusión es que «lo abierto» en educación es un tema relacionado con el uso de las TIC. En el pasado la reutilización y ajuste en el propósito del contenido educativo era menos factible y posible que ahora con las versiones electrónicas de dicho contenido. La emergencia de los MOOC plantea la necesidad de familiarizarse con este tema como nunca antes había pasado.

4.2. El pálido reflejo de los MOOC

En sus inicios, el concepto de MOOC y sus primeras experiencias prácticas fueron desarrolladas con base en un reducido conjunto de pilares de apertura. Estos pilares sirvieron de núcleo para este concepto que fue caracterizado por la reutilización, la remezcla, la colaboración y el compartir en un entorno de libre acceso.

En ese sentido, lo que se puede observar hoy en los MOOC que se ofrecen actualmente en los portales especializados no es sino un pálido reflejo de lo que un MOOC podría llegar a ser. De hecho, no sería una exageración llegar a sugerir que la mayoría de los MOOC actuales no son MOOC en absoluto ya que muy poco de los principios de lo abierto ha sobrevivido en ellos. Esta realidad confirma la preocupación de David Wiley acerca de la desfiguración del significado de este acrónimo (Wiley, 2012).

La consideración del significado completo del acrónimo MOOC es realmente importante para diseñar un curso consistente con sus principios y así abordar las preocupaciones planteadas en este artículo. De las cuatro letras que le componen, es tal vez la primera de las «Os» (open/abierto) la que mayor importancia tiene para comprender su significado e implicaciones.

La «C» (course/curso) genera una interesante diferenciación de otros modelos de aprendizaje distribuido. Ser un curso lo separa de los videotutoriales de autoaprendizaje y de acceso libre disponibles a través de Internet. Un curso no solo tiene una clara intencionalidad pedagógica sino que también provee una estructura curricular para lograr sus propósitos educativos, la cual tiene unos elementos constitutivos (personas, recursos, contenido, evaluación, realimentación, espacios de interacción, etc.). Todo esto está presente en un MOOC, pero manifestado en una forma muy diferente a la de las experiencias elearning «típicas».

La segunda «O» (online/en línea) indica que toda la experiencia de aprendizaje se realiza a través de Internet.

La «M» (Massive/masivo) pareciera la característica más popular de este concepto pero tal vez es la más circunstancial. Siendo uno de los componentes que le identifican, bien podría o no estar presente. Esto significa que un curso masivo puede estar pensado, diseñado e implementado para atender a un grupo muy numeroso de estudiantes, pero el que haya ese número de estudiantes se debe a factores más allá de su diseño, como aquellos relacionados al mercadeo del curso y su visibilidad. En otras palabras, un MOOC es masivo debido no a que tenga muchos estudiantes sino porque ha sido diseñado para tener muchos estudiantes.

En conclusión, este estudio ha revelado que hay una creciente divergencia entre el concepto de MOOC definido desde su acrónimo y los principios explorados en la literatura, y la oferta emergente de dichos MOOC. Esta divergencia se caracteriza por prácticas que no se fundan en las pedagogías sobre las cuales los MOOC fueron diseñados, con el peligro implícito de que las experiencias del estudiante sean menos que óptimas. Tal vez esta percepción de alguna manera explica la alarmante tasa de deserción reportada consistentemente por los proveedores de MOOC y sea la base de una urgente revisión de las prácticas asociadas a ellos antes de que empiecen a desacreditarse injustamente.

Referencias

Aguaded, I. (2013). The MOOC Revolution: A New Form of Education from the Technological Paradigm? Comunicar, 21(41), 07-08. (DOI: http://doi.org/tnh).

Anderson, T. & Dron, J. (2012). Learning Technology through Three Generations of Technology Enhanced Distance Education Pedagogy. European Journal of Open, Dis-tance and E-Learning, (2), 1-14.

Anderson, T. & McGreal, R. (2012). Disruptive Pedagogies and Technologies in Universities. Educational Technology & Society, 15(4), 380-389.

Baraniuk, R.G. (2007). Challenges and Opportunities for the Open Education Movement: A Connexions Case Study. In T. Liyoshi & M.S. Vijay-Kumar (Eds.), Opening up Education: The Collective Advancement of Education through Open Technology, Open Content, and Open Knowledge. (pp. 116-132). Cambridge: MIT Press.

Barth, R.S. (1972). Open Education and the American School. New York: Agathon Press, Inc.

Bragg, A.B. (2014). MOOC: Where to from Here? Training & Development, 41(1), 20-1.

Campbell, L. (2004). Engaging with the Learning Object Economy. In A. Littlehorn (Ed.), Reusing online resources: A Sustainable Approach to E-learning (pp. 35-45). London: Routledge. (http://goo.gl/303GCK) (16-04-2014).

Clarà, M. & Barberà, E. (2014). Three Problems with the Connectivist Conception of Learning. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 30: 197-206. (DOI: http://doi.org/tpg).

Cohen, J. (1968). Weighted Kappa: Nominal Scale Agreement Provision for Scaled Disagreement or Partial Credit. Psychological bulletin, 70(4), 213-220. (DOI: http://doi.org/dpbw5f).

Conn, V.S., Isaramalai, S., Rath, S., Jantarakupt, P., Wadhawan, R. & Dash, Y. (2003). Beyond MEDLINE for Literature Searches. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 35(2), 177-182. (DOI: http://doi.org/ccpwcg).

Conole, G. (2013). MOOC as Disruptive Technologies: Strategies for Enhancing the Learner Experience and Quality of MOOC. (http://goo.gl/B13K1c) (04-03-2014).

Dans, E. (2009). Online Education: Educational Platforms and the Openness Dilemm. RUSC. Universities and Knowledge Society Journal, 6(1), 22-30. (DOI: http://doi.org/tpj).

Daradoumis, T., Bassi, R., Xhafa, F. & Caballé, S. (2013). A Review on Massive E-learning (MOOC). Design, Delivery and Assessment. In Proceedings - 2013 8th International Conference on P2P, Parallel, Grid, Cloud and Internet Computing, 3PGCIC 2013 (pp. 208-213). (DOI: http://doi.org/tpk).

Dennis, R., Ruiz, J.G., Ruiz, A., Rodríguez, N. & Lozano, J.M. (1995). Estándares metodológicos para revisiones de la literatura biomédica. Acta Med Colomb, 20(6), 262-263. (http://goo.gl/Yv2uVh) (12-05-2014).

Downes, S. (2009). Half an Hour: New Technology Supporting Informal Learning. Half an Hour. (http://goo.gl/YboZHe) (09-03-2014).

D’Antoni, S. (2009). Open Educational Resources: Reviewing Initiatives and Issues. Open Learning: The Journal of Open, Distance and e-Learning, 24(1), 3-10. (DOI: http://doi.org/fwfdc2).

Ehlers, U.D. (2011). Extending the Territory: From Open Educational Resources to Open Educational Practices. Journal of Open, Flexible and Distance Learning, 15(2), 1-10.

Fereday, J. & Muir-Cochrane, E. (2006). Demonstrating Rigor Using Thematic Analysis: A Hybrid Approach of Inductive and Deductive Coding and Theme Development. International Journal Of Qualitative Methods, 5(1), 1-11. (http://goo.gl/P5sNe5) (08-03-2014).

Fini, A. (2009). The Technological Dimension of a Massive Open Online Course: The Case of the CCK08 Course Tools. The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 10(5). (http://goo.gl/3XdMmL) (08-03-2014).

Gibson, R. (2014). Four Strategies for Remote Workforce Training, Development, and Certification. In S. Hai-Jew (Ed.), Remote Workforce Training: Effective Technologies and Strategies (pp. 1-16). Hershey, PA: Business Science Reference. (DOI: http://doi.org/tpp).

Gil-Jaurena, I. (2013). Openness in Higher Education. Open Praxis, 5(1), 3-5. (DOI: http://doi.org/tpq).

Gordillo, J.J. & Rodríguez, V.H. (2009). Cálculo de la fiabilidad y concordancia entre codificadores de un sistema de categorías para el estudio del foro online en e-learning. Revista de Investigación, 27(1), 89-103.

Groom, J. & Lamb, B. (2009). The Un-education of the Technologist. RUSC. Uni-versities and Knowledge Society Journal, 6(1). (DOI: http://doi.org/tpr).

Hilton III, J., Wiley, D., Stein, J. & Johnson, A. (2010). The Four «R»s of Openness and ALMS Analysis: Frameworks for Open Educational Resources. Open Learning, 25(1), 37-44. (DOI: http://doi.org/fr6msj).

Jung, I. (2011). The dimensions of e-learning quality: from the learner’s perspective. Educational Technology Research and Development, 59(4), 445-464. (DOI: http://doi.org/bbp6fg).

Knox, J. (2013). The Limitations of Access Alone: Moving towards Open Processes in Education Technology. Open Praxis, 5(1), 21-29. (DOI: http://doi.org/fr6msj).

Koller, D., Ng, A., Do, C. & Chen, Z. (2013). Retention and Intention in Massive Open Online Courses: In Depth. Educause Review. (http://goo.gl/DEJzxZ) (05-04-2014).

Kop, R., Fournier, H. & Mak, J.S. (2011). A Pedagogy of Abundance or a Pedagogy to Support Human Beings? Participant Support on Massive Open Online Courses. The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 12(7), 74-93. (http://goo.gl/TFOzfB) (10-05-2014).

Lehman, R. (2007). Learning Object Repositories. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, 113, 57-66. (DOI: http://doi.org/dfx2fb).

Liyanagunawardena, T.R., Adams, A.A. & Williams, S.A. (2013). MOOC: A Systematic Study of the Published Literature 2008-2012. The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 14(3), 202-227. (http://goo.gl/CwyhSW) (12-05-2014).

Mackness, J., Mak, S. & Williams, R. (2010). The Ideals and Reality of Participating in a MOOC. En L. Dirckinck-Holmfeld, V. Hodgson, C. Jones, M. De-Laat, D. McConnell & T. Ryberg (Eds.), Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Networked Learning 2010?: (pp. 266-275). Lancaster: University of Lancaster. (http://goo.gl/4plqWf) (09-05-2014).

Marcelo, C. (2008). Evaluación de la calidad para programas completos de formación docente a través de estrategias de aprendizaje abierto y a distancia. RED, VII, 1-6.

Martin, F.G. (2012). Will Massive Open Online Courses Change How we Teach? Communications of the ACM, 55(8), 26-28. (DOI: http://doi.org/h4v).

McAuley, A., Stewart, B., Siemens, G. & Cormier, D. (2010). The MOOC Model for Digital Practice. University of Prince Edward Island. (http://goo.gl/NtFZCt) (08-04-2014).

Miguel, J., Caballe, S. & Prieto, J. (2013). Providing Information Security to MOOC: Towards Effective Student Authentication (pp. 289-292). IEEE. (DOI: http://doi.org/tps).

Miranda, S., Mangione, G.R., Orciuoli, F., Gaeta, M. & Loia, V. (2013). Automatic Generation of Assessment Objects and Remedial Works for MOOC (pp. 1-8). IEEE. (DOI: http://doi.org/tpt).

Montoya, M.S. & Aguilar, J.V. (2012). Movimiento Educativo Abierto. México: CIITE-ITESM. (http://goo.gl/4F6KWA) (11-03-2014).

Nerantzi, C. (2012). A Case of Problem Based Learning for Cross Institutional Collaboration. Electronic Journal of E-Learning, 10(3), 277-285.

North, S., Richardson, R. & North, M.M. (2014). To Adapt MOOC, or Not? That is No Longer the Question. Universal Journal of Educational Research, 2(1), 69-72. (http://goo.gl/kiMsVG) (10-03-2014).

Pantò, E. & Comas-Quinn, A. (2013). The Challenge of Open Education. Journal of E-Learning and Knowledge Society, 9(1), 11-22.

Parrish, P.E. (2004). The Trouble with Learning Objects. Educational Technology Re-search and Development, 52(1), 49-67. (DOI: http://doi.org/dcf4gz).

Peter, S. & Farrell, L. (2013). From Learning in Coffee Houses to Learning with Open Educational Resources. E-Learning and Digital Media, 10(2), 174-189. (DOI: http://doi.org/tqb).

Pirani, J. (2013). A Compendium of MOOC Perspectives, Research, and Resources. Educause Review. (http://goo.gl/tVImJd) (06-03-2014).

Ramírez, M. (2013). Retos y perspectivas en el movimiento educativo abierto de educación a distancia: estudio diagnóstico en un proyecto del SINED. RUSC, 10(2), 170-186 (http://doi.org/vgd).

Rodriguez, O. (2013). The Concept of Openness behind c and x-MOOC (Massive Open Online Courses). Open Praxis, 5(1), 67-73.

Saadatmand, M. & Kumpulainen, K. (2014). Participants' Perceptions of Learning and Networking in Connectivist MOOC. MERLOT (Journal of Online Learning and Teaching), 10(1), 16-30. (http://goo.gl/jyJrKb) (05-05-2014).

Schmidt, J.P., Geith, C., Håklev, S. & Thierstein, J. (2009). Peer-To-Peer Recognition of Learning in Open Education. The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 10(5). (http://goo.gl/jNroFM) (05-05-2014).

Siemens, G. (2006). Knowing Knowledge. US/Canada: Lulu Press, Inc.

Siemens, G. (2009). Socialization as Information Objects. (http://goo.gl/PRh4YU) (01-03-2014).

Siemens, G. (2013). Massive Open Online Courses: Innovation in Education? In R. McGreal, W. Kinuthia, S. Marshall & T. McNamara (Eds.), Open Educational Resources: Innovation, Research and Practice (pp. 5-16). Vancouver: Commonwealth of Learning and Athabasca University. (http://goo.gl/KHuoSf) (02-02-2014).

Tuckett, A.G. (2005). Applying Thematic Analysis Theory to Practice: A Researcher’s Experience. Contemporary Nurse, 19(1-2), 75-87. (DOI: http://doi.org/dhmwc8).

Walberg, H.J. & Thomas, S.C. (1972). Open Education: An Operational Definition and Validation in Great Britain and United States. American Educational Research Journal, 9(2), 197-208. (DOI: http://doi.org/czcqr6).

Whittemore, R. & Knafl, K. (2005). The Integrative Review: Updated Methodology. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 52(5), 546-553. (DOI: http://doi.org/dhbpb8).

Wiley, D. (2012). The MOOC Misnomer. Iterating toward Openness. (http://goo.gl/IlZwv1) (28-01-2014).

Yang, D., Sinha, T., Adamson, D. & Rose, C.P. (2013). Turn On, Tune in, Drop Out: Anticipating Student Dropouts in Massive Open Online Courses. (http://goo.gl/FyZjlX) (10-04-2014).

Young, J.R. (2012). Coursera Adds Honor-Code Prompt in Response to Reports of Plagiarism. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 24. (http://goo.gl/mxdZh3) (10-05-2014).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/14
Accepted on 31/12/14
Submitted on 31/12/14

Volume 23, Issue 1, 2015
DOI: 10.3916/C44-2015-01
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 41
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?