Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Teamwork is one of the most widespread teaching methods used to achieve learning skills. Despite the difficulty of finding out the degree of individual learning taking place in each member of the group, these methods are having an increasingly greater importance in university teaching. The present article shows the results of an R+D+i1 project aimed at «analysing the impact of eRubrics ?electronic rubrics? on the assessment of university learning in various forms». Likewise, it aims to show the scope of eRubrics in improving cooperative skills, which are achieved through teamwork and cooperative assessment of tasks in the computer lab. The experiment takes place in three groups selected from a total of six groups of students from the First Year of Primary Education Teaching during the 2011-12 academic year. From the three groups, one acted as the control group and the other two as the experimental groups in which eRubrics were used. Differences were found in students’ results in a written test taken by all the groups, as the group using eRubrics achieved better results than the other two. Additionally, a qualitative analysis was conducted, by classifying the answers of students in the control group with regard to the evaluation criteria that they used, in order to check for coincidences with the eRubric criteria used by students in the experimental groups.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Among the different teaching methods developed in recent years, cooperative models that use technologies (CSCL)1 (Voogt & Knezek, 2008) represent a deep renewal in education. In the field of university teaching design and planning, these methods (together with the use of technologies) have become increasingly important when it comes to centring teaching on student learning (Zabalza, 2010), while engaging students in their own learning process, especially when it comes to evaluation (Falchikov & Goldfinch, 2000; Brown & Glasner, 2003; Falchikov, 2005; Blanco, 2009, López-Pastor, 2009). As a result, different methods and ways of organising the teaching-learning process are planned based on the context of different universities (De-Miguel, 2006: 31). This is where the «teamwork» purpose brings all values ??and pedagogical principles together: «Students learn and assess collaboratively, by playing a more active and committed role in teaching and learning through technologies».

Human learning is fundamentally social; hence the construction of knowledge and collaborative learning should be a priority at all levels of education (Hargreaves, 2007). Nevertheless, considering that students and educational contexts do not always count on the necessary requirements to implement a collaborative model, a model of cooperative learning is most frequently used as a first step, resolving much of this starting situation, as it provides students with structure and guidance, while providing teachers with control.

When trying to extend collaborative learning to all stages of the teaching process, as in the case of evaluation, the need for guidance becomes more evident and crucial, and methods such as «teamwork» and «cooperative assessment» become important resources and techniques as a prelude to a model of collaborative assessment. This might be the reason why cooperative learning through teamwork is one of the most used methods in the promotion of skills development in all educational stages.

In any case, peer learning is especially beneficial when focused on the assessment process, where it is more often referred to as «collaborative assessment» by academic literature (Blanco, 2009: 115; Brown & Glasner, 2003: 31; López-Pastor, 2009: 94), and also known as «co-assessment», «shared assessment», «peer assessment», etc. A more accurate conceptual definition is needed, as the terms used do not always differ from each other –as it is the case for cooperative vs. collaborative learning–. Cooperative assessment is more structured and guided than collaborative assessment.

While these practices are becoming increasingly widespread, criticisms of certain aspects are raised, including the following:

• The difficulty of carrying out an individualized follow-up and assessment of the skills acquired by the different team members.

• A review of the impact these methods have on student learning, in relation to new contexts and given the use of technology.

• How to approach what students need in order to achieve a collaborative assessment, which requires greater reflection and self-criticism.

One of the principles supporting collaborative assessment consists of involving all team members in defining the criteria by which proof of learning in the team projects will be evaluated. This is a rather communicative and participatory approach to evaluation, starting with the exchange and understanding of goals, objectives and procedures, and ending with the evaluation of processes and outcomes. Quality criteria and indicators are applied on results and on the process. While learning tasks are well-defined and structured, there are often difficulties in communication between teachers and students, especially when online teaching is involved. The final evaluation is often the only aspect that is understood, provided there has been a shared analysis.

This communication issue caused by technology is likely to be solved if teachers and students keep a permanent dialogue on quality indicators, criteria and how criteria can apply to the proof of learning of teamwork. In this type of evaluation, rubrics are one of the techniques or tools that can facilitate communication (Osana & Seymour, 2004; Jonsson & Svingby, 2007; Reddy & Andrade, 2010; Rodríguez Gómez & Ibarra Sáiz, 2011; Panadero & Jonsson, 2013), and they are called «eRubrics» in their digital version. One of the advantages of eRubrics is that, they allow teachers and students to share quality indicators, criteria and proof of learning when evaluating learning objectives (Andrade, 2005). Federated eRubrics are even more interactive, as they are federated as well as digital. Federation provides the ideal support for cooperation and collaboration among users, thus overcoming the difficulties of interoperability among tools, services, contexts and technological systems, located both inside and outside the educational institution itself.

Federated eRubrics play a double role in teaching. On the one hand, as a technological system, they represent an ideal support for improving communication and understanding of the assessment process, while facilitating teamwork. They are an essential tool in assessing e-Portfolios, considering the monitoring process required by the teacher-student interaction through which students are enabled to understand the quality indicators, criteria and proof of learning. This is especially true when distance and technology are involved, considering that institutions often have different technological systems. An example is found in the Practicum, when students are distributed across different educational institutions, each with their own tools and technological systems (Meeusa, Petegema & Engelsb, 2009; Cebrián-de-la-Serna, 2011; Del-Pozo, 2012). On the other hand, as a technique and as a methodology, federated eRubrics facilitate formative assessment, because they require a clear definition of the level of learning standards and the implementation of task-related criteria. There is extensive literature on the impact of federated eRubrics, such as research conducted by Hafner & Hafner (2003) and Falchikov (2005), the so-called «deep and authentic learning» explained by Vickerman (2009), research on peer-assessment in technology-mediated collaboration environments (CSCL) (Prins, Sluijsmans, Kirschner & Strijbos, 2005), and a few studies on initial teacher training and acquisition of professional skills (Osana & Seymour, 2004; Bartolomé, Martínez & Tellado, 2012; Gámiz-Sánchez, Gallego & Moya, 2012; Moril, Ballester & Martínez, 2012; Martínez, Tellado & Raposo, 2013; Panadero, Alonso-Tapia & Reche, 2013).

However, despite the results, such research must be cautiously considered. We should aim for a much bigger picture with meta-analysis, such as the one offered by Svingby & Jonsson (2007) or Reddy & Andrade (2010), where a general view of rubrics in university education is offered, emphasizing the positive perception of students towards the use of programmes, taken in conjunction with research showing the resistance of certain groups of teachers to use them. Additionally, there is research on the positive impact of rubrics on academic performance, despite other studies finding no such impact.

Certainly, more studies on the impact of rubrics are needed, despite this broad and extensive literature. Research is especially required in the field of cooperative and collaborative assessment, since, although eRubrics have already been studied from a collaborative assessment approach (Falchikov, 2005: 125), this has not been the case with all the products of the recent boom in new technologies. This is important in studying the impact of «federated eRubrics», as they are more interactive than paper rubrics, facilitating communication, cooperation and collaboration between students and teachers of different institutions. Therefore, the scope and impact of federated eRubrics on cooperative and collaborative teaching and learning models is still unknown. Thus, new research is needed to analyse the interactive and communicative functions offered by technologies and social networks (Bartolomé, 2012). In particular there is a requirement for more rigorous methods, for greater reliability and for checking the validity of the procedures from broader geographic and cultural perspectives, as suggested by Reddy & Andrade (2010).

In pursuit of this aim, the results presented below are part of a research project in which federation technologies in general and federated eRubrics in particular are used for educational purposes and intra- and inter-institutional collaboration. The latter is precisely the topic of the present research: cooperative peer-assessment and teamwork developed in the lab. The interoperability enabled by federation technologies was used for cooperation within the same institution. Students only needed to log in and out to access the tools and federated services available, namely: an institutional platform where task resources were uploaded and shared, a federated eRubrics service for cooperative assessment, a «federated key» tool to upload and share large files, a «federated webquest» service to elaborate teaching materials, and a «federated Limesurvey» service to collect open assessments from the control group in order to contrast their results2.

2. Methodology

The use of rubrics to assess learning has been introduced in different subjects and university degrees, but their digital version -federated eRubric- is rarely used. Indeed, the innovation in this project lies in the lack of experience with these technologies. Likewise, a broad conceptual framework has been used to examine their impact, following the introduction of a new variable, which can play different roles according to whether the assessment is cooperative and/or collaborative (if it is cooperative, eRubrics are given by the teacher; if it is collaborative, eRubrics are negotiated).

While our research does not address all the possibilities in Chart 1, it does raise the need to answer the following questions: Does student academic learning improve when using cooperative assessment with eRubrics in teamwork? Which evaluation criteria are used by students in peer-assessment without the structure and guidance of eRubrics? Drawing on these questions, the specific objectives of this project are as follows:

1) To analyse the impact of eRubrics in academic learning by developing collaborative assessment methods and teamwork (cooperative assessment with eRubrics).

2) To analyse the criteria and rating used by students in peer-assessment without guidance (cooperative assessment without eRubrics).

By answering these questions and by developing the two research objectives set, the researchers wish to show the usefulness and effectiveness of eRubrics as a tool and as a method for formative assessment, thus allowing for the improvement of student learning, the internalization of evaluation criteria and the application of these criteria.

The research was planned in two stages: in the first stage, the contents and functionality of the eRubrics were agreed upon and designed, using Limesurvey to experiment with the contents for the first time. In the second stage, after evaluating the contents of the rubrics and creating our own eRubric tool, the planned research design was applied. For this second stage a multi-method approach was used, due to both the characteristics of the objectives and the nature of the data to be collected. The reality could then be seen at a qualitative and quantitative level. To achieve the first specific objective, a quasi-experimental methodology was designed: one class group would not use eRubrics (control group) and their results would be compared with the other two groups that would (experimental groups). To achieve the second objective, a qualitative methodology was applied through content analysis, where assessments were extracted from the control group that did not use eRubrics.

The sample consisted of three randomly selected groups out of six class groups studying the subject «Information and Communication Technologies Applied to Education», from the Primary Education Degree in the Faculty of Educational Sciences at the University of Malaga during the 2011/12 academic year. The three groups had 75 students each, and the context of the research design for both objectives was achieved by dividing each group into two sub-groups of 37 students each (six sub-groups in total), which were given two class hours to perform tasks and carry out peer-assessment in the computer labs. Therefore, research was conducted with 50% of the student population, i.e. 225 students: 75 students for the control group and 150 for the experimental groups. The contents of the eRubrics can be found in the public database of the tool by typing in the aforementioned course description.

The sample was selected by using the cluster sampling technique, where the sample unit was the class group. Differences between the control and experimental groups were minimized, randomly assigning the groups that would receive instruction and the group that would act as the control group, in order to achieve equality between the two, thus avoiding problems of internal and external validity (Colás, Buendía & Hernández, 2009). Groups B and C were the experimental groups and Group A was the control group.

In order to carry out the research, four tasks were conducted during the academic year, each with the same assessment methodology in the three class groups.

The methodology was directed by the same teacher in the three groups, following these steps:

• Two hours. Presentation of the task to the whole group (75 students), task completion and peer-assessment coordinated by the teacher.

• Two hours. Dividing each group into two smaller sub-groups (37 students approx) in the same computer lab, performing the same task but using different materials and examples. In order to perform the task, a file had to be downloaded from an online platform, completed and the team results uploaded so as to be shared. Once all teams had uploaded their tasks, access to the platform was open for all teams to download and assess tasks individually. At the end, the teacher closed the possibility of assessing, uploading and downloading tasks. He assessed all the teams and uploaded their task results to the platform.

The four tasks and their objectives were different. Group A, B and C had the same tasks. Team assessment was conducted by using a random formula provided by the teacher, although assessment between the same teams was avoided, despite the fact that assessment was anonymous in all cases. Tasks were performed in teams of 3-5 students, but assessment was individual, that is, each member of the team assessed the work of another team assigned by the teacher.

To collect quantitative data, four eRubrics were designed, one for each task. Students from the experimental groups carried out cooperative peer-assessment, which, together with the teacher’s assessment, was included in an excel spreadsheet. Students were identified with a number in order to be able to compare their individual scores in the final test with peer-assessments made and received during the lab practice. In contrast, the control group did not use any eRubric to assess the work of their peers, only a questionnaire - federated Limesurvey - with a simple open question: «What did you think of the task this team has performed?». This approach to peer-assessment and criteria given by the teacher sought a model of collaborative assessment, but was unsuccessful due to the lack of guidance, counselling and structure. Nevertheless, it has enabled us to get to know the arguments, criteria and thoughts of students in Group A, as a means (with further research) to pinpoint the requirements for collaborative assessment.

3. Analysis and results

Given that all students were identified (experimental and control), the results could be compared with other variables such as final scores and specific assessments of lab practice carried out at the end of the year. The practice test consisted of an individual test on a randomly chosen example from the four tasks designed to show the same skills worked in the lab practice, but with different materials from those used during the year. With regard to the first specific objective, the methodology used allowed us to analyse individual and group scores from the test and assessments of the four tasks conducted in the lab, both in Group A (control) as well as Groups B and C (experimental).

As for the second specific objective, the methodology used allowed us to compare the categories found in he content analysis of assessments from Group A (control) with eRubric criteria used by Groups B and C.


Draft Content 215453840-29655-en039.jpg

3.1. Quantitative analysis

For the quantitative analysis, the use or not of eRubrics by students and teacher was considered as the independent variable. As mentioned above, all groups took a final test at the end of the year. The scores from this test were considered as the dependent variable, thus examining possible differences among students’ scores in the different class groups.

To contrast scores from the final test, an analysis of variance has been conducted in the three groups, as the two experimental groups showed different trends. This may be because students do not usually know each other in the first year of their Degree, so the groups they form are more or less successful. Over time groups consolidate and reshape in different work teams. This common phenomenon –which takes place in the first year of any degree– had a higher incidence and caused more problems in Group C, where it happened most frequently. The group sizes were the same, although in the end there is a slight difference of two in the number of students in the control group, as shown in table 1.

3.1.1. Test scores comparison in the three class groups: A, B and C

Table 2 shows the results of the comparison of each group’s mean, showing significant differences. Scheffé’s multiple comparison test has shown differences among all class groups. In other words, there are differences between Group A’s scores and Group B’s scores, and between Group A’s scores and Group C’s scores. There are also differences between Group B’s mean and Group C’s mean. Given the significance and sign of mean differences in Scheffé’s test, the means of the groups’ scores are in the following order: A < C < B. That is, Group A’s mean is significantly lower than Group C’s mean and Group B’s mean, while Group C’s mean is significantly lower than Group B’s mean.


Draft Content 215453840-29655-en040.jpg

Graph 1 shows the box plot of the scores in each group. As can be seen, Group A’s scores show greater dispersion, while Groups B and C’s scores are closer together and also higher, especially in Group B. The greater homogeneity of scores in Group B causes extremely high and low values in this group, marked below by the circles.


Draft Content 215453840-29655-en041.jpg


Draft Content 215453840-29655-en042.jpg

3.2. Qualitative analysis

When analysing the evaluation criteria described by students in Group A, a greater overlap is found between the categories of 1) control group’s students’ assessments and 2) eRubric responses, whenever tasks include a high number of responses. Table 4 shows the overlap percentage between categories expressed by students in the control group and eRubric responses. eRubrics of Tasks 2 and 4 (with 16 responses each) show a higher percentage than eRubrics for Task 1 (with 5) and Task 3 (with 6).

When focusing exclusively on the analysis of the categories that match eRubric responses, it can be seen that a greater (or lesser) number of teams evaluated by each other for each task within the group A does not ensure a greater overlap between the categories found and the eRubric responses used in the experimental group. In other words, Table 5 shows a relationship and an equivalent rate of 100% in Activity 1 (with 15 assessed teams) and Activity 2 (with half of the teams assessed). This result also occurs in Activity 3, which has a higher percentage and a fewer number of teams in comparison to Activity 4. That is, the number of teams evaluated in each task does not ensure the spontaneous emergence in Group A of closer or coincidental criteria with eRubric responses.


Draft Content 215453840-29655-en043.jpg

The above analysis proves that teacher training with no evaluation criteria and no guidance from the teacher (as is the case of eRubrics) does not guarantee the necessary skills for students to evaluate in a more objective and specific manner over time. This fact can also be seen in Table 6, which shows the ratio of students-evaluators identified by their list number, whose assessments or criteria coincide with the eRubric assessments for tasks 1, 2, 3 or 4. There are no coincidences in the assessments of peer evaluators in all 4 tasks of the subject, while the highest percentage is 50.72% in the assessments of the first task.


Draft Content 215453840-29655-en044.jpg

4. Discussion and conclusion

There is widespread use of the rubrics as a tool for evaluating results and scores, instead of for formative assessment in its various forms. The present paper seeks to present the results from a formative assessment approach, especially with regard to cooperative assessment in teamwork. It also addresses a practice, which is not yet well known: the use of «federated eRubrics», which enables researchers to better study the variables that come together in teamwork, due to the ease of creating and exporting digital data and the federation technologies that support them, hence facilitating interoperability among different tools. Overall, research aims at developing a greater reliability and validity for these practices, in line with some of the reviews (Reddy & Andrade, 2010), while opening up new lines of research to highlight the possibility of studying from a broader conceptual framework in the future, by using eRubrics according to cooperative/collaborative learning/assessment modalities.

Among the most important results of this study, it is worth highlighting that the groups using eRubrics for cooperative assessment of teamwork have scored better and more homogeneous results than the control group in their individual marks when faced with the written test, whereas scores there were more dispersed. There were even scores well below the pass grade in the control group. This means that, in the absence of eRubric specific criteria, students in the control group had fewer elements with which to understand the tasks and more difficulties in facing them. This is reinforced by the results of the qualitative analysis, where the control group scored worse in the test and scores were more dispersed, even though they applied their own criteria, which matched the eRubric responses at over 40%. Regarding the analysis of the criteria used by students in the control group, we may also conclude that the higher the number of responses in the task, the higher approach to eRubric responses. As a consequence, the design of tasks with a high number of responses facilitates good results in learning assessment.

From both –quantitative and qualitative– analysis, eRubrics have proven to have a positive impact on achieving good individual learning results, mainly due to the specification of criteria for carrying out cooperative assessment of teamwork.

The present study highlights the analysis of uncommon practices. eRubrics, together with cooperative assessment, elicit skills that students will have to develop at some point in their career, as they will have to evaluate colleagues’ work and apply quality criteria to processes and products. In short, these teaching methods and technologies anticipate the professional realities students will face from an educational perspective. There are many other experiments and much research that together serve to validate the results of this study and provide a greater insight into eRubric methods and their technological use for formative assessment.

Falchikov (2005) studies collaborative assessment and tackles some of the problems, when individual differences are not taken into account in the team. These variables –gender, ethnicity, educational level, age, previous experiences, and so on– somehow influence results. To minimize these confounders, he gathers various formulae used by different authors, such as «weighting the individual factor equal to the rating of the individual effort divided by the average of the efforts in the scores». In this project we were unable to control the individual differences in the design. However we hope to consider them on future occasions, while trying as much as possible to respect the naturalness of groups with quasi-experimental and qualitative designs.

Supports

Project titled «eRubric Federated Service for Evaluating University Learning». National Plan I+D+i EDU2010-15432 (http://erubrica.org). This research has used the Gtea Federated eRubric (http://gteavirtual.org/rubric).

Notes

1 CSCL (Computer Supported Collaborative Learning).

2 Gtea Federated Environment (http://gteavirtual.org).

References

Andrade, H. (2005). Teaching with Rubrics: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly. College Teaching, 53(1), 27-31. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3200/CTCH.53.1.27-31).

Bartolomé, A. (2012). De la Web 2.0 al e-learning 2.0. Perspectiva, 30 (1), 131-153. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-795X.2012v30n1p131).

Bartolomé, A., Martínez, E. & Tellado, F. (2012). Análisis comparativo de metodologías de evaluación formativa: diarios personales mediante blogs y autoevaluación mediante e-rúbricas. In C. Leite & M. Zabalza (Coords.), Ensino superior. Inovação e qualidade na docencia (417-429). CIIE: Porto.

Blanco, A. (2009). Desarrollo y evaluación de competencias en educación superior. Madrid: Narcea.

Brown, S. & Glasner, A. (2003). Evaluar en la Universidad. Madrid: Narcea.

Cebrián-de-la-Serna, M. (2011). Supervisión con e-portafolios y su impacto en las reflexiones de los estudiantes en el Practicum. Estudio de Caso. Revista de Educación, 354, 183-208.

Colás, P., Buendía, L. & Hernández, F. (2009). Competencias científicas para la realización de una tesis doctoral. Madrid: Davinci.

De-Miguel, M. (2006). Modalidades de enseñanza centradas en el desarrollo de competencias. Ediciones Universidad de Oviedo. (http://goo.gl/1X1ESu) (07-07-2013).

Del-Pozo, J. (2012). Competencias profesionales. Herramientas de evaluación y portafolio, la rubrica y las pruebas situacionales. Madrid: Narcea.

Falchikov, N. & Goldfinch, J. (2000). Student Peer Assessment in Higher Education: A Meta-Analysis Comparing Peer & Teacher Marks. Review of Educational Research, 70, 3, 287-322.

Falchikov, N. (2005). Improving Assessment Trough Student Involment. New York (USA): Routledge.

Gámiz-Sánchez, V., Gallego-Arrufat, M.J. & Moya, E. (2012). Experiencias docentes de evaluación en metodologías activas con TIC: Análisis de casos en la Universidad de Granada. II Congreso Internacional sobre evaluación por competencias mediante e-rúbricas. Universidad de Málaga, Octubre 2012. (http://goo.gl/fUY4Jt) (16-08-2013).

Hafner, J.C. & Hafner, P.H. (2003). Quantitative Analysis of the Rubric as an Assessment Tool: An Empirical Study of Student Peer-Group Rating. International Journal of Science Education, 25, 12, 1.509-1.528. (DOI: http://dxdoi.org/10.1080/0950069022000038268).

Hargreaves, E. (2007). The Validity of Collaborative Assessment for Learning. Assessment in Education, 14, 2, 185-199. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0950069022000038268).

Jonsson, A. & Svingby, G. (2007). The Use of Scoring Rubrics: Reliability, Validity and Educational Conséquences. Educational Research Review 2, 130-144. (DOI: http://dx.dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.edurev.2007.05.002).

López-Pastor, V. (2009). Evaluación formativa y compartida en educación superior. Madrid: Narcea.

Martínez, M.E., Tellado, F. & Raposo, M. (2013). La rúbrica como instrumento para la autoevaluación: un estudio piloto. Revista de Docencia Universitaria, 11(2), 373-390.

Meeus, W., Petegem, P. & Engels, A. (2009). Validity and Reliability of Portfolio Assessment in Pre-Service Teacher Education. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 34(4), 401-413. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02602930802062659).

Moril, R., Ballester, L. & Martínez, J. (2012). Introducción de las matrices de valoración analítica en el proceso de evaluación del Practicum de los Grados de Infantil y de Primaria. Revista de Docencia Universitaria, 10(2), 251-271.

Osana, H. & Seymour, J. (2004). Critical Thinking in Preservice Teachers: A Rubric for Evaluating Argumentation and Statistical Reasoning. Educational Research and Evaluation, 10, 4-6, 473-498. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13803610512331383529).

Panadero, E. & Jonsson, A. (2013). The Use of Scoring Rubrics for Formative Assessment Purposes Revisited: A Review. Educational Research Review, 9, 129-144. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.edurev.2013.01.002).

Panadero, E., Alonso-Tapia, J. & Reche, E. (2013). Rubrics vs. self-assessment scripts effect on self-regulation, performance and self-efficacy in pre-service teachers. Studies in Educational Evaluation, 39(3), 125-132. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.stueduc.2013.04.001).

Prins, F.J., Sluijsmans, D.M.A., Kirschner, P.A. & Strijbos, J.W. (2005). Formative Peer Assessment in a CSCL Environment: A Case Study, Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 30, 417-444. (http://goo.gl/u2VOGY).

Reddy, Y. & Andrade, H. (2010). A Review of Rubric Use in Higher Education. Assessment & Evaluation In Higher Education, 35, 4, 435-448. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02602930902862859).

Rodríguez-Gómez, G. & Ibarra-Sáiz, M.S. (2011). E-Evaluación orientada al e-aprendizaje estratégico en educación superior. Madrid: Narcea.

Vickerman, Ph. (2009). Student Perspectives on Formative Peer Assessment: an Attempt to Deepen Learning, Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 34, 221-230.

Voogt, J. & Knezek, G. (2008). International Handbook of Information Technology in Primary and Secondary Education. New York: Springer.

Zabalza, M. (2010). Planificación de la docencia en la universidad. Madrid: Narcea.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

El trabajo cooperativo mediante tareas y proyectos en equipo es una de las metodologías más generalizadas en educación para lograr las competencias de aprendizaje. Estas metodologías están teniendo cada vez mayor aceptación en la enseñanza universitaria, a pesar de la dificultad de conocer los aprendizajes individuales producidos en cada uno de sus miembros. Este artículo muestra los resultados de un proyecto de I+D+i cuyo objetivo general consiste en «Analizar el impacto de las eRúbricas –rúbricas electrónicas- en la evaluación de los aprendizajes universitarios en sus diferentes modalidades», y pretende mostrar el alcance de esta herramienta para mejorar el aprendizaje de las competencias o habilidades cooperativas, producto del trabajo en equipo y la evaluación cooperativa de tareas en el laboratorio. La experiencia se desarrolla con tres grupos elegidos (205 estudiantes) de un total de seis grupos de estudiantes de 1º del grado de Primaria en el curso 2011/12. De los tres grupos, uno actúa como grupo de control y los otros dos como grupos experimentales en los que se ha utilizado eRúbricas. Se observan diferencias en las notas de una prueba escrita común a todos, con mejores resultados en los grupos con eRúbrica. Además, se realiza un análisis cualitativo categorizando las respuestas dadas por los estudiantes del grupo de control sobre los criterios de evaluación que éstos utilizan, para ver las coincidencias con los criterios de las eRúbricas usadas en los grupos experimentales.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Entre las recientes modalidades didácticas desarrolladas en la educación, los modelos de colaboración mediante tecnologías (CSCL)1 (Voogt & Knezek, 2008) representan una renovación profunda en la enseñanza. En las propuestas para el diseño y planificación de la docencia universitaria se insiste en la importancia de estas modalidades y el uso de las tecnologías para centrar la enseñanza en el aprendizaje de los estudiantes (Zabalza, 2010), a la vez que involucrarlos más en todo el proceso, especialmente en la evaluación (Falchikov & Goldfinch, 2000; Brown & Glasner, 2003; Falchikov, 2005; Blanco, 2009; López-Pastor, 2009), con lo que resultaría el planteamiento de diferentes modalidades metodológicas y distintas formas de organizar los procesos de enseñanza-aprendizaje según los diferentes contextos universitarios (De-Miguel, 2006: 31). Es aquí donde «el trabajo en equipo» aglutina como finalidad todos estos valores y principios pedagógicos: «que los estudiantes aprendan y evalúen en colaboración mediante la adopción de un papel más activo y comprometido con la enseñanza y el aprendizaje mediado con tecnologías».

El aprendizaje humano es fundamentalmente social, por lo que la construcción del conocimiento y el aprendizaje colaborativo es importante que se atienda como objetivo en todos los niveles educativos (Hargreaves, 2007). No obstante, y dado que los contextos y los estudiantes no siempre poseen los prerrequisitos mínimos para abordar un modelo de colaboración, suele emplearse con más frecuencia y como paso previo, un modelo de aprendizaje cooperativo, que resuelve en gran parte esta situación de partida al proporcionar mayor estructuración y guías a los estudiantes, a la vez que brinda mayor control a los docentes.

Cuando pretendemos extender el aprendizaje colaborativo en todos los momentos del proceso de enseñanza, como en el caso de la evaluación, la necesidad de una orientación guiada se hace más patente y crucial, y la metodología del «trabajo en equipo» y la «evaluación cooperativa» resultan ser destacados recursos y técnicas pedagógicas como antesala a un modelo de evaluación colaborativa.

El aprendizaje entre iguales es especialmente beneficioso cuando se centra en los procesos de evaluación, donde toma en la literatura especializada con más frecuencia el nombre de «evaluación colaborativa» (Blanco, 2009: 115; Brown & Glasner, 2003: 31; López-Pastor, 2009: 94), utilizando otros términos sinónimos como: «co-evaluación», «evaluación compartida», «evaluación entre pares», etc. Surge la necesidad de una mayor definición conceptual y del uso de los términos utilizados, dado que no siempre se diferencian –como sí ocurre entre el aprendizaje cooperativo vs. colaborativo–, entre los conceptos de la evaluación cooperativa frente a la evaluación colaborativa –más estructurada y guiada, en la primera frente a la segunda–.

Si bien, estas prácticas están generalizándose cada vez más, también existen voces críticas en cuanto a diferentes aspectos:

• La dificultad de un seguimiento y evaluación individualizada de las competencias adquiridas por los diferentes miembros de un equipo.

• Una revisión del impacto de dichas metodologías en los aprendizajes de los estudiantes según los nuevos contextos, especialmente por el uso de las tecnologías.

• Y por último, saber cómo abordar los prerrequisitos de los estudiantes para alcanzar una evaluación colaborativa que requiere mayor capacidad de reflexión y autocrítica.

Uno de los principios que sostiene la evaluación cooperativa consiste en hacer partícipes a todos sus miembros de los criterios por los cuales son evaluadas las evidencias de aprendizajes en las tareas y los proyectos en equipo. Este planteamiento más comunicativo y participativo sobre la evaluación comienza desde el intercambio y comprensión de objetivos, metas y procedimientos… hasta llegar a la evaluación de los procesos y sus resultados. En este proceso y en sus resultados es donde se aplican criterios e indicadores de calidad, y donde, a pesar de estar bien definidas y estructuradas las tareas, suelen existir dificultades de comunicación entre los docentes y los estudiantes, sobre todo cuando media Internet y la distancia, siendo en muchas ocasiones solo comprendida la evaluación al final del proceso si hay un análisis compartido.

Es obvio que esta situación problemática en la comunicación mediada por la tecnología se mejora con un diálogo permanente entre los docentes y los estudiantes sobre los indicadores de calidad, los criterios y cómo son aplicados éstos a las evidencias que plantean los trabajos en equipo. Unas de las técnicas y herramientas que facilita esta comunicación en la evaluación son las rúbricas (Osana & Seymour, 2004; Jonsson, & Svingby, 2007; Reddy & Andrade 2010; Rodríguez-Gómez & Ibarra-Sáiz 2011; Panadero & Jonsson, 2013), que en su versión digital se denominan «eRúbricas». Encontrando en su definición y entre sus funciones y ventajas, el permitir a los docentes y estudiantes compartir los indicadores, los criterios y las evidencias, así como el peso y la aplicación de las mismas en la evaluación de los objetos de aprendizaje (Andrade, 2005). Al ser digital y federada –eRúbrica federada– es más interactiva, al tiempo que la federación proporciona el soporte ideal para la cooperación y la colaboración de los usuarios, salvando las dificultades de la interoperatividad entre herramientas, servicios, contextos y sistemas tecnológicos diferentes, ubicados tanto dentro como fuera de la propia institución educativa.

La eRúbrica federada representa un doble papel en la enseñanza: por un lado, como tecnología es un soporte ideal para mejorar la comunicación y comprensión sobre los procesos de evaluación, al tiempo que facilita los modelos de trabajo en equipo. Representa un instrumento imprescindible en los procesos de evaluación con eportafolios, dado los modelos de seguimiento y la calidad que requiere las interacciones entre el docente y los estudiantes para comprender los indicadores, criterios y evidencias de aprendizaje, sobre todo en la distancia y mediado por tecnologías, que en muchos casos se realizan entre instituciones con sistemas tecnológicos diferentes. Como el caso del practicum, cuando estos estudiantes están repartidos en distintas instituciones, cada una con sus herramientas y sistemas tecnológicos (Meeus, Petegem & Engels, 2009; Cebrián-de-la-Serna, 2011; Del-Pozo, 2012). Por otro lado, como técnica y metodología que facilita la evaluación formativa, dado que exige definir con claridad la escala de estándares de aprendizaje y la aplicación de criterios relacionados con una tarea. Existiendo una extensa literatura sobre su impacto con trabajos pioneros como Hafner y Hafner (2003) y Falchikov, (2005); pasando por el aprendizaje profundo y auténtico de Vickerman (2009); hasta llegar a las investigaciones sobre la evaluación entre pares en entornos de colaboración mediados por tecnologías (CSCL) (Prins, Sluijsmans, Kirschner & Strijbos, 2005); y los estudios algo más escasos dentro del contexto de la formación inicial de docentes y la adquisición de competencias profesionales (Osana & Seymour, 2004; Bartolomé, Martínez & Tellado, 2012, Gámiz-Sánchez, Gallego & Moya, 2012; Moril, Ballester & Martínez, 2012; Martínez, Tellado & Raposo, 2013; Panadero, Alonso-Tapia & Reche, 2013).

No obstante, y a pesar de estos resultados, debemos considerar tales trabajos con prudencia y tener una visión más de conjunto con meta-análisis como los de Jonsson y Svingby (2007), y Reddy y Andrade (2010), donde nos ofrecen una visión general de las rúbricas en la enseñanza universitaria, destacando, por un lado, que existe una percepción positiva por parte de los estudiantes en la utilización de los programas, mientras que hay estudios que señalan la resistencia de ciertos grupos de docentes a utilizarlas. Y por otro lado, hay investigaciones sobre el impacto positivo de las rúbricas sobre los rendimientos académicos, mientras que otros estudios no encuentran este impacto.

Sin duda, necesitamos más estudios sobre el impacto de las eRúbricas a pesar de la existencia de esta literatura amplia y extensa. En especial sobre la evaluación cooperativa y colaborativa, que si bien, ya fueron estudiadas desde esta perspectiva –«collaborative assessment»– (Falchikov, 2005: 125), no ha sido así con el auge reciente de las nuevas tecnologías, especialmente en el estudio del impacto de las «eRúbricas federadas», que a diferencias de las rúbricas de papel son más interactivas, facilitando la comunicación, cooperación y colaboración entre estudiantes y docentes de diferentes instituciones. Queda por tanto conocer su alcance y su impacto en los modelos de enseñanza y aprendizaje cooperativo y colaborativo. Por lo que es necesario realizar investigaciones donde puedan analizarse las nuevas funciones interactivas y comunicativas que ofrecen estas tecnologías y las redes sociales (Bartolomé, 2012); especialmente, como propone Reddy y Andrade (2010) con metodologías más rigurosas, con mayor fiabilidad y validez en sus procedimientos, desde perspectivas geográficas y culturales más amplias. Siguiendo en esta línea de estudios, los resultados que a continuación se presentan son parte de un proyecto de investigación, donde se experimentan las tecnologías de federación en general y las «eRúbricas federadas» en particular para la educación y la colaboración intra e interinstitucional. Siendo el tema que nos ocupa aquí, la evaluación cooperativa entre los estudiantes y las tareas de equipos desarrolladas en el laboratorio.

Utilizamos para dicha cooperación dentro de la misma institución, la interoperatividad que permiten las tecnologías de federación, donde los estudiantes solo necesitan autenticarse –log in– y –log out– una sola vez para utilizar las diferentes herramientas y servicios federados puestos a disposición en esta experiencia e investigación, como fueron las siguientes: la plataforma institucional donde se subieron y se compartieron los recursos de las tareas; el servicio de eRúbrica federada para la evaluación cooperativa; la herramienta «Consigna federada» para subir y compartir ficheros de gran tamaño; el servicio de «Webquest federado» para la elaboración de materiales didácticos; y por último, el servicio de Limesurvey federado para recoger las evaluaciones abiertas de los grupos de control, con el fin de comparar sus resultados2.

2. Metodología

La utilización de las rúbricas en la evaluación de los aprendizajes se ha introducido en diferentes asignaturas y en diferentes titulaciones universitarias, pero en su formato digital –eRúbrica federada– no es muy corriente su uso. La innovación de este proyecto radica precisamente en la poca existencia de experiencias con estas tecnologías, al tiempo que, al investigar su impacto, parte de un marco conceptual más amplio hasta la presente, al introducir una nueva variable que puede representar diferentes papeles según sea una evaluación cooperativa y/o colaborativa (en el primer caso, eRúbricas dadas por el docente, y en el segundo, eRúbricas negociadas).

Si bien nuestra investigación no aborda todas las posibilidades del gráfico 1, sí plantea la necesidad de responder a las siguientes preguntas: ¿Mejoran los aprendizajes académicos de los estudiantes cuando se utiliza la evaluación cooperativa con eRúbricas en el trabajo en equipo?, ¿qué criterios de evaluación utilizan los estudiantes en una evaluación entre pares sin la estructuración y guía de las eRúbricas? Tomando como referencia estas preguntas, los objetivos específicos del proyecto son los siguientes:

1) Analizar el impacto de la eRúbrica en los aprendizajes académicos mediante el desarrollo de metodología de la evaluación cooperativa y el trabajo en equipo (evaluación cooperativa con eRúbricas).

2) Analizar los criterios y valoraciones utilizados por los estudiantes en las evaluaciones de los trabajos de sus compañeros sin orientaciones y guías para la evaluación (evaluación cooperativas sin eRúbricas).

Con la respuesta a estas preguntas y el desarrollo de los dos objetivos de investigación pretendemos mostrar la utilidad y la eficacia del empleo de la eRúbrica como herramienta y metodología para la evaluación formativa, permitiendo mejorar los aprendizajes de los estudiantes; al tiempo que la comprensión e interiorización de los criterios de evaluación y su aplicación.

La investigación estuvo planificada en dos fases; en la primera, se consensuaron y diseñaron los contenidos de las eRúbricas y su funcionalidad, experimentando por primera vez los contenidos con «limesurvey». En la segunda fase, una vez evaluado los contenidos de las rúbricas, así como creada la herramienta eRúbrica propia, se aplicó el diseño de investigación previsto. Para esta segunda fase se ha empleado un enfoque plurimetodológico, tanto por las características de los objetivos como por la naturaleza de los datos a recoger, donde se pudo observar la realidad a nivel cualitativo y cuantitativo. Para conseguir el primer objetivo específico se ha diseñado una metodología cuasi-experimental, donde un grupo no utiliza la eRúbrica (grupo de control) y sus resultados se comparan con otros dos grupos de clases que sí lo utilizan (grupos experimentales). Para el logro del segundo objetivo se ha planteado una metodología cualitativa mediante el análisis de contenido, cuyas valoraciones son obtenidas de las evaluaciones sin eRúbricas de los trabajos del grupo de control.

La muestra estudiada está constituida por tres grupos seleccionados al azar, de seis grupos que constituyen la población de la titulación del grado de Primaria que cursan la asignatura «Tecnologías de la comunicación y la información aplicadas a la educación» de la Facultad de Ciencias de la Educación de la Universidad de Málaga en el periodo académico 2011-12. Estos tres grupos contaban con 75 estudiantes cada uno, y el contexto del diseño de investigación para ambos objetivos se realizaron con la división de cada grupo en dos subgrupos de 37 estudiantes aproximadamente en los laboratorios de informática (6 subgrupos en total) con dos horas de clase para la realización de las tareas y la evaluación entre iguales. Por tanto, la investigación se realizó con el 50% de la población alcanzando un total de 225 estudiantes, con 75 para el grupo de control y 150 para los grupos experimentales. Los contenidos de las eRúbricas pueden encontrarse en la base de datos pública de la propia herramienta introduciendo la descripción de la asignatura mencionada.

La elección de la muestra se realizó con la técnica probabilística aleatoria por conglomerados, ya que en este muestreo la unidad muestral es el grupo, minimizándose las diferencias que pudiesen existir entre el grupo control y el grupo experimental, asignando al azar los grupos que recibirían el tratamiento y el grupo que haría de control, con el fin de lograr una equivalencia entre los dos, y así evitar como manifiestan Colás, Buendía y Hernández (2009), problemas de validez interna y externa, determinando a los grupos B y C como el grupo experimental y el grupo A como el grupo de control.

Para llevar a cabo la investigación se realizaron cuatro actividades durante el curso, cada una de ellas con la misma metodología de evaluación en los tres grupos de clase.

La metodología de clase fue dirigida por el mismo docente en los tres grupos y siguiendo estas fases:

• Dos horas: Exposición de la actividad en todo el grupo (75 estudiantes), realización de la tarea y evaluación por todos los estudiantes coordinada por el docente.

• Dos horas: Subdivisión de la mitad de cada grupo (37 aproximadamente) en el laboratorio donde en equipo se realizaba la misma tarea anterior pero con otros materiales o ejemplos. Para la tarea se utilizaba una ficha ubicada en una plataforma, se bajaba para su realización y se subían los resultados del equipo a un espacio compartido. Después de que todos hubieran subido la tarea se abría el acceso a la plataforma para que el resto de los equipos la bajase y la evaluaran de forma individual. Al final de todo el proceso el docente cerraba la posibilidad de evaluación y de subir o bajar los trabajos. Realizando éste la evaluación de todos los equipos y subiendo los resultados de la tarea a la plataforma.

Las cuatro tareas analizadas y sus objetivos eran de diferente naturaleza, ofreciendo a los grupos A, B y C las mismas tareas como sus explicaciones. La evaluación entre los equipos se realizaba con una combinación al azar dada por el docente, evitando la evaluación entre equipos iguales, a pesar de que en todos los casos las evaluaciones eran anónimas. La tarea se realizaba en equipo de tres a cinco estudiantes, pero las evaluaciones eran individuales, cada miembro del mismo equipo evaluaba el trabajo del equipo asignado por el docente.

Para recoger los datos cuantitativos se diseñaron cuatro eRúbricas diferentes, una para cada tarea, desde donde los estudiantes de los grupos experimentales realizaban la evaluación cooperativa, exportándose al final del proceso todas las evaluaciones de éstos y del docente a una hoja Excel. Todos los estudiantes estaban identificados con un número a fin de poder comparar su calificación individual en la prueba final del curso, con sus evaluaciones realizadas y recibidas entre sus iguales durante las prácticas de laboratorio. En cambio, para el grupo de control no se utilizó ninguna eRúbrica para evaluar los trabajos de sus compañeros, tan solo un cuestionario –Limesurvey federado– con una sencilla pregunta abierta: «¿Qué te ha parecido la actividad que ha realizado este equipo?», este enfoque para la evaluación entre iguales y sin criterios dados por el docente pretendía sin lograrlo del todo un modelo de evaluación colaborativa (por su falta de guías, orientación y estructuración); no obstante, este planteamiento nos permitía conocer sus argumentos, los criterios y las reflexiones utilizadas en las evaluaciones de sus compañeros en el grupo A, como un medio quizás –con más estudios sin duda– para conocer los prerrequisitos que requiere una evaluación colaborativa.

3. Análisis y resultados

Dado que todos los estudiantes estaban identificados (grupo experimental y de control) nos permitía un análisis de sus resultados con otras variables como las calificaciones finales de la asignatura y las evaluaciones específicas que sobre las prácticas de laboratorio se realizó al final del curso. Esta prueba de las prácticas consistía en un examen individual sobre un ejemplo elegido al azar entre las cuatro tareas diseñadas para mostrar las mismas competencias de las prácticas del laboratorio, pero con materiales diferentes a los utilizados durante el curso. Entre los diferentes análisis, la metodología nos permitió para el primer objetivo específico, analizar las calificaciones individuales y grupales obtenidas en el examen práctico y las evaluaciones de las cuatro actividades realizadas en el laboratorio, tanto en el grupo A (grupo de control) como los grupos B y C (grupos experimentales).

Para el segundo objetivo específico, nos permitió comparar las categorías halladas en el análisis de contenidos de las valoraciones y evaluaciones del grupo A (grupo de control) con las evidencias y criterios de la eRúbrica utilizadas para los grupos B y C.


Draft Content 215453840-29655 ov-es039.jpg

3.1. Análisis cuantitativo

Para el análisis cuantitativo se consideró la variable independiente como el uso, o no, de la eRúbricas por los estudiantes y el docente. Como se dijo antes, al final del curso se realizó una misma prueba escrita a todos los grupos, la nota obtenida en esta prueba se consideró como la variable dependiente, determinando si había diferencias entre las notas de los estudiantes en los distintos grupos de clase.

Para comparar las notas de la prueba escrita, se ha realizado un análisis de varianza con los tres grupos, ya que los dos grupos experimentales han mostrado evoluciones distintas como grupo. Esto pudo ser debido a que durante el primer curso del grado, los estudiantes forman equipos de trabajo con más, o menos, aciertos, ya que no suelen conocerse entre sí, y que con el transcurso del tiempo se van consolidando y rehaciéndose en otros equipos de trabajo con diferentes componentes. Este fenómeno común para los primeros cursos de los grados tuvo mayor incidencia y problemática en el grupo C, donde se produjo este fenómeno en mayor número de ocasiones. Los tamaños de los grupos eran iguales, aunque al final hay una ligera diferencia de 2 en el número de estudiantes del grupo de control, como se muestra en la tabla 1.

3.1.1. Comparación de las notas del examen en los tres grupos de Clase A, B, y C

En la tabla 2 se muestran los resultados de la comparación de medias de cada clase, obteniéndose que hay diferencias significativas entre las medias. En la prueba de comparación múltiple de Scheffé (tabla 3), se obtiene que las diferencias se dan entre todos los grupos de clase. Se puede decir, dado la significación y el signo de las diferencias de medias en la prueba Scheffé, que las medias de las notas de clases se encuentran en el siguiente orden A < C < B. Es decir, la media de la clase A es significativamente menor que la media de la clase C y que la media de la clase B y la media de la clase C es significativamente menor que la media de la clase B.


Draft Content 215453840-29655 ov-es040.jpg

En la gráfica 1 se muestra el diagrama de caja de las notas de cada uno de los grupos, en la que se puede observar como las notas en el grupo A tienen una mayor dispersión, mientras que las de los grupos B, y C están más próximas entre sí a la vez que son más altas, siendo este hecho más acentuado en el grupo B. La mayor homogeneidad de las notas en el grupo B hace que resulten, estadísticamente, valores extremadamente altos y bajos respecto a los de este grupo, quedando señalados por los círculos.


Draft Content 215453840-29655 ov-es041.jpg


Draft Content 215453840-29655 ov-es042.jpg

3.2. Análisis cualitativo

Al analizar los criterios de evaluación que describen los estudiantes del grupo A, se obtiene que existe una mayor coincidencia entre las categorías de las evaluaciones de los estudiantes del grupo de control con las evidencias de las eRúbricas, cuando las tareas ofrecen mayor número de evidencias. La tabla 4 muestra los porcentajes de coincidencias entre categorías que los estudiantes del grupo de control expresan y las evidencias de esta, especialmente para las de las actividades 2 y 4 con 16 evidencias cada una, hay mayor porcentaje que en las eRúbricas para la actividad 1 que con 5, y la actividad 3 con 6 evidencias.

Si nos centramos exclusivamente en el análisis de las categorías que tienen una coincidencia con las evidencias de la eRúbrica, se observó que un mayor o menor número de equipos evaluados entre sí para cada actividad dentro del grupo A, no asegura mayor coincidencia entre las categorías encontradas y los criterios y evidencias de las eRúbricas utilizadas en el grupo experimental. Se tiene un porcentaje del 100% tanto en la actividad 1 con 15 equipos evaluados, como en la actividad 2 con la mitad de equipos evaluados. Este resultado también se produce en la actividad 3 con un mayor porcentaje (7 equipos y 85,67%) y un menor número de equipos frente a la actividad 4 (9 equipos y 66,66%). Es decir, el número de equipos evaluados en cada actividad no asegura el surgimiento espontáneo en el grupo A de valoraciones y criterios más próximos o coincidentes con las evidencias de la eRúbrica.


Draft Content 215453840-29655 ov-es043.jpg

Siguiendo con este análisis, podemos entender que el entrenamiento con una evaluación sin criterios y orientaciones del profesor de ningún tipo (como pudieran ser las eRúbricas) no asegura la capacidad necesaria en los estudiantes para evaluar de forma más objetiva y específica con el tiempo. Este hecho se observa igualmente en la tabla 5, donde se muestra la relación de estudiantes evaluadores identificados por su número de lista cuyas valoraciones, o criterios, coinciden con las evidencias de las eRúbricas para las actividades 1, 2, 3 o 4. Observándose que no existe coincidencia de valoraciones por parte de los evaluadores pares en las 4 actividades de la asignatura, mientras que el porcentaje más alto es de 50,72% y se registra en las evaluaciones realizadas en la primera actividad.


Draft Content 215453840-29655 ov-es044.jpg

4. Discusión y conclusión

Existe un uso generalizado de las rúbricas como instrumentos para la evaluación de los resultados y calificaciones, en comparación con un uso más próximo a la evaluación formativa en sus diferentes modalidades. Este artículo está orientado a exponer los resultados desde un enfoque formativo de la evaluación, especialmente para la evaluación cooperativa en el trabajo en equipo. Aborda también una práctica poco difundida aún, como es el uso de las «eRúbricas federadas», que permiten estudiar mejor las variables que confluyen en el trabajo en equipo, por la facilidad de crear y exportar los datos digitales y por las tecnologías de federación que la sustentan, que facilitan la interoperatividad de diferentes herramientas. Igualmente, la investigación pretende buscar mayor fiabilidad y validez a estas prácticas, en consonancia con algunas de las críticas encontradas en las revisiones realizadas (Reddy & Andrade, 2010), a la vez que, abrir nuevas líneas de investigación al destacar la existencia y posibilidad de estudiar en el futuro desde un marco conceptual más amplio, con los diferentes usos de la eRúbricas según las modalidades de aprendizaje / evaluación cooperativas / colaborativas.

Entre los resultados más destacados en este estudio se puede concluir que los grupos que han utilizado la eRúbrica para la evaluación cooperativa sobre el trabajo en equipo, cuando se enfrentan a las pruebas de examen obtienen resultados más altos y más homogéneos en sus calificaciones individuales, mientras que en el grupo de control las notas muestran mayor dispersión y hay calificaciones muy por debajo del aprobado. Lo que significa que los estudiantes del grupo de control al no disponer de los criterios tan concretos de la eRúbrica, disponen de menos elementos para la comprensión de las tareas y se ven más limitados para enfrentarse a las mismas. Esto se refuerza con los resultados del análisis cualitativo, donde el grupo de control a pesar de que aplicaba sus propios criterios que coincidían con más de un 40% con las evidencias de las eRúbricas, obtuvo peores resultados en la prueba y mayor dispersión en las calificaciones. Con respecto al análisis de los criterios y valoraciones utilizados por los estudiantes del grupo de control, se concluye también que existe un mayor acercamiento a las evidencias de las eRúbricas, cuando se diseña un mayor número de evidencias en las tareas, por lo que se puede concluir que el diseño de tareas con más evidencias facilita el mejor resultado en las evaluaciones de los aprendizajes.

Desde ambos análisis –cuantitativo y cualitativo– se concluye que la eRúbica ofrece un impacto positivo en la obtención de mejores logros de aprendizaje individual, debido principalmente a la concreción de los criterios y el aprendizaje de los mismos para realizar evaluaciones cooperativas de las tareas en equipo. El estudio destaca el análisis de unas prácticas poco generalizadas, encontrando cómo las eRúbricas junto con la evaluación cooperativa facilitan las competencias que tendrán que desarrollar los estudiantes en algún momento de su vida profesional, donde tendrán que evaluar los trabajos de otros compañeros, aplicar criterios de calidad a los procesos y productos…

En suma, con estas metodologías y tecnologías nos adelantamos a esta realidad profesional desde la misma formación inicial. Quedan aún muchas más experiencias e investigaciones que validen los datos conseguidos en este trabajo y nos proporcionen mayor comprensión sobre estas metodologías y usos tecnológicos de la eRúbricas para la evaluación formativa.

El trabajo de Falchikov (2005) estudia la evaluación colaborativa y atiende a uno de los problemas de esta evaluación cuando no tenemos en cuenta los aspectos individuales de los equipos, variables que de alguna forma están influyendo en los resultados, tales como el género, la etnicidad, el nivel del curso y la edad, las experiencias previas… entre otras. En dicha obra recoge diversas fórmulas de diferentes autores para mitigar estas variables contaminantes, como «ponderar el factor individual igual a la calificación del esfuerzo individual dividido por la media de los esfuerzos de las calificaciones». En nuestro proyecto no hemos podido controlar el factor individual en el diseño. Esperamos para futuras ocasiones poder considerarlas, procurando en lo posible respetar la naturalidad de los grupos con diseños cuasi-experimentales y cualitativos.

Apoyos

Proyecto titulado «Servicio federado de eRúbrica para la evaluación de aprendizajes universitarios». Plan Nacional I+D+i EDU2010-15432. (http://eRubrica.org). En la investigación se empleó la eRúbrica federada de Gtea (http://gteavirtual.org/rubric).

Notas

1 CSCL (Computer Supported Collaborative Learning).

2 Entorno federado de Gtea (http://gteavirtual.org).

Referencias

Andrade, H. (2005). Teaching with Rubrics: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly. College Teaching, 53(1), 27-31. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3200/CTCH.53.1.27-31).

Bartolomé, A. (2012). De la Web 2.0 al e-learning 2.0. Perspectiva, 30 (1), 131-153. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-795X.2012v30n1p131).

Bartolomé, A., Martínez, E. & Tellado, F. (2012). Análisis comparativo de metodologías de evaluación formativa: diarios personales mediante blogs y autoevaluación mediante e-rúbricas. In C. Leite & M. Zabalza (Coords.), Ensino superior. Inovação e qualidade na docencia (417-429). CIIE: Porto.

Blanco, A. (2009). Desarrollo y evaluación de competencias en educación superior. Madrid: Narcea.

Brown, S. & Glasner, A. (2003). Evaluar en la Universidad. Madrid: Narcea.

Cebrián-de-la-Serna, M. (2011). Supervisión con e-portafolios y su impacto en las reflexiones de los estudiantes en el Practicum. Estudio de Caso. Revista de Educación, 354, 183-208.

Colás, P., Buendía, L. & Hernández, F. (2009). Competencias científicas para la realización de una tesis doctoral. Madrid: Davinci.

De-Miguel, M. (2006). Modalidades de enseñanza centradas en el desarrollo de competencias. Ediciones Universidad de Oviedo. (http://goo.gl/1X1ESu) (07-07-2013).

Del-Pozo, J. (2012). Competencias profesionales. Herramientas de evaluación y portafolio, la rubrica y las pruebas situacionales. Madrid: Narcea.

Falchikov, N. & Goldfinch, J. (2000). Student Peer Assessment in Higher Education: A Meta-Analysis Comparing Peer & Teacher Marks. Review of Educational Research, 70, 3, 287-322.

Falchikov, N. (2005). Improving Assessment Trough Student Involment. New York (USA): Routledge.

Gámiz-Sánchez, V., Gallego-Arrufat, M.J. & Moya, E. (2012). Experiencias docentes de evaluación en metodologías activas con TIC: Análisis de casos en la Universidad de Granada. II Congreso Internacional sobre evaluación por competencias mediante e-rúbricas. Universidad de Málaga, Octubre 2012. (http://goo.gl/fUY4Jt) (16-08-2013).

Hafner, J.C. & Hafner, P.H. (2003). Quantitative Analysis of the Rubric as an Assessment Tool: An Empirical Study of Student Peer-Group Rating. International Journal of Science Education, 25, 12, 1.509-1.528. (DOI: http://dxdoi.org/10.1080/0950069022000038268).

Hargreaves, E. (2007). The Validity of Collaborative Assessment for Learning. Assessment in Education, 14, 2, 185-199. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0950069022000038268).

Jonsson, A. & Svingby, G. (2007). The Use of Scoring Rubrics: Reliability, Validity and Educational Conséquences. Educational Research Review 2, 130-144. (DOI: http://dx.dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.edurev.2007.05.002).

López-Pastor, V. (2009). Evaluación formativa y compartida en educación superior. Madrid: Narcea.

Martínez, M.E., Tellado, F. & Raposo, M. (2013). La rúbrica como instrumento para la autoevaluación: un estudio piloto. Revista de Docencia Universitaria, 11(2), 373-390.

Meeus, W., Petegem, P. & Engels, A. (2009). Validity and Reliability of Portfolio Assessment in Pre-Service Teacher Education. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 34(4), 401-413. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02602930802062659).

Moril, R., Ballester, L. & Martínez, J. (2012). Introducción de las matrices de valoración analítica en el proceso de evaluación del Practicum de los Grados de Infantil y de Primaria. Revista de Docencia Universitaria, 10(2), 251-271.

Osana, H. & Seymour, J. (2004). Critical Thinking in Preservice Teachers: A Rubric for Evaluating Argumentation and Statistical Reasoning. Educational Research and Evaluation, 10, 4-6, 473-498. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13803610512331383529).

Panadero, E. & Jonsson, A. (2013). The Use of Scoring Rubrics for Formative Assessment Purposes Revisited: A Review. Educational Research Review, 9, 129-144. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.edurev.2013.01.002).

Panadero, E., Alonso-Tapia, J. & Reche, E. (2013). Rubrics vs. self-assessment scripts effect on self-regulation, performance and self-efficacy in pre-service teachers. Studies in Educational Evaluation, 39(3), 125-132. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.stueduc.2013.04.001).

Prins, F.J., Sluijsmans, D.M.A., Kirschner, P.A. & Strijbos, J.W. (2005). Formative Peer Assessment in a CSCL Environment: A Case Study, Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 30, 417-444. (http://goo.gl/u2VOGY).

Reddy, Y. & Andrade, H. (2010). A Review of Rubric Use in Higher Education. Assessment & Evaluation In Higher Education, 35, 4, 435-448. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02602930902862859).

Rodríguez-Gómez, G. & Ibarra-Sáiz, M.S. (2011). E-Evaluación orientada al e-aprendizaje estratégico en educación superior. Madrid: Narcea.

Vickerman, Ph. (2009). Student Perspectives on Formative Peer Assessment: an Attempt to Deepen Learning, Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 34, 221-230.

Voogt, J. & Knezek, G. (2008). International Handbook of Information Technology in Primary and Secondary Education. New York: Springer.

Zabalza, M. (2010). Planificación de la docencia en la universidad. Madrid: Narcea.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/06/14
Accepted on 30/06/14
Submitted on 30/06/14

Volume 22, Issue 2, 2014
DOI: 10.3916/C43-2014-15
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 9
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?