Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Science journalists are mainly responsible for publicly communicating science, which, in turn, is a major indicator of the social development of democratic societies. The transmission of quality scientific information that is rigorously researched and understandable is therefore crucial, and demand for this kind of information from both governments and citizens is growing. We analyzed the academic profiles of a representative sample of practicing science journalists in Spain to clarify what training they had received and how they perceived the quality and scope of this training. Using an ethnographic methodology based on a survey, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with science journalists working for the main Spanish media (mainly printed press, audiovisual, Internet and news agencies), we analyze their academic backgrounds and collect information on their opinions and proposals. Our findings depict a complex and heterogeneous scenario and also reveal that most science journalists not only do not have any scientific training, but also do not even consider this to be necessary to exercise as science reporters. They also criticize the current system for training journalists and consider that the best way of learning the profession is by acquiring experience on the job.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction and state of the art

Science is a crucial part of our lives and an indicator of the social development of democratic societies. Its dissemination and popularization is, therefore, a priority for the European Union, governments, and international institutions around the world. Franco (2008: 97), in a study of the challenges of science journalism, argues that “science is one of the pillars of society: with it citizenship is built, disease is combated, poverty is overcome and wars are won”.

However, bringing science knowledge and advances to the public in a clear and comprehensible way and highlighting the implications for our daily lives, is not an easy task. While this responsibility is shared with the media, scientists, and governments, science journalists are the last link in the chain of transmission, and their task of interpreting scientific results is often highly complex and conceptually and methodologically abstract. As Bauer, Howard, Romo-Ramos, Massarani and Amorim state (2013: 1), “social discussion about science is vital for any modern culture, and it is very important to identify the changing conditions in which this discussion about science takes place in different contexts. Clearly, science journalists play a fundamental role”.

However, the work of science journalists, despite the great consensus about their important social function, is not always appreciated by newsroom editors, who tend to relegate science news to a secondary role (Brumfield, 2009; Williams & Clifford, 2008). Nor is it always applauded by the scientific community, which often sees defects or simplifications in the journalistic interpretation of their research, sometimes with sensationalist touches (Rosen, Guenther, & Froehlich, 2016; Lynch, Bennett, Luntz, Toy, & Van-Benschoten, 2014).

In May 2014 on CNN’s StarTalk programme conducted by science journalist Miles O’Brien, astrophysicist and science popularizer Neil deGrasse Tyson, in response to the question “What’s wrong with science journalism?”, pointed to issues such as the desire for protagonism of journalists, audiences, and leaders (Meneses-Fernández & Martín-Gutiérrez, 2015). Journalists tend to deviate from quality science journalism for reasons that go beyond scientists and science, according to deGrasse Tyson, who questions the suitability of an exclusive focus on the journalists’ communication profile, when a major problem is their inadequate scientific training. This situation exemplifies the less than satisfactory relationship between scientists and journalists, widely studied by authors such as Calvo-Hernando (1977), Besley (2010), Bauer, Howard, Romo-Ramos, Massarani and Amorim (2013), Peters (2013), Lynch, Bennett, Luntz, Toy and Van-Benschoten (2014), and Meneses-Fernández and Martín-Gutiérrez (2015).

Who are the science journalists, however? And what training have they received to equip them to deal with such a great responsibility? The overall purpose of this article is to explore the academic profile of science journalists. Specific objectives are as follows: (1) to analyze the academic training received by science journalists; (2) to analyze the academic training that journalists consider ideal and compare it with the training they actually received; and (3) to analyze gaps in the Spanish educational system in this area, and consider how they could be resolved.

Modern science journalism originated between the late 1800s and the 1940s, a period that embraced the Second Industrial Revolution and the two World Wars. People’s interest in technological advances grew, especially in relation to war, atomic energy, and the space race. In Spain, however, it was not until the 1980s and 1990s that specialist science and technology pages, sections or supplements were included in major newspapers (Moreno, 2003).

However, the scenario has changed in recent years, as science has been one of the journalism’ specialties most affected by the economic crisis unleashed in recent years in much of Europe and the world. Most science supplements and pages have shrunk or disappeared altogether, and this has inevitably led to staff cutbacks, restructured newsrooms, and revised editorial functions (Kristiansen, Schäfer, & Lorencez, 2016; Cortiñas, Lazcano-Peña, & Pont, 2015; Williams & Clifford, 2008). These disruptive changes are very likely to have caused important changes in work routines and in science journalist profiles in recent years. Although there is ample literature regarding science journalism in Spain, as far as we are aware, no research to date has used ethnographic techniques to investigate the academic profiles of Spanish science journalists.

The journalist Manuel Calvo-Hernando (1977) laid the foundations for research into science journalism in Spain. Subsequently, researchers such as De-Semir (1996), Revuelta (1999), Fernández-Muerza (2004) and Cortiñas (2006; 2009) analyzed the dissemination of science in Spain, while Duran (1997), Del-Puerto (2000), Cortiñas (2008) and Elías (2008) investigated news handling of scientific results. Meanwhile, Moreno and Gómez (2002) took the first steps in researching the university training of science journalists in Spain. More recently, Cortiñas led studies on perceptions of pseudoscience by science journalists (Cortiñas, Alonso, Pont, & Escribà, 2014) and the impact of the economic crisis on science journalism (Cortiñas, Lazcano-Peña, & Pont, 2015).

Numerous international studies of science journalism analyse the work routines of science journalists and the difficulties and challenges facing the profession (Friedman, 1986; Hansen, 1994; Nelkin, 1995; Peters, 2013; Brumfield, 2009; Irwin, 2009; Williams & Clifford, 2008; Jensen, 2010; Schäfer, 2010; Secko, Amend, & Friday, 2013; Badenschier & Wormer, 2012; Bauer, Howard, Romo-Ramos, Massarani, & Amorim, 2013; Mellor, 2015; Kristiansen, Schäfer, & Lorencez, 2016). Some of these studies discuss the profile and training received by science journalists.

One of the most recent reports on science journalism is the “Global Science Journalism Report: Working Conditions and Practices, Professional Ethos and Future Expectations” (Bauer, Howard, Romo-Ramos, Massarani, & Amorim, 2013). Although this report does not focus specifically on the academic training of science journalists, it does provide some relevant information in this regard – for instance; it documents the fact that only 20%-25% of surveyed science journalists received academic training that combined journalism and science.

In previous studies, mostly focused on the USA and Canada, Palen (1994) also reported that few journalists had received scientific training. Weaver and Wilhoit (1996) confirmed that only 3% of university-educated journalists have a degree in science, regardless of their area of work and Hartz and Chappell (1997) concluded that most science reporters specialized in scientific information in the newsroom.

The studies of the above authors would suggest that journalists, in general, require more scientific training and, even more emphatically, for science journalists in particular.

Referring to science journalism in Spain, Elías (1999) distinguishes between the ‘specialist journalist’ and the ‘journalist by habit’; that is, between journalists with proper scientific training and journalists without scientific training who rate themselves as specialists because they have been working in the area for a long time.

Fahy and Nisbet (2011), in their analysis of the challenges facing science journalism, conclude that the science journalist of today requires scientific knowledge as well as journalistic skills to be able not only to transmit science results but to adopt a critical and analytical perspective. Williams and Clifford (2008), drawing on interviews with 47 UK science journalists, warn that science journalists have insufficient time for investigations and have increasingly become slaves to communiqués and press conferences. Kristiansen, Schäfer, and Lorencez (2016), in a study based on interviews with 78 Swiss science journalists, confirm that although working conditions in Switzerland are privileged in comparison with other countries, the economic crisis and newsroom budgetary cuts have negatively affected the routines of science journalists.

This impact of cutbacks was also confirmed in widely disseminated articles for Nature written by Toby Murcott (2009), science correspondent for the BBC, and Boyce Rensberger (2009), science correspondent for the Washington Post with over 30 years of science journalism and editorial experience. Both journalists also advocated less dependence on press releases and a more critical role for the science journalist. One clear conclusion, shared with Fahy and Nisbet (2011) and Williams and Clifford (2008), was that there was a need for more scientific training for journalists specializing in this area and dealing with often unfavorable working conditions.

2. Material and methods

This research, conducted within an ethnographic methodological context, was based on qualitative techniques (structured in-depth interviews based on open questions and focus group discussions) and quantitative techniques (a closed-question survey). This methodological triangulation allowed us not only to obtain quantitative data but also to observe and report concerns, feelings, and nuances as expressed by the science journalists themselves.

Understood as a science journalist is someone who has demonstrable and considerable experience as a journalist, and whose main professional occupation is to write about science for the media (whatever their academic background). In the case of freelance journalists, only included were freelancers whose dedication was equivalent regarding salary to a reputable journalist specializing in science.

A total of 49 science journalists covering science, technology and the environment for Spanish media were included in this study: 32 men (65%) and 17 women (35%). Regarding media, 35% work in the press, 33% in audiovisual media (radio and television), 16% on the internet, 6% in news agencies and 4% in other media.

There is no specific census of the number of science journalists working for the Spanish media. However, based on data provided by the interviewees themselves and other inferences, we estimate that there are around 150 science journalists in Spain. Our sample can be considered reasonably representative, as it includes a third of all science journalists working for the Spanish media. Journalists from specific newspapers refused to participate as informants, although this fact did not significantly alter the representativeness of this study.

Two focus groups were arranged, lasting (approximately) 90 minutes each: one with 12 and the other with 15 participants, both composed of a similar proportion of science journalists (four of whom were also interviewed) and scientists. The focus groups were held in Barcelona between September and May 2012. Interviews were recorded and transcribed with the permission of the interviewees. Likewise, the focus group discussions and survey were conducted in person, and the confidentiality of the data provided by the informants was guaranteed.

Since the aim of this research was to shed light on the academic training of science journalists and their perceptions regarding the relationship between their profession and training, we attempted to answer three research questions:

• What is the academic profile of science journalists in Spain?

• What is the ideal academic profile for a science journalist?

• What is lacking in the academic training of science journalists and how can this lack be overcome?

3. Analysis and results

Six different science journalist profiles were detected among the study participants and categorized regarding academic training (Figure 1):


Cassany et al 2018a-66315-en001.jpg

• With university studies in journalism/communication without scientific training (n=18; 36.73%).

• With university studies in journalism/communication and a master’s/doctorate in science (n=6; 12.24%).

• With university studies in science without journalism training (n= 6; 12.24%).

• With university studies in science and a master’s/doctorate in journalism/communication (n=12; 24.49%).

• With university studies unrelated to journalism or science (n=4; 8.16%).

• With no university studies (n=3; 6.12%).

3.1. More journalistic than scientific training

The most typical profile of science journalists in Spain –although not in the majority (category a: 36.73%)– is that of a journalist graduate without specialist training in science. Nonetheless, an equal proportion has both scientific and journalistic training (categories b+d; 36.73%). Another 12.24% (category c) have only scientific training, and 14.28% (categories e+f) have neither journalistic nor scientific training. We, therefore, identified four main groups of science journalists in Spain based on their academic training (Figure 2):

• With only journalism training (SJ_jou).

• With only science training (SJ_sci).

• With both journalism and science training (SJ_both)

• With neither scientific nor journalism training (SJ_ neither).


Cassany et al 2018a-66315-en002.jpg

Analyzing these data from the perspective of non-exclusive categories, it can be observed that journalism training takes precedence over science training among our informants: 73.46% (a+b+d: SJ_jou + SJ _both) had some journalistic training, whereas only 48.97% (b+c+d: SJ_sci + SJ_both) had some science training.

3.2. Ideal academic profile for science journalists

One of the most surprising results from both the surveys and the questions asked in the interviews and focus groups was that most science journalists in Spain do not consider a science education to be necessary to exercise as a science journalist. Thus, 59.1% of journalists disagreed or strongly disagreed with the statement: ‘To be a good science journalist it is increasingly necessary to have a degree in science’ (Figure 3).


Cassany et al 2018a-66315-en003.jpg

Breaking down these data according to training, disagreement was greater among those who received only formal training in journalism, 68.1% of whom believed that science training is not necessary. However, even among the science journalists who received both journalism and science training, science training was considered of secondary importance: 47.1% did not believe it to be necessary, whereas only 29.4% considered it necessary (Figure 4).


Cassany et al 2018a-66315-en004.jpg

In contrast, of the science journalists with formal training only in science (just over 12% of the sample), 75% consider science training to be necessary. Finally, not a single science journalist with no training in either science or journalism (just over 8% of the sample) believed that scientific training was necessary.

For the in-depth interviews, the results were similar. In response to the question ‘What is the ideal academic profile for a science journalist?’, 48.97% of informants said that journalistic training was essential, whereas only 28.49% indicated that scientific training was necessary.

3.3. Learning on the job

The above results coincide to a large extent with the conclusions drawn from the focus groups, although with some nuances. For instance, although science journalists did not consider science training to be essential to exercise the profession, they did acknowledge the importance of mixed training and specialization, which could, however, be obtained through experience on the job.

A clear majority of the science journalists considered the experience gained on the job to be more important than academic training, emphasizing the fact of being able to learn from prestigious and experienced professionals.

Although scientific training was relegated to a secondary role by most informants, half (51.02%) proposed training in both areas – not necessarily academic training, but (as has previously been pointed out) acquired through work experience in journalism or science. Reproduced below are some responses that reflect this thinking (SJ followed by a number refers to the science journalists in our sample using an internal code that ensures their anonymity):

“You do not have to have a degree in journalism to exercise the profession. This is learned from practice and attitudes. Having a science degree helps a lot to understand many things, but since science covers many different knowledge fields, a physicist and I are in exactly the same position when faced with zoology. What is really important is attitude and experience” (SJ18).

“I believe that having a science background helps, but I would like to demystify this. It helps not to be afraid of science (...), but the science journalist is not trained at a university. Three years of intense professional activity and you have a good science journalist” (PC22).

These positions are inevitably linked to a criticism of academic journalistic training, and a defense of learning on the job, as reflected in almost half of the responses and also in the focus group discussions. Thus, many informants referred to skills they rate as essential, including “intellectual curiosity” (SJ43), “being interested in science” and “having clear ideas and being focused”. (SJ33). Other similar or related comments were as follows: “You don’t have to have scientific training, but you do have to be generally knowledgeable” (SJ39); “Experience shows that journalists are good when they can manage the tools of the trade” (SJ26); “The key is to do the job well and, to do that, you don’t need to be either a journalist or a scientist, as you can do well coming from either field” (PC37); “Journalism is an art, it’s not something that’s learned by studying” (SJ1); and “I am one of those disillusioned by journalistic training, I think that journalism can be learned on the job” (SJ2).

3.4. Improving training

Journalists conceded (directly or indirectly, in the surveys, interviews and focus groups) that there were deficiencies in their academic training. The closed-question survey results indicate that 73.4% of the informants believed that university journalism and communication faculties do not pay enough attention to science journalism; furthermore, a mere 6% of the informants believed that the necessary importance is attached to science journalism (Figure 5).


Cassany et al 2018a-66315-en005.jpg

Just over a quarter of the informants (26.53%) specifically stated that the level of scientific knowledge is low in newsrooms, where science topics are often covered by generalist journalists without specialist training.

“There are deficiencies regarding a lack of knowledge of the scientific method, research procedures, clinical trials... Science does not prove anything, it discards or proves hypotheses, and [science journalists] sometimes do not understand this” (SJ42).

“We take what we read in journals at face value. It would be a good thing if the journals were afraid if they thought ‘reading is now more critical’. We need to stop believing that everything a scientist says is the truth. Nothing is 100% proven, there is always uncertainty, and that is not explained to readers either. Everything needs to be set in context” (SJ36).

As for how to overcome the shortcomings of training, around half of the informants, referred to scientific training in the form of offering elective subjects and postgraduate or master’s courses and including or reinforcing the subject of science journalism: one respondent went even further, indicating that “science and technology should be mandatory in the curriculum” (SJ14).

Furthermore, 18.36% of the informants believed that the deficiencies in science journalism training are shared by all journalism specialties and that, consequently, improvements in training should be aimed across the board.

However, while the majority do criticise training, there is a clear minority of science journalists who have more positive opinions of the existing training, and focus their criticisms on other aspects. Thus: “The problem is not training but the lack of work. You only have to see the number of people with a master’s out there” (SJ25).

In fact, a considerable number of the science journalists went off the main topic (training) to criticise working conditions, thereby displacing the problem to one of the work settings. The panorama described is one of a wide variety of topics and areas to be covered, the impossibility of specializing properly and, directly related, low pay, and a lack of time. These would point to a precarious work situation for science journalists, who have to write many articles, are unable to do thorough research and, in short, have many limitations on rigorously fulfilling their information function.

“It’s not so much an academic as a working conditions problem. The situation is very precarious (...) very few science journalists are on a payroll. If you are poorly paid and have to write on many different topics, then that’s more a source of error than training. There are journalistic tools that compensate, but if you have little time, quality will suffer” (SJ3).

4. Discussion and conclusions

As the results of this research show, the profile of the science journalist in Spain is complex and heterogeneous. While the academic backgrounds of active professionals are very different, university journalism or communication degree is the most common background. Significant is the fact that while 73.46% of professionals have some journalistic training, only 48.97% have received some scientific training. Just over a third of science journalists have mixed training in both areas. Mixed training, in fact, is considered to be the most suitable profile, even though journalistic training continues to be considered more important than scientific training.

Most science journalists in Spain not only do not have science training but also do not consider it necessary, with almost 60% of the informants of the opinion that a science qualification is not necessary to exercise as a science journalist. Even more revealing is the opinion regarding whether a scientific qualification is necessary to exercise as a science journalist: most (75%) of those with only scientific training, but only 22.7% of those with only journalistic training, considered this necessary. Among those who received both kinds of training, only 29.4% consider it necessary, whereas none of those with no academic training in either journalism or science consider it necessary. Therefore, the more scientific the profile of the journalist, the more value is attached to science training, and vice versa.

The little value that is attached to scientific training for journalists is surprising since scientists indicate that it is precisely the lack of a scientific background that generates distrust towards their work. The science journalists also acknowledge deficiencies in training and the need to be more critical and analytical regarding sources and information. Corroborating both Murcott (2009) and Rensberger (2009), they also suggest the need to foster a more critical role among science journalists regarding questioning, not only scientific findings but the entire scientific process.

Along the same lines, it is interesting to note the dissonance between the ideal and real profiles of science journalists in Spain. According to our sample of science journalists, while journalistic training is more important than scientific training, complementary scientific training for journalism graduates is also fundamental. The ideal profile, therefore, is that of the journalist trained in communication who has received further training in science; the reality is, paradoxically, that only a small minority (12.24% of our informants) have this profile.

Three other conclusions drawn from the study further explain the above paradox and refer to factors with a bearing on the quality and kind of training.

First, it is evident that the journalists attach great importance to ongoing learning and the experience and knowledge that can be acquired outside academia. For many, the best training for a science journalist is on-the-job learning.

Second, the journalists criticize university training for journalists in Spain. A considerable number suggest that specific training in science journalism should be acquired through elective subjects taken as part of the undergraduate degree or through a master’s degree. In fact, fully 73.4% of the journalists in our sample consider that Spanish journalism and communication faculties do not attach sufficient importance to this specialty.

Third, many journalists place the spotlight, not on academic training, but on working conditions in Spain: low pay, lack of time and general employment precariousness hinder in-depth investigation, specialization, and further training. This last conclusion corroborates those of previous studies in Spain that document how newsrooms have undergone a profound transformation in recent decades, with many veterans and experienced journalists replaced by young, inexperienced or trainee journalists lacking the expertise to be able to tackle the complexity of science journalism (Cortiñas, Lazcano-Peña, & Pont, 2015).

Finally, regarding the future of the profession, most science journalists in our sample advocate the need to promote mixed or interdisciplinary profiles, whether through formal training or tutored work experience. For most of these journalists, on-the-job learning is the key to the development of a good science journalist. Nonetheless, it continues to be desirable for both academia and the media to invest greater efforts and resources in the training and growth of professionals capable of communicating science from a rigorous and critical perspective.

In universities, therefore, communication and scientific faculties both need to foster hybrid training, which could be done by including science topics (especially on the scientific method) in humanities degrees, and of writing and communication topics in science degrees, by offering science journalism electives in undergraduate degrees, and by offering master’s degrees and specialist postgraduate courses to both journalists and scientists. Training good science journalists –more than a dilemma for ethnographers– is essential to the successful communication of science and to building a better society.

Funding agency

This research was funded by the Spanish Ministry of the Economy and Competition under R+D+i Project ‘Science journalism in Spain and the new information technologies: current map and proposals to improve communication processes’ (CSO2011-25969, 2014).

References

Badenschier, F., & Wormer, H. (2012). Issue selection in science journalism: Towards a special theory of news values for science news? In S. Rödder, M. Francen, & P. Weingart (Eds.), The sciences’ media connection: Public communication and its repercussions (pp. 59-86). Dordrecht: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-2085-5_4

Bauer, M., Howard, S., Romo-Ramos, Y., Massarani, L., & Amorim, L. (2013). Global Science Journalism Report: working conditions & Practices, Professional Ethos and Future Expectations. London: Science and Development Network (https://goo.gl/rqMThJ).

Besley, J. (2010). Imagining public engagement. Public Understanding of Science. 21(5), 590-605. https://doi.org/10.1177%2F0963662510379792

Brumfield, G. (2009). Supplanting the old media? Nature 458(19), 274-277. https://doi.org/10.1038/458274a

Calvo-Hernando, M. (1977). Periodismo científico. Madrid: Paraninfo.

Cortiñas, S. (2006). Les estratègies redaccionals de la periodística de Javier Sampedro i la seva relació amb les principals tradicions de divulgació científica (Tesis doctoral). Barcelona: Universitat Pompeu Fabra. (https://goo.gl/wNbygA).

Cortiñas, S. (2008). Metaphors of DNA: A review of the popularisation processes. Journal of Science Communication (JCOM), 7(1), 1-8. (https://goo.gl/T524KU).

Cortiñas, S. (2009). Història de la divulgació científica. Vic: Eumo.

Cortiñas, S., Alonso, F., Pont, C., & Escribà, E. (2014). Science journalists perceptions and attitudes to pseudoscience in Spain. Public Understanding of Science, 24(4), 450-465. https://doi.org/10.1177%2F0963662514558991

Cortiñas, S., Lazcano-Peña, D., & Pont, C. (2015). Periodistas científicos y efectos de la crisis sobre la información de ciencia: ¿hacia dónde va la profesión? Estudio del caso español. Panace@, 16(42), 142-150 (https://goo.gl/7soQQY).

De Semir, V. (1996). What is Newsworthy? The Lancet, 347(9009), 1163-1166. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(96)90614-5

Del Puerto, C. (2000). Periodismo científico: la astronomía en titulares de prensa (Tesis doctoral). Tenerife: Universidad de la Laguna. (https://goo.gl/vvp9PX).

Duran, X. (1997). Tractament periodístic de dos fets tecnològics: Els primers Sputnik (1957) i l’arribada a la lluna (1969) a la premsa diaria de Barcelona. (Tesis doctoral). Barcelona: Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. (https://goo.gl/usjNN5 / https://goo.gl/Yo657T).

Elías, C. (1999). Periodistas especializados y acostumbrados: La divulgación de la ciencia. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 20. (https://goo.gl/QnAjp2).

Elías, C. (2008). Fundamentos de periodismo científico y divulgación mediática. Madrid: Alianza Editorial.

Fahy, D., & Nisbet, M. (2011). The science journalist online: Emerging practices. Journalism, 12(7), 778-793. https://doi.org/10.1177%2F1464884911412697

Fernández-Muerza, A. (2004). Estudio del periodismo de información científica en la prensa de referencia: El caso español a partir de un análisis comparativo. (Tesis doctoral). Bilbao: Universidad del País Vasco.

Franco, M. (2008). Los desafíos de hacer periodismo científico en Colombia: conocer, educar y difundir. In L. Massarani & C. Polino (Eds.), Los desafíos y la evaluación del periodismo científico en Iberoamérica (pp. 97-107). Jornadas Iberoamericanas sobre Ciencia en los Medios Masivos. Santa Cruz de la Sierra: AECI, RICYT, CYTEDm SciDevNet, OEA. (https://goo.gl/1vg5EM).

Friedman, S. (1986). Scientists and Journalists. Reporting science as news. Nueva York: American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Hansen, A. (1994). Journalistic practices and science reporting in the British press. Public Understanding of Science, 23 3), 237-243. https://doi.org/10.1088%2F0963-6625%2F3%2F2%2F001

Hartz, J., & Chappell, R. (1997). Worlds apart: How the distance between science and journalism threatens America’s future. Nashville: First Amendment Center. (https://goo.gl/C2ZuVC).

Irwin, A. (2009). Science journalism ‘flourishing’ in developing world. SciDevNet. (https://goo.gl/pofaeD).

Jensen, E. (2010). Between credulity and skepticism: Envosaging the fourth estate in 21st-century science journalism. Media, Culture & Society, 32, 615-630. https://doi.org/10.1177%2F0163443710367695

Kristiansen, S., Schäfer, M., & Lorencez, S. (2016). Science journalists in Switzerland: Results from a survey on professional goals, working conditions, and current changes. Studies in Communication Sciences, 16(2), 132-140. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scoms.2016.10.004

Lynch, J., Bennett, D., Luntz, A., Toy, C., & Van-Benschoten, E. (2014). Bridging science and journalism: Indentifying the role of pubic relations in the construction and circulation of stem cell research among laypeople. Science Communication, 36(4), 479-501 https://doi.org/10.1177%2F1075547014533661

Mellor, F. (2015). Non-news values in science journalism. In B. Rappert, & B. Balmer (Eds.), Absence in science, security and policy: from several agendas to global strategy (pp. 93-113). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. (https://goo.gl/ceJZ3J).

Meneses-Fernández, D., & Martín-Gutiérrez, J. (2015). ¿Tienen razón los investigadores al quejarse de la información periodística sobre ciencias? Experiencias con alumnos de Periodismo y científicos. Revista Española de Documentación Científica, 38(4), e104. https://doi.org/10.3989/redc.2015.4.1252

Moreno, C. (2003). La investigación universitaria en periodismo científico. Ámbitos. 9-10, 121-141. (https://goo.gl/bfi18m).

Moreno, C., & Gómez, J.L. (2002). Science and technology in journalists training. [Ciencia y tecnología en la formación de los futuros comunicadores]. Comunicar, 19, 19-24. (https://goo.gl/PUDf1Q).

Murcott, T. (2009). Science journalism: Toppling the priesthood. Nature, 459(7250), 1054-1055. https://doi.org/10.1038/4591054a

Nelkin, D. (1995). Selling science: How the press covers science and technology. New York: W.H. Freeman.

Palen, J.A. (1994). A map for science reporters: Science, technology, and society studies concepts in basic reporting and newswriting textbooks. Michigan Academician, 26, 507-519.

Peters, H.P. (2013). Gap between science and media revisited: Scientists as public communicators. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 110(3), 14102-14109. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1212745110

Rensberger, B. (2009). Science Journalism: Too close for confort. Nature, 459(7250), 1055-1056. https://doi.org/10.1038/4591055a

Revuelta, G. (1999). Situación del periodismo científico en la Unión Europea. Comunicar ciencia en el siglo XX: I Congreso sobre Comunicación Social de la Ciencia, 1 (pp. 255-261). (https://goo.gl/QMfh99).

Rosen, C., Guenther, L., & Froehlich, K. (2016). The question of newsworthiness: A cross-comparison among science journalists’ selection criteria in Argentina, France and Germany. Science Communication, 38(3), 328-355. https://doi.org/10.1177%2F1075547016645585

Schäfer, M. (2010). Taking stock: a meta-analysis of studies on the media’s coverage of science. Public Understanding of Science 21(6), 650-663. https://doi.org/10.1177%2F0963662510387559

Secko, D., Amend, E., & Friday, T. (2013). Four models of science journalism. Journalism Practice, 7(1), 62-80. https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2012.691351

Weaver, D.H., & Wilhoit, G.C. (1996). The American journalist in the 1990s: U.S. News people at the end of an era. Mahwah: Lawrence Erlbaum. (https://goo.gl/Za5VTh).

Williams, A., & Clifford, S. (2008). Mapping the field: Specialist science news journalism in the UK national media. Cardiff: Cardiff University School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies. (https://goo.gl/qiPZPH).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

El periodista científico es uno de los principales responsables en la cadena de transmisión e interpretación hacia la sociedad de toda noticia, novedad o avance de carácter científico. A su vez, una información científica rigurosa, comprensible y de calidad es, además, un indicador del desarrollo social. La demanda de este tipo de información crece cada día en nuestras sociedades, tanto por parte de los gobiernos como de los ciudadanos. Por este motivo, y con el objetivo de esclarecer cuál es el perfil de los periodistas científicos que deben lidiar con tal responsabilidad, cómo se han formado y cómo ellos mismos creen que deberían haber sido formados, en esta investigación analizamos los perfiles académicos (tanto el real como el ideal) de estos profesionales en España. Utilizando una metodología etnográfica, basada en entrevistas, cuestionarios y focus group con periodistas científicos que trabajan en los principales medios españoles, analizamos su trayectoria académica y sus consideraciones y propuestas al respecto. Los resultados muestran un escenario complejo y heterogéneo, pero también revelan que la mayoría de los periodistas científicos no solo no goza de una titulación universitaria en el ámbito científico, sino que tampoco la considera necesaria. Los periodistas científicos son críticos con el sistema educativo y consideran que la mejor forma de aprender es trabajar en los medios, más que estudiar.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

La ciencia es parte integral de nuestras vidas y un indicador del desarrollo social de las sociedades democráticas. Por ello, su divulgación y popularización es un reto prioritario para la Unión Europea y para gobiernos e instituciones internacionales de todo el mundo. Franco (2008: 97), en su estudio sobre los desafíos del periodismo científico, sostiene que «la ciencia es uno de los pilares de la sociedad, con ella se construye la ciudadanía, se combate la enfermedad, se vence la pobreza y se ganan guerras».

Sin embargo, acercar al gran público de forma clara y comprensible los conocimientos y avances científicos, así como sus implicaciones en nuestro hábitat y nuestra vida diaria, no es tarea fácil. Es una responsabilidad compartida entre periodistas, medios de comunicación, científicos y gobiernos. Pero en la mayoría de los casos son los periodistas científicos, los últimos de la cadena de transmisión, los encargados de reelaborar en clave periodística significados científicos, muchos de ellos con alto grado de complejidad y abstracción conceptual y metodológica. Como dicen Bauer, Howard, Romo-Ramos, Massarani y Amorim (2013: 1), «la discusión social sobre ciencia es vital para cualquier cultura moderna, y es de gran importancia identificar las condiciones cambiantes en que se produce esta discusión sobre ciencia en diferentes contextos. Claramente, los periodistas científicos juegan un papel fundamental».

No obstante, el trabajo de los periodistas científicos, a pesar de gozar de gran consenso sobre su importante función social, no siempre es valorado por los editores de los medios de comunicación, que tienden a relegarlo a espacios menores (Brumfield, 2009; Williams & Clifford, 2008); y no siempre es aplaudido por la comunidad científica, que a menudo ve en la traducción periodística de sus investigaciones imperfecciones o simplificaciones, a veces con toques sensacionalistas (Rosen, Guenther, & Froehlich, 2016; Lynch, Bennett, Luntz, Toy, & Van-Benschoten, 2014).

El astrofísico y divulgador científico Neil deGrasse Tyson se preguntaba en mayo del 2014 en el programa StarTalk de la CNN conducido por el periodista científico Miles O’Brien, «¿qué es lo que va mal en el periodismo científico?». Su respuesta ponía el acento en cuestiones como el afán de protagonismo de los periodistas, las audiencias y los liderazgos (Meneses-Fernández & Martín-Gutiérrez, 2015). Los periodistas científicos, según DeGrasse, tendían a desviarse de un periodismo científico de calidad por causas ajenas a los científicos y a la ciencia y ponía en duda la conveniencia del perfil exclusivamente comunicador de los periodistas, achacándoles el no tener suficiente formación científica. Este solo es un ejemplo de las no siempre buenas relaciones entre científicos y periodistas, ampliamente estudiadas por autores como Calvo-Hernando (1977), Besley (2010), Bauer, Howard, Romo-Ramos, Massarani y Amorim (2013), Peters (2013), Lynch, Bennett, Luntz, Toy y Van-Benschoten (2014), y Meneses-Fernández y Martín-Gutiérrez (2015).

¿Quiénes son, pues, los periodistas científicos? ¿Qué formación han recibido para lidiar con tal responsabilidad? El propósito de este artículo es precisamente explorar el perfil académico del periodista científico. En concreto, los objetivos son tres: 1) Analizar la formación académica que ha recibido el periodista científico; 2) Analizar la formación académica que los mismos periodistas consideran ideal para realizar su trabajo, comparándola con la formación realmente recibida; 3) Analizar cuáles son las carencias que presenta el sistema educativo español en este ámbito y cómo se podrían resolver.

Los orígenes del periodismo científico moderno se sitúan entre finales del siglo XIX y la cuarta década del siglo XX, coincidiendo con la Segunda Revolución Industrial y las dos Guerras Mundiales. Entonces crecía el interés ciudadano por los avances tecnológicos sobre todo en relación con propósitos bélicos, la energía atómica o la carrera espacial. En España, no es hasta la década de los años 80 y de los años 90 del siglo XX que se comienzan a incluir páginas o secciones especializadas en ciencia y tecnología o suplementos especializados en los periódicos de referencia (Moreno, 2003).

Sin embargo, el escenario ha cambiado en los últimos años, puesto que el periodismo científico ha sido una de las especializaciones periodísticas más golpeadas por la crisis económica que, en los últimos años, ha afectado buena parte de Europa y del mundo: la mayoría de suplementos y secciones científicas han desaparecido o han quedado reducidas a la mínima expresión, lo que inevitablemente ha provocado reducciones de personal, reestructuración de las redacciones y de las funciones de los redactores (Kristiansen, Schäfer, & Lorencez, 2016; Cortiñas, Lazcano-Peña, & Pont, 2015; Williams & Clifford, 2008). No es erróneo pensar, tampoco, que este golpe puede haber provocado en los últimos años cambios importantes en las rutinas de trabajo y en los perfiles de los periodistas científicos. Y si bien es cierto que existen numerosos y valiosos antecedentes bibliográficos sobre el periodismo científico en España, no existen investigaciones que utilicen técnicas etnográficas para acercarse a los perfiles de los periodistas científicos y que relacionen su profesión con su formación.

El periodista Manuel Calvo-Hernando (1977) sentó las bases para la investigación del periodismo científico en España; más adelante, investigadores como De-Semir (1996), Revuelta (1999), Fernández-Muerza (2004) y Cortiñas (2006; 2009), entre otros, analizaron la divulgación del conocimiento científico; Duran (1997), Del-Puerto (2000), Cortiñas (2008) y Elías (2008), entre otros, investigaron el tratamiento informativo de los hechos científicos; Moreno y Gómez dieron los primeros pasos en la investigación de la formación universitaria de los periodistas científicos en España (2002); y el mismo Cortiñas lideró estudios sobre la percepción de la pseudociencia por parte de los periodistas científicos (Cortiñas, Alonso, Pont, & Escribà, 2014) y los efectos de la crisis económica en esta especialidad del periodismo (Cortiñas, Lazcano-Peña, & Pont, 2015).

A nivel internacional, son muchos los estudios sobre el periodismo científico que analizan las rutinas de trabajo de los periodistas científicos y las dificultades y los retos de la profesión (Friedman, 1986; Hansen, 1994; Nelkin, 1995; Peters, 2013; Brumfield, 2009; Irwin, 2009; Williams & Clifford, 2008; Jensen, 2010; Schäfer, 2010; Secko, Amend, & Friday, 2013; Badenschier & Wormer, 2012; Bauer, Howard, Romo-Ramos, Massarani, & Amorim, 2013; Mellor, 2015; Kristiansen, Schäfer, & Lorencez, 2016). Algunos de estos estudios sí ponen parte del foco en el perfil y la formación recibida por parte de los periodistas científicos.

Uno de los más recientes sobre el periodista científico es «Informe periodístico-científico global: condiciones y prácticas de trabajo, ética profesional y expectativas futuras» (Bauer, Howard, Romo Ramos, Massarani, & Amorim, 2013). Aunque el propósito de esta investigación no se centra en la formación académica de los periodistas científicos, sí que aporta al respecto algunos datos relevantes: Solo entre un 20% y un 25% de los periodistas científicos encuestados goza de una formación académica titulada que combina periodismo y ciencia.

En estudios anteriores, la mayoría centrados en Estados Unidos y Canadá, Palen (1994) afirmaba que son pocos los periodistas que poseen formación científica. Por su parte, Hartz y Chappel (1997) concluían que la mayoría de redactores de ciencia se especializaban en información científica en el trabajo en la redacción. Weaver y Wilhoit (1996) aportaban más cifras: solo el 3% de los periodistas con formación universitaria tiene titulación en ciencias, con independencia de su área de trabajo.

Todos estos autores defendían, en sus respectivos estudios, que el periodismo en general echa en falta y también requiere más formación científica. Y, todavía con más énfasis, reclamaban una mayor formación científica dentro del colectivo de periodistas científicos.

En España, Elías (1999) distingue entre el «periodista especializado» en ciencias y el «periodista acostumbrado»: eso es, entre el periodista realmente especializado y formado en ciencias, y el periodista que «se cree especializado» porque lleva mucho tiempo en una sección, pero que sin embargo no lo es porque no ha adquirido los conocimientos necesarios para especializarse durante su formación académica.

Fahy y Nisbet (2011), en su análisis de los retos para el periodismo científico, concluyen que el periodista científico de hoy debe dejar de actuar como un mero transmisor de los resultados científicos y adoptar un papel cada vez más crítico y analítico, lo que a menudo, además de aptitudes periodísticas, requiere conocimientos científicos. En una línea similar Williams y Clifford (2008), con entrevistas a 47 periodistas científicos del Reino Unido, advierten que estos profesionales tienen poco tiempo para trabajar en reportajes e investigaciones propias, y se convierten, cada vez más, en esclavos de los comunicados y las ruedas de prensa. Por otro lado, Kristiansen, Schäfer y Lorencez (2016), con entrevistas a 78 periodistas científicos suizos, constatan que las condiciones de trabajo en Suiza son privilegiadas en comparación con otros países, pero también revelan que la crisis económica y los recortes en las redacciones han afectado las rutinas de los periodistas científicos.

Esta misma circunstancia ya fue descrita por Toby Murcott (2009), responsable de la información científica de la BBC, en su conocido artículo en la revista «Nature». En el mismo número de la revista, Boyce Rensberger (2009), periodista científico del «Washington Post» con más de treinta años de experiencia, apuntaba a conclusiones parecidas. Ambos periodistas abogaban por una menor dependencia de los comunicados de prensa y por una función más crítica del periodista científico. De sus ensayos resultaba clara una conclusión, latente también en los trabajos de Fahy y Nisbet (2011) y de Williams y Clifford (2008): la necesidad de una mayor formación científica para los periodistas que tuvieran que lidiar con dicha información y con condiciones de trabajo no siempre favorables.

2. Material y métodos

Para realizar esta investigación se han utilizado técnicas cualitativas (entrevista estructurada de preguntas abiertas y focus group) y cuantitativas (encuesta de preguntas cerradas), dentro de un contexto metodológico etnográfico. Esta triangulación metodológica ha permitido, no solo obtener datos cuantificables de gran valor para los objetivos de la investigación, sino también percibir y reportar las inquietudes, los matices y las sensaciones expresadas por los propios periodistas científicos.

En concreto, se ha entrevistado a un total de 49 periodistas científicos españoles, entendiendo periodista científico como aquel profesional que ejerce de periodista (sea cual sea su formación académica) y escribe sobre ciencia en los medios, siendo esta su ocupación profesional principal, con experiencia demostrable y considerable en este ámbito. En el caso de los periodistas free-lance solo se han considerado aquellos casos en los que su dedicación era equivalente en salario a la de un periodista especializado en ciencia y de reconocido prestigio. A pesar de no contar con un censo específico sobre la cantidad de periodistas científicos en los medios españoles, a partir de los datos facilitados por los mismos entrevistados, así como otras inferencias, estimamos que hay un universo de cerca de 150 periodistas dedicados a esta actividad en España. Nuestra muestra es, por consiguiente, de considerable valor, pues está en ella un tercio del conjunto total de periodistas científicos del sistema mediático español. En unos pocos casos, periodistas de periódicos concretos rechazaron participar como informantes, aunque este hecho no alteró de manera significativa la representatividad del estudio.

A partir de estos criterios, han sido entrevistados y encuestados para este estudio periodistas científicos de medios españoles dedicados a la cobertura de temas de ciencia, tecnología o medio ambiente. De ellos, 32 son hombres (65%) y 17 mujeres (35%). En cuanto al medio, el 35% trabaja en prensa, 33% en medios audiovisuales (radio y televisión), 16% en Internet, 6% en agencias informativas, y 4% en otros medios.

Por otro lado, se han realizado dos focus group, de 90 minutos (aproximadamente): uno con 12 integrantes y el otro con 15, formados ambos y con proporciones equivalentes, por periodistas científicos (cuatro de los cuales forman parte también del grupo de periodistas entrevistados) y por científicos. Los focus group fueron realizados en Barcelona, entre septiembre y mayo de 2012. Tanto las entrevistas, que se grabaron y transcribieron con permiso de los entrevistados, como los focus group y las encuestas, se realizaron presencialmente y se garantizó la confidencialidad de los datos aportados a los informantes.

Este artículo tiene como objetivo aportar luz sobre la formación académica de los periodistas científicos y conocer las percepciones y opiniones que tienen sobre la relación entre su profesión y la formación. Este estudio trata de responder a tres preguntas de investigación:

• ¿Qué perfil académico tienen los periodistas científicos en España?

• ¿Cuál es el mejor perfil para desarrollar la profesión de periodista científico?

• ¿Qué carencias tienen los periodistas científicos en relación a su formación académica y cómo se pueden resolver?

3. Análisis y resultados

Para esta investigación se han detectado y categorizado seis perfiles diferentes entre los periodistas científicos en cuanto a su formación académica, a partir de las entrevistas en profundidad (Figura 1):

• Con estudios universitarios en periodismo o comunicación (sin formación científica); 18 (36,73%).


Cassany et al 2018a-66315 ov-es001.jpg

• Con estudios universitarios en periodismo o comunicación y con especialización (máster o doctorado) en ciencia; 6 (12,24%).

• Con estudios universitarios en alguna disciplina científica (sin formación periodística); 6 (12,24%).

• Con estudios universitarios en alguna disciplina científica y con especialización (máster o doctorado) en periodismo o comunicación; 12 (24,49%).

• Con estudios universitarios no relacionados ni con el periodismo ni con la ciencia; 4 (8,16%).

• Sin estudios universitarios; 3 (6,12%).

3.1. Más formación periodística que científica

De estos primeros resultados se deduce que el perfil más habitual, sin ser mayoritario (poco más de un tercio), es el de periodista graduado sin formación de especialización en ciencias. Pero de allí se desprenden otros datos: un 36,73% (b + d) de los periodistas científicos en España tiene una formación tanto científica como periodística; otro 36,73% (a), como hemos visto, tiene formación solo periodística; otro 12,24% (c) tiene únicamente formación científica; y un 14,28 % (e + f) no tiene ni formación periodística ni científica. Podemos establecer aquí cuatro grupos de periodistas científicos en España en función de su formación académica (Figura 2):

• El periodista científico que tiene solo formación periodística (FP).

• El periodista científico que tiene solo formación científica (FC).

• El periodista científico que tiene formación tanto periodística como científica (FCP).

• El periodista científico que no tiene formación ni científica ni periodística (SF).

Si analizamos estos datos desde otra perspectiva, con categorías no excluyentes, vemos que la formación periodística prima sobre la formación científica. Un 73,46% (FCP+FP) tiene algún tipo de formación periodística, mientras que solo el 48,97% (FCP+FC) tiene algún tipo de formación científica.


Cassany et al 2018a-66315 ov-es002.jpg

3.2. ¿Cuál es el perfil académico más idóneo para el desarrollo del periodismo científico, según los entrevistados?

Tanto de las encuestas, como de las preguntas de las entrevistas en profundidad y de los focus group, se desprende uno de los principales resultados de esta investigación, que tal vez pueda resultar sorprendente: la mayoría de los periodistas científicos en España no cree necesaria la formación en ciencias.

Si analizamos primero los datos que resultan de las encuestas, el 59,1% de los periodistas está en desacuerdo o en total desacuerdo con la afirmación: Para ser un buen periodista científico es cada vez más necesario tener una titulación en ciencias (Figura 3).


Cassany et al 2018a-66315 ov-es003.jpg

Si separamos estos datos según la formación de los encuestados, el desacuerdo con la afirmación aumenta en el grupo de periodistas científicos que han recibido únicamente formación reglada en periodismo: un 68,1% cree que la formación científica no es necesaria. Sin embargo, incluso entre aquellos que han recibido ambas formaciones, la científica queda relegada a un segundo término: entre los periodistas científicos que han recibido formación académica tanto periodística como científica, el 47,1% no cree necesaria la formación científica y solo el 29,4% la considera necesaria (Figura 4).


Cassany et al 2018a-66315 ov-es004.jpg

Por el contrario, en el caso de los periodistas científicos con formación reglada únicamente en ciencias (que en el conjunto del sistema mediático español representan solo el 12% de la profesión), el 75% sí considera necesaria la formación en ciencias. Finalmente, entre los periodistas científicos que no tienen formación ni en ciencias ni en periodismo, los datos son aún más contundentes: ninguno de ellos cree necesaria la formación científica.

Si nos centramos ahora en las entrevistas en profundidad, los resultados son similares. A la pregunta «¿Cuál es el mejor perfil académico para desarrollar su función?», la formación en periodismo tiene mayor consideración: el 48,97% de los entrevistados afirma que esta formación es indispensable para la profesión, mientras que son relativamente pocos, de nuevo, los que defienden que una formación científica es claramente necesaria (28,49%).

3.3. Aprender trabajando

Estos resultados coinciden en gran medida si analizamos, finalmente, las conclusiones obtenidas de los focus group, aunque con matices: los periodistas científicos no consideran necesaria la formación en ciencias para ejercer la profesión, aunque al mismo tiempo ven importante la formación mixta y especialización, algo que, no obstante, en su opinión puede obtenerse trabajando, con la experiencia.

En concreto, en los focus group, una mayoría clara de los periodistas pone en primer lugar, por encima de la formación académica, la experiencia que se adquiere trabajando, haciendo también hincapié en el hecho de poder ejercer la profesión al lado de profesionales de prestigio y experimentados de los cuales aprender.

En las entrevistas, si bien es cierto que la formación científica es relegada por la mayoría a un segundo plano, es también cierto que la mitad de los entrevistados (51,02%) apuesta por una formación en los dos ámbitos, pero no necesariamente académica, sino, como se ha apuntado, adquirida con la experiencia y trabajando, sea en periodismo o en ciencia. Estas son algunas de las respuestas que dan cuenta de ello (PC18 se refiere al Periodista Científico número 18, siendo una codificación interna que garantiza el anonimato de los periodistas que han participado en este trabajo):

«No hay que tener un título de periodismo para ejercer la profesión, esto lo da la práctica y actitudes del sujeto. Y tener una carrera científica ayuda mucho a entender muchas cosas, pero como la cantidad de conocimientos de ciencia abarca muchos campos, un físico y yo estamos igual ante la zoología. Lo realmente importante es la actitud y la experiencia» (PC18).

«Yo creo que tener una formación científica ayuda, pero quisiera desmitificarlo. Ayuda a no tener miedo a la ciencia (…) Pero el periodista científico no se forma en una carrera. Con tres años de actividad profesional intensa puede haber un periodista científico bueno» (PC22).

Estas posturas van inevitablemente ligadas a una crítica a los estudios académicos de periodismo y una defensa de la profesión y del trabajo diario en la redacción como aprendizaje, algo que aparece en prácticamente la mitad de las respuestas y también en los focus group. Así, muchos apelan a aptitudes que consideran imprescindibles tales como la «curiosidad intelectual» (PC43), «interés por la ciencia» o «la cabeza amueblada» (PC33). O también: «No es necesario ni tener cultura científica, sino cultura general» (PC39), «la experiencia te demuestra que los periodistas son buenos cuando son buenos con las herramientas del oficio» (PC26), «la esencia es hacerlo bien y para hacerlo, no es imprescindible ni ser periodista ni científico; puedes hacerlo bien viniendo de los dos campos» (PC37), «el periodismo es un sacramento, no es una cosa que se estudia» (PC1) o «yo soy una desencantada de la formación periodística, pienso que eso se puede aprender trabajando» (PC2).

3.4. Mejorar la formación

De modo más o menos explícito, los periodistas admiten (tanto en las encuestas como en las entrevistas y en los focus group) carencias en su propia formación académica. En las encuestas con preguntas cerradas los datos son claros: el 73,4% de los encuestados cree que las facultades de periodismo y comunicación no prestan suficiente atención al periodismo científico y solo el 6% cree que sí se da la importancia necesaria a esta especialidad (Figura 5).


Cassany et al 2018a-66315 ov-es005.jpg

En las entrevistas en profundidad una cuarta parte de los entrevistados (26,53%) señala específicamente que el conocimiento científico en las redacciones es bajo, porque los temas de ciencia son a menudo cubiertos por periodistas generalistas sin una formación especializada.

«Hay carencias de falta de conocimiento del método científico, el proceso de una investigación, los ensayos clínicos… La ciencia en realidad no demuestra nada, descarta o acepta hipótesis, y (los periodistas científicos) eso a veces no lo entienden» (PC42).

«Lo que leemos de las revistas nos lo creemos a pies juntillas. Estaría bien que las revistas cogieran miedo, que pensaran ‘ahora me leen con más tino’. [La solución a ello sería] Que se deje de percibir todo lo que un científico dice como verdad. No hay nada 100% demostrado, siempre hay incertidumbre y eso tampoco se lo explicamos a los lectores. Hay que contextualizar todo» (PC36).

Como forma de subsanar las carencias de la formación, aparece en alrededor de la mitad de las respuestas la formación científica de posgrado o máster y la importancia de las materias optativas, además de la necesidad de impartir o reforzar la asignatura de periodismo científico. PC14 va incluso más allá y considera que «los conocimientos en ciencia y tecnología tendrían que incluirse en el currículum como algo obligatorio».

Por otro lado, el 18,36% de los entrevistados considera que las carencias en la formación del periodismo científico son compartidas con todos los periodismos especializados y que las hipotéticas mejoras en la formación deberían dirigirse a la especialización periodística en general.

Sin embargo, la crítica a la formación, aunque amplia, no goza de consenso completo entre los profesionales. Aunque en clara minoría, hay quien es optimista sobre este aspecto y concentra la crítica sobre otros aspectos: «El problema no es la formación sino la falta de trabajo. No hay más que ver la cantidad de másteres que hay» (PC25).

De hecho, existe un número considerable de respuestas que se desvían del tema propuesto (la formación) y articulan una crítica general a las condiciones laborales del periodista, desplazando el problema del profesional a su entorno. El panorama descrito es: la extensa variedad de temas y ámbitos que el periodista científico debe cubrir, ligada a la imposibilidad de especializarse, y, en directa relación con ello, la falta de dinero o tiempo, conduce a la precarización del periodista científico. En este entorno, el periodista tiene la necesidad de escribir mucho, no puede hacer investigación a fondo y, en definitiva, no puede cumplir con rigor su función divulgativa en plenas condiciones.

«No es tanto un problema académico como laboral. Cuando la precariedad es muy grande… Son muy pocos los periodistas científicos que puedan vivir con nómina. Si estás mal pagado y tienes que escribir muchos temas, de ahí vienen más los errores que de la formación. Hay herramientas periodísticas para suplir tus carencias. Pero si tienes poco tiempo, irás restando (calidad)» (PC3).

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Como muestran los resultados de este trabajo, el perfil del periodista científico en España es complejo y heterogéneo. Las procedencias académicas de los profesionales en activo son sumamente dispares. Aun así, la formación académica en periodismo o comunicación es la más común. De hecho, es significativo que mientras el 73,46% de los profesionales tiene algún tipo de formación periodística, solo el 48,97% ha recibido algún tipo de formación científica. Solo poco más de un tercio de los profesionales goza de una formación mixta en ambos ámbitos, descrita por muchos como el perfil más idóneo, aunque dando siempre más valor, en la mayoría de los casos, a la base académica periodística.

Otra conclusión de peso, que da respuesta al segundo objetivo de este estudio: la mayoría de los periodistas científicos en España no solo no tiene formación en ciencias, sino que no la considera necesaria. En concreto, casi el 60% de los encuestados no cree que sea necesaria una titulación científica para ejercer la profesión. Si vamos un paso más allá, los resultados son todavía más reveladores: solo los periodistas científicos con formación académica únicamente científica consideran en su mayoría (75% de ellos) necesaria tener una titulación científica. En cambio, solo el 22,7% de los periodistas científicos con formación únicamente periodística consideran necesaria la titulación científica. De entre los que gozan de ambas formaciones, solo 29,4% la considera necesaria y ninguno de los que no gozan de formación académica ni en periodismo ni en ciencias la considera necesaria. Es decir, cuanto más científico es el perfil del periodista más valor da a la formación académica en ciencias. Y viceversa.

El poco valor que en general se da a la formación científica del periodista sorprende, puesto que los científicos admiten que la falta de formación científica genera desconfianza hacia el trabajo que realizan. Al mismo tiempo, el periodista admite carencias en su formación y la necesidad de ser más crítico y analítico con las fuentes e informaciones científicas. Los mismos periodistas científicos del estudio han dado cuenta de la necesidad de promover una función más crítica del periodista científico para que sea capaz de poner en duda no solo hallazgos científicos sino todo el proceso que ha llevado a ellos, algo que difícilmente se hace. Esta misma reivindicación ya fue descrita por Murcott (2009) o por Rensberger (2009).

En relación a este mismo punto, es interesante ver la discordancia entre el perfil que los mismos periodistas científicos consideran ideal para su profesión y el perfil real del colectivo. En su mayoría, los periodistas consideran que la formación periodística es más necesaria que la científica (algo que sí que se corresponde con la realidad), pero ellos mismos consideran fundamental una formación científica complementaria cuando la principal formación es periodística (algo que, en cambio, se da solo en un 12,24% de los casos).

Es decir, el perfil que los mismos periodistas científicos consideran más idóneo en el sector es el del periodista formado en comunicación que ha recibido una formación posterior en ciencias. Sin embargo, es algo paradójico que solo el 12,24% de los entrevistados responda en realidad a este perfil. A continuación se señalan otras tres conclusiones derivadas del estudio, algunas de las cuales, a su vez, ayudan a explicar un poco más esta paradoja indicada y dan respuesta al tercer objetivo de este estudio: cuáles son las carencias y cómo se pueden resolver:

En primer lugar, los periodistas dan un gran valor al aprendizaje continuo y a la experiencia, así como a los conocimientos que se adquieren trabajando o lejos de las aulas. Para muchos, buena parte de la formación necesaria para un periodista científico se adquiere trabajando.

En segundo lugar, expresan críticas a la formación universitaria y al sistema educativo español en general. Un número considerable reclama una formación específica en periodismo científico a través de másteres o asignaturas optativas durante el grado. De hecho, el 73,4% de los encuestados cree que las facultades de periodismo y comunicación no prestan suficiente atención a esta especialidad.

Y, en tercer lugar, son también muchos los que, de un modo u otro, desplazan la crítica y achacan las carencias en la formación no tanto a las instituciones académicas sino a las condiciones laborales del periodista en España: la falta de dinero o de tiempo, que conduce a la precarización del periodista científico, dificulta la especialización, la investigación a fondo y su propia formación durante su carrera profesional.

Esta última conclusión coincide con las de anteriores estudios en España. Las redacciones en los medios han sufrido recientemente una transformación profunda, con el abandono de los periodistas veteranos y experimentados, que han sido sustituidos por periodistas jóvenes o becarios, ambos sin suficiente experiencia para lidiar con garantías ante la información científica (Cortiñas, Lazcano-Peña, & Pont, 2015).

Finalmente, en cuanto a las visiones de futuro respecto de la profesión, la gran mayoría aboga por la necesidad de potenciar los perfiles mixtos o interdisciplinares, ya sea desde una base puramente académica, con formación universitaria específica, o a través de la experiencia laboral. Para la mayoría de los entrevistados, «aprender trabajando» es la clave para ser un buen periodista científico. Ello no es óbice para que sea deseable que tanto las instituciones académicas como los medios de comunicación dediquen más esfuerzos y recursos a la formación y el crecimiento de profesionales aptos para comunicar aspectos científicos desde el rigor y el espíritu crítico.

Para lograrlo, las universidades, tanto en las facultades de comunicación como en las que imparten disciplinas científicas, deberían potenciar más la formación de perfiles híbridos, ya sea a través de asignaturas curriculares de ciencias (especialmente sobre el método científico) en las carreras de letras, asignaturas curriculares de redacción y de comunicación en las carreras de ciencias, materias optativas de periodismo científico, y másteres o posgrados de especialización a los que puedan tener acceso tanto comunicadores como científicos. Formar buenos periodistas científicos, más allá de un dilema para etnógrafos, es esencial para construir una sociedad mejor.

Apoyos

Esta investigación ha sido financiada por el Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad, a través del proyecto I+D+I, «El periodismo científico en España y las nuevas tecnologías de la información: mapa de situación y propuestas de actuación para mejorar los procesos comunicativos» (CSO2011-25969, 2014).

Referencias

Badenschier, F., & Wormer, H. (2012). Issue selection in science journalism: Towards a special theory of news values for science news? In S. Rödder, M. Francen, & P. Weingart (Eds.), The sciences’ media connection: Public communication and its repercussions (pp. 59-86). Dordrecht: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-2085-5_4

Bauer, M., Howard, S., Romo-Ramos, Y., Massarani, L., & Amorim, L. (2013). Global Science Journalism Report: working conditions & Practices, Professional Ethos and Future Expectations. London: Science and Development Network (https://goo.gl/rqMThJ).

Besley, J. (2010). Imagining public engagement. Public Understanding of Science. 21(5), 590-605. https://doi.org/10.1177%2F0963662510379792

Brumfield, G. (2009). Supplanting the old media? Nature 458(19), 274-277. https://doi.org/10.1038/458274a

Calvo-Hernando, M. (1977). Periodismo científico. Madrid: Paraninfo.

Cortiñas, S. (2006). Les estratègies redaccionals de la periodística de Javier Sampedro i la seva relació amb les principals tradicions de divulgació científica (Tesis doctoral). Barcelona: Universitat Pompeu Fabra. (https://goo.gl/wNbygA).

Cortiñas, S. (2008). Metaphors of DNA: A review of the popularisation processes. Journal of Science Communication (JCOM), 7(1), 1-8. (https://goo.gl/T524KU).

Cortiñas, S. (2009). Història de la divulgació científica. Vic: Eumo.

Cortiñas, S., Alonso, F., Pont, C., & Escribà, E. (2014). Science journalists perceptions and attitudes to pseudoscience in Spain. Public Understanding of Science, 24(4), 450-465. https://doi.org/10.1177%2F0963662514558991

Cortiñas, S., Lazcano-Peña, D., & Pont, C. (2015). Periodistas científicos y efectos de la crisis sobre la información de ciencia: ¿hacia dónde va la profesión? Estudio del caso español. Panace@, 16(42), 142-150 (https://goo.gl/7soQQY).

De Semir, V. (1996). What is Newsworthy? The Lancet, 347(9009), 1163-1166. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(96)90614-5

Del Puerto, C. (2000). Periodismo científico: la astronomía en titulares de prensa (Tesis doctoral). Tenerife: Universidad de la Laguna. (https://goo.gl/vvp9PX).

Duran, X. (1997). Tractament periodístic de dos fets tecnològics: Els primers Sputnik (1957) i l’arribada a la lluna (1969) a la premsa diaria de Barcelona. (Tesis doctoral). Barcelona: Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. (https://goo.gl/usjNN5 / https://goo.gl/Yo657T).

Elías, C. (1999). Periodistas especializados y acostumbrados: La divulgación de la ciencia. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 20. (https://goo.gl/QnAjp2).

Elías, C. (2008). Fundamentos de periodismo científico y divulgación mediática. Madrid: Alianza Editorial.

Fahy, D., & Nisbet, M. (2011). The science journalist online: Emerging practices. Journalism, 12(7), 778-793. https://doi.org/10.1177%2F1464884911412697

Fernández-Muerza, A. (2004). Estudio del periodismo de información científica en la prensa de referencia: El caso español a partir de un análisis comparativo. (Tesis doctoral). Bilbao: Universidad del País Vasco.

Franco, M. (2008). Los desafíos de hacer periodismo científico en Colombia: conocer, educar y difundir. In L. Massarani & C. Polino (Eds.), Los desafíos y la evaluación del periodismo científico en Iberoamérica (pp. 97-107). Jornadas Iberoamericanas sobre Ciencia en los Medios Masivos. Santa Cruz de la Sierra: AECI, RICYT, CYTEDm SciDevNet, OEA. (https://goo.gl/1vg5EM).

Friedman, S. (1986). Scientists and Journalists. Reporting science as news. Nueva York: American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Hansen, A. (1994). Journalistic practices and science reporting in the British press. Public Understanding of Science, 23 3), 237-243. https://doi.org/10.1088%2F0963-6625%2F3%2F2%2F001

Hartz, J., & Chappell, R. (1997). Worlds apart: How the distance between science and journalism threatens America’s future. Nashville: First Amendment Center. (https://goo.gl/C2ZuVC).

Irwin, A. (2009). Science journalism ‘flourishing’ in developing world. SciDevNet. (https://goo.gl/pofaeD).

Jensen, E. (2010). Between credulity and skepticism: Envosaging the fourth estate in 21st-century science journalism. Media, Culture & Society, 32, 615-630. https://doi.org/10.1177%2F0163443710367695

Kristiansen, S., Schäfer, M., & Lorencez, S. (2016). Science journalists in Switzerland: Results from a survey on professional goals, working conditions, and current changes. Studies in Communication Sciences, 16(2), 132-140. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scoms.2016.10.004

Lynch, J., Bennett, D., Luntz, A., Toy, C., & Van-Benschoten, E. (2014). Bridging science and journalism: Indentifying the role of pubic relations in the construction and circulation of stem cell research among laypeople. Science Communication, 36(4), 479-501 https://doi.org/10.1177%2F1075547014533661

Mellor, F. (2015). Non-news values in science journalism. In B. Rappert, & B. Balmer (Eds.), Absence in science, security and policy: from several agendas to global strategy (pp. 93-113). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. (https://goo.gl/ceJZ3J).

Meneses-Fernández, D., & Martín-Gutiérrez, J. (2015). ¿Tienen razón los investigadores al quejarse de la información periodística sobre ciencias? Experiencias con alumnos de Periodismo y científicos. Revista Española de Documentación Científica, 38(4), e104. https://doi.org/10.3989/redc.2015.4.1252

Moreno, C. (2003). La investigación universitaria en periodismo científico. Ámbitos. 9-10, 121-141. (https://goo.gl/bfi18m).

Moreno, C., & Gómez, J.L. (2002). Science and technology in journalists training. [Ciencia y tecnología en la formación de los futuros comunicadores]. Comunicar, 19, 19-24. (https://goo.gl/PUDf1Q).

Murcott, T. (2009). Science journalism: Toppling the priesthood. Nature, 459(7250), 1054-1055. https://doi.org/10.1038/4591054a

Nelkin, D. (1995). Selling science: How the press covers science and technology. New York: W.H. Freeman.

Palen, J.A. (1994). A map for science reporters: Science, technology, and society studies concepts in basic reporting and newswriting textbooks. Michigan Academician, 26, 507-519.

Peters, H.P. (2013). Gap between science and media revisited: Scientists as public communicators. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 110(3), 14102-14109. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1212745110

Rensberger, B. (2009). Science Journalism: Too close for confort. Nature, 459(7250), 1055-1056. https://doi.org/10.1038/4591055a

Revuelta, G. (1999). Situación del periodismo científico en la Unión Europea. Comunicar ciencia en el siglo XX: I Congreso sobre Comunicación Social de la Ciencia, 1 (pp. 255-261). (https://goo.gl/QMfh99).

Rosen, C., Guenther, L., & Froehlich, K. (2016). The question of newsworthiness: A cross-comparison among science journalists’ selection criteria in Argentina, France and Germany. Science Communication, 38(3), 328-355. https://doi.org/10.1177%2F1075547016645585

Schäfer, M. (2010). Taking stock: a meta-analysis of studies on the media’s coverage of science. Public Understanding of Science 21(6), 650-663. https://doi.org/10.1177%2F0963662510387559

Secko, D., Amend, E., & Friday, T. (2013). Four models of science journalism. Journalism Practice, 7(1), 62-80. https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2012.691351

Weaver, D.H., & Wilhoit, G.C. (1996). The American journalist in the 1990s: U.S. News people at the end of an era. Mahwah: Lawrence Erlbaum. (https://goo.gl/Za5VTh).

Williams, A., & Clifford, S. (2008). Mapping the field: Specialist science news journalism in the UK national media. Cardiff: Cardiff University School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies. (https://goo.gl/qiPZPH).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/03/18
Accepted on 31/03/18
Submitted on 31/03/18

Volume 26, Issue 1, 2018
DOI: 10.3916/C55-2018-01
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Views 1
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?