Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

In this paper we analyse child viewers’ interpretation of television violence shown in television programmes specifically aimed at children. The justification for this work is based on the research that considers that more theoretical and empirical studies need to be carried out on the conceptualisation of violence, and about how much violence is legitimised and through what mechanisms such legitimacy is constructed. It is aimed at providing a notion of television violence as interpreted by child television viewers which takes these mechanisms into account. The methodology used is based on an analysis of the content and the dialogue of in-depth interviews conducted with sixteen children under the age of 12 years, after showing them two sequences of television programmes with types and various formalisation of fictional violence. The results, as well as providing a conceptual map of the responses, also show how children define and differentiate different types of violence. We can also verify how their reception process is framed by their cultural history and specific reading and consumption experiences, in which contextual narrative aspects play a very important role in children’s interpretation of violence. Thus, the results of this study indicate how children give an unrestricted significance to violence.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Concern about violence is a discourse that runs through our society and that relates to collective sensitivity, to social pathos. The very notion of violence changes over time and according to the subject of enunciation. Like so many other constructs, it is the result of a social convention subject to negotiation by the various political and social forces. Although the research community is not unanimous, many scholars refer to aggression as a biological basis of human activity, whereas the notion of violence is formed by an attitude due to the intervention of cultural factors. From a psychological perspective, Bandura’s social learning theory (1977) enables us to understand aggression as a learned behaviour which can be positively or negatively reinforced. From sociology, Elias (1977) provides us with the evocative image of the taming of impulses in parallel to the process of civilisation. Meanwhile, the historian Chesnais (1982) refers to the «secular process of moral transformation». In line with other writers, such as Fowles (1999), Chesnais relates the forms of violence to the great stages of the process of civilisation, which he specifies as three: primitive and archaic violence (traditional agrarian society), institutionalised violence (industrial society) and mediatised social violence (tertiary society).

On the other hand, it should be remembered that research on violence has a long and rich tradition in communication studies. From the classic theory of cultivation (Gerbner & Gross, 1976) to the more modern approaches of neuroscience (Carnagey, Bartholow & Anderson 2007), concern about the effects of media violence has been a constant feature. Furthermore, the emergence of new communication practices, for instance, the use of video games, in which violence is very frequently shown, has only increased the concern about its effects, such as desensitisation to real violence (Carnagey, Anderson & Bushman, 2007). It should also be noted that, inevitably, there is not always a consensus in the academic community regarding the influence of the media (Rodrigo, Busquet & al., 2008). However, the concern about its influence on children is apparent, as a result of which the specialist literature has particularly focused on child audiences. Some writers highlight that the amount of television violence viewed in childhood (Huesmann, Moise-Titus & al., 2003) and adolescence (Johnson, Cohen & al., 2002) favours aggressive behaviour in the future. On this theme, the conclusion is that the long-term effects of media violence have a greater influence on childhood (Bushman & Huesmann, 2006). In another vein, as noted by Fernández-Villanueva, Revilla & Domínguez (2011b: 11), other scholars focus their audience research not on what they consider to be «scientific reports on internal or visible physiological states» but on the emotions aroused by television violence in that «these are stories about emotions with cultural meanings, moral evaluations and relationships between emotions and social practices» (Johnson-Laird & Oatley, 2000). As noted, there have been multiple approaches to the phenomenon from different disciplines.

The overall aim of this paper is to understand, from a constructivist perspective, the role of the media in the debate on mediatised social violence, particularly in its representation in television fiction. Authors such as Ang (1996), Alasuutari (1999), Boyle (2005), Tulloch and Tulloch (1992), Schlesinger, Haynes & al. (1998) and Hill (2001) have noted how viewers take a stance and interpret television broadcasts in different ways and, as a result, establish the different ways they are influenced by them, according to their attitudes, identities or circumstances in life. Thus, television shows, designates and labels the presence of violence, but we are convinced that it only makes sense to define the types of representation of television violence if we also ask questions about the value of these categories within social discourse. Therefore, on this occasion, we aim to gain an understanding of the social dimensions involved in child viewers’ experience of the violence viewed in children’s television fiction.

But is there still anything to be discovered on a subject that has been studied by so many communication departments worldwide? Fernandez-Villanueva, Revilla & & al. (2008) point out precisely how, perhaps due to the difficulty in correctly assessing the total amount of violence –including variations in the definitions of the concepts of aggression and violence–, the results of the various studies conducted on this subject have not produced unanimous conclusions. Therefore, they consider that further theoretical and empirical work is called for on the phenomenon of violence on television and on how much violence is legitimated or justified and by what mechanisms such legitimisation is constructed (Fernández-Villanueva, Domínguez & al. 2004). That demand was explicitly re-stated more recently by the same research team (Fernández-Villanueva, Revilla & Domínguez, 2011b), who specifically stress the importance of gathering viewers’ discourse for three reasons, which can be summarised as follows: a) the lack of qualitative, discursive research of this kind concerning violence on television; b) the possibility of linking the results obtained with those related to emotions and effects produced by television violence; c) the viewers’ discourse enables us to relate it to the value system of the cultural contexts in which it occurs. This paper forms part of this requirement for a broader perspective of the phenomenon itself summarised as media violence. The study presented here, in the context of a more extensive study dedicated to child viewers’ interpretative processes of fictional violence, has the following aims:

• To understand how the interpretation of child viewers is influenced by a number of variables that determine the construction of the meaning of the notion of television violence.

• To provide a notion of television violence as interpreted by the child viewers.

2. Material and methods

With regard to the methodological approach, and according to the last two axioms of «Lineation Theory» (a more multivariate perspective is required that focuses on the effects of a probabilistic nature, and the importance of individual interpretations must be acknowledged), the research has been structured based on a multivariate analysis (Potter, 1999; Morrison, MacGregor & al., 1999). In particular, this paper is focused on the definers of violence based on the question: In what way do the children interviewed understand the notion of violence in the fictional images? The research was conducted as follows. Firstly, an overview was made of the conceptualisation of the notion of television violence, and the main qualitative research on content analysis of media violence and its reception were compiled and studied. A typological theory1 was defined for the analysis of television violence (Aran, 2008: 303-312), structured on the basis of the categories of violence of Chesnais (1982), Barthes (1985), Galtung (1969, 1996 and reformulated by Reychler, 1997) and Morrison, MacGregor & al. (1999, reformulated by Millwood, 2003), as well as the procedures of significance in audiovisual narrative of Potter (1999), Tisseron (2000) and Buckingham (2005).

2.1. Material

Secondly, we then selected the unit of analysis (audiovisual text or «corpus» –two television programme sequences–) and designed the fieldwork. The two sequences were selected from children’s programmes, in line with the following criteria:

a) Aimed at children (sample broadcast on television and designated for children under 13 years).

b) Presence of violence in the narrative (ritualised and realistic –not real–).

c) Diversity of types of violence (physical and symbolic).

d) Different degrees of recognition of this violence (more and less explicit).

e) Diversity of forms (animation versus actors).

f) Brevity of the messages and both examples of a similar length.

We evaluated and validated the analytical criteria for selecting the two sequences using two instruments. The first, the typological theory mentioned above (Aran, 2008), facilitated the identification of types of violence by their nature and features (content analysis), and pointed to qualitative aspects considered as contextual (policy influences, variables of the message, appraisal of the message, among others). The second of the instruments facilitated an external assessment of the two sequences chosen by the analysts from the Audiovisual Council of Catalonia, based on the analysis of the qualification (language, theme, conflict resolution, forms and use of violence, personal identity and conflict) and the degree of suitability of programmes for the viewers’ age. This assessment proved to be an indispensible contrast in the selection criteria.

The resulting «corpus» was two sequences, each under 2 minutes long, from the cartoon series «Doraemon» (Japan), based on the comic by Fujiko F. Fujio, and the adventure film «Lost in Africa» (UK), by the director Steward Rafill, broadcast by TV3 (April 2003) and TVE (May 2003), respectively. The examples were edited on a DVD in this order. In this phase, we made the final selection of two schools which did not excessively polarise such a quantitatively limited sample. Throughout the school year 2002-2003, a pilot test was carried out in each to observe the suitability of the selected sequences, the questions and the circumstances of observation. Based on the pilot test, adjustments were made to the evaluation instruments and the procedure was validated.

2.2. Participants

After initial contact with the teaching staff, the selection of pupils was agreed and the procedure was implemented with the study sample during the 2003-2004 school year. 16 questionnaires and in-depth interviews were conducted on pupils who were in the second (n=8) and sixth years (n=8) of two primary schools located in the city of Barcelona, one state school and one state-assisted private school. The criteria for the selection of participants were established according to proportionality, both with respect to the school (ownership and balanced sociocultural representation) and to the subjects (different gender and age groups but with sufficient verbal and expressive ability), in line with previous research that use these primary education levels as suitable to contrast the verbalisation of perceptions (Aran, Barata & al., 2001; Busquet, Aran & al., 2002; Buckingham, 2005).

2.3. Techniques of information collection

To obtain information on the subjects, two instruments were used: a questionnaire about the television viewing routines and preferences of the subjects and their families, and a semi-structured interview. The questionnaire contained 32 questions organised in two sections: the ethnography of media consumption and consideration of television consumption. The questionnaire was useful for introducing the subject in a relaxed manner and shifting the focus onto violence, and above all, providing a context for some of the later responses to the interview as cross-checks in order to discern exaggerations and distortions in the subjects’ remarks, according to King, Keohane & Verba (1994)’s scheme of triangulation of qualitative data. The semi-structured interview, inspired by Tisseron’s model (2000), is structured into 17 open or semi-directed questions designed to elicit their interpretations of the two viewings containing violence. The question specifically designed to observe the notion of violence is, «What is violence (for you)?», although this specific question was not posed until the subjects themselves made reference to the existence of violence in the examples, thus the answers emerged over the course of the interview.

The interviews lasted approximately 50 minutes and were carried out in the morning break. They were always conducted in the same classroom which had video equipment. The work was presented as a study carried out on boys’ and girls’ television tastes, aimed at finding out their preferences, and without having to follow a format of true or false questions and answers. They were told that the audio recording was made (after receiving parental approval and the consent of the subjects) in order to recall what they told us.

2.4. Analysis of the information

The verbatim transcription of the interviews was then carried out, and the data was analysed. We designed a method of discourse analysis by adapting the procedure proposed by Morrison, MacGregor & al. (1999), and we proceeded to implement it. As a reminder, the indicators of the reception analysis proposed by the researchers are:

1. Primary indicators. These are derived from the social environment or social expectations.

a) The act itself (understood here as the violent nature of the act).

b) The contextual factors (of the situation portrayed). They qualify the violent act.

2. Secondary indicators. The artistic and physical expression of the scene.

a) Production techniques. The resources for the staging and performance.

3. Tertiary indicators. The emotional response (of the social actors).

a) Elements intensifying the emotional response.

The aim of this work is focused on the notion of violence and its qualification as interpreted by child viewers, therefore our analysis is concentrated on the primary indicators, i.e. both on the violent nature of the act and the contextual parameters that are observed according to the type of television violence presented (Aran, 2008) and to previous research (Gunter & Harrison, 1998; Potter, 1999; Morrison, MacGregor & al., 1999; Buckingham, 1996, 2002; Busquet, Aran & al., 2002; Millwood, 2003). Taking these previous studies into account, the resulting general categories were:

1) Type of violence; 2) Intensity of violence; 3) Representation of violence; 4) Motivation for violence; 5) Definers of violence that appear in the story related to the perception of the participants. During this phase of the research, we followed Taylor & Bogdan (1996)’s stages of data analysis relating to discovery, coding and discounting, including the cross-checking of the results. The reliability between the different external encoders (two researchers in the fields of psychology and social anthropology) was estimated according to the percentage of consistency, following Holsti’s procedure (1969). The percentage of reliability between encoders obtained was an average of 86 and a range from 72.1 to 98.2. Almost all the variables were in the range of .80 to .85, which is generally considered good (Riffe & al., 1998). According to Cronbach’s alpha procedures for calculating inter-rater reliability, the remaining 14% was resolved by discussion and consensus.

3. Findings

The descriptive results set out below regarding the children’s discourse on the notion of violence in fictional images refer to the type of violence, the intensity of the violence present, its representation, the motivation for the violent acts represented and the definitions of violence that are proposed. The categories selected were combined with the characteristics of the participants, such as sex, age and type of school ownership, giving overall results and differences that were only significant in relation to age.

3.1. Type of violence

We present, using illustrative examples, those categories of the typology already described in which the research subjects provided significant information. On this basis, in the types of violence, all the subjects discriminated between types of violence in the images. The distinctions they made relate to the following dimensions of violence: physical violence (killing); verbal violence (insults); symbolic or cultural violence (differentiation between the good and bad people) and private and collective violence. The latter even includes types of institutional (wars) and structural violence, in line with Galtung’s concept (1969, 1996).

In addition, the subjects make distinctions between forms of violence, essentially between real and represented. None of the subjects confused the two sequences viewed with reality or considered it to be the truth instead of a representation. But they also recognised formal violence, the codes of the audiovisual language (sound intensification, visual attention to detail...). Lastly, in relation to perception, the subjects of the research showed a negative perception of violence (when the act is perceived as bad), a neutral perception (when the appraisal of the violence is relativised in accordance with its form) and a positive perception (when it is interpreted that the action has a noble purpose). However, the resulting perception of violence of the subjects analysed was much more complex than this first typology. In the sections below (3.2 to 3.4), we observe in particular how the subjects establish other distinctions that relate to both contextual and socio-cultural aspects of the violence.

3.2. Intensity of violence

Under this variable, the subjects express considerations of severity according to a relationship between the recognition of actual damage and a subjective perception of the violence. Within this section, we can distinguish various criteria. With regard to severity, the subjects clearly identify physical violence (intentional assault and battery). With regard to regulation (understood as the institutional parameter) they recognise violence that is unlawful, punished by the state. As regards the means, they distinguish between violence with firearms, sharp instruments and blunt objects. Lastly, in relation to the perception of the intensity of the violence, they differentiate mild (argument), severe (insults) and extreme violence (shots).


Draft Content 687944000-26745-en033.jpg

3.3. Representation of violence

The subjects differentiate between plausible and implausible representations of violence. Plausibility refers here, in Aristotelian terms, to the attributes of possibility, as opposed to veracity which refers to the attributes of truth (plausibility of the factual). Subjects ascribe what they saw to a format (cartoon, film) and an audiovisual genre (humour, adventure), which implies that they tacitly generate different expectations for them in relation to those production and narrative conventions. They distinguished between ritualised and realistic types of representation (they were all representations; they were not shown examples of real violence or violence in the news). Fairly spontaneously, the subjects make comparisons between the types of fictional violence represented and real situations with violence. These situations relate, particularly, to events they have experienced or discussed at home and at school (family arguments, neighbourhood disputes) or seen in the news (child abuse, the war in Iraq).

3.4. Motivation for violence

The concept of motivation for violence includes the arguments relating to the aggressor’s objectives, which the subjects attribute to them based on the use of the violence and on their need to make sense of that violence. It is shown here that they distinguish between the use of instrumental violence (violence as a means), when they consider that there are reasons for carrying out the violence, and an expressive use (violence as an end), when it is perceived that lasting damage to the victim is sought. Lastly, it was established that the subjects in the study look for a meaning to the violence. Along these lines, they recognise reactive violence when the violent actions are committed in self-defence, or for other characters, as a response to a previous attack.

3.5. Definitions of violence

Lastly, based on the results, we note –coinciding with contemporary research, such as that of Fernández-Villanueva, Revilla & al. (2008)–, the variability of what subjects understand as violence, depending on those viewers’ values and the mechanisms of identification they trigger with the perpetrators and victims. As a graphical summary of the definitions of violence provided by our child viewers throughout the interviews, we have represented these in a Visone concept map (see Molina, 2006), based on the proximity of the words in their responses and the frequency with which they are mentioned. Here, the size of the concepts relates to the number of references by the children (fugure 1). The thickness of each definition (the lines) represents the number of references by the subjects. The most strategic nodes are those which form a bridge between different nodes. The squares relate to the types of violence. Given the importance that subjects gave to verbal and non-verbal (psychological) expressions, we have shown these two categories separately.

Some key aspects of the conceptual map are:

a) The children clearly recognise forms of direct violence, both physical and psychological (and verbal). They also express indirect violence by reference to the power of words of political leaders as instigators of wars (structural violence).

b) Physical violence has the largest variety of definitions, notably «kill», followed by «hit» and «abuse».

c) Structural violence encompasses various references to the concepts of «war», «Bush» and «theft».

d) The importance of the nodal intersections is highlighted, indicating the links between the children’s definitions of violence as significant relationships in their discourse: «soldier» (physical and structural violence), «hurting by talking» (structural and verbal violence) and «arguing unreasonably», «taunting» and, especially, «parental arguments, parents fighting» (verbal and psychological violence).

e) The most unpleasant violence for children was arguments between parents in cartoons, divided between psychological and verbal violence (as attributive connections, the subjects highlight «son», «parents» and in other types of violence, «Bush» and «small children»).

To summarise, the views presented by the subjects underline how they establish motivations which justify, mitigate or increase the seriousness, even beyond an absolute value of violence or its restricted conceptualisation. As a result, all the subjects recognised mortal (as a consequence) violence in the examples as the most serious (feature film with actors), but the majority (10 subjects), were most upset by the parental argument, a form of symbolic violence which is represented in a ritualised (cartoons) and plausible way.

The children in our study indicate, as a majority definition of violence, the most restrictive meanings, those which are confined to the notion of physical and direct violence. We attribute this choice as being in line with criteria of visibility, economy and social use (we recall that restrictive definitions are the most frequent in common usage). However, the children also mentioned the broader definitions, by way of comments on inequality –age inequality, in weapons...–, disproportion and verbal or psychological humiliation.

We shall now seek to clarify the relevance of some of these contextual factors of the violent narrative in the framework of television fiction. According to the research findings, the main primary indicators of violence are:

1) The act itself, understood as the violent nature of the act: a) If mechanisms of identification with the victim or situation are triggered (attribution of a violent significance to the act when the child identifies with the victim, for example the main character, Novita, or with the situation, for example, arguments within the family); b) If the attackers are «the good guys»; c) The probability of it being based on a true story.

2) The contextual aspects: a) The narrative genre (subjects effectively attribute the stories to a type of genre which in their conventions may imply an explicit presence of violence, often of a serious nature); b) Unfair or disproportionate violence in an unbalanced relationship between the characters (the perceived seriousness of the violence increases when it affects minors or victims who are considered by the subjects to be «vulnerable» or «innocent»); c) Gratuitous violence (for example, when there has been no previous provocation). Other indicators appear to a lesser extent, also in the act itself, where the children are moved or disturbed by the representation of pain or injury (visual representation of the consequences of the violence).

4. Discussion and conclusions

The findings of our research show how children define violence with a not necessarily restricted significance. From the analysis of the interpretative processes carried out on a sample of fictional television violence, the children participating in the study showed how the reception process is framed by a cultural background and specific reading and consumption practices, in which contextual narrative aspects have a major role, especially relating to the perception of proximity displayed by the subjects. Logically, the size of the sample does not permit an extrapolation of the results, however, in addition to the emergence of dimensions considered important by other scholars, a typology of analysis of television violence was found and implemented, which enables the fundamental factors of its perception by child viewers to be organised and to study in-depth the narrative nature of the experience of viewing violence on television. This reinforces the direction of research in the past decade focused on indicators of media influence which, as noted by Jacquinot (2002) have been undertaken with the intention of raising the awareness of as many decision-makers and stakeholders as possible, but are difficult to transfer to the «daily activity of the media» (Jacquinot, 2002: 31).

To conclude, we will attempt to outline some of the aspects which, in our view, still need to be included in the analysis of television violence and viewers’ interpretation of it. The analysis of television violence is, even today, still based on a restrictive conceptualisation of the notion of violence, understood as the physical expression (and in some cases verbal). Contributions are rarely made from content analysis that broaden the spectrum to the cultural and structural dimensions of violence. The definition of violence once proposed by Gerbner continues to be the standard framework of reference. We recall that Gerbner (1972: 31) defined television violence as: «the overt expression of physical force against others or self, or the compelling of action against one’s will on pain of being hurt or killed. The expression of injurious or lethal force had to be credible or real in the symbolic terms of the drama. Humorous and even farcical violence can be credible and real, even if it has a presumable comic effect».

It is on this definition, which should be considered within the restrictive definitions (Aróstegui, 1994), that most of the descriptions and content analyses conducted to determine the characteristics of violence on television today are still based. It is specifically this restriction of the term to the physical expression that we consider to be out-of-date and inadequate for understanding the current complexity and diversity of violence and its media representations.

In contrast, the second part of Gerbner’s definition seems to us to be very much up-to-date, since, in relation to the violence depicted, it is in the area of the «symbolic terms of the drama». In the context of these fictional representations of violence on television, we must therefore observe it according to the conventions of the genre which underpin the narrative rules of television discourse. The audiovisual genres define the interpretative margins for the viewers, and those margins in turn fluctuate according to the interpretative weighting that each viewer assigns them. Within the conventions of the television genre there is a series of contextual factors which qualify the act of violence. Each viewer, in turn, frames these variables within their knowledge and experience of television narrative (media skills) and in the context of its reception (relevance of the medium within the social interaction as a whole).

Lastly, movements which form public opinion and the expression of the transgression of limits through social alarm come into play. Here we must contemplate media practices in the broader sphere, the social and political context that governs the actions and perceptions of social order. It will be this discourse of order which will redefine what we understand by violence. Thus, to return to the beginning, the circle is complete. In this sense we have been able to see, on the basis of the questionnaires and in-depth interviews, how, in the interpretation of fictional violence, social norms coexist with family and community values, as well as individual sensitivities. As Fernández-Villanueva, Revilla & Domínguez (2011a) conclude in their research, viewers are neither passive nor isolated in generating emotions, especially as a result of the perception of that content (Pinto da Mota, 2005).

As a final reflection, we would like to underline that both the notion of violence and the discourses that are constructed on media violence are of an historical, changeable and often institutionally coercive nature (Foucault, 2002). At the outset our research aimed to examine the concept of violence in television fiction according to the interpretations of child viewers. However, we have moved from the analysis of a concern, from the analysis of a discourse that refers to the collective sensibility –to «social pathos»– as we stated at the beginning, to an analysis of production of the discourse, which refers to power and management of that social space. Often, the media act as amplifiers of the presence of violence in the real world, too often magnifying it. But they can also act virtuously in two directions: firstly, giving public prominence to the presence of silent violence, tacitly accepted by society, and secondly, the media allow the debate on violence to be opened up beyond scientific and political discourse and, despite the risks of co-operating with a certain alarmist reductionism, encourage the involvement of social agents. As Cecilia Von Feilitzen (2002) affirms, the media are in many ways a prerequisite for public debate and for the functioning of today’s society, and it is not always possible to differentiate between the media and society, because communication through the media also means participation in society. This participation makes the most sense if it is built on media literacy, particularly in the audiovisual field, which considers young viewers as active participants.

Notes

1 The expression does not refer here to a certain typology but to «the group of mechanisms and operations that allow the discourse analysed to be classified in different ways, and the series of epistemological procedures that would lead to the selection of one typology or another» (Pérez-Tornero, 1982: 60-61).

References

Alasuutari, P. (Ed.) (1999). Rethinking the Media Audience. Lon­don: Sage.

Ang, I. (1996). Living Room Wars: Rethinking Media Audiences for a Postmodern World. London: Routledge.

Aran, S. (2008). Representació mediàtica i percepció social de la violència en la ficció. Estudi de cas: la interpretació dels infants de la violència en la ficció televisiva infantil. Barcelona: Tesis doctoral, URL.

Aran, S., Barata, F. & al. (2001). La violència en la mirada. L’a­nàlisi de la violència a la televisió. Barcelona: Trípodos.

Aróstegui, J. (1994). Violencia, sociedad y política: la definición de la violencia. Ayer, 13, 17-55.

Bandura, A. (1977). Social Learning Theory. New York: Prentice-Hall.

Barthes, R. (1985). The Grain of the Voice. New York: Hill & Wang.

Boyle, K. (2005). Media and Violence. London: Sage.

Buckingham, D. (1996). Moving Images: Understanding Chil­dren’s Emotional Responses to Television. Manchester (UK): Man­chester University Press.

Buckingham, D. (2002). Crecer en la era de los medios electrónicos: tras la muerte de la infancia. Madrid: Morata.

Buckingham, D. (2005). Educación en medios: alfabetización, aprendizaje y cultura contemporánea. Barcelona: Paidós.

Bushman, B.J. & Huesmann, L.R. (2006). Short-term and Long-term Effects of Violent Media on Aggression in Children and Adults. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 160 (4), 348-352.

Busquet, J., Aran, S. & al. (2002). Infància, violència i televisió. Usos televisius i percepció infantil de la violència a la televisió. Barcelona: CAC. (www.cac.cat/pfw_files/cma/recerca/estudis_­re­cerca/violenciapercepcio.pdf) (08-01-2012).

Carnagey, N.L., Anderson, C.A. & Bartholow B.D. (2007). Media Violence and Social Neuroscience New Questions and New Opportunities. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 16 (4), 178-182. (www.psychology.iastate.edu/faculty/caa/abstracts/­2005-2009/07cab2.pdf) (28-09-2012).

Carnagey, N.L., Anderson, C.A. & Bushman, B.J. (2007). The Effect of Video Game Violence on Physiological Desensitization to Real-life violence. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 43 (3), 489-496.

Chesnais, J.C. (1982). Histoire de la violence. Paris: Robert La­ffont.

Elias, N. (1977). La civilisation des moeurs. Paris: Pluriel.

Fernández-Villanueva, C. & Domínguez, R. & al. (2004). Formas de legitimación de la violencia en televisión. Política y Sociedad, 41 (1), 183-199.

Fernández-Villanueva, C., Revilla, J.C. & al. (2008). Los es­pectadores ante la violencia televisiva: funciones, efectos e interpretaciones situadas. Comunicación y Sociedad, XXI, 2, 85-113.

Fernández-Villanueva, C., Revilla, J.C. & Domínguez, R. (2011a). Las emociones que suscita la violencia en televisión. Co­municar, 36, 95-103. (DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C36-2011-02-10).

Fernández-Villanueva, C., Revilla, J.C. & Domínguez, R. (2011b). Identificación y especularidad en los espectadores de violencia en televisión: una reconstrucción a partir del discurso. Comu­nicación y Sociedad, XXIV, 1, 7-33.

Foucault, M. (2002). El orden del discurso. Barcelona: Tusquets.

Fowles, J. (1999). The Case for Television Violence. Thousand Oaks (USA): Sage.

Galtung, J. (1969). Violence, Peace and Peace Research. Journal of Peace Research, 3, 167-192.

Galtung, J. (1996). Peace by Peaceful Means. Peace and Conflict Development and Civilization. London: Sage.

Gerbner, G. & Gross, L. (1976). Living with Television: The Violence Profile. Journal of Communication, 26 (2), 173-199.

Gerbner, G. (1972). Violence in Television Drama: Trends in Symbolic Functions. In G.A. Comstock & E.A. Rubinstein (Eds.), Television Social Behaviour, 1. Media Content and Control. (pp. 28-187). Washington (USA): Government Printing Office.

Gunter, B. & Harrison, J. (1998). Violence on Television. An Analysis of Amount, Nature, Location and Origin of Violence in British Programmes. London: Routledge.

Hill, A. (2001). «Looks Like it Hurts». Women’s Responses to Shocking Entertainment. In M. Barker & J. Petley (Eds.), Ill Effects: The Media Violence Debate. (pp. 135-149). London: Uni­versity of Luton.

Holsti, O.R. (1969). Content Analysis for the Social Sciences and Humanities. Reading, MA: Addison Wesley.

Huesmann, L.R., Moise-Titus, J. & al. (2003). Longitudinal Relations between Children’s Exposure to TV Violence and their Aggressive and Violent Behavior in Young Adulthood: 1977-1992. Developmental Psychology, 39 (2), 201-221.

Jacquinot, G. (2002). La violencia de las imágenes televisivas y su impacto en las conciencias. Comunicar, 18, 27-33.

Johnson, J.G., Cohen, P. & al. (2002). Television Viewing and Aggressive Behavior during Adolescence and Adulthood. Science, 295 (5564), 2.468-2.471.

Johnson-Laird, P.N. & Oatley, K. (2000). Cognitive and Social Construction of Emotions. In M. Lewis & J.M. Ha­viland-Jones (Eds.), Handbook of Emotions (pp. 458-475). New York: Guilford Press.

King, G., Keohane, R. & Verba, S. (1994). Designing Social Inquiry. Princeton (USA): Princeton University Press.

Millwood, A. (2003). How Children Interpret Screen Violence. Report of the Joint Research Programme Broadcasting Standards Commission and Independent Television Commission. London: BBC.

Molina, J.L. (2006). (Ed.). Talleres de autoformación con programas informáticos de análisis de redes sociales. Barcelona: Servei de Publicacions UAB.

Morrison, D., MacGregor, B. & al. (1999). Defining Violence. The Search of Understanding. Luton (UK): University of Luton Press.

Pérez-Tornero, J.M. (1982). Esbozo de un modelo de análisis del discurso. Cuadernos de Traducción e Interpretación, 1, 57-73.

Pinto da Mota, A. (2005). Televisão e violência: (para) novas formas de olhar. Comunicar, 25. (www.revistaco­municar.com/­in­dex.php?­contenido=detalles&numero=25&articulo=25-2005-075&mostrar=comocitar) (10-02-2012).

Potter, W.J. (1999). On Media Violence. Thousand Oaks (USA): Sage.

Reychler, L. (1997). Les crises et leurs fondements. GRIP, 215-217, 39-59.

Riffe, D., Lacy, S. & al. (1998). Analyzing Media Messages. Mah­wah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Rodrigo-Alsina, M., Busquet, J. & al. (2008). Las teorías sobre los efectos sociales de la violencia en televisión. Estado de la cuestión. Verso e Reverso, 22 (49). (www.unisinos.br/_diversos/revistas/versoereverso/index.php?e=13&s=9&a=111) (28-09-12).

Schlesinger, P., Haynes, R. & al. (1998). Men Viewing Violence. London: Broadcasting Standars Comission.

Taylor, S.J. & Bogdan, R. (1996). Introducción a los métodos cua­litativos de investigación. La búsqueda de significados. Barce­lona: Paidós.

Tisseron, S. (2000). Enfants sous influence. Les écrans redent-ils les jeunes violents? Paris: Armand Colin.

Tulloch, J. & Tulloch, M. (1992). Discourses about Violence: Critical Theory and the TV Violence’ Debate. Text, 12, 183-231.

Von Feilitzen, C. (2002). Aprender haciendo: reflexiones sobre la educación y los medios de comunicación. Comunicar, 18, 21-26.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

En el presente trabajo se analiza la interpretación de los espectadores infantiles ante la presencia de violencia en la programación televisiva dirigida a la infancia. Su justificación se enmarca en aquellas investigaciones que consideran necesario la realización de más estudios teóricos y empíricos sobre la conceptualización de la violencia, y sobre cuánta violencia se legitima y cuáles son los mecanismos con los que se construye dicha legitimación. El objetivo que se persigue es ofrecer una noción de violencia televisiva según la interpretación de los telespectadores infantiles que tenga en cuenta dichos mecanismos. La metodología utilizada se basa en el análisis de contenido y del discurso de las entrevistas en profundidad efectuadas a dieciséis niños y niñas menores de 12 años, después de mostrarles dos secuencias de la programación televisiva con tipos y formalización diversa de violencia de ficción. Los resultados, además de ofrecer un mapa conceptual sobre las respuestas, indican cómo niños y niñas definen y diferencian distintos tipos de violencia. También se puede constatar cómo su proceso de recepción está enmarcado por una historia cultural y por unas prácticas concretas de lectura y consumo, en las que los aspectos narrativos contextuales tienen un gran protagonismo en la interpretación infantil de la violencia. Así, los resultados de la investigación señalan cómo niños y niñas dan a la violencia una significación de carácter no restringido.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

La preocupación por la violencia es un discurso que atraviesa nuestra sociedad y que remite a la sensibilidad colectiva, al pathos social. La propia noción de violencia cambia en el tiempo y según el sujeto de enunciación. Como tantos otros constructos, es el resultado de una convención social sujeta a negociación por parte de los diferentes actores políticos y sociales. A pesar de que en la comunidad científica no hay unanimidad, muchos autores se refieren a la agresividad desde un fundamento biológico de la actividad humana, mientras que la noción de violencia se concreta en una actitud por intervención de los factores culturales. Desde la perspectiva psicológica, la teoría del aprendizaje social de Bandura (1977) nos permite entender la agresividad como una conducta que se aprende y que puede ser positiva o negativamente reforzada. Desde la sociología, Elías (1977) nos ofrece la sugerente imagen de la domesticación de las pulsiones en paralelo al proceso de civilización. Por su parte, Chesnais (1982) se refiere al «proceso secular de transformación moral». Es este mismo historiador –en la línea de otros autores, como Fowles (1999)– quien hace corresponder las formas de violencia con las grandes etapas del proceso de civilización, que él concreta en tres: violencia primitiva y arcaica (sociedad agraria tradicional); violencia institucionalizada (sociedad industrial) y violencia social mediatizada (sociedad terciaria).

Por otra parte, hay que recordar que la investigación sobre la violencia tiene una larga y extensa tradición en los estudios de la comunicación. Desde la clásica teoría del cultivo (Gerbner & Gross, 1976) hasta las más modernas aproximaciones de la neurociencia (Carnagey, Anderson & Bartholow, 2007), la preocupación sobre los efectos de la violencia mediática ha sido una constante. Además, la aparición de nuevas prácticas de comunicación como el uso de videojuegos en los que la violencia aparece con gran frecuencia, no ha hecho más que aumentar la preocupación de sus efectos, como puede ser la insensibilización hacia la violencia real (Carnagey, Anderson & Bushman, 2007). También hay que señalar que, como no podía ser de otro modo, no siempre hay un consenso en la comunidad científica sobre la influencia de los medios (Rodrigo, Busquet & al., 2008). Sin embargo, lo que se constata es la preocupación sobre dicha influencia en la infancia, por ello la literatura especializada ha prestado una especial atención a la audiencia infantil. Así, algunos autores ponen de manifiesto que la cantidad de violencia televisiva vista durante la infancia (Huesmann, Moise-Titus & al., 2003) y la adolescencia (Johnson, Cohen & al., 2002) propicia conductas agresivas en el futuro. En esta línea también se concluye que los efectos de la violencia mediática a largo plazo tienen mayor influencia en la infancia (Bushman & Huesmann, 2006). En otra línea, como recogen Fernández-Villanueva, Revilla y Domínguez (2011b: 11), otros autores dirigen sus investigaciones sobre la audiencia, no hacia lo que consideran «informes científicos sobre estados fisiológicos internos o visibles», sino hacia las emociones que suscita la violencia televisiva en tanto «se trata de relatos de emociones (telling) con los significados culturales, las evaluaciones morales y las relaciones entre emociones y prácticas sociales» (Johnson-Laird & Oatley, 2000). Como observamos, las aproximaciones al fenómeno han sido múltiples y desde distintas disciplinas.

El objetivo general de este trabajo es entender, desde una perspectiva constructivista, cuál es el papel de los medios de comunicación en el debate sobre dicha violencia social mediatizada, particularmente sobre su representación en la ficción televisiva. Diferentes autores (Ang, 1996; Alasuutari, 1999; Boyle, 2005; Tulloch & Tulloch, 1992; Schlesinger, Haynes & al., 1998; Hill, 2001) han observado cómo los espectadores se posicionan e interpretan las emisiones televisivas de diversas maneras y, en consecuencia, constatan las diversas maneras de ser influenciados por ellas, según sus actitudes, identidades o condiciones de vida. Así, la televisión muestra, designa y etiqueta la presencia de violencia, pero estamos convencidos de que definir los tipos de representación de la violencia televisiva solo tiene sentido si también nos interrogamos sobre el valor de estas categorías dentro del discurso social. Por ello, en esta ocasión, pretendemos entender cuáles son las dimensiones sociales que intervienen en la experiencia de los espectadores infantiles ante la violencia vista en la ficción televisiva para menores.

Pero, ¿hay algo todavía por descubrir en un tema que ha sido objeto de estudio en tantos departamentos de comunicación de todo el mundo? Fernández-Villanueva, Revilla y otros (2008) señalan precisamente cómo debido quizás a la dificultad para evaluar de forma correcta la cantidad total de violencia –incluso por las variaciones en las definiciones de los conceptos de agresión y violencia–, los resultados de los diversos estudios realizados al respecto no han arrojado conclusiones unánimes. En consecuencia, consideran que se precisa más trabajo teórico y empírico sobre el fenómeno de la violencia en televisión y sobre cuánta violencia se legitima o se justifica y cuáles son los mecanismos con los que se construye dicha legitimación (Fernández-Villanueva, Domínguez & al., 2004). Dicha demanda vuelve a ser explicitada por el mismo equipo investigador más recientemente (Fernández-Villanueva, Revilla & Domínguez, 2011b), y específicamente destacan la importancia de recoger el discurso de los espectadores por tres motivos, que resumimos: a) la escasez de investigaciones de este tipo, cualitativas, discursivas referidas a la violencia en televisión; b) la posibilidad de conectar los resultados obtenidos con los que se refieren a las emociones y efectos producidos por la violencia televisiva; c) el discurso de los espectadores nos permite relacionarlo con el sistema de valores de los contextos culturales en los que se produce. El presente texto se enmarca en dicho requerimiento de una perspectiva más amplia del propio fenómeno resumido en violencia mediática. La investigación que presentamos, en el marco de un estudio más extenso dedicado a los procesos interpretativos de los telespectadores infantiles ante la violencia ficcional, persigue aquí los objetivos siguientes:

• Comprender cómo incide en la interpretación de los espectadores infantiles una serie de variables que determinan la construcción del significado de la noción de violencia televisiva.

• Ofrecer una noción de violencia televisiva según la interpretación de los telespectadores infantiles.

2. Material y métodos

En lo que respecta al enfoque metodológico, y de acuerdo a los dos últimos axiomas de la «Lineation Theory» (se necesita una mayor mirada multivariada que focalice en los efectos de carácter probabilístico, y se debe reconocer la importancia de las interpretaciones individuales), hemos organizado la investigación según un análisis multivariado (Potter, 1999; Morrison, MacGregor & al., 1999). En concreto, hemos centrado las páginas siguientes en los definidores de violencia a partir de la pregunta: ¿Cómo entienden los niños y niñas entrevistados la noción de violencia en las imágenes de ficción? La investigación se realizó de acuerdo con el siguiente proceso. En primer lugar, se efectuó una panorámica sobre la conceptualización de la noción de violencia televisiva y una recopilación y estudio de las principales investigaciones de carácter cualitativo sobre el análisis de contenido de la violencia mediática y su recepción. Se definió una teoría tipológica1 para el análisis de la violencia en la televisión (Aran, 2008: 303-312), organizada a partir de las categorizaciones de la violencia (Chesnais, 1982; Barthes, 1985; Galtung, 1969; 1996), la reformulación que efectúa Reychler (1997) y Morrison, MacGregor y otros (1999, reformulado por Millwood, 2003), así como de los procedimientos de significación en el relato audiovisual de Potter (1999), Tisseron (2000) y Buckingham (2005).

2.1. Material

En segundo lugar, se procedió a la selección de la unidad de análisis (el texto o «corpus» audiovisual –dos secuencias de la programación televisiva–) y al diseño del trabajo de campo. Las dos secuencias fueron escogidas de la programación infantil, de acuerdo a los siguientes criterios:

a) Dirigida a niños/as (muestra emitida por televisión y señalizada para menores de 13 años).

b) Presencia de violencia en la narración (ritualizada y realista –no auténtica–).

c) Diversidad de tipos de violencia (física y simbólica).

d) Grados diferentes de reconocimiento de dicha violencia (más y menos explícita).

e) Formalización diversa (animación «versus» actores).

f) Brevedad de los mensajes y duración similar de ambos ejemplos.

Se valoraron y validaron los criterios de análisis para la selección de las dos secuencias a partir de dos instrumentos. El primero, la mencionada teoría tipológica (Aran, 2008), permitió la identificación de tipos de violencia según su naturaleza y funciones (análisis de contenido), e indicó aspectos cualitativos considerados como aspectos contextuales (influencias normativas, variables del mensaje, apreciación del mensaje, entre otros). El segundo de los instrumentos permitió una valoración externa por parte de analistas del Consejo del Audiovisual de Catalunya, de las dos secuencias seleccionadas, a partir del análisis de cualificación (lenguaje, temática, resolución de conflictos, formas y uso de la violencia, identidad personal y conflicto) y del grado de idoneidad de la programación de acuerdo a las edades de los telespectadores. Dicha valoración resultó un contraste imprescindible en los criterios de selección.

El «corpus» resultante fueron dos secuencias de menos de dos minutos de duración pertenecientes a la serie de dibujos animados «Doraemon» (Japón), basada en el cómic de Fujiko F. Fujio, y al largometraje de aventuras «Lost in Africa» (Inglaterra), del director Steward Rafill, emitidas por TV3 (abril de 2003) y TVE (mayo de 2003), respectivamente. Los ejemplos se editaron en un DVD siguiendo este mismo orden. En esta fase, se procedió a la selección final de dos escuelas que no polarizaran en exceso una muestra de carácter cuantitativamente limitado. A lo largo del curso 2002-2003 se realizó en cada una de ellas una prueba piloto para observar la adecuación de las secuencias escogidas, de las preguntas y de las circunstancias de la observación. A partir de la prueba piloto, se realizaron ajustes en los instrumentos de evaluación y se procedió a la validación del procedimiento.

2.2. Participantes

Después de unos contactos iniciales con el profesorado, se acordó la selección de alumnos y se procedió a la implementación del procedimiento en la muestra de estudio durante el curso 2003/04. Se realizaron 16 cuestionarios y entrevistas en profundidad entre alumnos que cursaban segundo (n=8) y sexto curso (n=8) de dos centros de educación primaria ubicados en la ciudad de Barcelona, uno público y el otro concertado. Los criterios para la selección de los participantes se establecieron de acuerdo a la proporcionalidad, tanto en lo que respecta a los centros (titularidad y representatividad sociocultural equilibrada) como a los sujetos (género y grupo de edad diferenciado pero con suficiente capacidad verbal y expresiva), de acuerdo a investigaciones previas que se acogen a dichas etapas de la educación primaria como aptas para el contraste de la verbalización de las percepciones (Aran, Barata & al., 2001; Busquet, Aran & al., 2002; Buckingham, 2005).

2.3. Técnicas de recogida de la información

Para obtener información de los sujetos, los instrumentos utilizados fueron dos: un cuestionario sobre las rutinas y preferencias de visionado televisivo de los sujetos y sus familias; y una entrevista semiestructurada. El cuestionario se organiza en 32 preguntas de acuerdo a dos bloques: etnografía del consumo mediático y apreciación del consumo televisivo. Dicho cuestionario resultó útil para introducir el tema de manera distendida y desviar el foco sobre la violencia y, sobre todo, permitió tanto contextualizar algunas de las posteriores respuestas a la entrevista como efectuar controles cruzados para discernir exageraciones y distorsiones en los comentarios de los sujetos, de acuerdo al esquema de triangulación de datos cualitativos de King, Keohane y Verba (1994). La entrevista semiestructurada, inspirada en el modelo de Tisseron (2000), se organiza en 17 preguntas abiertas o semidirigidas destinadas a obtener sus interpretaciones de los dos visionados con presencia de violencia. La pregunta específicamente diseñada para observar la noción de violencia se corresponde a una «¿Qué es (para ti) la violencia?», aunque dicha concreción no se efectuaba hasta que los propios sujetos hacían alusiones a la presencia de violencia en los ejemplos, y así las respuestas van surgiendo a lo largo de la entrevista.

Las entrevistas, de una duración aproximada de unos 50 minutos en el tiempo de recreo de la mañana, se realizaron siempre en una misma aula de la escuela dotada de un equipamiento de vídeo. Se presentó el trabajo como una práctica de un estudio sobre los gustos televisivos de los niños/as que buscaba recoger sus preferencias, sin tener que responder a ningún formato de preguntas y respuestas verdaderas o falsas. Se les explicaba que el registro de audio se realizaba (previa autorización de los padres y con el consentimiento de los sujetos) para recordar lo que nos decían.

2.4. Análisis de la información

A continuación se procedió a la transcripción literal de las entrevistas y al análisis de los datos. Diseñamos un procedimiento de análisis del discurso adaptando la propuesta de Morrison, MacGregor y otros (1999) y procedimos a aplicarlo. Recordemos los indicadores del análisis de la recepción que proponen dichos autores:

1) Indicadores primarios. Se derivan del entorno social o de las expectativas sociales:

El acto en sí mismo (aquí entendido como la naturaleza violenta del acto).

Los aspectos contextuales (de la situación representada). Califican el acto violento.

2) Indicadores secundarios. Son la expresión artística y plástica de la escena:

Técnicas de producción. Son los recursos de la puesta en escena, de la performance.

3) Indicadores terciarios. Se refieren a la respuesta emocional (de los actores sociales):

Elementos intensificadores de la respuesta emocional.

El objetivo del presente trabajo se centra en la noción de violencia y su calificación según la interpretación de los espectadores infantiles, así nuestro análisis está focalizado en los indicadores primarios. Es decir, tanto en la naturaleza violenta del acto como en los parámetros contextuales que se observan de acuerdo a la tipología de la violencia televisiva presentada (Aran, 2008) y a investigaciones previas (Gunter & Harrison, 1998; Potter, 1999; Morrison, MacGregor & al., 1999; Buckingham, 1996, 2002; Busquet, Aran & al., 2002; Millwood, 2003). Teniendo en cuenta dichas investigaciones previas, las categorías generales resultantes fueron: 1) Tipología de la violencia; 2) Intensidad de la violencia; 3) Representación de la violencia; 4) Motivación de la violencia; 5) Definidores de la violencia que aparecen en el relato conectadas con la percepción de los participantes.

Durante esta fase de la investigación, se siguieron las etapas del análisis de datos de Taylor & Bogdan (1996) referidas al descubrimiento, codificación y relativización, incluyendo el contraste de los resultados. La fiabilidad entre los diferentes codificadores externos (dos investigadores del ámbito de la psicología y de la antropología social), se estimó según el porcentaje de congruencia, siguiendo el procedimiento de Holsti (1969). El porcentaje de fiabilidad entre codificadores obtuvo una media de 86 y un rango de .72,1 a .98,2. Casi todas las variables estaban en el rango de .80 a .85, que en general se considera bueno (Riffe & al., 1998). De acuerdo con los procedimientos de cálculo de fiabilidad inter-jueces del coeficiente alfa de Cronbach, el restante 14% se resolvió mediante discusión y consenso.

3. Resultados

Los resultados descriptivos del discurso de los niños/as sobre la noción de violencia en las imágenes ficcionales que recogemos a continuación hacen referencia a la tipología de la violencia, a la intensidad de la presencia de la violencia, a su representación, a la motivación de los actos violentos representados y a las definiciones de violencia que proponen. Las categorías seleccionadas se combinaron con las características de los participantes, como sexo, edad y tipo de titularidad de la escuela, ofreciendo los resultados generales y unas diferencias que solo resultaron substanciales en relación a la edad.

3.1. Tipología de violencia

Presentamos a partir de ejemplos ilustrativos aquellas categorías de la tipología descrita en las que los sujetos investigados aportaron información significativa. Así, en los tipos de violencia, todos los sujetos discriminan entre tipos de violencia en las imágenes. Las distinciones que establecen están referidas a las siguientes dimensiones de la violencia: violencia física (matar); violencia verbal (insultar); violencia simbólica o cultural (diferenciación entre buenos y malos) y violencia privada y colectiva, e incluso dentro de esta última se refieren a tipos de violencia institucional (guerras) y estructural, de acuerdo a la noción de Galtung (1969; 1996). Además, los sujetos establecen distinciones entre formas de violencia, esencialmente entre la real y la representada. Ningún sujeto ha confundido las dos secuencias visionadas con la realidad ni les han otorgado un estatus de verdad, sino de representación. Pero también reconocen la violencia formal, como serían los códigos propios del lenguaje audiovisual (amplificación sonora, detallismo visual…).

Por último, en relación a la percepción, los sujetos investigados ponen de manifiesto una percepción de la violencia negativa (cuando se percibe el acto como malo), una percepción neutra (cuando se relativiza la apreciación de la violencia según su formalización) y una percepción positiva (cuando se interpreta que la acción tiene una finalidad noble). Pero la percepción de la violencia de los sujetos analizados se ha mostrado mucho más compleja que esta primera tipología. En los apartados siguientes (3.2 a 3.4) se observa de manera particular cómo los sujetos establecen otras distinciones que tienen que ver tanto con aspectos contextuales como con la dimensión sociocultural de la violencia.

3.2. Intensidad de la presencia de violencia

Los sujetos expresan bajo este parámetro consideraciones de gravedad de acuerdo a una interrelación entre el reconocimiento de daños objetivos y una percepción subjetiva de la violencia. En este apartado podríamos distinguir distintos parámetros. En relación a la gravedad identifican claramente la violencia corporal (golpes y heridas intencionadas). En relación a la regulación (entendida como parámetro institucional) reconocen la violencia ilegítima, sancionada por el Estado. Por lo que hace referencia a los medios distinguen entre la violencia con armas de fuego, con arma blanca y con objetos contundentes. Por último, en relación a la percepción de la intensidad de la violencia diferencian la violencia leve (discusión), la grave (insultos) y la extrema (disparos).


Draft Content 687944000-26745 ov-es033.jpg

3.3. Representación

Los sujetos diferencian entre representaciones de la violencia verosímiles y no verosímiles. La verosimilitud se refiere aquí, en términos aristotélicos, a los atributos de lo posible, diferenciada de la veracidad que hace referencia a los atributos de la verdad (verosimilitud de lo factual). Los sujetos adscriben lo que han visto a un formato (dibujos animados, película) y a un género audiovisual (humor, aventuras), que implica que tácitamente se generan en ellos diferentes expectativas en relación a dichas convenciones de producción y narrativas. Distinguen entre tipos de representación ritualizadas y realistas (todas ellas representadas, no se les han mostrado ejemplos de violencia auténtica o «de actualidad»). De manera bastante espontánea, los sujetos establecen comparaciones entre los tipos de violencia ficcional representados y situaciones reales con violencia. Dichas situaciones responden sobre todo a hechos vividos o comentados en el hogar y en la escuela (discusiones familiares, disputas vecinales) o vistos en las noticias (maltrato infantil, guerra de Irak).

3.4. Motivación

Bajo el concepto de motivación se recogen las argumentaciones referidas a los objetivos del agresor, que los sujetos atribuyen a partir del uso de la violencia y a partir de su necesidad de encontrar un sentido a esa violencia. Así se pone de manifiesto que distinguen un uso de la violencia instrumental (violencia como medio), cuando se plantean que hay razones para ejercer la violencia, y un uso expresivo (violencia como fin), cuando se percibe que se busca que el daño perdure en la víctima. Por último, se ha constatado que los sujetos investigados buscan un sentido a la violencia. Así reconocen una violencia reactiva, cuando los actos violentos son cometidos en defensa propia, o de algún otro personaje, como respuesta a un ataque previo.

3.5. Definiciones de violencia

Finalmente, a partir de los resultados, observamos –coincidiendo con investigaciones coetáneas como la de Fernández-Villanueva, Revilla y otros (2008)–, la variabilidad de lo que los sujetos entienden por violencia, con dependencia de los valores de esos espectadores y los mecanismos de identificación que activan con los agresores y las víctimas. Como resumen gráfico de las definiciones de violencia que nos han ofrecido nuestros espectadores infantiles a lo largo de las entrevistas hemos querido hacer una representación como mapa conceptual de Visone (Molina, 2006), basado en la proximidad de las palabras en sus respuestas y al número de registros (figura 1, página anterior). Así, el tamaño de los conceptos se adecua al número de registros de los niños/as. El grosor de cada definición (líneas) representa la cantidad de registros de los sujetos. Los nodos más estratégicos son aquellos que se sitúan como puente entre unos y otros nodos. La forma cuadrada corresponde a los tipos de violencia. Dada la relevancia que los sujetos han otorgado a las expresiones verbales y no verbales (psicológicas), hemos representado diferenciadas estas dos categorías.

Del mapa conceptual se pueden señalar algunos aspectos fundamentales:

a) Los niños/as han reconocido claramente formas de violencia directa, tanto física como psicológica (y verbal). Incluso expresan la violencia indirecta al referirse al poder de la palabra de líderes políticos como activadores de guerras (violencia estructural).

b) La violencia física tiene la mayor variedad de definiciones, entre las que destacan «matar», seguida de «pegar» y «maltratar».

c) La violencia estructural agrupa diferentes menciones a los conceptos «guerra», «Bush» y «robar».

d) Destaca la importancia de las intersecciones nodales que señalan los vínculos entre las definiciones de violencia de los niños/as como relaciones significativas en su discurso: «militar» (violencia física y estructural); «hacer daño hablando» (violencia estructural y verbal) y «discutir sin ser razonable», «burlar» y, sobre todo, «discusión entre padres, padres peleándose» (violencia verbal y psicológica).

e) La violencia más desagradable para los niños/as ha resultado la discusión entre los padres en los dibujos animados, a caballo entre la violencia psicológica y la verbal (como relaciones atributivas, destacan los sujetos «hijo», «padres» y, en los otros tipos de violencia, «Bush» y «niños pequeños»).

En resumen, las opiniones aportadas por los sujetos subrayan cómo establecen motivaciones justificadoras, atenuantes o potenciadoras de gravedad, más allá incluso de un valor absoluto de la violencia o de su conceptualización restringida. Así, todos los sujetos han reconocido en los ejemplos la violencia (con consecuencia) mortal como la más grave (largometraje con actores), pero mayoritariamente (10 sujetos), dirigen su máximo disgusto hacia la discusión entre los padres, una forma de violencia simbólica que se representa ritualizada (dibujos animados) y verosímil.

Los niños/as de nuestro estudio señalan como definición mayoritaria de violencia las acepciones más restrictivas, aquellas que se ciñen a la noción de violencia física y directa. Atribuimos esta opción de acuerdo a criterios de visibilidad, de economía y de uso social (recordemos que las definiciones restrictivas son las más habituales en el uso común). Pero también entre los niños y niñas han aparecido las definiciones amplias, amparadas bajo comentarios sobre la desigualdad –de edad, en armas...–, la desproporción y la humillación verbal o psicológica.

A continuación intentaremos precisar la relevancia que tienen algunos de estos factores contextuales de la narración violenta en el marco de la ficción televisiva. De acuerdo con los resultados obtenidos en la investigación los principales indicadores primarios de violencia son los siguientes:

1) El acto en sí mismo, entendido como naturaleza violenta de la acción: a) Si se activan mecanismos de identificación con la víctima o situación (atribución de significación violenta al acto cuando el niño/a se identifica con la víctima: por ejemplo, el protagonista: Novita, o con la situación: por ejemplo, discusiones en entornos familiares); b) Si los agresores son los «buenos»; c) La probabilidad de basarse en un hecho real.

2) Los aspectos contextuales: a) El género narrativo (los sujetos atribuyen eficazmente los relatos a un tipo de género que puede conllevar en sus convenciones una presencia explícita de la violencia, a menudo de carácter grave); b) La violencia injusta o desproporcionada en una relación desequilibrada entre los protagonistas (la percepción de gravedad de la violencia se incrementa cuando afecta a menores o a víctimas consideradas por los sujetos como «vulnerables» o «inocentes»); c) La gratuidad de la violencia (por ejemplo, cuando no se ha producido ninguna provocación previa). Con una menor presencia aparecen otros indicadores, también en el acto en sí mismo, que serían que a los niños y niñas les conmueve o perturba la representación del dolor o del daño (representación gráfica de las consecuencias del acto violento).

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Los resultados de nuestra investigación señalan cómo niños/as definen la violencia con una significación de carácter no necesariamente restringido. A partir del análisis de las operaciones interpretativas que efectúan sobre una muestra de violencia televisiva ficcional, los niños participantes en la investigación han mostrado cómo el proceso de recepción está enmarcado por una historia cultural y por unas prácticas concretas de lectura y consumo, en las que los aspectos narrativos contextuales tienen un gran protagonismo, en especial desde la percepción de proximidad que manifiestan los sujetos. Lógicamente, el tamaño de la muestra no permite extrapolar los resultados, sin embargo, a la vez que han aparecido dimensiones consideradas importantes por otros autores, también se ha encontrado y aplicado una tipología de análisis de la violencia televisiva que permite organizar los factores fundamentales de su percepción por parte de los espectadores infantiles y profundizar en el carácter narrativo de la experiencia de ver violencia en la televisión. Ello refuerza el camino de investigaciones de la reciente década centradas en los indicadores de influencia de los medios que, según recoge Jacquinot (2002: 31), se están emprendiendo con la intención de sensibilizar al máximo número de responsables y actores sociales, pero que se hacen difíciles de trasladar a la «frecuentación cotidiana de los medios de comunicación».

Para finalizar, intentaremos esbozar algunos de aquellos aspectos que, a nuestro parecer, requieren todavía hoy ser incorporados en el análisis de la violencia televisiva y la interpretación que hacen de ella los espectadores. El análisis de la violencia televisiva parte aún hoy de una conceptualización restrictiva de la noción de violencia, entendida como expresión física (y en algunos casos también verbal). Raramente se producen aportaciones desde el análisis de contenido que amplíen este espectro a las dimensiones culturales y estructurales de la violencia. La definición de violencia que en su momento propuso George Gerbner (1972: 31) continúa siendo el marco de referencia habitual. Recordemos que este autor definía la violencia televisiva como: «La expresión palpable de la fuerza física contra uno mismo o contra los demás, que te fuerza a actuar contra tu propia voluntad con el peligro de que te hieran o maten, o de herir o matar tú. La expresión de una fuerza dañina o letal ha de ser creíble y real en los términos simbólicos del drama. La situación jocosa o incluso absurda puede ser creíble y real, incluso cuando tiene un efecto que se supone cómico».

Esta definición, que deberíamos considerar dentro de las definiciones restrictivas (Aróstegui,1994), fundamenta aún hoy la mayoría de las descripciones y los análisis de contenido que se efectúan para precisar las características de la violencia en la televisión. Es precisamente dicha restricción del término a la expresión física la que consideramos extemporánea e inadecuada para entender la complejidad y diversidad actual de la violencia y de sus representaciones mediáticas.

Por contra, nos parece plenamente actual la segunda parte de la definición de Gerbner, dado que se sitúa, en relación a la violencia representada, en la esfera de los «términos simbólicos del drama». Enmarcados dentro de estas representaciones de ficción de la violencia televisiva, debemos en consecuencia observarla de acuerdo a las convenciones de género que fundamentan las reglas narrativas del discurso televisivo. Los géneros audiovisuales definen unos márgenes interpretativos para los espectadores y dichos márgenes a su vez fluctúan de acuerdo a la carga interpretativa que cada espectador les otorga. Dentro de las convenciones de género televisivo, aparecen una serie de factores contextuales que califican el acto violento. Cada espectador, a su vez, enmarca estas variables en su conocimiento y experiencia de la narración televisiva (habilidad mediática) y en su contexto de recepción (relevancia del medio dentro del conjunto de interacciones sociales).

Finalmente, entran en juego los movimientos que marcan la opinión pública y la expresión de la transgresión de unos límites a través de la alarma social. Aquí debemos entender las prácticas mediáticas desde la esfera más amplia, la del contexto social y político que regula las actuaciones y percepciones del orden social. Será este discurso del orden el que redefinirá qué entendemos por violencia. De esta manera, al regresar al inicio, se completa el círculo. En este sentido hemos podido apreciar, a partir de los cuestionarios y las entrevistas en profundidad, cómo en la interpretación de la violencia ficcional las normas sociales conviven con los valores familiares y comunitarios, así como con las sensibilidades individuales. Como concluyen en su investigación Fernández-Villanueva, Revilla & Domínguez (2011a), los espectadores ni son pasivos ni están aislados al generar emociones, especialmente como resultado de la percepción de esos contenidos (Pinto da Mota, 2005).

Como reflexiones finales, queremos evidenciar que tanto la noción de violencia como los discursos que sobre la violencia mediática se construyen tienen un carácter histórico, modificable y, a menudo, institucionalmente coactivo (Foucault, 2002). El propósito de nuestra investigación se dirigía inicialmente a la noción de violencia en la ficción televisiva, de acuerdo a las interpretaciones de los telespectadores infantiles. Pero hemos pasado del análisis de una preocupación, del análisis de un discurso que remite a la sensibilidad colectiva –al «pathos social»–, como apuntábamos al inicio, a un análisis de la producción del discurso, que remite al poder y a la gestión de ese espacio social. A menudo, los medios de comunicación actúan como amplificadores de la presencia de violencia en el mundo real, demasiadas veces sobredimensionándola. Pero también pueden actuar virtuosamente en una doble dirección: por un lado, dan relevancia pública a una presencia de la violencia silenciosa y tácitamente asumida por la sociedad; por otro, los medios permiten abrir el debate sobre la violencia más allá del discurso científico y político y, a pesar del riesgo de colaborar en un cierto reduccionismo alarmista, favorecen la implicación de los agentes sociales. Como indica Cecilia Von Feilitzen (2002), los medios de comunicación son en muchos aspectos requisitos previos para el debate público y para el funcionamiento de la sociedad de hoy, y no siempre es posible diferenciar entre los medios de comunicación y la sociedad, porque la comunicación a través de los medios también significa la participación en la sociedad. Una participación que tiene su máximo sentido si se construye desde una educación mediática, particularmente audiovisual, que contempla a los espectadores infantiles como sujetos activos.

Notas

1 Expresión que no se refiere aquí a una determinada tipología sino «al conjunto de mecanismos y operaciones que permiten clasificar de maneras diferentes los discursos analizados, y a la serie de procedimientos epistemológicos que darían pie a decidirse por una tipología o por otra» (Pérez-Tornero, 1982: 60-61).

Referencias

Alasuutari, P. (Ed.) (1999). Rethinking the Media Audience. Lon­don: Sage.

Ang, I. (1996). Living Room Wars: Rethinking Media Audiences for a Postmodern World. London: Routledge.

Aran, S. (2008). Representació mediàtica i percepció social de la violència en la ficció. Estudi de cas: la interpretació dels infants de la violència en la ficció televisiva infantil. Barcelona: Tesis doctoral, URL.

Aran, S., Barata, F. & al. (2001). La violència en la mirada. L’a­nàlisi de la violència a la televisió. Barcelona: Trípodos.

Aróstegui, J. (1994). Violencia, sociedad y política: la definición de la violencia. Ayer, 13, 17-55.

Bandura, A. (1977). Social Learning Theory. New York: Prentice-Hall.

Barthes, R. (1985). The Grain of the Voice. New York: Hill & Wang.

Boyle, K. (2005). Media and Violence. London: Sage.

Buckingham, D. (1996). Moving Images: Understanding Chil­dren’s Emotional Responses to Television. Manchester (UK): Man­chester University Press.

Buckingham, D. (2002). Crecer en la era de los medios electrónicos: tras la muerte de la infancia. Madrid: Morata.

Buckingham, D. (2005). Educación en medios: alfabetización, aprendizaje y cultura contemporánea. Barcelona: Paidós.

Bushman, B.J. & Huesmann, L.R. (2006). Short-term and Long-term Effects of Violent Media on Aggression in Children and Adults. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 160 (4), 348-352.

Busquet, J., Aran, S. & al. (2002). Infància, violència i televisió. Usos televisius i percepció infantil de la violència a la televisió. Barcelona: CAC. (www.cac.cat/pfw_files/cma/recerca/estudis_­re­cerca/violenciapercepcio.pdf) (08-01-2012).

Carnagey, N.L., Anderson, C.A. & Bartholow B.D. (2007). Media Violence and Social Neuroscience New Questions and New Opportunities. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 16 (4), 178-182. (www.psychology.iastate.edu/faculty/caa/abstracts/­2005-2009/07cab2.pdf) (28-09-2012).

Carnagey, N.L., Anderson, C.A. & Bushman, B.J. (2007). The Effect of Video Game Violence on Physiological Desensitization to Real-life violence. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 43 (3), 489-496.

Chesnais, J.C. (1982). Histoire de la violence. Paris: Robert La­ffont.

Elias, N. (1977). La civilisation des moeurs. Paris: Pluriel.

Fernández-Villanueva, C. & Domínguez, R. & al. (2004). Formas de legitimación de la violencia en televisión. Política y Sociedad, 41 (1), 183-199.

Fernández-Villanueva, C., Revilla, J.C. & al. (2008). Los es­pectadores ante la violencia televisiva: funciones, efectos e interpretaciones situadas. Comunicación y Sociedad, XXI, 2, 85-113.

Fernández-Villanueva, C., Revilla, J.C. & Domínguez, R. (2011a). Las emociones que suscita la violencia en televisión. Co­municar, 36, 95-103. (DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C36-2011-02-10).

Fernández-Villanueva, C., Revilla, J.C. & Domínguez, R. (2011b). Identificación y especularidad en los espectadores de violencia en televisión: una reconstrucción a partir del discurso. Comu­nicación y Sociedad, XXIV, 1, 7-33.

Foucault, M. (2002). El orden del discurso. Barcelona: Tusquets.

Fowles, J. (1999). The Case for Television Violence. Thousand Oaks (USA): Sage.

Galtung, J. (1969). Violence, Peace and Peace Research. Journal of Peace Research, 3, 167-192.

Galtung, J. (1996). Peace by Peaceful Means. Peace and Conflict Development and Civilization. London: Sage.

Gerbner, G. & Gross, L. (1976). Living with Television: The Violence Profile. Journal of Communication, 26 (2), 173-199.

Gerbner, G. (1972). Violence in Television Drama: Trends in Symbolic Functions. In G.A. Comstock & E.A. Rubinstein (Eds.), Television Social Behaviour, 1. Media Content and Control. (pp. 28-187). Washington (USA): Government Printing Office.

Gunter, B. & Harrison, J. (1998). Violence on Television. An Analysis of Amount, Nature, Location and Origin of Violence in British Programmes. London: Routledge.

Hill, A. (2001). «Looks Like it Hurts». Women’s Responses to Shocking Entertainment. In M. Barker & J. Petley (Eds.), Ill Effects: The Media Violence Debate. (pp. 135-149). London: Uni­versity of Luton.

Holsti, O.R. (1969). Content Analysis for the Social Sciences and Humanities. Reading, MA: Addison Wesley.

Huesmann, L.R., Moise-Titus, J. & al. (2003). Longitudinal Relations between Children’s Exposure to TV Violence and their Aggressive and Violent Behavior in Young Adulthood: 1977-1992. Developmental Psychology, 39 (2), 201-221.

Jacquinot, G. (2002). La violencia de las imágenes televisivas y su impacto en las conciencias. Comunicar, 18, 27-33.

Johnson, J.G., Cohen, P. & al. (2002). Television Viewing and Aggressive Behavior during Adolescence and Adulthood. Science, 295 (5564), 2.468-2.471.

Johnson-Laird, P.N. & Oatley, K. (2000). Cognitive and Social Construction of Emotions. In M. Lewis & J.M. Ha­viland-Jones (Eds.), Handbook of Emotions (pp. 458-475). New York: Guilford Press.

King, G., Keohane, R. & Verba, S. (1994). Designing Social Inquiry. Princeton (USA): Princeton University Press.

Millwood, A. (2003). How Children Interpret Screen Violence. Report of the Joint Research Programme Broadcasting Standards Commission and Independent Television Commission. London: BBC.

Molina, J.L. (2006). (Ed.). Talleres de autoformación con programas informáticos de análisis de redes sociales. Barcelona: Servei de Publicacions UAB.

Morrison, D., MacGregor, B. & al. (1999). Defining Violence. The Search of Understanding. Luton (UK): University of Luton Press.

Pérez-Tornero, J.M. (1982). Esbozo de un modelo de análisis del discurso. Cuadernos de Traducción e Interpretación, 1, 57-73.

Pinto da Mota, A. (2005). Televisão e violência: (para) novas formas de olhar. Comunicar, 25. (www.revistaco­municar.com/­in­dex.php?­contenido=detalles&numero=25&articulo=25-2005-075&mostrar=comocitar) (10-02-2012).

Potter, W.J. (1999). On Media Violence. Thousand Oaks (USA): Sage.

Reychler, L. (1997). Les crises et leurs fondements. GRIP, 215-217, 39-59.

Riffe, D., Lacy, S. & al. (1998). Analyzing Media Messages. Mah­wah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Rodrigo-Alsina, M., Busquet, J. & al. (2008). Las teorías sobre los efectos sociales de la violencia en televisión. Estado de la cuestión. Verso e Reverso, 22 (49). (www.unisinos.br/_diversos/revistas/versoereverso/index.php?e=13&s=9&a=111) (28-09-12).

Schlesinger, P., Haynes, R. & al. (1998). Men Viewing Violence. London: Broadcasting Standars Comission.

Taylor, S.J. & Bogdan, R. (1996). Introducción a los métodos cua­litativos de investigación. La búsqueda de significados. Barce­lona: Paidós.

Tisseron, S. (2000). Enfants sous influence. Les écrans redent-ils les jeunes violents? Paris: Armand Colin.

Tulloch, J. & Tulloch, M. (1992). Discourses about Violence: Critical Theory and the TV Violence’ Debate. Text, 12, 183-231.

Von Feilitzen, C. (2002). Aprender haciendo: reflexiones sobre la educación y los medios de comunicación. Comunicar, 18, 21-26.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 28/02/13
Accepted on 28/02/13
Submitted on 28/02/13

Volume 21, Issue 1, 2013
DOI: 10.3916/C40-2013-03-06
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 2
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?