Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Over the past twenty years, the high penetration of mobile phones as a means of interpersonal communication, especially among adolescents, has facilitated access to broader social environments outside their own family. Through the extension of their social environment, teenagers are able to establish new and more extensive relationships, while facing risks that may negatively affect their socialization process. The aim of this article was to find out how computer-mediated communication helps or obstructs the creation of social capital between teenagers, and what are the consequences of its use for this age group. To achieve this, an index of social capital was developed in the study, designed to determine the positive or negative impact of certain components of mobile mediated communication in the creation of this intangible resource. Questionnaires were distributed among Spanish adolescents of secondary and high school age, from different public and private schools of Navarre. Furthermore, the study considered the adolescents’ own perceptions about the incidence of the use of mobile phones in their social relationships. As reflected in the results, to identify the components of mediated communication that significantly affect social capital it is necessary to conduct an objective measurement of this resource.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction and statement of the question

Digital technology has achieved great importance among adolescents, and it makes up a large part of their daily activities in various contexts, including the family, education, and social settings. The mobile phone is of great importance in the world of technology because it is adaptable to specific social and consumer needs.

The impact of mobile phones on adolescent social relationships deserves particular attention because younger social groups use technology to a great extent, and mobile phones facilitate this process. The activities that adolescents engage in online and offline are challenging to disentangle and at the same time mutually influence one another (Boyd, 2014; Korchmaros & al., 2013). Mobile phones are worth studying because of their communication function, as well as the fact that adolescents are early adopters of this particular technology. The objective of this study was to understand how mobile phones influence communication mechanisms within adolescent social settings, as well as how it differs from face-to-face interactions.

The quality of relationships, specifically those that have been transported to online social networks and virtual communities, is still challenging to measure, and that is why it is advantageous to employ the concept of social capital. The intention of this study is to understand the potential positive impact that mobile phones have on the quality of adolescent social relationships by using the concept of social capital and its role in adolescent communities.

The hypothesis proposed is that the objective measure of social capital permits the identification of the components of communication conducted using mobile devices that significantly impact the social relations of adolescents.

1.1. Social capital

Many of the key motives for involvement in virtual communities or communication via internet are primarily intangible, such as, searching for information and opinions, friendships, support and confidence or the sense of belonging to a group (Baym, 2011; Jenkins, Ford, & Green, 2015; Korchmaros & al., 2013; Smith, Himelboim, Rainie, & Shneiderman, 2015). By means of this analysis and the benefits obtained through mobile phone communication, the concept of social capital emerges often. This term is understood as a series of resources that unites individuals in a community and enriches the relationships, as well as benefits the development of said relationships (Smith, 2014). The exploration of social capital has been the object of study for more than three decades (Bourdieu, 1980, 2002; Coleman, 1988; Bourdieu & Wacquant, 1992; Portes, 1998; 2014; Durston, 2000; Putnam, 2000, 2001; Neira, Portela, & Vieira, 2010). According to Bourdieu (1986: 248), the person who coined the term, social capital refers to “the aggregate of actual or potential links to stabilize social relationships that are relatively formal and where there is mutual awareness and acknowledgement”.

Bourdieu (1986) grants this concept an active meaning, which highlights the benefits that individuals acquire through participating in groups and the deliberate building of relationships with the goal of creating and obtaining resources. He distinguishes between two elements of social capital: 1) social networks that permit members claim to or the ability to access distinctive resources, and 2) the quantity and quality of these relationships.

Years later, Bourdieu and Wacquant (1992: 119) defined social capital as, “the sum of the resources, real or virtual, that could reach another person or group via networks of relationships of mutual awareness and acknowledgement that are relatively institutionalized”. In other words, the relationships can make the resources that are obtained vary in function and form.

Later on, Putnam (2000: 21) defined social capital as “social networks and norms that are reciprocated”, and posed that this concept fell into different customs and dimensions in reference to different matters or problems. In his book “Bowling Alone” he describes how the civic participation in the United States underwent typical ups and downs in the twentieth century until finally plateauing considerably in the present time. This shifted the U.S. from a strong and active civil society to a more individualistic culture. Putman claims that social capital –the connection between families, friends, and neighbors– disintegrated and has led to the destitution of cities (Putnam, 2000). This author distinguishes between inclusive social capital or “bridging social capital” and exclusive social capital or “bonding social capital” to refer to the distinct quality of the different ties that are generated among people that form part of those networks. In other words, social capital may be voluntary or necessary. For insiders it tends to reinforce exclusive identities and homogenous groups; meanwhile, groups that are more open permit diversity but the ties are usually weaker (Putnam, 2000: 22).

In addition to exclusive and inclusive social capital, Ellison, Steinfield and Lampe (2007) analyze another type of social capital, which they termed “maintained” to refer to weak links that people sustain when they are physically apart and allow for relationship to continue in spite of the distance.

The extent and quality of the links that people form among each other, along with other environmental factors, can influence social capital in communities and society in general. Among these factors, technology emerges as a medium of interpersonal communication that facilitates access among adolescents in wider environments, different from the more familiar scope. For this reason, it is necessary to conduct an updated analysis in terms of internet usage and digital screens.

Numerous investigations have already addressed the relationship between adolescent participation in online social networks and the subsequent social capital generated (Ellison & Vitak, 2015; Hampton, Lee, & Her, 2011; Lambert, 2015; Liu & Brown, 2014; Sádaba & Vidales, 2015; Wu, Wang, Su, & Yeh, 2013; Xie, 2014). However, there is still a need to develop an adequate method to measure this intangible resource –social capital– to understand the influence that mobile communication has on adolescents’ social relationships.

1.2. Measurement of social capital generated via communities

Putnam (2001) proposed some indicators to measure social capital in the United States. Previously, different scales were developed with the purpose of measuring social capital produced in social networking sites (i.e., internet) (Appel & al., 2014; Hooghe & Oser, 2015; Jiang & de-Bruijn, 2014). Williams (2006) investigated the quality or characteristics of online relationships and conducted his analysis using the Internet Social Capital Scale (ISCS). In addition, he proposed distinctions between the social capital constructed via the internet or technology and social capital constructed in a material environment.

As previously stated, mobile phones reinforce bonds among people. Schrock (2016) analyzes the different uses of Facebook by means of mobile phones and how this impacts individual social capital. His findings show that the principle emotional link is related to the frequency to which individuals create, edit, and publish images and videos as opposed to the type of content. Therefore, certain elements are offered as a result of mobile phones, distinguishing them from other technologies, and could influence the generation of social capital among communities in a special way.

In an attempt to understand the impact that the internet and mobile phones have on social capital among communities, Katz, Rice, Acorda, Dasgupta, and David (2004) analyze different communication mechanisms that could impact these resources: interactions over the internet and physical environment, the number of contacts, the composition of the communities, the frequency and spontaneity of communication, the local/global location of contacts, confidence, distance, speed, identify, and control. Their theory differs from those developed by Hooghe and Oser (2015), Jiang and de-Bruijn (2014) who focused on the general impact that the internet (as well as other traditional resources like television) have on social capital. In this study, there is special attention devoted to mobile phones’ impact on adolescents’ social relationships due to the scarce research dedicated to this area.

Even though Katz and colleagues (2004) developed ten communication mechanisms that influence social capital related to mobile phones, the scale is reformulated in this study because some of the components are vague and potentially consequences as opposed to elements of communication. For example, confidence, cooperation, institutional effectiveness, and mutual support could be considered consequences of social capital (Putnam, 2000:22).

Our research is in line with Papacharissi (2005), Schrock (2016: 8), who affirm that mobile social resources are not constituted by new environmental relationships; rather, they produce new forms of fine-tuning social contact, managing time, and expressing identity. For this reason, adolescents do not always distinguish between the virtual world of the internet and the material world. The activities they engage in and the relationships they maintain with their peers are blended continuously in both contexts (Bauwens, 2012). However, Katz and colleagues (2004) believe that positive communication and relationships can only be established if the correct distinction is made between the virtual world and material world.

The next section describes the research conducted on how adolescents use mobile phones and how it influences their relationships.

2. Materials and methodology

The following research questions are investigated:

• Do mobile phones influence communication in adolescents’ social relationships?

• What are adolescents’ perceptions of the influence mobile phones have on their relationships?

• What relationship exists between perceived social capital and objective social capital generated in adolescent communities via mobile phones?

To respond to these questions and understand the impact that mobile phone usage has on adolescent social relationships, Katz and colleagues’ (2004) theory of communication mechanisms was utilized. Using the same process used by the aforementioned authors, our study opted to measure the communication mechanisms using an indirect method to help explore the behavior of the adolescents with respect to each component. All ten of Katz (2004) components were considered in the creation of the questionnaire; however, only the components that clearly explained the impact of mobile phones on social capital were considered in the analysis. Table 1 shows questions 18-44 of the questionnaire paired up with the components.


Vidales-Bolanos Sadaba-Chalezquer 2017a-62664-en004.jpg

Each one of these variables was translated into questions for the questionnaire, utilizing a Likert Scale ranging from 1 to 5, with higher numbers indicating higher frequency, quantity, or importance. Questions that helped define the technological profile of the adolescents, as well as demonstrated general usage of internet social networks, were also included in the questionnaire. The questionnaire had a total of 45 questions, most of which required a single response and only two allowed for multiple responses. The validation of the questionnaire was accomplished with a pilot study, which was a representative sample with significant data. This allowed for corrections and the elimination of two questions that did not generate relevant information.

2.1. Design of the sample

The distribution of the sample was proportional according to type of school, public or private, and academic level, including secondary and high school. The total population considered were secondary and high school students within the Community of Navarre (MEDC, 2016). The confidence interval used was at 95% with a margin of error of 5%. The minimum size recommended for our sample was 552 students. After adding 10% of clustering effects for each school, and a 5% error collection, the total number of questionnaires collected was 674, and this covered 97% of the sample necessary to conduct a representative analysis.

2.2. Methods

The last question of the questionnaire was used to measure perceived social capital among adolescents. Respondents indicated whether they believe that their relationships were improved via mobile communication. These results were compared with an objective measure of social capital. For both types of social capital, an ordinary least squares (OLS) analysis was used to understand how each type of social capital depends on the variables of gender academic level, family structure, and other variables related to mobile usage.

The formula (in its simplest form) used for the analysis is as follows: Yi=?0+?1Ti+?2Xi+?3Ci+?i.

Where Yi is the dependent variable, Ti is variable of interest, Xi represents other important explanatory variables of interest, Ci represents all of the control variables (to mitigate omitted variable bias), and ?i is the error term. Each regression was controlled for heteroscedasticity using the standard White method.

In the case of objective social capital, a social capital index was created using principle components analysis (PCA) in order to more clearly understand how the components positively or negatively impact the use of phones. There are four components that make up the social capital index: 1) frequency of communication via mobile phones, 2) frequency of in-person activities with friends, 3) the diversity amid the groups respondents communicates with using mobile phones, 4) the diversity amid the groups he/she communicates with offline (Table 2).

Once the online and offline components were separated, two types of objective social capital were analyzed: mobile social capital and physical social capital. Regression analyses were also conducted for these dependent variables to the degree that the significant variables were identifiable in the increase or decrease of the resources in a specific environment.


Vidales-Bolanos Sadaba-Chalezquer 2017a-62664-en005.jpg

In addition, a linear regression analysis was conducted for both identity and confidence –both were considered as communication mechanisms for mobile phones by Katz and colleagues (2004); however, in this study they are analyzed separately because it is unclear whether they are independent of or a consequence of increased or decreased social capital. On the one hand, confidence was measured along one single variable. The linear regression analysis looked at the significant influence each variable has on the quantity of information the adolescents share and how that impacts their confidence in their social relationships.

On the other hand, identity was analyzed using an index like the one created for objective social capital, which was made up of two variables: 1) the importance adolescents place on the comments received via social networks, and 2) the frequency at which they change their profile picture. Principle components analysis (PCA) was also used as the method of analysis, with the goal of understanding the importance of each of the components that make up the index. Using linear regression analysis, variables that impact the construction of their personality were identified.

The self-image that adolescents develop via mobile resources could be considered an independent element, without being a cause or effect of social capital. The analysis permits further understanding of the impact certain variables related to communication mediated by mobile phones could have on the configuration of personality, keeping in mind that there are other non-virtual practices that influence the process.

3. Analysis and results

The results can be divided into three parts: 1) analysis of the variables that significantly influence social capital in adolescent communities, 2) analysis of the confidence generated using mobile phones, 3) analysis of the influence certain variables have on the construction of self-image.

As seen in Table 3, there is little relationship between socioeconomic demographics; the use of mobile phones, and the perception adolescents have regarding the influence of these screens in their social relationships. However, the social capital index allows us to understand this dynamic in an objective manner by looking closely at variables such as, mediated communication, as well as other variables like sex, academic course, and family structure.


Vidales-Bolanos Sadaba-Chalezquer 2017a-62664-en006.jpg

The results show that the number of contacts and the relationships with people from broader environments, different from their own neighborhood, positively influence social capital generated in both environments. Both gender and academic level positively affect the creation of this resource, which means growth can be greater for females (or young girls) and those who are at a higher academic levels. Also, the variable regarding people who have personal mobile phones resulted significant: the more personal (not shared) the greater the possibilities to expand social capital.

With regard to physical social capital, made up of variables that have to do with the activities undertaken and the composition of the communities in this environment, variables such as the number of contacts and the quality resulted significant. The quality of the contacts consisted of a variable created by dividing the number of total contacts with which the adolescents communicate with using their mobile phone and the principle contacts. For all practical purposes, it can be said that the larger the number and quality of contacts, the larger is the impact of the use of mobile phones on physical social capital. Another significant variable was relationships with people from more diverse environments. Finally, gender and family structure influence these resources.

The number of contacts significantly influences mobile social capital. The indicators that served to measure this resource are the frequency of online communication and the composition of the communities in this environment. This resource is significantly impacted by the relationships with broader environments, aside from own neighborhood, including people from the city or country in general; sex and academic level are impacted in the same manner. In addition, the possession of a personal mobile phone especially influenced the creation of online social capital.

In closing, it must be noted that there was interest in the significant impact that certain applications, for example games, have on perceived and objective social capital. These results reflect the influence that online games have on more frequent communication and the interaction among greater diversity in a manner that warrants the growth of social capital in general.


Vidales-Bolanos Sadaba-Chalezquer 2017a-62664-en007.jpg

As previously explained, the confidence generated via mobile communication is measured apart from the components mentioned by Katz and colleagues (2004). The results shown in Table 4 demonstrate that objective social capital positively influences confidence, which means that more information is shared using mobile phones. The type of space that is utilized to communicate, in terms of open mediums or private mediums, influences the creation of these resources. Finally, the results showed that adolescents who prefer to communicate face-to-face with other people have greater confidence and are more capable of enriching relationships.

The third and final analysis shown in Table 5 has to do with the variables that significantly impact the construction of self-image. In the case of sex, females (or young women) tend to be the ones who engage in practices such as changing profile pictures more frequently or giving greater importance to the comments received via mobile phones. The needs to communicate everything that happens to oneself and to check their mobile phone when alone are variables that, in general, affect the process of self-image. Finally, among the applications, WhatsApp resulted especially significant, meaning that this could reflect the behavior of adolescents who need to construct their self-image by means of the Internet.

4. Discussion and conclusion

Vidales-Bolanos Sadaba-Chalezquer 2017a-62664-en008.jpg

There are many conclusions that could be extracted from this study. First of all, the hypothesis is accepted, which states that the objective measure of social capital permits the identification of the communication mechanisms conducted using mobile phones, which significantly impacts social relationships among adolescents. The impact reflected in the results, using the social capital index, shows that there is a significant difference with perceived social capital among adolescents.

Among the most important socio-demographic variables that influence objective social capital is the academic course, which influences the relationships that are maintained online; meanwhile, family structure is significant for relationships outside the internet. Meanwhile, sex has a significant impact on total social capital.

Mobile phone communication positively influences social relationships of adolescents who have shown they are more capable of reconciling their activities both offline and online networks, for example, when they communicate with certain frequency via mobile, while at the same time maintaining the same or more contact with friends offline. This also occurs when the group of friends using these resources includes people from other schools, neighborhood, or cities, which permits greater diversity. Interactions online and relationships outside the internet complement each other as long as they do not yield a disequilibrium that negatively impacts social relationships.

The analysis conducted in both independent environments, inside and outside social networks, was possible with the creation of an index that took into account the frequency with which young people communicate and the diversity of groups they form. Results showed that the communication mechanisms by means of mobile phones, such as number of contacts and local or global relationships, significantly impact both types of social capital, and for this reason they need to be developed in a balanced way. Other variables, like the quality of the contacts maintained, significantly impact the relationships in offline environments, which appear to need maintenance and reinforcement. As Turkle (2011) and Baym (2011) explained, face-to-face contact is vital to ensure that mobile phones have a positive impact on adolescent social relationships. Therefore, aside from the capacity to differentiate between both online and offline spaces (i.e., to ensure positive communication), it is necessary to grow the number of contacts and maintain equilibrium by paying proper attention to physical and social elements that permit interactions with other people.

The degree of confidence generated via communication was also analyzed and it was shown that, consistent with the results already discussed, relationships positively impact the social capital index. This supports the argument by Putnam (2000), who states that confidence is a consequence and not an element of social capital. The use of private spaces for communication and the possibility of doing it face-to-face shows the potential positive impact of these resources.

Finally, WhatsApp particularly impacts the construction of self-image via the use of mobile phones. Especially among females this is significantly related to the importance of comments received and the frequency of updating profile pictures on social networks.

Future researchers should place greater emphasis on exploring the relationship between self-image in online spaces and the impact it has on the quality of social relationships among adolescents. It would be worthwhile to research on how mobile phones can have a positive result without becoming an indispensable component of personal and social development. It would also be useful to understand the offline practices that counter the excessive dependence or unsuitable mobile use.

It would be valuable to implement these indices for other groups of adolescents in different geographic areas. Even though this work was conducted at the Community of Navarre, the use of mobile phones is a habitual practice among adolescents in different cultures (Campbell, Ling, & Bayer, 2014; Ling & Bertel, 2013; Mascheroni & Olafsson, 2016; Vanden-Abeele, 2016) and could generate different perceptions and uses that could impact different geographic social relationships in unique ways.

Notes

1 This method is in alignment with the work of Vyas and Kumaranayake (2006) and it permits the calculations of certain values called “proper vectors” that are based on correlations between variables. These vectors are utilized as assigned weights for each variable in the index. This has the goal of identifying those variables that have the most influence on the direction of each vector. Even though these are ordinal variables, they have the same values and are significant in the same manner, which makes this method valid. In this case alone, the first variable of principle components analysis was utilized.

References

Appel, L., Dadlani, P., Dwyer, M., Hampton, K., Kitzie, V., Matni, Z. A., Teodoro, R. (2014). Testing the Validity of Social Capital Measures in the Study of Information and Communication Technologies. Information, Communication & Society, 17(4), 398-416. https://doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2014.884612

Bauwens, J. (2012). Teenagers, the Internet and Morality. Generational Use of New Media, 31-48. (https://goo.gl/tzMhBF).

Baym, N.K. (2011). Personal Connections in the Digital Age. Digital Media and Society Series, 1. Cambridge: Polity Press. (https://goo.gl/z9fn4K).

Bourdieu, P. (1980). Le capital social. In Actes de la recherche en sciences sociales, 31, 2-3. (https://goo.gl/Yai2bA).

Bourdieu, P. (1986). The Forms of Capital. Readings in Economic Sociology, 280-291. https://doi.org/10.1002/9780470755679.ch15

Bourdieu, P., & Wacquant, L.J. (1992). An Invitation to Reflexive Sociology. University of Chicago Press. (https://goo.gl/UUSGTt).

Boyd, D. (2014). It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens. Yale University Press. (https://goo.gl/K5CrLF).

Campbell, S.W., Ling, R., & Bayer, J.B. (2014). The Structural Transformation of Mobile Communication: Implications for Self and Society. In Oliver, M.B., & Raney, A. (Eds.), Media and Social Life. New York, NY: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315794174

Coleman, J. (1988). Social Capital in the Creation of Human Capital. American Journal of Sociology. (https://goo.gl/63Dmef).

Durston, J. (2000). ¿Qué es el capital social comunitario? Serie Políticas Sociales, 38. (https://goo.gl/MfHkwq).

Ellison, N., & Vitak, J. (2015). Social Network Site Affordances and Their Relationship to Social Capital Processes. The Handbook of the Psychology of Communication Technology, 203-227. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118426456.ch9

Ellison, N.B., Steinfield, C., & Lampe, C. (2007). The Benefits of Facebook “Friends": Social Capital and College Students’ Use of Online Social Network Sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 12(4), 1143-1168. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1083-6101.2007.00367.x

Hampton, K.N., Lee, C., & Her, E.J. (2011). How New Media Affords Network Diversity: Direct and Mediated Access to Social Capital Through Participation in Local Social Settings. New Media & Society, 13(7), 1031-1049. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444810390342

Hooghe, M., & Oser, J. (2015). Internet, Television and Social Capital: the Effect of “Screen Time” on Social Capital. Information, Communication & Society. (http://goo.gl/ur6JUK).

Jenkins, H., Ford, S., & Green, J. (2015). Cultura transmedia: la creacio´n de contenido y valor en una cultura en red. Gedisa. (https://goo.gl/XRYKeB).

Jiang, Y., & de-Bruijn, O. (2014). Facebook Helps: A Case Study of Cross-Cultural Social Networking and Social Capital. Information, Communication & Society, 17(6), 732-749. https://doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2013.830636

Katz, J., Rice, R., & Acord, S. (2004). Personal Mediated Communication and the Concept of Community in Theory and Practice. In Kalbfleisch, P.J. (Ed.), Communication and Community, Communication Yearbook 28 (pp. 315-371). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. (http://goo.gl/2Z22Ci).

Korchmaros, J.D., Ybarra, M.L., Langhinrichsen-Rohling, J., Boyd, D., & Lenhart, A. (2013). Perpetration of Teen Dating Violence in a Networked Society. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 16(8), 561-567. https://doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2012.0627

Lambert, A. (2015). Intimacy and Social Capital on Facebook: Beyond the Psychological Perspective. New Media & Society. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444815588902

Ling, R., & Bertel, T. (2013). Mobile Communication Culture among Children and Adolescents. Handbook of Children, Adolescents and Media. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203366981.ch15

Liu, D., & Brown, B.B. (2014). Self-disclosure on Social Networking Sites, Positive Feedback, and Social Capital among Chinese College Students. Computers in Human Behavior, 38, 213-219. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2014.06.003

Mascheroni, G., & Olafsson, K. (2016). The Mobile Internet: Access, Use, Opportunities and Divides among European Children. New Media & Society, 18(8), 1657-1679. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444814567986

MECD (Edición 2016) Las cifras de la educación en España. Curso 2013-2014. (https://goo.gl/kMaV7I).

Neira, I., Portela, M., & Vieira, E. (2010). Social Capital and Growth in European Regions. Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies, 10(2). (https://goo.gl/DCjmGk).

Papacharissi, Z. (2005). The Real-Virtual Dichotomy in Online Interaction: New Media Uses and Consequences Revisited. Annals of the International Communication Association, 29(1), 216-238. https://doi.org/10.1080/23808985.2005.11679048

Portes, A. (1998). Social Capital: Its Origins and Applications in Modern Sociology. Annual Review of Sociology, 24(1), 1-24. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev.soc.24.1.1

Portes, A. (2014). Downsides of Social Capital. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111(52), 18407-8. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1421888112

Putnam, R.D. (2000). Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community. New York: Simon & Schuster. https://doi.org/10.1145/358916.361990

Putnam, R.D. (2001). Social Capital: Measurement and Consequences. Canadian Journal of Policy Research. (https://goo.gl/j562qr).

Sádaba, C., & Vidales, M.J. (2015). El impacto de la comunicación mediada por la tecnología en el capital social: adolescentes y teléfonos móviles. Virtualis, 11(1), 75-92. (https://goo.gl/0kk6xK).

Schrock, A.R. (2016). Exploring the Relationship Between Mobile Facebook and Social Capital: What Is the "Mobile Difference" for Parents of Young Children? Social Media & Society, 2(3). https://doi.org/10.1177/2056305116662163

Smith, M.A. (2014). Mapping Online Social Media Networks. In Alhajj, R., & Rokne, J. (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Social Network Analysis and Mining (pp. 848-857). New York: Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6170-8_331

Smith, M.A., Himelboim, I., Rainie, L., & Shneiderman, B. (2015). The Structures of Twitter Crowds and Conversations. In S.A. Matei; M.G. Russell, & E. Bertino (Eds.),Transparency in Social Media (pp. 67–108). Cham: Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-18552-1_5

Turkle, S. (2011). Alone Together: Why we Expect more from Technology and Less from Each Other. New York: Basic Books.

Vanden-Abeele, M.M. (2016). Mobile Lifestyles: Conceptualizing Heterogeneity in Mobile Youth Culture. New Media & Society, 18(6), 908-926. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444814551349

Vyas, S., & Kumaranayake, L. (2006). Constructing Socio-Economic Status Indices: How to Use Principal Components Analysis. Health Policy and Planning, 21(6), 459-468. https://doi.org/10.1093/heapol/czl029

Williams, D. (2006). On and Off the’Net: Scales for Social Capital in an Online Era. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication. (https://goo.gl/5gibMj).

Wu, L., Wang, Y., Su, Y., & Yeh, M. (2013). Cultivating Social Capital through Interactivity on Social Network Sites. Pacis. (https://goo.gl/UKVTm2).

Xie, W. (2014). Social Network Site Use, Mobile Personal Talk and Social Capital among Teenagers. Computers in Human Behavior. (https://goo.gl/4TFlb3).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

La alta penetración del teléfono móvil entre los adolescentes y su uso como medio de comunicación inter-personal ha facilitado para este público el acceso, durante los últimos veinte años, a entornos más amplios, distintos al familiar. A través de la extensión de su ámbito social, estos son capaces de establecer nuevos vínculos y relaciones más extensas, al tiempo que se enfrentan a riesgos que afectan de manera negativa a su proceso de socialización. El objetivo de este trabajo fue conocer de qué manera la comunicación mediada por la tecnología favorece o no la creación de capital social entre las comunidades de adolescentes, y cuáles son las consecuencias que pueden resultar de su uso para este grupo de edad. Para ello se propuso un índice de capital social, que permitiera conocer el impacto positivo o negativo que tienen determinados componentes de la comunicación mediada por el móvil en la creación de este recurso. Se repartieron cuestionarios entre jóvenes españoles de la ESO y Bachillerato, en colegios públicos y privados de la Comunidad Foral de Navarra. Además, se tuvo en cuenta la propia percepción de los adolescentes, sobre la incidencia del uso de este dispositivo en sus relaciones sociales. Tal como reflejan los resultados, solo a través de una medición objetiva del capital social es posible identificar aquellos componentes de la comunicación mediada que afectan de manera significativa a este recurso.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

La tecnología digital ha adquirido gran importancia entre el público adolescente y forma parte de sus prácticas cotidianas en distintos ámbitos como el familiar, educativo y social. En ellas, el teléfono móvil ocupa un lugar importante pues se trata de un dispositivo personal que se adapta a sus particulares necesidades sociales y de consumo.

La incidencia que el móvil puede tener en las relaciones sociales de los jóvenes adquiere especial interés, pues en gran medida las comunidades de las que forman parte utilizan la tecnología para comunicarse, y este dispositivo lo facilita. Las actividades que los jóvenes realizan dentro y fuera de Internet no se separan, pero sí se influyen mutuamente (Boyd, 2014; Korchmaros & al., 2013). La función comunicativa de este dispositivo y su rápida adopción por parte de los jóvenes lo convierten en una modalidad de comunicación mediada que interesa analizar detenidamente. El objetivo de este trabajo fue conocer cómo influyen determinados componentes característicos de la comunicación mediada por el móvil en las relaciones sociales de los adolescentes y de qué manera se diferencian de aquellas que mantienen cara a cara.

La calidad de estas relaciones, que ahora se trasladan a un ámbito «online» a través de las redes sociales y las comunidades virtuales, todavía es difícil de medir, y por ello resulta útil analizar el concepto de capital social. Mediante el análisis de este recurso, y teniendo en cuenta su presencia en las comunidades o grupos de adolescentes, se pretende conocer el impacto más o menos positivo que tiene la comunicación mediada por el móvil en la calidad de sus relaciones sociales.

Se plantea la hipótesis de que la medición objetiva del capital social permite identificar componentes de la comunicación mediada por el móvil, que inciden de modo significativo en las relaciones sociales de los adolescentes.

1.1. Capital social

Entre los motivos que llevan a las personas a involucrarse en comunidades virtuales o a comunicarse con otros a través de Internet destacan especialmente recursos que son intangibles, como la búsqueda de información y opiniones, las amistades, el apoyo y confianza mutuos o el sentido de pertenencia a un grupo (Baym, 2011; Jenkins, Ford, & Green, 2015; Korchmaros & al., 2013; Smith, Himelboim, Rainie, & Shneiderman, 2015). A través del análisis de estos recursos y de los beneficios obtenidos mediante dicha participación, emerge de modo recurrente el concepto de capital social, entendido como una serie de recursos que aúna a los individuos de una comunidad, pues enriquece las relaciones que mantienen entre sí, y beneficia su desarrollo (Smith, 2014). El análisis de este recurso referido a las relaciones sociales ya ha sido objeto de investigación desde hace más de tres décadas (Bourdieu, 1980, 2002; Coleman, 1988; Bourdieu & Wacquant, 1992; Portes, 1998; 2014; Durston, 2000; Putnam, 2000, 2001; Neira, Portela, & Vieira, 2010). Tal y como explicaba Bourdieu (1986: 248), a quien se considera precursor del término, el capital social hace referencia al «agregado de los recursos actuales o potenciales vinculados a la posesión de una red estable de relaciones más o menos formales de conocimiento mutuo o de reconocimiento».

Bourdieu (1986) otorgaba a este concepto un sentido instrumental, destacando los beneficios que los individuos pueden acumular a través de la participación en grupos y de la construcción deliberada de relaciones con el fin de crear y obtener recursos. Distinguía dos elementos en el capital social: las redes sociales que permiten a sus miembros reclamar o acceder a distintos recursos, y la cantidad y cualidad de estos.

Años más tarde, Bourdieu y Wacquant (1992: 119) definieron el capital social como «la suma de recursos, reales o virtuales, que puede alcanzar una persona o un grupo a través de una red de relaciones de conocimiento mutuo y reconocimiento, más o menos institucionalizada». Es decir, las relaciones pueden hacer variar los recursos que se obtienen en función y forma.

Más tarde, Putnam (2000: 21) definió el capital social como «redes sociales y normas de reciprocidad asociadas a ellas», y aseguraba que este concepto adquiría formas y tamaños diferentes relacionados con distintos asuntos o problemas. En su libro «Bowling Alone», describió cómo la participación ciudadana en Estados Unidos en el siglo veinte sufrió altibajos hasta disminuir considerablemente en la actualidad, pasando de ser una sociedad civil fuerte y activa a otra más individualista. Afirmaba que el capital social que permite la conexión entre familiares, amigos y vecinos se había descompuesto provocando el empobrecimiento de las ciudades (Putnam, 2000). Este autor distinguía entre capital social inclusivo o «bridging social capital» y capital social exclusivo o «bonding social capital» para referirse a la distinta calidad de los vínculos que se generan entre las personas que forman parte de las redes. Explicaba que ciertas formas de capital social son, por elección o necesidad, hacia dentro y tienden a reforzar identidades exclusivas y grupos homogéneos; mientras que otras hacia fuera permiten relacionar una mayor diversidad de personas pero mediante vínculos más frágiles (Putnam, 2000: 22).

Además del capital social exclusivo e inclusivo, Ellison, Steinfield y Lampe (2007) analizaban otro tipo de capital social, al que llamaban «mantained», para referirse a vínculos débiles entre personas que se encuentran separadas físicamente y que les permiten mantener las relaciones a pesar de las distancias.

La extensión y la calidad de los vínculos que las personas forman entre sí, junto con factores del entorno, pueden influir en el capital social de las comunidades y en la sociedad en general. Entre estos factores, la tecnología emerge como un medio de comunicación interpersonal que facilita el acceso de los adolescentes a entornos más amplios, distintos al ámbito familiar. Por ello parece necesario analizar este concepto de manera más actualizada en relación con el uso de Internet y las pantallas digitales.

Numerosas investigaciones ya abordan la relación entre la participación de los adolescentes en las redes sociales en Internet y el capital social generado (Ellison & Vitak, 2015; Hampton, Lee, & Her, 2011; Lambert, 2015; Liu & Brown, 2014; Sádaba & Vidales, 2015; Wu, Wang, Su, & Yeh, 2013; Xie, 2014). Sin embargo, todavía deben desarrollarse métodos adecuados para medir este recurso de naturaleza intangible, de manera que pueda entenderse la influencia que la comunicación mediada por las tecnologías, y en particular por el móvil, tiene en las relaciones sociales de los jóvenes.

1.2. Medición del capital social generado en las comunidades

Putnam (2001) propuso unos indicadores para medir el capital social en el caso concreto de Estados Unidos. Posteriormente se han desarrollado diversas escalas que buscan medir el capital social que se produce, de manera particular, en las redes sociales en Internet (Appel & al., 2014; Hooghe & Oser, 2015; Jiang & de-Bruijn, 2014). Williams (2006) se preguntaba sobre la calidad o características de las relaciones que se forman en Internet, y proponía su análisis mediante las Escalas de Capital Social en Internet (ECSI). Además, sugería la posible distinción entre el capital social que se construye a través de Internet y las tecnologías, y aquel que se construye en el ámbito físico.

Partiendo de la idea de que el móvil es capaz de reforzar lazos estrechos entre personas, Schrock (2016) analiza el impacto que diferentes usos de Facebook, a través del móvil, tienen en el capital social de los individuos. Entre sus conclusiones explicaba que lo que define principalmente la conexión emocional que se produce a través del uso de este dispositivo es la frecuencia con la que los individuos crean, editan y publican imágenes y vídeos, y no tanto el contenido de estos medios. Se presentan, por tanto, ciertos elementos (affordances) de los móviles que los distinguen de otras tecnologías, y que podrían incidir de modo particular en la generación de capital social en las comunidades.

En su intento por conocer el impacto que Internet y el móvil tienen en el capital social de las comunidades, Katz, Rice, Acorda, Dasgupta y David (2004) analizaron distintos componentes de la comunicación mediada que pueden afectar a este recurso: las interacciones en Internet y en el ámbito físico, el número de contactos, la composición de las comunidades, la frecuencia y la espontaneidad de la comunicación, la localidad/globalidad de los contactos, la confianza, las distancias, la rapidez, la identidad y el control. Al considerar el teléfono móvil en particular, su teoría se distingue de las desarrolladas por Hooghe y Oser (2015), Jiang y de-Bruijn (2014), más centradas en el impacto que Internet en general, y otros medios tradicionales como la televisión, tienen sobre el capital social. Por eso adquiere un interés especial en este trabajo al adecuarse al tema sobre el impacto que el móvil puede tener en las relaciones sociales de los jóvenes.

Aunque en su investigación Katz y otros (2004) mencionaban diez componentes de la comunicación mediada por el móvil que pueden influir sobre el capital social, se propone reformular este elenco, ya que algunos de ellos podrían ser vistos como consecuencia y no tanto como un elemento de la comunicación mediada. La confianza, por ejemplo, junto con la cooperación, la efectividad institucional o el apoyo mutuo, podrían considerarse consecuencias del capital social (Putnam, 2000: 22).

En línea con Papacharissi (2005), Schrock (2016: 8) afirma que los medios sociales móviles no constituyen un nuevo entorno relacional, sino que resultan nuevas formas de afinar el contacto social, gestionar el tiempo y expresar la identidad. Por eso, los más jóvenes no siempre distinguen entre el mundo virtual en Internet y otro físico, pues las actividades que realizan y las relaciones que mantienen con otras personas de su edad se mezclan de forma continua, en ambos contextos (Bauwens, 2012). No obstante, Katz y otros (2004) creen que solo la correcta distinción entre el mundo virtual y real permitirá que la comunicación y las relaciones que establecen sean positivas.

En el siguiente apartado se explica el trabajo de campo que se ha llevado a cabo entre adolescentes, para conocer cómo usan el móvil y de qué manera influye en sus relaciones.

2. Material y métodos

Se plantearon las siguientes preguntas de investigación:

• ¿Influye la comunicación mediada por el móvil en las relaciones sociales de los jóvenes?

• ¿Cuál es la percepción de los adolescentes sobre la influencia del uso del móvil en sus relaciones sociales?

• ¿Qué relación existe entre el capital social percibido y el capital social objetivo que se genera en las comunidades de adolescentes, mediante el uso del móvil?

Para responder a estas preguntas de investigación y conocer la incidencia que tiene el uso del móvil en las relaciones sociales de los jóvenes, se tuvo como referencia la teoría de Katz y otros (2004) sobre los componentes de la comunicación mediada que influyen en el capital social de las comunidades. Siguiendo el propio planteamiento realizado por estos autores, se optó por medirlos de modo indirecto estableciendo para cada uno de ellos variables que ayudaran a conocer el comportamiento de los adolescentes respecto a cada componente. En la elaboración del cuestionario se tuvieron en cuenta los diez componentes mencionados por Katz y otros (2004), pero en el análisis posterior solamente se seleccionaron aquellos que, de manera clara, explican el impacto que la comunicación mediada por el móvil puede tener en el capital social. La Tabla 1 muestra la relación de los componentes con las preguntas 18-44 del cuestionario.


Vidales-Bolanos Sadaba-Chalezquer 2017a-62664 ov-es004.jpg

Cada una de estas variables se tradujo en preguntas en un cuestionario, utilizando la escala de Likert con respuestas del 1 al 5 según aumentara su frecuencia, cantidad o importancia. También se incluyeron preguntas que permitieron definir el perfil tecnológico de los jóvenes encuestados, y que mostraron usos generales sobre las redes sociales en Internet. En total fueron 45 preguntas, la mayoría de respuesta única y solo en dos ocasiones de respuesta múltiple. La validación del cuestionario, para la que se contó con una muestra representativa y se obtuvieron datos significativos, permitió incluir correcciones y eliminar dos preguntas que no aportaban información relevante.

2.1. Diseño de la muestra

La distribución de la muestra se realizó de manera proporcional según los tipos de colegio, público o privado, y según el nivel del curso académico, incluyendo la ESO y Bachillerato. Se tuvo en cuenta la población total de estudiantes de ESO y de Bachillerato, en la Comunidad Foral de Navarra (MECD, 2016).

En un intervalo de confianza del 95% y con un margen de error del 5%, el tamaño mínimo de la muestra recomendado es de 552 alumnos. Después de añadir un 10% de efectos de agrupamiento o «clustering effects» por cada tipo de colegio, y un 5% de errores de recogida o «error collection», se recogió un total de 674 cuestionarios, y con ello se cubrió un 97% de la muestra necesaria para realizar este análisis de un modo representativo.

2.2. Métodos

Para medir el capital social percibido por los adolescentes se usó la última pregunta del cuestionario, en la que responden si piensan que sus relaciones mejoran a través de la comunicación mediada por el móvil; y estos resultados se contrastaron con una medición objetiva del capital social. Para ambos tipos de capital social se realizó un análisis de regresión lineal para conocer la dependencia de cada uno de ellos en relación con las variables sexo, curso académico, estructura familiar, y también otras que tienen que ver con el uso del móvil.

A continuación, se muestra la fórmula (en su forma más simplificada) que fue utilizada en el análisis de regresión: Yi=?0+?1Ti+?2Xi+?3Ci+?i.

Donde Yi es la variable dependiente, Ti es la variable de asignación, Xi abarca otras variables explicativas de importancia que se desean analizar, Ci abarca todas las variables de control (para mitigar el riesgo de la variable omitida), y ?i es el término de error. Cada regresión se controló por heterocedasticidad mediante el método estándar White.

En el caso del capital social objetivo, se elaboró un índice de capital social utilizando el método de análisis de componentes principales (ACP), para conocer la importancia de los componentes que manifiestan con mayor claridad el impacto positivo o negativo que la comunicación mediada puede tener en este recurso1. Los componentes que conforman el índice del capital social son cuatro: 1) frecuencia de la comunicación a través del móvil, 2) frecuencia de las actividades con amigos en persona, 3) diversidad de los grupos con los que se comunican a través del móvil, 4) diversidad de los grupos con los que se comunican fuera de Internet (Tabla 2).


Vidales-Bolanos Sadaba-Chalezquer 2017a-62664 ov-es005.jpg

Al separar estos componentes entre aquellos que se refieren al ámbito «online», y los que explican la realidad en el ámbito «offline», se analizaron dos tipos de capital social objetivo: capital social móvil y capital social físico. También se realizaron análisis de regresión lineal para estas variables dependientes, de manera que pudieran identificarse aquellas variables significativas en el crecimiento o disminución de este recurso en un ámbito más específico.

Además se analizaron los conceptos identidad y confianza, y se realizó un análisis de regresión lineal para cada uno de ellos. Ambos conceptos son considerados por Katz y otros (2004) como componentes de la comunicación mediada por el móvil. Sin embargo, aquí se analizaron de forma separada pues no parece claro si se trata de elementos independientes o consecuencias de un aumento o disminución del capital social. Por un lado, se midió la confianza a través de una sola variable. Al realizar el análisis de regresión lineal, se analizó la influencia más o menos significativa que tienen ciertas variables en la cantidad de información que los jóvenes comparten, de manera que quedara reflejada la confianza producida en sus relaciones sociales.

Por otro lado, para analizar la identidad se realizó un índice de la misma manera que el capital social objetivo, formado por dos variables: 1) la importancia que los adolescentes dan a los comentarios que reciben a través de las redes sociales, y 2) la frecuencia con la que cambian su foto de perfil. También se utilizó el método de análisis de los componentes principales (ACP), con el fin de entender la importancia de cada uno de los componentes que conforman el índice. Mediante un análisis de regresión lineal se identificaron algunas de las variables que afectan de forma significativa a la construcción de su propia personalidad.

La construcción que los adolescentes pueden hacer de sí mismos a través del móvil podría considerarse un elemento independiente, sin ser causa o efecto del capital social. El análisis realizado permite conocer el impacto que algunas variables de la comunicación mediada pueden tener en la configuración de la propia personalidad, reconociendo que existen también otras prácticas no virtuales que influyen en este proceso.

3. Análisis y resultados

Los resultados pueden dividirse en tres partes: 1) análisis sobre las variables que influyen de manera significativa en el capital social de las comunidades de adolescentes, 2) análisis sobre la confianza generada mediante el uso del móvil, 3) análisis sobre la influencia de ciertas variables en la construcción de la propia identidad.


Vidales-Bolanos Sadaba-Chalezquer 2017a-62664 ov-es006.jpg

Tal como muestran los resultados de la Tabla 3, existe muy poca relación entre las variables sociodemográficas, las formas particulares de uso del móvil, y la percepción que los jóvenes tienen acerca del impacto de uso de este dispositivo en sus relaciones sociales. Sin embargo, a través del índice de capital social, es posible conocer de forma objetiva la manera en que ciertas variables de la comunicación mediada y otras como el sexo, curso académico y estructura familiar afectan a este recurso.

Los resultados muestran que el número de contactos y la relación con personas de ámbitos más amplios, distintos al propio barrio, influyen de manera positiva en el capital social generado en ambos espacios. Tanto el sexo como el curso académico afectan de modo positivo en la creación de este recurso, lo que significa que su crecimiento puede ser mayor según se trate de chicas y también en la medida en que sean cursos más avanzados. También la variable sobre la posesión o no de un teléfono móvil propio resulta especialmente significativa: cuanto más personal es el dispositivo (no compartido) mayores son las posibilidades de aumentar el capital social.

En el caso del capital social físico, conformado por las variables que tienen que ver con las actividades realizadas y la composición de las comunidades en este ámbito, tanto el número de contactos como la calidad de estos resultan significativos. La calidad de los contactos consiste en una variable creada al dividir el número total de contactos con quienes los jóvenes se relacionan a través del móvil entre los contactos principales. Por lo tanto, puede decirse que cuanto mayor es el número y la calidad de los contactos, mayor es el impacto que el uso de este dispositivo tiene en el capital social físico. También resulta significativa la relación con personas de ámbitos más amplios. Por último, el sexo y la estructura familiar influyen en la creación de este recurso.

El número de contactos influye también de manera significativa en el capital social móvil. Los indicadores que sirven para medir este recurso son la frecuencia de la comunicación «online» y la composición de las comunidades en este ámbito. Este recurso se ve afectado de manera significativa por las relaciones con entornos más extensos, además del propio barrio, incluyendo a personas de la ciudad y del país en general; de la misma manera se ve afectado por el sexo y el curso académico. Además, la posesión de un móvil propio influye especialmente en la creación de capital social «online».


Vidales-Bolanos Sadaba-Chalezquer 2017a-62664 ov-es007.jpg

Cabe señalar por último, el impacto significativo que tienen algunas aplicaciones como los juegos en el capital social percibido y objetivo. De manera especial en este último, los resultados reflejan la influencia que los juegos «online» tienen en una comunicación más frecuente y en la interacción con grupos más diversos, de manera que permiten el crecimiento del capital social en general.

Como se ha explicado antes, la confianza generada mediante la comunicación móvil se ha medido como un componente aparte de los mencionados por Katz y otros (2004). Los resultados que aparecen en la Tabla 4, muestran la manera en que el capital social objetivo influye de manera positiva en la generación de confianza, que se traduce en una mayor cantidad de información compartida mediante el móvil. También el tipo de espacios que utilizan para comunicarse, en la medida en que pasen de medios abiertos a otros más privados, influye en la creación de este recurso. Por último, la preferencia de los jóvenes por comunicarse con otras personas cara a cara, incide de manera positiva en la confianza, y por eso es capaz de enriquecer las relaciones que mantienen entre sí.

El tercer y último análisis que aparece reflejado en la Tabla 5, tiene que ver con aquellas variables que inciden de manera significativa en la construcción de la propia identidad. En el caso del sexo, son las chicas quienes tienden más a prácticas como cambiar de manera frecuente su foto de perfil, o a dar mayor importancia a los comentarios que reciben a través del móvil. La necesidad de comunicar todo lo que les ocurre y de mirar el móvil cuando están solos son variables que, en general, afectan al proceso de construcción de la identidad. Por último, entre las aplicaciones que resultan especialmente significativas por su relación con esta variable dependiente, se encuentra WhatsApp, cuyo uso puede incidir en los comportamientos que reflejan la necesidad de muchos jóvenes de decidir quiénes son a través de Internet.


Vidales-Bolanos Sadaba-Chalezquer 2017a-62664 ov-es008.jpg

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Son muchas las conclusiones que se pueden extraer del estudio realizado. En primer lugar, se acepta la hipótesis que afirma la necesidad de una medición objetiva del capital social para identificar componentes de la comunicación mediada por el móvil que influyen de modo significativo en este recurso. El impacto reflejado en los resultados, a través de la elaboración de un índice de capital social, se diferencia significativamente del percibido por los propios jóvenes.

Entre las variables sociodemográficas que influyen en el capital social objetivo destacan el curso académico, que influye en las relaciones que mantienen en el ámbito «online», mientras que la estructura familiar tiene un impacto relevante en las relaciones fuera de Internet. Por su parte, la variable sexo tiene un impacto significativo en el capital social total.

La comunicación mediada por el móvil influye de forma positiva en las relaciones sociales de aquellos adolescentes que se muestran más capaces de conciliar sus actividades dentro y fuera de la Red, como por ejemplo, cuando se comunican con cierta frecuencia a través del móvil, a la vez que mantienen el mismo o mayor contacto con sus amigos fuera de Internet. También ocurre cuando el grupo de amigos que gestionan a través de este dispositivo incluye a personas de otros colegios, barrios o ciudades, permitiendo una mayor diversidad. La interacción online a través del móvil y las relaciones fuera de Internet se complementan, de modo que no se producen desequilibrios que afectan negativamente a sus relaciones sociales.

El análisis realizado de forma independiente en ambos espacios, dentro y fuera de la Red, fue posible mediante la elaboración de un índice que tuviera en cuenta la frecuencia con la que los jóvenes se comunican y la diversidad de los grupos que forman. De acuerdo con los resultados, determinados componentes de la comunicación mediada por el móvil, como el número de contactos y la localidad o globalidad de las relaciones, impactan significativamente en ambos tipos de capital social, y por ello tendrían que desarrollarse de modo equilibrado en los dos espacios. Otros, como la calidad de los contactos que mantienen, afectan especialmente a las relaciones en el ámbito fuera de Internet, por lo que parece necesario mantenerlas y reforzarlas. Tal como lo explicaban Turkle (2011) y Baym (2011), asegurar el contacto cara a cara es vital para conseguir que el uso del móvil tenga un impacto positivo en las relaciones sociales de los adolescentes. Por lo tanto, además de la capacidad de distinguir ambos espacios, para que la comunicación mediada sea positiva es necesario crecer en el número de contactos y ámbitos de relación de modo equilibrado, prestando atención al contacto físico y a elementos sociales que permitan el trato con otras personas.

En el trabajo se analizó también el grado de confianza que se genera en la comunicación mediada y que, de acuerdo con los resultados, se relaciona de manera positiva con el índice de capital social. Esto apoya el argumento de Putnam (2000), para quien la confianza es una consecuencia y no un elemento constitutivo del capital social. El uso de espacios privados para comunicarse y la posibilidad de hacerlo también cara a cara, destacan por su incidencia positiva en este recurso.

Por último, la construcción de la propia identidad mediante el uso del móvil se ve especialmente afectada por el uso de WhatsApp, que se relaciona de forma significativa con la importancia que, de manera particular las chicas, dan a los comentarios de lo que comparten a través de Internet, y con la frecuencia con que cambian su foto de perfil en las redes sociales.

En el futuro, sería relevante profundizar en la relación entre un mayor afán de construcción de la imagen personal en espacios virtuales y la calidad de las relaciones sociales que mantienen los jóvenes. Habría que indagar de qué manera esta influencia puede ser positiva, sin convertir el móvil en un dispositivo indispensable para su desarrollo personal y social. Resultaría también útil conocer qué prácticas fuera de Internet permiten contrarrestar el efecto que tiene una dependencia excesiva o inadecuada del móvil.

Cabría considerar también trasladar este índice a grupos de adolescentes en otros contextos territoriales. Aunque se trata de un trabajo realizado en la Comunidad Foral de Navarra, el uso del móvil se ha convertido en una práctica habitual entre los jóvenes en diferentes culturas (Campbell, Ling, & Bayer, 2014; Ling & Bertel, 2013; Mascheroni & Olafsson, 2016; Vanden-Abeele, 2016), y pueden surgir distintas percepciones y usos de este dispositivo que podrían afectar de un modo particular a sus relaciones sociales.

Notas

1 Este método está alineado con los trabajos de Vyas y Kumaranayake (2006) y permite calcular ciertos valores llamados «vectores propios» que se basan en correlaciones entre variables. Estos vectores se utilizaron como pesos asignados a cada variable en el índice, con el fin de identificar aquellas variables con mayor influencia sobre la dirección de este. A pesar de que se trata de variables ordinales, tienen los mismos valores y son significativas en el mismo sentido, y por ello es válido utilizar este método. En este caso se utilizó únicamente la primera variable de los componentes principales.

Referencias

Appel, L., Dadlani, P., Dwyer, M., Hampton, K., Kitzie, V., Matni, Z. A., Teodoro, R. (2014). Testing the Validity of Social Capital Measures in the Study of Information and Communication Technologies. Information, Communication & Society, 17(4), 398-416. https://doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2014.884612

Bauwens, J. (2012). Teenagers, the Internet and Morality. Generational Use of New Media, 31-48. (https://goo.gl/tzMhBF).

Baym, N.K. (2011). Personal Connections in the Digital Age. Digital Media and Society Series, 1. Cambridge: Polity Press. (https://goo.gl/z9fn4K).

Bourdieu, P. (1980). Le capital social. In Actes de la recherche en sciences sociales, 31, 2-3. (https://goo.gl/Yai2bA).

Bourdieu, P. (1986). The Forms of Capital. Readings in Economic Sociology, 280-291. https://doi.org/10.1002/9780470755679.ch15

Bourdieu, P., & Wacquant, L.J. (1992). An Invitation to Reflexive Sociology. University of Chicago Press. (https://goo.gl/UUSGTt).

Boyd, D. (2014). It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens. Yale University Press. (https://goo.gl/K5CrLF).

Campbell, S.W., Ling, R., & Bayer, J.B. (2014). The Structural Transformation of Mobile Communication: Implications for Self and Society. In Oliver, M.B., & Raney, A. (Eds.), Media and Social Life. New York, NY: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315794174

Coleman, J. (1988). Social Capital in the Creation of Human Capital. American Journal of Sociology. (https://goo.gl/63Dmef).

Durston, J. (2000). ¿Qué es el capital social comunitario? Serie Políticas Sociales, 38. (https://goo.gl/MfHkwq).

Ellison, N., & Vitak, J. (2015). Social Network Site Affordances and Their Relationship to Social Capital Processes. The Handbook of the Psychology of Communication Technology, 203-227. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118426456.ch9

Ellison, N.B., Steinfield, C., & Lampe, C. (2007). The Benefits of Facebook “Friends": Social Capital and College Students’ Use of Online Social Network Sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 12(4), 1143-1168. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1083-6101.2007.00367.x

Hampton, K.N., Lee, C., & Her, E.J. (2011). How New Media Affords Network Diversity: Direct and Mediated Access to Social Capital Through Participation in Local Social Settings. New Media & Society, 13(7), 1031-1049. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444810390342

Hooghe, M., & Oser, J. (2015). Internet, Television and Social Capital: the Effect of “Screen Time” on Social Capital. Information, Communication & Society. (http://goo.gl/ur6JUK).

Jenkins, H., Ford, S., & Green, J. (2015). Cultura transmedia: la creacio´n de contenido y valor en una cultura en red. Gedisa. (https://goo.gl/XRYKeB).

Jiang, Y., & de-Bruijn, O. (2014). Facebook Helps: A Case Study of Cross-Cultural Social Networking and Social Capital. Information, Communication & Society, 17(6), 732-749. https://doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2013.830636

Katz, J., Rice, R., & Acord, S. (2004). Personal Mediated Communication and the Concept of Community in Theory and Practice. In Kalbfleisch, P.J. (Ed.), Communication and Community, Communication Yearbook 28 (pp. 315-371). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. (http://goo.gl/2Z22Ci).

Korchmaros, J.D., Ybarra, M.L., Langhinrichsen-Rohling, J., Boyd, D., & Lenhart, A. (2013). Perpetration of Teen Dating Violence in a Networked Society. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 16(8), 561-567. https://doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2012.0627

Lambert, A. (2015). Intimacy and Social Capital on Facebook: Beyond the Psychological Perspective. New Media & Society. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444815588902

Ling, R., & Bertel, T. (2013). Mobile Communication Culture among Children and Adolescents. Handbook of Children, Adolescents and Media. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203366981.ch15

Liu, D., & Brown, B.B. (2014). Self-disclosure on Social Networking Sites, Positive Feedback, and Social Capital among Chinese College Students. Computers in Human Behavior, 38, 213-219. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2014.06.003

Mascheroni, G., & Olafsson, K. (2016). The Mobile Internet: Access, Use, Opportunities and Divides among European Children. New Media & Society, 18(8), 1657-1679. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444814567986

MECD (Edición 2016) Las cifras de la educación en España. Curso 2013-2014. (https://goo.gl/kMaV7I).

Neira, I., Portela, M., & Vieira, E. (2010). Social Capital and Growth in European Regions. Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies, 10(2). (https://goo.gl/DCjmGk).

Papacharissi, Z. (2005). The Real-Virtual Dichotomy in Online Interaction: New Media Uses and Consequences Revisited. Annals of the International Communication Association, 29(1), 216-238. https://doi.org/10.1080/23808985.2005.11679048

Portes, A. (1998). Social Capital: Its Origins and Applications in Modern Sociology. Annual Review of Sociology, 24(1), 1-24. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev.soc.24.1.1

Portes, A. (2014). Downsides of Social Capital. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111(52), 18407-8. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1421888112

Putnam, R.D. (2000). Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community. New York: Simon & Schuster. https://doi.org/10.1145/358916.361990

Putnam, R.D. (2001). Social Capital: Measurement and Consequences. Canadian Journal of Policy Research. (https://goo.gl/j562qr).

Sádaba, C., & Vidales, M.J. (2015). El impacto de la comunicación mediada por la tecnología en el capital social: adolescentes y teléfonos móviles. Virtualis, 11(1), 75-92. (https://goo.gl/0kk6xK).

Schrock, A.R. (2016). Exploring the Relationship Between Mobile Facebook and Social Capital: What Is the "Mobile Difference" for Parents of Young Children? Social Media & Society, 2(3). https://doi.org/10.1177/2056305116662163

Smith, M.A. (2014). Mapping Online Social Media Networks. In Alhajj, R., & Rokne, J. (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Social Network Analysis and Mining (pp. 848-857). New York: Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6170-8_331

Smith, M.A., Himelboim, I., Rainie, L., & Shneiderman, B. (2015). The Structures of Twitter Crowds and Conversations. In S.A. Matei; M.G. Russell, & E. Bertino (Eds.),Transparency in Social Media (pp. 67–108). Cham: Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-18552-1_5

Turkle, S. (2011). Alone Together: Why we Expect more from Technology and Less from Each Other. New York: Basic Books.

Vanden-Abeele, M.M. (2016). Mobile Lifestyles: Conceptualizing Heterogeneity in Mobile Youth Culture. New Media & Society, 18(6), 908-926. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444814551349

Vyas, S., & Kumaranayake, L. (2006). Constructing Socio-Economic Status Indices: How to Use Principal Components Analysis. Health Policy and Planning, 21(6), 459-468. https://doi.org/10.1093/heapol/czl029

Williams, D. (2006). On and Off the’Net: Scales for Social Capital in an Online Era. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication. (https://goo.gl/5gibMj).

Wu, L., Wang, Y., Su, Y., & Yeh, M. (2013). Cultivating Social Capital through Interactivity on Social Network Sites. Pacis. (https://goo.gl/UKVTm2).

Xie, W. (2014). Social Network Site Use, Mobile Personal Talk and Social Capital among Teenagers. Computers in Human Behavior. (https://goo.gl/4TFlb3).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/09/17
Accepted on 30/09/17
Submitted on 30/09/17

Volume 25, Issue 2, 2017
DOI: 10.3916/C53-2017-02
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 4
Views 3
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?