Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The «Network Society» is identified by accelerated changes that occur between real and virtual worlds. The progress of digital devices has generated a new model of leisure that it has conditioned family interactions. The aim of this research was to identify the relationship between digital leisure experiences and perceived family functioning in post-compulsory secondary education Spanish students. The sample was composed of 1,764 Spanish young people 15-18 years old; all of them were post-compulsory secondary education students. Students’ digital leisure activities were measured by an opening question by which they indicated the three most important leisure activities for them, and family functioning was measured by the answers from the Spanish adaptation for FACES IV questionnaire (Family Adaptability and Cohesion Scale). A descriptive analysis about digital leisure activities of young people was used. The family functioning coefficient of each subject was determined and, finally, the relationship between students’ family functioning perceived and students’ digital leisure practices assessed by a factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA). Young people give importance to digital leisure activities, highlighting social network participation, playing videogames and browsing the Internet. Cohesion, flexibility and family functioning are healthier when children don´t point to any digital activity into their preferred leisure practices. The results suggest that new research should be conducted to confirm whether this negative association between family functioning and digital leisure is causal or due to other factors.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

The term "Network Society" refers to rapid changes that occur both in the real world and in the virtual world (Valdemoros, Ponce de León, Sanz, & Caride, 2014) and which have become increasingly important for the new forms of leisure. Leisure is a value in itself, related to intention, satisfaction, and freedom (Cuenca & Goytia, 2012). It is also the stronghold of human development (Cuenca, Aguilar, & Ortega, 2010), because leisure time has gone from being an interesting opportunity to becoming established as a right, valued by youth to a greater or lesser extent (Aristegui & Silvestre, 2012). The advance of cheaper digital devices that are also easier to use, along with the generalized use of broadband Internet, have led to a new model of leisure, which has transformed traditional activities and generated new ones, resulting in an experience of leisure that can now be carried out either in the natural or the virtual world (García, López, & Samper, 2012).

Since the beginning of the XXI century, two new concepts have emerged: digital natives - modern youths who were born "connected" to the digital world - and digital immigrants - people who were born in the natural world, but were forced to migrate to the digital world (Prensky, 2001 a, b). The scientific literature shows that digital natives invest a lot of time in polishing their skills (Cox, Clough, & Marlow, 2008); they actively seek information online and are exposed to multiple communication channels regardless of the risk because change does not intimidate them. This leads them to enjoy the technologies in their leisure time (Buse, 2009). However, an intergenerational gap is observed with the digital immigrants, who assign different meanings to the binomial leisure-digital technologies, as well as to their activities (Selwyn, 2004).

Digital leisure consists of all the leisure opportunities involving digital technologies, for instance, consoles, mobile phones, the Internet, computers, and many digital devices from the technological industry (iPad, tablets, MP3, or e-books, among others) that have innovated the experience of leisure by adding connectivity, interactivity, hyper-textuality, anonymity, convenience, ubiquity, etc. (Viñals, Abad, & Aguilar, 2014). The meaning assigned by youth to many digital activities is not only that of entertainment but, also, of the construction of their personal and social identity (Morduchowicz, 2012; Schroeder, 2010) because through such activities, they can pursue in their leisure time some hobbies or quirks that go unnoticed in natural world (Orchard & Fullwood, 2010), they can interact selectively (Johnson, 2009; Patterson, 2012), and increase their cultural competencies and their potential for communication (Lepicnik & Samec, 2013). These issues syntonize with the uses and gratifications theory (Katz, Blumler, & Gurevitch, 1971), given that the consumption of digital leisure is geared to the instrumental use of the media, in which a mediatic emitter interacts with a receptor, which implies gratification linked to fun, interpersonal relations, personal identity, or access to information.

García-Continente, Pérez-Giménez, Espelt, and Nebot (2013) assert that technologies have been established as an essential referent for youth's leisure time, as well as an area for youth consumption. Access to the Information Technologies, and specifically, to the Internet, is generalized in this collective (Gomes-Franco & Sendín-Gutiérrez, 2014; Muñoz, Ortega & al., 2014), just like the use of social networks (Colás, González, & de Pablos, 2013; Zheng & Cheok, 2011) and video games (Muñoz & al., 2014; Gros, 2009; Sánchez, Alfageme, & Serrano, 2010). A report from the “Instituto de la Juventud de España” (Institute of Youth of Spain; INJUVE, 2012) notes that, among young people, computer use is parallel to the increase of Internet connection (93% access the Internet daily and 87% several times a day) and that Internet users highlight seeking information or documentation (82.0%), participating in social networks (79.6%), and using email (76.3%) as their three main activities. García, López de Ayala, and Catalina (2013) confirm that the priority digital leisure habits of Spanish youth are participating in social networks, visiting websites where they share videos, and surfing the Internet.

The rapid progress in the access to and use of technologies in the family has generated an intergenerational digital divide, and parents are concerned to see their children spending hours in front of the computer or connected to their friends by mobile phone, or playing with their console rather than interacting in person with other people. This concern, sometimes caused by parents' lack of information and training in the digital world, may disturb the family dynamics (Fernández-Montalvo, Peñalva, & Irazabal, 2015).

Recent studies have also shown that digital devices have led to qualitative changes in family functioning, the creation of new interaction scenarios, and even the rearrangement of the relational patterns of the contemporary family (Carvalho, Francisco, & Revals, 2015).

In order to understand the family functioning, we propose the Circumplex Model of Marital and Family Systems (Olson, 2000; Olson, Sprenkle, & Russell, 1979), as it has had an enormous academic impact in the last few years because it integrates various recurrent concepts in family therapy. This model emphasizes the need to appraise family functioning by conjointly examining two essential constructs: cohesion and flexibility (Martínez-Pampliega, Iraurgi, & Sanz, 2011). Cohesion is considered as the emotional reciprocity among family members, linked to family ties, family involvement, mutual respect, or the establishment of "internal boundaries" in intergenerational relationships. Flexibility is the ability to adequately cope with the changes and adjustments required in a particular situation, learning from the different experiences that emerge, and which can lead to consequences in the processes of leadership, negotiation, discipline, roles, or rules (Olson, 2011).

Family functioning will be unhealthy if group dependence is excessive, if there is lack of communication and/or inflexible or too flexible communication, creating an unbalanced system that cannot meet the demands of our changing society (Smith, Freeman, & Zabriskie, 2009).

Examining in depth the binomial of digital leisure-family functioning, some authors (Jago, Edwards, Urbanski, & Sebire, 2013) have noted a relationship between family functioning and children's digital leisure, showing that not only can family functioning affect children's digital leisure, but also that children's digital activity and the associated devices can affect family functioning.

On the one hand, the family can determine how to consume digital devices for the children’s benefit (Ballesta & Cerezo, 2011). Studies with non-Spanish populations, like that of Atkin, Corder & al. (2015), reported that, when adolescents perceive a healthy family functioning, they dedicate less time to digital leisure such as playing video games or surfing the Internet. Specifically, Carlson, Fulton & al. (2010) and Sorbring (2014) confirmed that family flexibility protects children from misusing the technologies.

On the other hand, some investigations have found discrepant results about the facilitating or inhibiting power of digital devices and activities on family functioning. Some have confirmed that digital activity, such as the use of video games, mobiles, or surfing the Internet, encourages family cohesion (Oliva, Hidalgo, & al., 2012) by strengthening family boundaries and contributing to the development of a collective identity through shared family projects (Mesch, 2006a). However, Mesch confirmed that frequent Internet use has also been negatively associated with shared family time and positively with family conflicts, which can negatively affect family cohesion.

Discrepant results have also been found concerning communication. Some investigations report that digital activity enables building a channel through which family members communicate and share experiences, allowing them to synchronize their agendas, coordinate their leisure time and social interaction (Kennedy & Wellman, 2007; Fernández-Montalvo & al., 2015; Jupp & Bentlley, 2001; Mesch, 2006a, b). However, other authors claim that the Internet use does not contribute to improving family relations (Lenhart, Raine, & Lewis, 2001) because it reduces the time spent on shared activities and leads to social isolation (Nie, Hillygus, & Erbing, 2002; Subrahmanyam & al., 2000), as well as limiting face-to-face family relationships. It can also lead to the abuse of parental control of their children through the use of mobile phones or to the children's use of mobiles as a tool to escape from parental control. These situations can produce stress in all the members of the family system (Verza & Wagner, 2010). Authors like Gomes-Franco and Sendín-Gutiérrez (2014) or Godinho, Araújo, Barro, and Ramos (2014) even noted that impaired family functioning can cause youth to spend more time connected to the Internet, as a substitute for their family interactions or to protest against them.

More recent studies conclude that, given that digital devices will continue to increase their role in our social time, more research is needed to understand their impact on the health of family functioning (Wang, Chu, Viswanath, Wan, Lam, & Chan, 2015). The lack of national studies and the divergent results of prior research lead us to attempt to answer some questions: What percentage of young Spaniards from the upper educational stage consider digital leisure to be important? What digital leisure activities are the most relevant for students? How do Spanish adolescents between 15 and 18 years of age perceive their family functioning? Is there an association between digital consumption and the perception of their family's functioning as measured through family cohesion and flexibility?

In order to answer these questions, the goal of the present study is to evaluate the relationship between family functioning as perceived by Spanish students of Upper Secondary Education and their practice of digital leisure, in order to establish whether children's consumption of digital leisure facilitates or hinders family interactions. On the basis of these findings, lines of action could be established for family education in digital leisure.

2. Material and method

2.1. Population and sample

The target population of this study comprised students of Upper Secondary Education in Spain, aged between 15 and 18 years. The sample size, which included 1,764 students, was calculated for a 95% confidence level and a 2.3% margin of error, from the data provided by the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport of the academic year 2010-2011.

Simple random sampling was performed, retaining the proportional affixation in each of the Autonomous Communities and in each instructional cycle of the General Education System (67% high school students, 32.7% students from the middle instructional cycle, and 10.3% students from basic vocational training).

The final sample units were selected through clusters during the academic year 2013-2014, choosing random schools in each Autonomous Community, with two conditions: we selected one rural school from each Autonomous Community and a proportion of one private-concerted center for every three public schools. The questionnaires were applied in a single session in each of the selected schools to the number of students required to cover the sample quota. This field work was carried out during the months of March and June of 2014.

Before applying the instruments, we requested permission from the General Director of Education of each Autonomous Community and from the directors of the schools, and we provided details of the investigation. Two trained researchers went personally to each school to apply the instruments, in order to follow a standardized protocol.

Of the sample, 50.1% were female (n=885) and 49.9% were male (n=879). Their mean age was 17.60 years (SD=1.60), and 89.6% were of Spanish nationality (n=1,581).

2.2. Variables and instruments

We employed two instruments to collect information of the 5 variables that make up this study. The two variables concerning digital leisure were recorded through Item 21 of a much broader and more complex questionnaire that collected data for a piece of coordinated national research of which this work formed a part. That instrument was validated through a pilot test conducted in 8 Autonomous Communities and valued by 14 experts from 7 Spanish universities, who approved the final application. Its reliability was also tested.

These digital leisure variables were:

• “The Importance of Digital Leisure Activities”, which aims to identify whether digital activities are a priority in the leisure of Spanish students of Upper Secondary Education. It consists of four categories:

– Digital activities are not among the three main leisure activities.

– One digital activity is one of the three important leisure activities.

– Two digital activities are part of the three important leisure activities.

– Three digital activities are the three main leisure activities.

• “The Type of Digital Leisure Activity”, which classifies digital activities into eight topics:

– Seeking specific information on the Internet.

– Surfing the Internet without a specific goal.

– Writing my own blog or Website.

– Sharing information (videos, photos, presentations etc.).

– Participating in chats, discussion forums, or virtual communities.

– Social networks (Facebook, Tuenti, Twitter, etc.).

– Playing video games.

– Online gambling.

Family Functioning was analyzed through three variables defined by Olson (2008). These data were obtained from the students’ responses to the Spanish adaptation of the FACES IV questionnaire (Rivero, Martínez-Pampliega, & Olson, 2010), which collects information about the cohesion and flexibility perceived within the family. Participants rated their level of agreement/disagreement with each of the 42 items of the instrument on a five-point Likert scale, ranging from 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree).

The variables of family functioning were:

• “Family Cohesion Ratio”, which records the level of balance or imbalance perceived in family cohesion, by means of Items 1, 7, 13, 19, 25, 31, 37; 3, 9, 15, 21 27, 33, 39; 4, 10, 16, 22, 28, 34, and 40.

• “Family Flexibility Ratio”, which indicates the level of balance or imbalance perceived in family flexibility by means of Items 2, 8, 14, 20, 26, 32, 38; 5, 11, 17, 23, 29, 35, 41; 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, and 42.

• “Family functioning”, assessed through the family functioning coefficient, indicates the level of functionality or dysfunctionality perceived in the family system. It is the result of the mean of the balance/imbalance between family cohesion and flexibility.

These three variables are numerical, with values below 1 indicating imbalance and values greater than 1 indicating balance. Imbalanced cohesion refers to an excess of either attachment or disengagement, whereas balanced family cohesion is considered healthy. Imbalanced flexibility could be due either to excessive rigidity or chaos, whereas balanced family flexibility is considered healthy. The value of the three variables was calculated according to the directions of Olson (2008).

2.3. Data analysis

The data were analyzed in three phases. In the first phase, we conducted a descriptive analysis of adolescents’ digital leisure activities. In the second phase, the Family Functioning Coefficient of each subject was determined, following the guidelines of Olson (2008). In the third phase, using one-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA), we assessed the relationship between family functioning perceived by the students and their digital leisure activities. Before performing the ANOVA, we tested the homoscedasticity or homogeneity of the variances, as well as the normality of the variables, to determine whether the required assumptions were met. Finally, we performed contrasts through multiple post-hoc comparisons; in those cases in which Levene's statistic had equal variances, we employed Tukey's HSD test; if the variances were not equal, we used the Games-Howell test. The level of significance used in all cases was p<.05.

3. Results

Almost 30% of the Spanish students of Upper Secondary Education reported one digital activity among their three most important leisure practices.

The three most mentioned digital activities were participating in social networks (13.8%), playing video games (12.3%), and surfing the Internet (3.5%). The practice of activities such as seeking information on the Internet (3.5%), participating in chats (0.8%), sharing information (0.6%), online gambling (0.4%), and writing their own blog (0.3%) was considerably lower.

Focusing on family functioning perceived by Spanish students of Upper Secondary Education, the data show very positive values, with means above 1 both in cohesion (Cohesion Ratio=2.21) and flexibility (Flexibility Ratio=1.75), as well as in family functioning (Family Functioning Coefficient=2). This shows that Spanish adolescents perceive their families as being very balanced on cohesion, with emotional ties that are not excessively binding, and as having healthy flexibility with some discipline, without rigidity or chaos, and hence, a fairly balanced family functioning.


Draft Content 825564514-54557-en038.jpg

Examining more closely the relationship between adolescents’ digital leisure and family functioning, these results confirm that family cohesion is healthier when young people do not place any digital activities among their favorite leisure practices versus when they report one or two digital leisure activities among their favorite activities. As shown in table 1, family cohesion is healthier when young people practice one digital leisure activity than when they perform two (X0 digital activity=2.39+1.11; ? 1 digital activity=2.23+1.07; vs X2 digital activity=2.14+1.04; F(3, 1646)=9.351, p<.001). Family flexibility, defined by the quality and expression of leadership and family organization, the relationship among roles, as well as the rules and negotiations in family interactions, is also healthier in families whose children do not indicate any digital leisure activity among their three priority activities versus those who indicated one digital activity (X0 digital activity=1.87+0.76 vs X1 digital activity=1.75+0.73; F(3, 1633)=3.763, p<.005) (table 2).

Lastly, we confirmed that family functioning is also healthier when youngsters do not report any digital activities among their priority leisure practices versus when they indicate one or two digital leisure activities among their favorites. Moreover, family functioning is healthier among those who practice one digital leisure activity compared to those who perform two digital activities (X0 digital activity=2.13+0.84; X1 digital activity =1.94+0.80; X2 digital activities=1.87+0.82; F(3, 1608)=8.154, p<.001) (table 3).

4. Discussion

Draft Content 825564514-54557-en039.jpg

This study reveals that Spanish students of Upper Secondary Education grant value to digital activities in their leisure time, although the importance varies according to the type of practice. In particular, in accordance with other studies and authors, the target participants of this study underscore as priority activities their participation in social networks (Colás, González & de-Pablos, 2013; García, López-de-Ayala, & Catalina, 2013; INJUVE, 2012; Zheng & Cheok, 2011), playing video games (Muñoz & al., 2014; Gros, 2009), and surfing the Internet (García & al., 2013; Gomes-Franco, & Sendín-Gutiérrez, 2014; Muñoz, & al., 2014), whereas other digital activities, like participating in chats, sharing information over the network, online gambling, or writing their own blog are less important to them.

Regarding family functioning perceived by the analyzed young Spaniards, we observed balanced family cohesion, revealing affective links without excessive dependence, healthy flexibility without rigidity or chaos and, consequently, a sufficiently balanced and serene family functioning.


Draft Content 825564514-54557-en040.jpg

In relation to the link between children's digital leisure and family functioning, this research makes some interesting contributions. For example, family cohesion is healthier when young people do not indicate any digital activities among their predominant leisure practices than when they report one or two digital leisure practices among their favorites. Moreover, family functioning is healthier if the adolescents perform a single digital leisure activity than if they perform two activities. This reveals that lower digital consumption in children is linked to families with stronger emotional ties among family members, possible emotional reciprocity, family engagement, mutual respect between parents and children, as well as the establishment of "internal boundaries" and alliances in intergenerational relationships. These results are consistent with the conclusions of Mesch (2006a) but they contradict the findings of other studies (Kennedy & Wellman, 2007; Fernández-Montalvo & al., 2015; Oliva, Hidalgo, & al., 2012) that confirmed important benefits of digital devices for the cohesion of family systems.

We obtained similar findings regarding family flexibility. Spanish students of post-compulsory secondary education who do not place any digital leisure practices among their three priority activities are related to families with healthier flexibility as compared to families whose children indicated one digital leisure activity among their three preferred activities. This shows that families with healthy flexibility can adequately cope with changes, adapt to and learn from different experiences and situations, which can often lead to practical consequences for those involved in the processes of leadership, negotiation, discipline, roles, or rules. These results are more in accordance with authors like Verza and Wagner (2010), who confirmed that the use of digital devices can limit face-to-face relations within the family and increase stressful family situations.

These findings associate children's digital leisure with family functioning; we emphasize that this concept includes cohesion and flexibility. In contrast to the findings of other authors (Kennedy & Wellman, 2007; Fernández-Montalvo & al., 2015; Jupp & Bentlley, 2001), this research confirms that family functioning is healthier when the children do not place digital activities among their favorite leisure practices. In fact, family functioning is more complete when children practice one digital leisure activity than when they practice two. These issues confirm that optimal internal family functioning is related to children's lower practice of digital leisure. This leads to considering that children's greater practice of digital activities fosters unhealthier functioning, translating into a system that is either inflexible or too flexible, with greater dependence among its members and little capacity to cope with the demands of the “Network Society” (Smith & al., 2009). All this hinders positive juvenile and family leisure in which to enjoy interesting, attractive, and enriching experiences that are significantly related to satisfaction with family life (Agate, Zabriskie, Agate, & Poff, 2009; Hornberger, Zabriskie, & Freeman, 2010; Smith & al., 2009).

The conclusions obtained in this research lead us to consider that the new entertainment experiences related to the digital world require an adaptation of the family educational project. Families should receive guidance and education so they can naturally incorporate technology into their daily life (Bringué, Sádaba, & Sanjurjo, 2013). In this regard, it is encouraging to find research that confirms that families express great interest in the use and incorporation of digital media, as well as in receiving training in the use of these devices (Ballesta & Cerezo, 2011).

One of the limitations of this research is the lack of data on shared experiences of digital leisure within the family and their relation to family functioning, in order to confirm our findings of the relationship between family functioning and children's digital leisure. Future research should investigate shared digital activities within the family and determine their potential to improve family cohesion and flexibility and, hence, to make internal family functioning healthier.

We highlight that the present work identifies an association between digital leisure and the family functioning of young students of Upper Secondary Education but it fails to determine the possible causality or direction of the relationship. Future studies should focus on resolving this issue, which would provide important insights for intervention to improve digital use, conciliating it with a high quality family life.

Supports

The text presented herein is linked to the Research Project "From educational times to social times: daily construction of the juvenile condition in a network society. Specific problems and pedagogical-social alternatives" (coordinated project EDU2012-39080-C07-00) and to the subproject "From educational times to social times: daily family events in the construction of juvenile physical-sport leisure" (EDU2012-39080-C07-05), co-financed within the framework of the National I+D+i Plan, with a subsidy from the Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, and from the European Regional Development Fund (FEDER, 2007-2013). The research was also supported by the Bridge Support to Research Projects of the University of La Rioja (Ref: APPI 16/09).

References

Agate, J.R., Zabriskie, R.B., Agate, S.T., & Poff, R. (2009). Family Leisure Satisfaction and Satisfaction with Family Life. Journal of Leisure Research, 41(2), 205-223.

Aristegui, I., & Silvestre, M. (2012). El ocio como valor en la sociedad actual. Arbor, 188, 283-291. https://doi.org/10.3989/arbor.2012.754n2001

Atkin, A.J., Corder, K., Goodyer, I., Bamber, D., Ekelund, U., Brage… Van Sluijs, E.M.F. (2015). Perceived Family Functioning and Friendship Quality: Cross-sectional Associations with Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviours. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 12, 23. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12966-015-0180-x

Ballesta, J., & Cerezo, M.C. (2011). Familia y escuela ante la incorporación de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación. Educación XX1, 14(2), 133-156. https://doi.org/10.5944/educxx1.14.2.248

Bringué, X., Sádaba, C., & Sanjurjo, E. (2013). Menores y ocio digital en el siglo XXI. Análisis exploratorio de perfiles de usuarios de videojuegos en España. Bordón, 65(1), 147-166.

Buse, C.E. (2009). When You Retire, Does Everything Become Leisure? Information and Communication Technology Use and the Work/leisure Boundary in Retirement. New Media & Society, 11(7), 1.143-1.161. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444809342052

Carlson, A., Fulton, E., & al. (2010). Influence of Limit-Setting and Participation in Physical Activity on Youth Screen Time. Pediatrics, 126(1), e86-e96. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2009-3374

Carvalho, J., Francisco, R., & Revals, A.P. (2015). Family Functioning and Information and Communication Technologies: How do They Relate? A Literature Review. Computers in Human Behavior, 45, 99-108. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2014.11.037

Cox, A.M., Clough, P.D., & Marlow, J. (2008). Flickr: A First Look at User Behaviour in the Context of Photography as Serious Leisure. Information Research, 13(1). (http://goo.gl/fF24qk) (2016-03-30)

Cuenca, M., & Goytia, A. (2012). Ocio experiencial: antecedentes y características. Arbor, 188, 265-281. https://doi.org/10.3989/arbor.2012.754n2001

Cuenca, M., Aguilar, E., & Ortega, C. (2010). Ocio para innovar. Bilbao: Universidad de Deusto, Documentos de Estudios de Ocio, 42.

Fernández-Montalvo, J., Peñalva, A., & Irazabal, I. (2015). Hábitos de uso y conductas de riesgo en Internet en la preadolescencia. [Internet Use Habits and Risk Behaviours in Preadolescence]. Comunicar, 44, 113-120. https://doi.org/10.3916/C44-2015-12

García, A., López-de-Ayala. M.C., & Catalina, B. (2013). Hábitos de uso en Internet y en las redes sociales de los adolescentes españoles. [The Influence of Social Networks on the Adolescents’ Online Practices]. Comunicar, 41, 195-204. https://doi.org/10.3916/C41-2013-19

García, E., López, J., & Samper, A. (2012). Retos y tendencias del ocio digital: transformación de dimensiones, experiencias y modelos empresariales. Arbor, 188(754), 395-407. https://doi.org/10.3989/arbor.2012.754n2011

García-Continente, X., Pérez-Giménez, A., Espelt, A., & Nebot Adell, M. (2013). Factors Associated with Media Use Among Adolescents: a Multilevel Approach. European Journal of Public Health, 24(1), 5-10. https://doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckt013

Godinho, J., Araújo, J., Barrio, H., & Ramos, E. (2014). Characteristics Associated with Media Use in Early Adolescence. Cadernos de Saúde Pública, 30(3), 587-598. https://doi.org/10.1590/0102-311X00100313

Gros, B. (2009). Certezas e interrogantes acerca del uso de los videojuegos para el aprendizaje. Comunicación, 7(1), 251-264.

Hornberger, L.B., Zabriskie, R.B., & Freeman, P. (2010). Contributions of Family Leisure to Family Functioning Among Single-Parent Families. Leisure Sciences, 32(2), 143-161. https://doi.org/10.1080/01490400903547153

Instituto de la Juventud de España (2012). Jóvenes y TIC. Madrid: INJUVE. (http://goo.gl/n5BIFa) (2015-03-02).

Jago, R., Edwards, M.J., Urbanski, C.R., & Sebire, S.J. (2013). General and Specific Approaches to Media Parenting: A Systematic Review of Current Measures, Associations with Screen-Viewing, and Measurement Implications. Childhood Obesity, 9(1), 51-72. https://doi.org/10.1089/chi.2013.0031

Johnson, N.F. (2009). Cyber-relations in the Field of Home Computer Use for Leisure: Bourdieu and Teenage Technological Experts. E-Learning, 6(2), 187-197. https://doi.org/10.2304/elea.2009.6.2.187

Jupp, B., & Bentley, T. (2001). Surfing Alone? E-commerce and social capital (pp. 97-118). In J. Wilsdon (Ed.), Digital Futures: Living in a Dot-com World. London: Earthscan.

Katz, E., Blumler, J., & Gurevitch, M. (1974). Uses and Gratifications Research. The Public Opinion Quarterly, 37(4), 509-523.

Kennedy, T.L.M., & Wellman, B. (2007). The Networked Household. Information, Communication & Society, 10(5), 645-670.

Lenhart, A., Rainie, L., & Lewis, O. (2001). Teenage Life Online: The Rise of the Instant Message Generation and the Internet’s Impact on Friendships and Family Relationships. Washington DC: Pew Internet & American Life Project.

Lepicnik, J., & Samec, P. (2013). Uso de tecnologías en el entorno familiar en niños de cuatro años de Eslovenia [Communication Technology in the Home Environment of Four-year-old Children (Slovenia)]. Comunicar, 40(XX), 119-126. https://doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-03-02

Martínez-Pampliega, A., Iraurgi, I., & Sanz, M. (2011). Validez estructural del FACES-20Esp: Versión española de 20 ítems de la Escala de Evaluación de la Cohesión y Adaptabilidad Familiar. Revista Iberoamericana de Diagnóstico y Evaluación Psicológica, 29(1), 147-165.

Mesch, G.S. (2006a). Family Relations and the Internet: Exploring a Family Boundaries Approach. The Journal of Family Communication, 6(2), 119-138. https://doi.org/10.1207/s15327698jfc0602_2

Mesch, G.S. (2006b). Family Characteristics and Intergenerational Conflicts over the Internet. Information, Communication and Society, 9(4), 473-495. https://doi.org/10.1080/13691180600858705

Morduchowicz, R. (2012). Los adolescentes y las redes sociales: la construcción de la identidad juvenil en Internet. Buenos Aires: Fondo de Cultura Económica.

Muñoz, R., Ortega, R., Batalla, C., López, M.R., Manresa, J.M., & Torán, P. (2014). Acceso y uso de nuevas tecnologías entre los jóvenes de educación secundaria, implicaciones en salud. Estudio JOITIC. Atención Primaria, 46(2), 77-88. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aprim.2013.06.001

Nie, N.H., Hillygus, D.S., & Erbring, L. (2002). Internet Use, Interpersonal Relations, and Sociability. In B. Wellman, & C. Haythornthwaite (Eds.), The Internet in Everyday Life (pp. 215-243). Malden, MA: Blackwell.

Oliva, A., Hidalgo, M.V., & al. (2012). Uso y riesgo de adicciones a las nuevas tecnologías entre adolescentes y jóvenes andaluces. Alicante: AguaClara.

Olson, D.H. (2000). Circumplex Model of Marital and Family Systems. Journal of Family Therapy, 22(2), 144-167. https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-6427.00144

Olson, D.H. (2008). FACES. IV Manual. Minneapolis (MN): Life Innovations.

Olson, D.H. (2011). FACES. IV and the Circumplex Model: Validation Study. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 37(1), 64-80. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1752-0606.2009.00175.x

Olson, D.H., Sprenkle, D.H., & Russell, C. (1979). Circumplex Model of Marital and Family Systems. I. Cohesion and Adaptability Dimensions, Family Types, and Clinical Applications. Family Process, 18, 3-28. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1545-5300.1979.00003.x

Orchard, L.J., & Fullwood, C. (2010). Current Perspectives on Personality and Internet Use. Social Science Computer Review, 28(2), 155-169. https://doi.org/10.1177/0894439309335115

Patterson, A. (2012). Social-networkers of the World, Unite and Take Over: A Meta-introspective Perspective on the Facebook Brand. Journal of Business Research, 65, 527-534. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2011.02.032

Prensky, M. (2001a). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. (http://goo.gl/20sMqV) (2015-03-06).

Prensky, M. (2001b). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants, Part II: Do They Really Think Differently? (http://goo.gl/3DgSwJ) (2015-03-06).

Rivero, N., Martínez-Pampliega, A., & Olson, D. (2010). Spanish Adaptation of the FACES IV Questionnaire. Psychometric Characteristics. The Family Journal, 18, 288-296.

Sánchez, P.A., Alfageme, M.B., & Serrano, F.J. (2010). Aspectos sociales de los videojuegos. Revista Latinoamericana de Tecnología Educativa, 9(1), 29-41.

Schroeder, R. (2010). Mobile Phones and the Inexorable Advance of Multimodal Connectedness. New Media & Society, 12(1), 75-90. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444809355114

Selwyn, N. (2004). Reconsidering Political and Popular Understandings of the Digital Divide. New Media Society, 6(3), 341-362. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444804042519

Smith, K.M., Freeman, P.A., & Zabriskie, R. (2009). An Examination of Family Communication within the Core and Balance Model of Family Leisure Functioning. Family Relations, 58(1), 79-90. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1741-3729.2008.00536.x

Sorbring, E. (2014). Parents’ Concerns about Their Teenage Children’s Internet Use. Journal of Family Issues, 35(1), 75-96. https://doi.org/10.1177/0192513X12467754

Subrahmanyam, K., Kraut, R.E., Greenfield, P.M., & Gross, E.F. (2000). The Impact of Home Computer use on Children’s Activities and Development. The Future of Children, 10, 123-144.

Valdemoros, M.A., Ponce-de-León A., Sanz, E., & Caride, J.A. (2014). La influencia de la familia en el ocio físico-deportivo juvenil: nuevas perspectivas para la reflexión y la acción. Arbor, 190(770): 192. https://doi.org/10.3989/arbor.2014.770n6013

Verza, F., & Wagner, A. (2010). Uso del teléfono móvil, juventud y familia: Un panorama de la realidad brasileña. Psychological Intervention, 19(1), 57-71.

Viñals, A., Abad, M., & Aguilar, E. (2014). Jóvenes conectados: una aproximación al ocio digital de los jóvenes españoles. Communication & Papers, 4(3), 52-68.

Wang, M.P., Chu, J.T., Viswanath, K., Wan, A., Lam, T.H., & Chan, S.S. (2015). Using Information and Communication Technologies for Family Communication and Its Association with Family Well-Being in Hong Kong: Family Project. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 17(8), 207. https://doi.org/10.2196/jmir.4722

Zheng, R., & Cheok, A. (2011). Singaporean Adoles­cents´ Perceptions of on-line Social Communication: An Exploratory Factor Analysis. Journal Educational Computing Research, 45(2), 203-221.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

La «Sociedad Red» se identifica con acelerados cambios que se suceden entre el mundo real y el virtual. El progreso de dispositivos digitales ha generado un nuevo modelo de ocio que ha condicionado las interacciones familiares. El objetivo de esta investigación fue valorar la relación entre el funcionamiento familiar percibido por estudiantes españoles de educación secundaria postobligatoria y su práctica de ocio digital. La muestra ascendió a 1.764 estudiantes. El ocio digital se midió a partir de una pregunta abierta en la que debían señalar las tres actividades de ocio más importantes, y el funcionamiento familiar se valoró mediante la versión española del FACES IV (Escala de cohesión y adaptación familiar). Se realizó un análisis descriptivo sobre las actividades de ocio digital de los jóvenes, se determinó el coeficiente del funcionamiento familiar de cada sujeto y mediante análisis de varianza (ANOVA) de un factor se valoró la relación entre el funcionamiento familiar percibido por los estudiantes y las actividades de ocio digital practicadas por los mismos. Los jóvenes otorgan importancia a las actividades digitales de ocio, destacando la participación en redes sociales, jugar a videojuegos y navegar por Internet. La cohesión, la flexibilidad y el funcionamiento familiar gozan de mejor salud cuando los hijos no apuntan actividades digitales entre sus prácticas preferentes de ocio. Los resultados sugieren nuevas investigaciones que comprueben si esta asociación negativa entre funcionamiento familiar y ocio digital es causal o se debe a otros factores.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

La «Sociedad Red» se identifica con acelerados cambios que se suceden entre el mundo real y el virtual (Valdemoros, Ponce-de-León, Sanz, & Caride, 2014) y que adquieren gran importancia en las nuevas formas de configurar el espacio de ocio. El ocio es un valor en sí mismo vinculado a la voluntariedad, la satisfacción y la libertad (Cuenca & Goytia, 2012) y se constituye en baluarte del desarrollo humano (Cuenca, Aguilar, & Ortega, 2010), dado que el tiempo de ocio ha pasado de ser una interesante oportunidad a instaurarse en un derecho preciado en mayor medida por los jóvenes (Aristegui & Silvestre, 2012). El avance de dispositivos digitales más asequibles y fáciles de usar, junto a la democratización del uso de Internet de banda ancha, ha dado lugar a un nuevo modelo de ocio, que ha transformado las actividades tradicionales y generado otras nuevas, lo que deriva en una experiencia de ocio que hoy puede desenvolverse tanto en un mundo natural como en otro cimentado digitalmente (García, López, & Samper, 2012).

Desde comienzos del actual siglo se manejan dos conceptos que se refieren a los nativos digitales –jóvenes actuales que han nacido «conectados» al mundo digital– y los inmigrantes digitales –quienes nacen en el mundo natural, pero se han visto obligados a emigrar al digital– (Prensky, 2001a; 2001b). La literatura científica pone en evidencia que los nativos digitales llegan a invertir mucho tiempo en el progreso de destrezas (Cox, Clough, & Marlow, 2008), buscan en la Red información de manera activa y se exponen a múltiples canales de comunicación sin importarles arriesgarse, porque los cambios no les intimidan, esto les permite disfrutar de las tecnologías en su tiempo de ocio (Buse, 2009); sin embargo, se vislumbra una brecha intergeneracional con los inmigrantes digitales, quienes otorgan otros significados al binomio ocio y tecnologías digitales, así como a las actividades que realizan (Selwyn, 2004).

El ocio digital lo constituyen aquellas oportunidades de ocio vinculadas a las tecnologías digitales, caso de las consolas, los teléfonos móviles, Internet, el ordenador y los múltiples dispositivos digitales procedentes de la industria tecnológica (iPad, tablets, MP3 o e-books, entre otros), que han innovado la experiencia de ocio al añadirle conectividad, interactividad, hipertextualidad, anonimato, comodidad, ubicuidad, etc. (Viñals, Abad, & Aguilar, 2014). El sentido que los jóvenes otorgan a muchas de las actividades digitales no solo es el del entretenimiento sino, también, el de la construcción de su identidad personal y social (Morduchowicz, 2012; Schroeder, 2010) pues les posibilita, durante el tiempo de ocio, destacar algunas aficiones o peculiaridades que permanecen en la sombra en los mundos naturales (Orchard & Fullwood, 2010), les permite llevar a cabo una interacción selectiva (Johnson, 2009; Patterson, 2012) y aumentar sus competencias culturales y sus posibilidades para la comunicación (Lepicnik & Samec, 2013). Cuestiones que sintonizan con la teoría de usos y gratificaciones (Katz, Blumler, & Gurevitch, 1971), dado que el consumo de ocio digital se establece en un uso instrumental de los medios, en el que interacciona un emisor mediático y un receptor, que conlleva gratificaciones vinculadas a la diversión, las relaciones interpersonales, la identidad personal o el acceso a la información.

García-Continente, Pérez-Giménez, Espelt y Nebot (2013) aseveran que las tecnologías se han instaurado como referentes fundamentales en el tiempo de ocio de los jóvenes, así como en un espacio de consumo juvenil. El acceso a las tecnologías de la información, y en concreto a Internet en este colectivo, se ha generalizado (Muñoz & al., 2014), al igual que el uso de las redes sociales (Zheng & Cheok, 2011) y de los videojuegos (Muñoz & al., 2014; Gros, 2009; Sánchez, Alfageme, & Serrano, 2010). Un informe al respecto del Instituto de la Juventud de España (INJUVE, 2012) constata que entre los jóvenes el uso del ordenador es paralelo al aumento en la conexión a Internet (un 93% accede a diario y un 87% varias veces al día) y que los usuarios de Internet destacan en la búsqueda de información o documentación (82%), el estar en redes sociales (79,6%) y usar el correo electrónico (76,3%) como sus tres principales actividades. García, López-de-Ayala y Catalina (2013) verifican que los hábitos de ocio digital prioritarios de los jóvenes españoles son la participación en redes sociales, la visita a sitios web en los que se comparten vídeos y navegar por Internet.

El progreso vertiginoso en el acceso y uso de las tecnologías en la familia ha generado una fisura digital intergeneracional, e inquietado a los padres al ver que sus hijos pasan largas horas ante el ordenador o conectados a sus amigos con el teléfono móvil, o jugando a la consola, en lugar de interactuar presencialmente con otras personas; esta intranquilidad puede generar alteraciones en la dinámica familiar y puede originarse, en ocasiones, por una falta de información y formación de los progenitores sobre el mundo digital (Fernández-Montalvo, Peñalva, & Irazabal, 2015).

Asimismo, estudios recientes muestran que los dispositivos digitales han implicado cambios cualitativos en el funcionamiento familiar, la creación de nuevos escenarios de interacción e incluso han reordenado los patrones relacionales de la familia actual (Carvalho, Francisco, & Revals, 2015).

Para entender el funcionamiento familiar se toma como referente el modelo circunflejo de sistemas familiares y maritales (Olson, 2000; Olson, Sprenkle, & Russell, 1979), por establecerse en uno de los que mayor repercusión académica ha tenido en los últimos años, pues integra diversos conceptos recurrentes en la terapia familiar. En este modelo se enfatiza la necesidad de valorar el funcionamiento familiar atendiendo de forma conjunta a dos constructos fundamentales: la cohesión y la flexibilidad (Martínez-Pampliega, Iraurgi, & Sanz, 2011). La cohesión, es entendida como la reciprocidad emocional entre los miembros de la familia, vinculada a los lazos familiares, a la implicación familiar, al respeto mutuo, o al establecimiento de «fronteras internas» en las relaciones intergeneracionales. La flexibilidad es la capacidad para afrontar adecuadamente los cambios y adaptaciones que se requieran en una determinada situación, aprendiendo de las diferentes experiencias que se originan de ellas, pudiendo conllevar consecuencias en los procesos de liderazgo, la negociación, la disciplina, los roles o las reglas (Olson, 2011).

Una familia soportará un funcionamiento poco saludable cuando la dependencia al grupo sea excesiva, exista falta de comunicación y/o sea muy poco o demasiado flexible, generando un sistema de­sequilibrado que no es capaz de responder a las exigencias de nuestra sociedad cambiante (Smith, Freeman, & Za­briskie, 2009).

Profundizando en el binomio ocio digital y funcionamiento familiar, algunos autores (Jago, Edwards, Urbanski, & Sebire, 2013) constatan una vinculación entre el funcionamiento familiar y el ocio digital de los hijos, poniéndose de manifiesto que el funcionamiento familiar no solo puede condicionar el ocio digital de los descendientes sino, además, que la actividad digital de los hijos y los dispositivos asociados a la misma pueden afectar al funcionamiento vivido en el seno de la familia.

Por un lado, se comprueba que la institución familiar puede determinar el modo de consumo de los dispositivos digitales en beneficio de los hijos (Ballesta & Cerezo, 2011). Estudios con poblaciones no españolas, como el de Atkin, Corder y colaboradores (2015) reportan que cuando los adolescentes perciben un funcionamiento familiar sano, dedican menos tiempo a un ocio digital, como jugar a videojuegos o navegar por Internet. Más en concreto, Carlson, Fulton y otros (2010), y Sorbring (2014) comprueban que la flexibilidad familiar protege a los hijos de un mal uso de las tecnologías.

Por otro lado, existen investigaciones con resultados discrepantes sobre el poder facilitador o inhibidor de los dispositivos y actividades digitales sobre el funcionamiento familiar. Algunas constatan que la actividad digital, materializada en el uso de videojuegos, del móvil o la navegación por Internet, favorece la cohesión familiar (Oliva, Hidalgo, & al., 2012) al fortalecer los límites familiares y contribuir al desarrollo de una identidad colectiva a través de proyectos familiares compartidos (Mesch, 2006a). Sin embargo, este mismo autor confirma que la frecuencia de uso de Internet también se ha asociado negativamente con el tiempo compartido en familia y positivamente con los conflictos familiares, lo que puede afectar negativamente a la cohesión familiar.

Respecto a la comunicación se descubren, igualmente, resultados discrepantes; mientras unas investigaciones certifican que la actividad digital posibilita la construcción de un canal a través del que los miembros de la unidad familiar se comunican y comparten experiencias, permite sincronizar agendas, coordinar el tiempo de ocio y la interacción social (Kennedy & Wellman, 2007; Fernández-Montalvo & al., 2015; Jupp & Bentlley, 2001; Mesch, 2006 a, b), otras afirman que el uso de Internet no contribuye a mejorar las relaciones familiares (Lenhart, Raine, & Lewis, 2001) pues reduce el tiempo dedicado a actividades en común y conduce al aislamiento social (Nie, Hillygus, & Erbing, 2002; Subrahmanyam & al., 2000), además de limitar las relaciones familiares de forma presencial, propiciar un abuso del control de los padres sobre sus hijos mediante el uso del teléfono móvil o un uso del mismo por parte de los hijos como herramienta para liberarse del control parental, estableciéndose en motivos susceptibles de potenciar situaciones estresantes entre todos los miembros del sistema familiar (Verza & Wagner, 2010). Incluso autores como Godinho, Araújo, Barro y Ramos (2014) constatan que un deteriorado funcionamiento familiar influye en que los jóvenes pasen más tiempo conectados a la Red, en un intento de suplir sus interacciones familiares o protestar frente a ellas.

Los estudios más actuales concluyen que debido a que los dispositivos digitales seguirán aumentando su protagonismo en los tiempos sociales, se necesitan más investigaciones que ayuden a comprender el impacto de los dispositivos digitales en la salubridad del funcionamiento familiar (Wang, Chu, Viswanath, Wan, Lam, & Chan, 2015). Del mismo modo, la escasez de estudios nacionales y la divergencia de resultados en la investigación previa, motiva el interés de este estudio por tratar de responder algunos interrogantes: ¿Qué porcentaje de jóvenes españoles de la etapa de educación postobligatoria consideran importante el ocio digital? ¿Qué actividades de ocio digital son las más relevantes para estos estudiantes? ¿Cómo perciben los jóvenes españoles de entre 15 y 18 años su funcionamiento familiar? ¿Existe asociación entre el consumo digital y la percepción del funcionamiento de su familia medido a través de la cohesión y la flexibilidad familiar?

Para dar respuesta a estas cuestiones se plantea como objetivo del presente estudio valorar la relación entre el funcionamiento familiar percibido por los estudiantes españoles de educación secundaria postobligatoria y su práctica de ocio digital, con el fin de establecer si el consumo de ocio digital de los hijos facilita o dificulta las interacciones familiares. A partir de estos hallazgos se podrán establecer líneas de actuación en la educación familiar del ocio digital.

2. Material y método

2.1. Población y muestra

La población objeto de este estudio estuvo conformada por los estudiantes de educación secundaria postobligatoria en España, con edades comprendidas entre los 15 y los 18 años. El tamaño muestral, que ascendió a 1.764 estudiantes, se calculó, para un nivel de confianza del 95% y un margen de error del 2,3%, a partir de los datos aportados por el Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte del curso 2010-2011.

El tipo de muestreo fue aleatorio simple, conservando la afijación proporcional en cada una de las Comu­nidades Autónomas y en cada una de las enseñanzas de régimen general (67% estudiantes de Bachillerato, 32,7% alumnado de Ciclo Formativo de Grado Medio y 10,3% discentes de Formación Profesional Básica).

Las unidades muestrales últimas se seleccionaron por conglomerados durante el curso 2013-2014, eligiendo al azar centros educativos de cada Comunidad Autónoma atendiendo a dos consideraciones, seleccionar un centro rural por Comunidad Autónoma y una proporción de un centro de régimen privado-concertado por cada tres de titularidad pública. En cada uno de los centros seleccionados se aplicó en sesión única el cuestionario al número de estudiantes necesarios para cubrir la cuota muestral. Este trabajo de campo se desarrolló durante los meses de marzo a junio de 2014.

Previa aplicación de los instrumentos se solicitó permiso tanto al Director General de Educación de cada Comunidad Autónoma, como a los directores de los centros educativos, y se informó de los pormenores de la investigación. Para la aplicación de los instrumentos, dos investigadores debidamente formados acudieron personalmente a cada centro, con el fin de seguir un protocolo de actuación debidamente estandarizado.

Un 50,1% de la muestra eran mujeres (n=885) y un 49,9% hombres (n=879). La media de edad fue de 17,6 años (SD=1,60), el 89,6% de nacionalidad española (n=1.581).

2.2. Variables e instrumentos

Se emplearon dos instrumentos para recoger información de las cinco variables que conforman este estudio. Las dos variables que reúnen información sobre el ocio digital se registraron a través del ítem 21 de un cuestionario mucho más amplio y complejo que permitió recoger datos para una investigación nacional coordinada de la que este trabajo formó parte. Dicho instrumento fue validado a través de una prueba piloto realizada en ocho Comu­nidades Autónomas y valorado por 14 expertos pertenecientes a siete universidades españolas, que dieron su visto bueno para la aplicación definitiva, asimismo su fiabilidad fue contrastada.

Estas variables de ocio digital fueron:

• La «Importancia de las actividades digitales en el ocio», que pretende identificar si las actividades digitales ocupan un lugar primordial en el ocio de los estudiantes españoles de educación secundaria postobligatoria. Se compone de cuatro categorías:

– Las actividades digitales no se encuentran entre las tres actividades de ocio principales.

– Una actividad digital forma parte de sus tres actividades de ocio importantes.

– Dos actividades digitales forman parte de sus tres actividades de ocio importantes.

– Tres actividades digitales constituyen sus tres actividades de ocio importantes.

• El «Tipo de actividad de ocio digital», que clasifica las actividades digitales en ocho temáticas:

– Buscar información concreta en Internet.

– Navegar por Internet sin un objetivo concreto.

– Escribir mi propio blog o página web.

– Compartir información (vídeos, fotos, presentaciones etc.).

– Participar en chats, foros de discusión o comunidades virtuales.

– Redes sociales (Facebook, Tuenti, Twitter, etc.).

– Jugar a videojuegos.

– Apuestas y juegos de azar on-line.

El funcionamiento familiar se analizó a través de tres variables definidas por Olson (2008). Los datos de estas se obtuvieron mediante las respuestas de los estudiantes a la adaptación española del cuestionario FACES IV (Rivero, Martínez-Pampliega, & Olson, 2010), que recoge información sobre la cohesión y la flexibilidad percibida en el seno familiar. Cada participante señaló su nivel de acuerdo o desacuerdo a cada uno de los 42 ítems que conforman el instrumento mediante una escala Likert de cinco puntos, en la que el 1 simbolizaba totalmente en desacuerdo y el 5 totalmente de acuerdo.

Las variables de funcionamiento familiar fueron:

• El «Ratio de Cohesión Familiar»: registró el nivel de equilibrio o desequilibrio percibido en la cohesión familiar, se midió a través de los ítems 1, 7, 13, 19, 25, 31, 37; 3, 9, 15, 21 27, 33, 39; 4, 10, 16, 22, 28, 34 y 40.

• El «Ratio de Flexibilidad Familiar»: señaló el nivel de equilibrio o desequilibrio percibido en la flexibilidad familiar; se midió a través de los ítems 2, 8, 14, 20, 26, 32, 38; 5, 11, 17, 23, 29, 35, 41; 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36 y 42.

• El «Funcionamiento Familiar»: valorado a través del coeficiente de funcionamiento familiar, que indicó el nivel de funcionalidad o disfuncionalidad percibido en el sistema familiar, y que es fruto de la media entre el equilibrio-desequilibrio entre cohesión y flexibilidad familiar.

Estas tres variables son numéricas, en las que los valores por debajo de 1 indican desequilibrio y los valores superiores a 1 marcan equilibrio. En el caso de la cohesión, se habla de desequilibrio, bien sea por un exceso de apego o de desapego, y una cohesión familiar equilibrada es una cohesión familiar sana. En cuanto a la flexibilidad, el desequilibrio puede deberse bien a un exceso de rigidez o de anarquía, y una flexibilidad familiar equilibrada es al tiempo sana. El valor de las tres variables se calculó siguiendo fielmente las indicaciones de Olson (2008).

2.3. Análisis de datos

El análisis de los datos se llevó a cabo en tres fases. En la primera de ellas se efectuó un análisis descriptivo sobre las actividades de ocio digital de los jóvenes. En la segunda fase se determinó el coeficiente del funcionamiento familiar de cada sujeto siguiendo las pautas de Olson (2008). En la tercera fase, mediante el análisis de varianza (ANOVA) de un factor se valoró la relación entre el funcionamiento familiar percibido por los estudiantes y las actividades de ocio digital practicadas por los mismos. En todo análisis de varianza se probó la homogeneidad u homocedasticidad de las varianzas, así como la normalidad de las variables, para acreditar los supuestos necesarios. Finalmente, se efectuaron contrastes mediante comparaciones múltiples post-hoc; en los casos en que el estadístico de Levene asumió varianzas iguales se empleó la prueba HSD Tukey, mientras que cuando no asumió varianzas iguales, la prueba empleada fue la de Games-Howell. El nivel de significatividad considerado en todo momento fue p<.05.

3. Resultados

Casi un 30% de los estudiantes españoles de educación secundaria postobligatoria señaló una actividad digital entre sus tres prácticas de ocio más importantes.

Las tres actividades digitales más señaladas han sido la participación en redes sociales (13,8%), jugar a videojuegos (12,3%) y navegar por Internet (3,5%). Se reduce considerablemente la práctica de actividades como buscar información por Internet (3,5%), participar en chats (0,8%), compartir información (0,6%), realizar apuestas en juegos de azar on-line (0,4%) y escribir su propio blog (0,3%).

Centrando la atención sobre el funcionamiento familiar percibido por los estudiantes españoles de educación secundaria postobligatoria, los datos revelan valores muy positivos, obteniendo medias por encima de 1 tanto en la cohesión (Ratio de Cohesión=2,21) como en la flexibilidad (Ratio de Flexibilidad=1,75) y en el funcionamiento familiar (Coeficiente de Funcionamiento Familiar=2) reflejando que los jóvenes españoles perciben una cohesión muy equilibrada en sus familias, con vínculos afectivos sin ataduras excesivas; una flexibilidad saludable con un cierto orden, sin rigidez ni anarquía; y, por consiguiente, un funcionamiento familiar bastante equilibrado.


Draft Content 825564514-54557 ov-es038.jpg

Profundizando en la relación entre el ocio digital de los jóvenes y el funcionamiento familiar, estos resultados verifican que la cohesión familiar es más saludable cuando los jóvenes no señalan actividades digitales entre sus prácticas prioritarias de ocio que cuando indican una o dos prácticas de ocio digital entre sus preferidas; más en concreto, dicho funcionamiento es más sano entre quienes llevan a cabo una práctica de ocio digital frente a los que realizan dos (X0 actividad digital=2.39+1.11; X1 actividad digital=2.23+1.07; vs X2 actividad digital=2.14+ 1.04; F(3, 1646)=9.351, p<.001) (tabla 1).

También la flexibilidad familiar, concretada en la calidad y la expresión de liderazgo y organización familiar, en la relación entre roles, así como en las normas y negociaciones en las interacciones familiares, es más sana en aquellas familias cuyos hijos no indican ninguna actividad de ocio digital entre sus tres actividades prioritarias, frente a quienes indicaron una (X0 actividad digital=1.87+0.76 vs X1 actividad digital=1.75+0.73; F(3, 1633)=3.763, p<.005) (tabla 2).

Finalmente, se confirma que el funcionamiento familiar es más saludable cuando los jóvenes no señalan actividades digitales entre sus prácticas prioritarias de ocio que cuando indican una o dos prácticas de ocio digital entre sus preferidas; asimismo, dicho funcionamiento es más sano entre quienes practican una actividad digitalde ocio frente a los que realizan dos (X0 actividad digital=2.13+0.84; X1 actividad digital=1.94+0.80; X2 actividades digitalesl=1.87+0.82;F(3, 1608) = 8.154, p<.001) (tabla 3).

Draft Content 825564514-54557 ov-es039.jpg

4. Discusión

Este estudio destaca que los estudiantes españoles de educación secundaria postobligatoria confieren valor a las actividades digitales en su tiempo de ocio, si bien esta importancia varía según el tipo de práctica. En concreto, los jóvenes objeto de este estudio destacan como actividades prioritarias, de acuerdo con otros estudios y autores, la participación en redes sociales (García, López-de-Ayala, & Catalina, 2013; INJUVE, 2012; Zheng & Cheok, 2011), jugar a videojuegos (Muñoz & al., 2014; Gros, 2009) y navegar por Internet (García & al., 2013; Muñoz & al., 2014), quedando relegadas otras actividades digitales planteadas como participar en chats, compartir información a través de la red, realizar apuestas en juegos de azar online o escribir su propio blog.


Draft Content 825564514-54557 ov-es040.jpg

Respecto al funcionamiento familiar percibido por los jóvenes españoles analizados se constata la consideración de una proporcionada cohesión en sus familias, con vínculos afectivos sin gran dependencia, una sana flexibilidad exenta tanto de rigidez como de caos y, en consecuencia, un funcionamiento familiar sereno y suficientemente equilibrado.

En relación a la vinculación entre el ocio digital de los hijos y el funcionamiento familiar, esta investigación desvela interesantes aportaciones. Por ejemplo, la cohesión familiar es más saludable cuando los jóvenes no señalan actividades digitales entre sus prácticas predominantes de ocio que cuando indican una o dos prácticas de ocio digital entre sus favoritas; más en concreto, dicho funcionamiento es más sano entre quienes llevan a cabo una sola actividad de ocio digital frente a los que efectúan dos, poniéndose de manifiesto que un menor consumo digital en los hijos se vincula a familias que gozan de una mayor fortaleza en la vinculación emocional entre sus miembros, en la reciprocidad emocional que se da o puede darse entre los componentes de la familia, en la implicación familiar, en el respeto mutuo entre padres e hijos, así como en el establecimiento de «fronteras internas» y alianzas que se establecen en las relaciones intergeneracionales. Cuestiones que sintonizan con las conclusiones de Mesch (2006a) pero entran en contradicción con los hallazgos obtenidos en otros estudios previos (Kennedy & Wellman, 2007; Fernández-Montalvo & al., 2015; Oliva & al., 2012) que verificaron importantes beneficios de los dispositivos digitales para la cohesión de los sistemas familiares.

Algo similar ocurre al indagar en la flexibilidad familiar; los estudiantes españoles de educación secundaria post­obligatoria que no expresaron prácticas de ocio digital entre sus tres actividades prioritarias se vinculan a familias en las que se experimenta una flexibilidad más saludable, si se compara con aquellas cuyos hijos indicaron una actividad de ocio digital entre las tres preferentes, lo que pone de manifiesto que las primeras disfrutan de más capacidad para afrontar adecuadamente los cambios, así como para adaptarse y aprender de diferentes experiencias y situaciones, a menudo con algún tipo de consecuencia práctica en los procesos de liderazgo, la negociación, la disciplina, los roles o las reglas que adopten las personas que participen en ellas. Resultados que sintonizan en mayor medida con autores como Verza y Wagner (2010), quienes constataron que el uso de dispositivos digitales puede limitar las relaciones presenciales en el seno familiar e incrementar las situaciones familiares estresantes.

Estos resultados asocian el ocio digital de los hijos con el funcionamiento familiar; se matiza que este concepto está integrado por la cohesión y la flexibilidad. Contrariando los hallazgos de otros autores (Kennedy & Wellman, 2007; Fernández-Montalvo & al., 2015; Jupp & Bentlley, 2001) esta investigación vuelve a constatar que dicho funcionamiento goza de mejor salud cuando los hijos no apuntan actividades digitales entre sus prácticas destacadas de ocio; incluso se verifica que dicho funcionamiento es más íntegro entre quienes practican una actividad de ocio frente a los que realizan dos. Cuestiones que confirman que el óptimo funcionamiento interno familiar se vincula a una menor práctica de ocio digital de los hijos y lleva a considerar que una mayor práctica de actividades digitales en los hijos favorece un funcionamiento menos saludable, esto se traduce en un sistema poco o demasiado flexible, en el que se da mayor dependencia entre sus miembros y con poca capacidad para dar respuesta a las demandas que emergen en la «Sociedad Red» (Smith & al., 2009), lo que desfavorece la vivencia de un ocio juvenil y familiar positivo en el que se disfruten experiencias interesantes, atractivas y enriquecedoras que se relacionan significativamente con una mayor satisfacción en la vida familiar (Agate, Zabriskie, Agate, & Poff, 2009; Hornberger, Zabriskie, & Freeman, 2010; Smith & al., 2009).

Las conclusiones obtenidas en esta investigación llevan a considerar que las nuevas experiencias de ocio vinculadas al mundo digital exigen una adaptación del proyecto educativo familiar, y un acompañamiento y aprendizaje en familia que incluya la incorporación natural de la tecnología en su cotidianeidad (Bringué, Sádaba, & Sanjurjo, 2013). En este sentido resulta alentador descubrir investigaciones que certifican que la familia manifiesta un gran interés en la utilización e incorporación de los medios digitales, así como en formarse sobre el potencial de estos dispositivos (Ballesta & Cerezo, 2011). Una de las limitaciones puesta de manifiesto en esta investigación es la ausencia de datos sobre las experiencias de ocio digital compartidas en familia y su vinculación con el funcionamiento familiar, con el fin de comprobar si existe sintonía con lo evidenciado al asociarse este al ocio digital experimentado por los jóvenes. Queda entonces como prospectiva indagar en las actividades digitales compartidas en familia y comprobar su potencial para la mejora de la cohesión y la flexibilidad familiar y, por ende, del aumento de la salud del funcionamiento interno familiar.

Se hace necesario resaltar que el presente trabajo identifica una asociación entre ocio digital y funcionamiento familiar de los jóvenes estudiantes de secundaria postobligatoria, pero no llega a determinar si esta relación es de causalidad ni el sentido de esta. Estudios futuros deberían centrar sus esfuerzos en resolver esta cuestión, que aportaría importantes claves de intervención para la mejora del uso digital, en conciliación con una buena calidad de vida familiar.

Apoyos

El texto que presentamos se vincula al Proyecto de Investigación «De los tiempos educativos a los tiempos sociales: la construcción cotidiana de la condición juvenil en una sociedad de redes. Problemáticas específicas y alternativas pedagógico-sociales» (proyecto coordinado EDU2012-39080-C07-00) y al subproyecto «De los tiempos educativos a los tiempos sociales: la cotidianidad familiar en la construcción del ocio físico-deportivo juvenil» (EDU2012-39080-C07-05), cofinanciado en el marco del Plan Nacional I+D+i con cargo a una ayuda del Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad, y por el Fondo Europeo de Desarrollo Regional (FEDER, 2007-2013). También la investigación ha contado con la Ayuda Puente a Proyectos de Investigación de la Universidad de La Rioja (Ref: APPI 16/09).

Referencias

Agate, J.R., Zabriskie, R.B., Agate, S.T., & Poff, R. (2009). Family Leisure Satisfaction and Satisfaction with Family Life. Journal of Leisure Research, 41(2), 205-223.

Aristegui, I., & Silvestre, M. (2012). El ocio como valor en la sociedad actual. Arbor, 188, 283-291. https://doi.org/10.3989/arbor.2012.754n2001

Atkin, A.J., Corder, K., Goodyer, I., Bamber, D., Ekelund, U., Brage… Van Sluijs, E.M.F. (2015). Perceived Family Functioning and Friendship Quality: Cross-sectional Associations with Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviours. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 12, 23. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12966-015-0180-x

Ballesta, J., & Cerezo, M.C. (2011). Familia y escuela ante la incorporación de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación. Educación XX1, 14(2), 133-156. https://doi.org/10.5944/educxx1.14.2.248

Bringué, X., Sádaba, C., & Sanjurjo, E. (2013). Menores y ocio digital en el siglo XXI. Análisis exploratorio de perfiles de usuarios de videojuegos en España. Bordón, 65(1), 147-166.

Buse, C.E. (2009). When You Retire, Does Everything Become Leisure? Information and Communication Technology Use and the Work/leisure Boundary in Retirement. New Media & Society, 11(7), 1.143-1.161. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444809342052

Carlson, A., Fulton, E., & al. (2010). Influence of Limit-Setting and Participation in Physical Activity on Youth Screen Time. Pediatrics, 126(1), e86-e96. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2009-3374

Carvalho, J., Francisco, R., & Revals, A.P. (2015). Family Functioning and Information and Communication Technologies: How do They Relate? A Literature Review. Computers in Human Behavior, 45, 99-108. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2014.11.037

Cox, A.M., Clough, P.D., & Marlow, J. (2008). Flickr: A First Look at User Behaviour in the Context of Photography as Serious Leisure. Information Research, 13(1). (http://goo.gl/fF24qk) (2016-03-30)

Cuenca, M., & Goytia, A. (2012). Ocio experiencial: antecedentes y características. Arbor, 188, 265-281. https://doi.org/10.3989/arbor.2012.754n2001

Cuenca, M., Aguilar, E., & Ortega, C. (2010). Ocio para innovar. Bilbao: Universidad de Deusto, Documentos de Estudios de Ocio, 42.

Fernández-Montalvo, J., Peñalva, A., & Irazabal, I. (2015). Hábitos de uso y conductas de riesgo en Internet en la preadolescencia. [Internet Use Habits and Risk Behaviours in Preadolescence]. Comunicar, 44, 113-120. https://doi.org/10.3916/C44-2015-12

García, A., López-de-Ayala. M.C., & Catalina, B. (2013). Hábitos de uso en Internet y en las redes sociales de los adolescentes españoles. [The Influence of Social Networks on the Adolescents’ Online Practices]. Comunicar, 41, 195-204. https://doi.org/10.3916/C41-2013-19

García, E., López, J., & Samper, A. (2012). Retos y tendencias del ocio digital: transformación de dimensiones, experiencias y modelos empresariales. Arbor, 188(754), 395-407. https://doi.org/10.3989/arbor.2012.754n2011

García-Continente, X., Pérez-Giménez, A., Espelt, A., & Nebot Adell, M. (2013). Factors Associated with Media Use Among Adolescents: a Multilevel Approach. European Journal of Public Health, 24(1), 5-10. https://doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckt013

Godinho, J., Araújo, J., Barrio, H., & Ramos, E. (2014). Characteristics Associated with Media Use in Early Adolescence. Cadernos de Saúde Pública, 30(3), 587-598. https://doi.org/10.1590/0102-311X00100313

Gros, B. (2009). Certezas e interrogantes acerca del uso de los videojuegos para el aprendizaje. Comunicación, 7(1), 251-264.

Hornberger, L.B., Zabriskie, R.B., & Freeman, P. (2010). Contributions of Family Leisure to Family Functioning Among Single-Parent Families. Leisure Sciences, 32(2), 143-161. https://doi.org/10.1080/01490400903547153

Instituto de la Juventud de España (2012). Jóvenes y TIC. Madrid: INJUVE. (http://goo.gl/n5BIFa) (2015-03-02).

Jago, R., Edwards, M.J., Urbanski, C.R., & Sebire, S.J. (2013). General and Specific Approaches to Media Parenting: A Systematic Review of Current Measures, Associations with Screen-Viewing, and Measurement Implications. Childhood Obesity, 9(1), 51-72. https://doi.org/10.1089/chi.2013.0031

Johnson, N.F. (2009). Cyber-relations in the Field of Home Computer Use for Leisure: Bourdieu and Teenage Technological Experts. E-Learning, 6(2), 187-197. https://doi.org/10.2304/elea.2009.6.2.187

Jupp, B., & Bentley, T. (2001). Surfing Alone? E-commerce and social capital (pp. 97-118). In J. Wilsdon (Ed.), Digital Futures: Living in a Dot-com World. London: Earthscan.

Katz, E., Blumler, J., & Gurevitch, M. (1974). Uses and Gratifications Research. The Public Opinion Quarterly, 37(4), 509-523.

Kennedy, T.L.M., & Wellman, B. (2007). The Networked Household. Information, Communication & Society, 10(5), 645-670.

Lenhart, A., Rainie, L., & Lewis, O. (2001). Teenage Life Online: The Rise of the Instant Message Generation and the Internet’s Impact on Friendships and Family Relationships. Washington DC: Pew Internet & American Life Project.

Lepicnik, J., & Samec, P. (2013). Uso de tecnologías en el entorno familiar en niños de cuatro años de Eslovenia [Communication Technology in the Home Environment of Four-year-old Children (Slovenia)]. Comunicar, 40(XX), 119-126. https://doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-03-02

Martínez-Pampliega, A., Iraurgi, I., & Sanz, M. (2011). Validez estructural del FACES-20Esp: Versión española de 20 ítems de la Escala de Evaluación de la Cohesión y Adaptabilidad Familiar. Revista Iberoamericana de Diagnóstico y Evaluación Psicológica, 29(1), 147-165.

Mesch, G.S. (2006a). Family Relations and the Internet: Exploring a Family Boundaries Approach. The Journal of Family Communication, 6(2), 119-138. https://doi.org/10.1207/s15327698jfc0602_2

Mesch, G.S. (2006b). Family Characteristics and Intergenerational Conflicts over the Internet. Information, Communication and Society, 9(4), 473-495. https://doi.org/10.1080/13691180600858705

Morduchowicz, R. (2012). Los adolescentes y las redes sociales: la construcción de la identidad juvenil en Internet. Buenos Aires: Fondo de Cultura Económica.

Muñoz, R., Ortega, R., Batalla, C., López, M.R., Manresa, J.M., & Torán, P. (2014). Acceso y uso de nuevas tecnologías entre los jóvenes de educación secundaria, implicaciones en salud. Estudio JOITIC. Atención Primaria, 46(2), 77-88. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aprim.2013.06.001

Nie, N.H., Hillygus, D.S., & Erbring, L. (2002). Internet Use, Interpersonal Relations, and Sociability. In B. Wellman, & C. Haythornthwaite (Eds.), The Internet in Everyday Life (pp. 215-243). Malden, MA: Blackwell.

Oliva, A., Hidalgo, M.V., & al. (2012). Uso y riesgo de adicciones a las nuevas tecnologías entre adolescentes y jóvenes andaluces. Alicante: AguaClara.

Olson, D.H. (2000). Circumplex Model of Marital and Family Systems. Journal of Family Therapy, 22(2), 144-167. https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-6427.00144

Olson, D.H. (2008). FACES. IV Manual. Minneapolis (MN): Life Innovations.

Olson, D.H. (2011). FACES. IV and the Circumplex Model: Validation Study. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 37(1), 64-80. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1752-0606.2009.00175.x

Olson, D.H., Sprenkle, D.H., & Russell, C. (1979). Circumplex Model of Marital and Family Systems. I. Cohesion and Adaptability Dimensions, Family Types, and Clinical Applications. Family Process, 18, 3-28. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1545-5300.1979.00003.x

Orchard, L.J., & Fullwood, C. (2010). Current Perspectives on Personality and Internet Use. Social Science Computer Review, 28(2), 155-169. https://doi.org/10.1177/0894439309335115

Patterson, A. (2012). Social-networkers of the World, Unite and Take Over: A Meta-introspective Perspective on the Facebook Brand. Journal of Business Research, 65, 527-534. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2011.02.032

Prensky, M. (2001a). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. (http://goo.gl/20sMqV) (2015-03-06).

Prensky, M. (2001b). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants, Part II: Do They Really Think Differently? (http://goo.gl/3DgSwJ) (2015-03-06).

Rivero, N., Martínez-Pampliega, A., & Olson, D. (2010). Spanish Adaptation of the FACES IV Questionnaire. Psychometric Characteristics. The Family Journal, 18, 288-296.

Sánchez, P.A., Alfageme, M.B., & Serrano, F.J. (2010). Aspectos sociales de los videojuegos. Revista Latinoamericana de Tecnología Educativa, 9(1), 29-41.

Schroeder, R. (2010). Mobile Phones and the Inexorable Advance of Multimodal Connectedness. New Media & Society, 12(1), 75-90. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444809355114

Selwyn, N. (2004). Reconsidering Political and Popular Understandings of the Digital Divide. New Media Society, 6(3), 341-362. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444804042519

Smith, K.M., Freeman, P.A., & Zabriskie, R. (2009). An Examination of Family Communication within the Core and Balance Model of Family Leisure Functioning. Family Relations, 58(1), 79-90. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1741-3729.2008.00536.x

Sorbring, E. (2014). Parents’ Concerns about Their Teenage Children’s Internet Use. Journal of Family Issues, 35(1), 75-96. https://doi.org/10.1177/0192513X12467754

Subrahmanyam, K., Kraut, R.E., Greenfield, P.M., & Gross, E.F. (2000). The Impact of Home Computer use on Children’s Activities and Development. The Future of Children, 10, 123-144.

Valdemoros, M.A., Ponce-de-León A., Sanz, E., & Caride, J.A. (2014). La influencia de la familia en el ocio físico-deportivo juvenil: nuevas perspectivas para la reflexión y la acción. Arbor, 190(770): 192. https://doi.org/10.3989/arbor.2014.770n6013

Verza, F., & Wagner, A. (2010). Uso del teléfono móvil, juventud y familia: Un panorama de la realidad brasileña. Psychological Intervention, 19(1), 57-71.

Viñals, A., Abad, M., & Aguilar, E. (2014). Jóvenes conectados: una aproximación al ocio digital de los jóvenes españoles. Communication & Papers, 4(3), 52-68.

Wang, M.P., Chu, J.T., Viswanath, K., Wan, A., Lam, T.H., & Chan, S.S. (2015). Using Information and Communication Technologies for Family Communication and Its Association with Family Well-Being in Hong Kong: Family Project. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 17(8), 207. https://doi.org/10.2196/jmir.4722

Zheng, R., & Cheok, A. (2011). Singaporean Adoles­cents´ Perceptions of on-line Social Communication: An Exploratory Factor Analysis. Journal Educational Computing Research, 45(2), 203-221.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/16
Accepted on 31/12/16
Submitted on 31/12/16

Volume 25, Issue 1, 2017
DOI: 10.3916/C50-2017-09
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 10
Views 1
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?