Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The deep-rooted changes that have taken place in the media world over recent years have brought about changes in both television itself and in the relationships established with this medium. Consequently, it is important to understand how young people watch television today, in order to design strategies to help them develop the capacities they require to ensure responsible use. With this aim, the present study analyzes the television viewing habits of 553 adolescents (267 boys and 286 girls), aged between 14 and 19, from Ireland, Spain and Mexico. Through the implementation of two questionnaires (CH-TV 0.2 and VAL-TV 0.2), four viewing patterns were detected that can be generalized to all the contexts studied. Two of these patterns clearly distinguish between boys (critical-cultural) and girls (social-conversational), with boys viewing more cultural and information-oriented programs, and girls tending to watch shows with a view to talking about them later with their friends. Two of the variables which best distinguish between the other two patterns identified are the perception of a conflictive climate (conflictive-passive viewing) and the perception of responsible parental mediation (committed-positive viewing). Moreover, preferred television genre was found to be the factor with the greatest discriminatory power in relation to these patterns, while time spent watching television, perceived realism and cultural context were not found to be significant.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction and current context

Television was the subject of much research during the 20th century. The development and gradual spread of this type of screen-based entertainment device to most homes aroused a great deal of curiosity regarding its possible influence, especially on minors. Nevertheless, over the course of the century the media context underwent considerable change. Advances in new technologies and the convergence of different screens have generated a context in which constant interaction with the digital media forms an integral part of young people’s lives (Buckingham & Martínez-Rodríguez, 2013). These young people are “digital natives” as Prenksy calls them (2001); they are the “net-generation” (Tapscott, 1998). But the fact that television now has to share the limelight with other screen-based media does not mean that it is no longer watched. In the studies conducted by Carlsson (2010) and Bucht and Harrie (2013) on media use by young people in Nordic countries, the authors found that, even though young people did use the Internet a lot, television viewing was still one of the most popular media pursuits. Similarly, in a study carried out in Aragón (Spain) on parents’ perception of their children’s use of various different screens at home, Marta and Gabelas (2008:11) concluded that “television continues to be the most popular screen among minors during their leisure time”. Thus, even in this new media context, television continues to form part of young people’s lives. They watch it mainly for entertainment (Medrano, Palacios, & Aierbe, 2007), although, to a lesser extent, as a source of information also. In two pieces of research which aimed to analyze to what extent today's youngsters watched the news, the authors found that although the social media are the most popular choice, television is the second most common type of screen (Casero-Ripollés, 2012; Condeza, Bachmann, & Mujica, 2014).

Nevertheless, it is important to bear in mind that the change undergone by the media context is in turn triggering changes in the relationship established between young people and the television screen. As stated in the Green Paper (European Commission, 2013), the familiar consumption models of the 20th century are changing. This is important because family context (Medrano, Aierbe, & Palacios, 2010; Tonantzin & Alonso, 2012; Torrecillas, 2013), family climate (Aierbe, Orozco, & Medrano, 2014), and parental mediation (Radanielina, 2014; Cánovas & Sahuquillo, 2010; Bjelland & al., 2015; Uribe & Santos, 2008) are elements that influence the way in which children and adolescents view and process television messages. Moreover, the development of new technologies is modifying young people’s television viewing habits (López-Vidales, González-Aldea, & Medina de-la-Viña, 2011) and triggering changes in the medium itself (Marta & Gabelas, 2008). Digital television is a clear example of this, since it offers viewers access to programs from countries far removed from their own. In a study carried out in Nigeria, Oyero and Oyesomi (2014) found that 90% of children claimed to watch foreign cartoons via satellite, thus exposing themselves constantly to contents from other cultures. Guarinos (2009) found that North American models were more widespread than Spanish ones in the prototypes of adolescents represented in series and television films broadcast in Spain. These results become even more relevant if we take into account the well-reported socializing effect of the media and television (Medrano, Martínez-de-Morentin, & Apodaca, 2015; Pallarés, 2014; Pindado, 2010; Sihvonen, 2015), an effect that is hardly surprising given that there are very few households without at least one television set (Ackermann & al., 2014; Bittman & Sipthorp, 2012; INE, 2014), and that the TV is one of the main devices used in homes and daily life (Torrecillas, 2012).

This media context which characterizes the digital era in which adolescents live has given rise to a certain degree of concern about whether or not young people are sufficiently trained and educated to interact properly with the media (Aguaded & Pérez-Rodríguez, 2012). Thus, digital literacy should occupy a priority place in the education we provide our children in the 21st century (Aguaded, 2013). With this in mind, on 22 May 2008, the Council of the European Union issued a call (Council of the European Union, 2008) for all member states to work towards improving media literacy by including this subject in lifelong learning programs and providing citizens with the tools necessary for developing the competences required to use the media in a critical and responsible manner. There is no doubt that in light of the increasingly changing environment in which we live, it is vital to ensure that the population acquires an adequate level of media literacy (Aguaded, 2013). And we should not forget that television forms part of this context. In a recent cross-cultural study which analyzed the television viewing habits of young people from different countries, Medrano et al. concluded that media narratives should be studied at school in order to avoid passive viewing and ensure that students are capable of correctly decoding the messages conveyed.

We can conclude that, today, any piece of research aiming to study television must take into account the new challenges posed by the transformation undergone by viewers’ relationship with this medium within the new media context. One of these challenges is the need to define the current television viewing habits of adolescents. As Casero-Ripollés (2012) points out, young people constitute a privileged group to study since they are digital natives, subjects who have grown up interacting with and using digital media. It is by studying this segment of the population that we will be able to identify the characteristics of the viewing habits of those who have been raised in a digital environment. Moreover, we acknowledge that it is necessary to offer 21st century citizens the tools they required to make optimum use of the media through media literacy (Aguaded, 2013), then we should work together in order to conduct empirical research that will help us understand those aspects that may improve the quality of this literacy.

The contribution made by this study focuses on analyzing the relationships which exist between today’s adolescents and the television screen, by exploring the different television viewing variables and the role played by each. Our study is based on the premise that adolescents’ viewing habits are influenced by different tastes, which pre­dominate in different age groups (Huertas & França, 2001; Lapuente, 2011; Medrano & Aierbe, 2008), and are fairly similar as regards reception, which is mainly based on imitation (França, 2001). In light of the above, this study had two aims: 1) To identify common patterns among adolescents from three different cultural contexts; and 2) To detect key factors in the configuration of these patterns.

2. Material and methods

Participants were 553 adolescents (267 boys and 286 girls) from 4 different cities: Dublin (Ireland), Gua­dalajara (Mexico), San Sebas­tián and Málaga (Spain). All participants were aged be­tween 14 and 19. Due to budgetary restrictions common to projects of this kind, the representativeness of the sample could not rely on random selection systems, and the cities and schools selected were chosen due to the fact that researchers from those countries were participating in this project, thus providing access to the sample group. Thus, the sample group was chosen on the basis of “convenience”, with priority being given to ecological validity, over and above random representativeness. Schools were selected on the basis of offering optimum conditions for both access and the administration of the instruments. An effort was also made to ensure the equivalence of the student groups studied, by using similar selection criteria for all of them: type of school, age and school year. This orientation was considered appropriate for the sample selection process since the aim of the study was not to estimate population rates but rather to compare different cultural groups.

As regards to the type of school, the sample group was taken from one or two schools for each sub-sample (city), both public and private, or with different socioeconomic levels (although no extreme cases were included). The sample was therefore drawn from 7 schools and was distributed as follows: Málaga – 2 schools, one private one public, with students from 4th grade of secondary school and 2nd year of the Spanish Baccalaureate (higher education) system; San Sebastián – 2 schools, one public one private, with students from 4th grade of secondary school and 2nd year of the Spanish Baccalaureate (higher education) system; Guadalajara (Mexico) – one private school and students from PREPA (equivalent to 4th grade of secondary school) and years 1 and 3 of the Mexican Baccalaureate system; and Dublin – 2 schools, one private one public, with students from the 3rd year of Junior Cycle and the 2nd level of Senior Cycle.

A descriptive-correlational and cross-cultural ex post-facto research design was used, in which a number of different variables were studied, including: identification, family context and the values perceived in television characters.

Data were collected by means of two questionnaires: the Television Viewing Habits Questionnaire (CH-TV 0.2) and the Television Values Questionnaire (VAL-TV 0.2). The CH-TV 0.2 was created and validated by Rodríguez, Medrano, Aierbe and Martínez-de-Morentin (2013), and has an internal consistency of 0.84 (Cronbach’s Alpha). It consists of seven initial questions which gather socio-demographic data such as: the parent’s educational level, profession and current situation, number of siblings, sex and age of siblings, whether they are older or younger than the child, and information about other people living in the household. These questions are followed by 24 items (scored on a five-point Lickert-type scale), which reflect a total of 14 variables. This study focused on 10 of these variables, since they were the ones related to the research objective. They are as follows: reasons for identifying with the character, reason for viewing, identification with the character, perceived realism, time spent watching, alternative activities, television genres, conversation, perceived family climate and parental mediation. The Television Values Questionnaire (VAL-TV 0.2) is a Spanish version of Schwartz and Boehnke’s PVQ (2003), adapted to the Spanish context by Medrano, Aierbe and Orejundo (2010). The questionnaire measures the values perceived in TV characters, divided into four dimensions: self-transcendence (a=0.87), openness to change (a=0.80), conservatism (a=0.77) and self-promotion (a=0.72). The scale consists of 21 items, the responses to which are scored on a Lickert-type scale, from one to six.

The Spanish versions of both questionnaires were adapted to create two new versions: a Mexican one and an English one (appropriate examples and language). These new versions were reviewed by four communications experts and four educational experts who, among other aspects, assessed whether or not the questions related to real television viewing habits and whether the value definitions were applicable in their respective cultures. Once both versions had been drafted and approved, the questionnaires were administered on-line to students from all participating schools, with the help of teaching assistants who had received the appropriate training. The teaching assistants completed the survey with students in the schools' IT classrooms, a process which took between 50-60 minutes. In accordance with the capacity of the classroom itself, students completed the questionnaire in either one or two phases.

3. Analysis and results

In order to respond to the first aim, a multiple correspondence analysis was conducted to determine the relationship between the principal television viewing variables. Based on the results of this analysis, the variables were grouped into viewing patterns or habits. Figure 1 shows the results of the analyses.


Draft Content 925856619-54554-en025.jpg


Draft Content 925856619-54554-en026.jpg

Figure 1 shows the location of the different variables studied. In this diagram, physical closeness between variables should be interpreted as attraction or association, while distance represents opposition. Being located in the center of the diagram indicates that the variable in question is subject to neither attraction nor opposition to the others.

Figure 1 indicates the existence of four groups whose location at the edge of the diagram implies a greater degree of association between the constituent elements. One group that can be identified encompasses the following variables: entertainment as the reason for watching television, perception of inhibited parental mediation and a conflictive family climate. This is a multivariate category that describes young people with conflictive families that do not view themselves as capable or qualified to regulate or guide their children's viewing habits. These youngsters also seem to watch television more passively, mainly for entertainment purposes. We could define this type of viewing pattern as "Conflictive-Passive".

Another group worth highlighting is that which reflects a preference for cultural shows, comedy programs and cartoons, and is predominantly male. This group indicates a more critical and reflexive pattern of television viewing. It is also more common among boys. Watching television as a source of information is also associated with this group, although to a lesser extent. Adolescents who watch television in this way could be described as having an active or even proactive attitude to television viewing. The category individualism (as the value perceived in respondents' favorite character) is a satellite element of this group. The distance between this category and the group described above is considerable, which suggests that we should be cautious when estimating the intensity of the association between this category and the other variables. Nevertheless, as shown in the figure, the category individualism is not associated with any other group. We can therefore conclude that individualism is the values category, which best describes the television viewing pattern outlined above. In this sense, it is important to complete the description of this group by noting that it is made up of people whose favorite characters are open to change (as a counterpoint to conformity, security, etc.) and are oriented towards self-promotion. We have termed this second television viewing pattern the "Critical-Cultural" pattern.

There is also a third group which encompasses affective family climate, responsible parental mediation and a weak degree of individualism as the value pattern perceived in respondents' favorite characters. To a lesser and more peripheral extent, other elements of this group also include short viewing times on weekdays, viewing for educational purposes, and self-transcendence as the value perceived in respondents' favorite character. The core elements of the television viewing pattern constituted by this group are a good family climate and committed educational mediation by parents in an effort to regulate and orient their children's viewing habits. Although the values attached to respondents' favorite character are not particularly well-defined, they tend towards self-transcendence and a moderate degree of openness to change, while the values of self-promotion and conservatism are rejected (although only to a moderate extent also). We termed this viewing pattern "Committed-Positive".

Finally, the fourth group identified comprised young people who watch television in order to talk about the content of the shows seen. This viewing pattern is associated with girls and the category “gossip-talk shows” is located on its periphery. It therefore describes a viewing pattern related to the social sphere. As well as evincing an interest in issues inherent to people's social and emotional life, those in this group also tend to share the viewing experience through an equally social activity, i.e. conversation. Most of the young people in this "Social-Conversational" viewing pattern were girls.

Once the common viewing patterns shared by adolescents from the various different cities studied had been identified, the role played by each of the study variables in their constitution was analyzed. Figure 2 shows the results of this analysis.

Firstly, it is important to mention that sex played a key role in the definition of the different viewing patterns, since one group was found to be comprised almost exclusively of boys, while another was found to be comprised almost exclusively of girls. Nevertheless, city of residence did not seem to be particularly related to the set of viewing patterns detected. It should be remembered that this factor was not involved in the construction of the axes or dimensions, since it was considered "illustrative" in nature. This is because previous analyses carried out in this re­search project have found that television viewing habits are subject to a gradual process of globalization. We cannot, therefore, talk about viewing habits typical of any one region, and must instead talk about globalized viewing habits that are present to a greater or lesser extent in all regions and cultures studied. Empirical support for this idea is provided both by the presence of all the cities studied in the central area of the diagram shown in figure 1 (which indicates no specific relationship with any of the television viewing patterns identified) and by their low discriminatory power in figure 2.

As regards the other variables, their relevance may be interpreted in accordance with their location (central or peripheral) on the two-dimensional diagram in figure 1. Thus, the variable with the greatest degree of discriminatory power is preferred genre, followed by (in order) perceived parental mediation, values perceived in favorite character, sex and perceived family climate. Reason for viewing was found to have only moderate discriminatory power.

Time spent watching television, on the other hand, along with perceived realism of the content and city of residence, was not found to be discriminating factors in the viewing patterns identified.

4. Discussion and conclusions

In response to the first aim, we have identified and typified four viewing patterns which are applicable to adolescents from all the contexts studied. The first pattern was termed "Conflictive-Passive", and consists of a conflictive perceived family climate, inhibited parental mediation and viewing for entertainment purposes. It encompasses young people who watch television both to entertain themselves and as a means of evading the conflictive climate they perceive in their families, who in turn provide no instruction and impose no restrictions on their viewing. This pattern was most prevalent in Dublin. This may be explained by the characteristics of the schools from which the data was collected, since in Dublin, they were located in districts with high levels of social conflict and economic precariousness.

The second pattern was termed "Committed-Positive", and encompasses young people with families who try to provide training and guidance in relation to screen use. These adolescents are mainly interested in characters that evince a degree of social commitment and value freedom of thought. This indicates the positive influence that responsible mediation may have on the way adolescents process the messages they receive (Radanielina, 2014), as well as the importance of type of mediation and parenting style in the way they interpret said messages (Cánovas & Sahuquillo, 2010; Bjelland & al., 2015; Uribe & Santos, 2008). Furthermore, the relationship observed by Aierbe et al. (2014) between family climate and parental mediation is also reflected in the results, with a positive association being found between the perception of an affective climate and responsible parental mediation.

The third pattern identified was "Critical-Cultural" viewing, a group mainly made up by boys and characterized by a preference for humorous cultural programs and cartoons. This pattern pertains to adolescents who view selectively and actively. They watch television to keep abreast of events (although this is not their only motivation) and have a slight tendency to identify with characters representing the values of self-promotion and openness to change.

The fourth viewing pattern, "Social-Conversational" is mainly represented by girls. This viewing pattern is defined by a tendency to watch gossip and talk shows, and the main motivation is to have something to chat about.

Sex is an important factor in the analysis of television viewing habits. Social stereotypes of masculinity and femininity are clearly reflected in the patterns defined as mainly male or female. However, we should highlight the fact that the indicator most closely associated with girls is conversation, while interest in gossip and talk shows was found to be less intense.

As regards city of residence, unlike in relation to sex, no specific relationship was found between viewing habits and any of the cities studied, with the exception of Dublin. This indicates a possible homogenization of television viewing habits in the diverse cities studied. The distance between cities (both physically and in relation to television broadcasts) has shrunk over recent years, with adolescents in San Sebastián (Spain) now being able to watch the same programs as those in Guadalajara (Mexico), for example. This in turn means that similar image and behavior patterns have tended to emerge in different parts of the world, something that raises new research questions and issues that should be explored in future work.

When the discriminatory power of the variables studied was explored in response to the second aim of this paper, preferred genre was found to be the indicator with the greatest discriminatory power. Several different studies have found that adolescents' tastes and preferences in relation to television are clearly different from those reported by other age groups (Huertas & França, 2001; Lapuente, 2011; Medrano & Aierbe, 2008). We can therefore conclude that these preferences are a key discriminating factor in adolescents' television viewing habits, with particular differences being found between sexes, as described above.

Other variables with notable discriminatory power were (in order of intensity) perceived parental mediation, perceived values, sex and perceived family climate. All these variables were found to be important predictors of the way the adolescents in question watch television. Not unexpectedly, the perception of a conflictive family climate is associated with inhibited perceived parental mediation, while an affective family climate was related to responsible mediation. The key role played by family context in helping adolescents correctly process the messages conveyed by television, as well as in encouraging them to establish adequate media habits and relationships (Medrano & al., 2010; Tonantzin & Alonso, 2012; Torrecillas, 2013). It highlights the importance of focusing on and intervening in the family environment when attempting to establish parenting patterns conducive to good television use. More­over, the results indicate that the values perceived by adolescents in television programs depend on the relationship established between diverse variables. The type of values perceived is therefore an indicator of the type of viewing engaged in.


Draft Content 925856619-54554-en027.jpg

Finally, the correspondence analysis revealed that time spent watching television, perceived realism and cultural context were not discriminating factors. This result is as surprising as it is important. It should be remembered that the relevance of these three variables in television viewing has been amply reported by many different studies; however, in our study, these factors were found not to be decisive in the configuration of television viewing patterns. Indeed, Medrano (2005) previously pointed out that, with the exception of certain prejudices, there is in fact no relationship between time spent viewing television and the impact of this medium on the viewer. Now, our data indicate that there also seems to be no direct relationship between time spent watching television and type of viewing, at least not at a general level, with this variable being located on the periphery of the viewing patterns with which it is associated.

For their part, the data provided by the multiple correspondence analysis support the idea of a possible homogenizing trend in adolescents' television viewing habits. Our results confirm the existence of viewing patterns common to all the contexts studied, made up by specific relationships between variables that mediate how messages are received and processed. Knowing which variables may mediate the development of healthier viewing habits provides valuable information for defining which aspects should be included in media education. This study identifies the following variables as viewing habit predictors: firstly, preferred genre, followed by perceived parental mediation, sex, perceived family climate and values. In this sense, the data reveal that the aforementioned variables, and consequently the type of viewing engaged in, influence the type of values that adolescents perceive when watching television.

Preferred genre was found to be one of the variables that best predicted type of viewing, with the differences that arose within this area being modulated to a large extent by sex. This variable may be an interesting one to consider from a two-way educational perspective. Firstly, it would be interesting to use those television genres that are perceived as attractive by adolescents in the educational field, to work on media literacy and to encourage a critical interpretation of the content conveyed. And secondly, it would be a good idea to foster students' curiosity about and interest in those television genres that educators consider interesting for young people. Another useful exercise would be to encourage students to think about why girls and boys tend to prefer different genres. Resources such as film clubs or the joint viewing of previously-selected television programs and their subsequent analysis through class debate may be good strategies to apply here.

Perceived parental mediation and family climate were also found to be important discriminating variables. It is therefore very important not to overlook this field when designing educational projects aimed at improving media and information literacy. Thus, establishing training courses designed to provide families with guidelines for mediating television use and to increase their awareness of the importance of this task should be a vital component of any program aimed at fostering healthy television viewing habits among adolescents.

Another aspect of educational interest is the social stereotypes observed in some of the variables studied. Girls reported a type of viewing pattern that reveals a marked preference for those television genres whose content is considered to be less appropriate, such as gossip or talk shows. Sex is therefore an important discriminating factor in the configuration of viewing patterns. This should be borne in mind from an educational perspective in order to work with both sexes on those aspects considered to be important during adolescence.

The study has certain limitations that should be taken into consideration when interpreting these conclusions. The fact that the questionnaires used were self-reports implies the risk of respondents being influenced by the social desirability bias. Also, the use of a convenience-based sample group generated a contrast with Dublin, a city that, while not exceptionally different from the other cities studied, does nevertheless have somewhat higher levels of social conflict. Nevertheless, this very circumstance prompts the question of whether or not socioeconomic factors and social conflict levels may themselves be more decisive in determining the composition of standardized viewing patterns than the cultural characteristics of the cities studied. This question remains open for future research. In any case, it should be remembered that, since we used a convenience-based sample group, the results presented in this paper should be viewed as indicators for guiding future research, rather than conclusions applicable to any context.

Funding support

This study forms part of an R&D project funded by the Spanish Ministry for Economics and Competitiveness EDU 2012-36720, as well as by the University of the Basque Country's Training and Research Units project (UFI 11/04) entitled "Psychology and Society in the 21st century".

References

Ackermann, R., & al. (2014). A Randomized Comparative Effectiveness Trial of Using Cable Television to Deliver Diabetes Prevention Programming. Obesity, 22(7), 1601-1607. https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.20762

Aguaded, I. (2013). El programa «Media» de la Comisión Europea, apoyo internacional a la educación de medios [Media Programme (EU) – International Support for Media Education]. Comunicar, 40(XX), 7-8. https://doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-01-01

Aguaded, I., & Pérez-Rodríguez, M.A. (2012). Estrategias para la alfabetización mediática: competencias audiovisuales y ciudadanía en Andalucía. New Approaches in Educational Research, 1(1), 25-30. https://doi.org/10.7821/naer.1.22-26

Aierbe, A., Orozco, G., & Medrano, C. (2014). Family Context, Television and Perceived Values. A Cross-cultural Study with Adolescent. Communication and Society, 2(27), 79-99. (http://goo.gl/YdFQO4) (2016-08-22).

Bittman, M., & Sipthorp, M. (2012). Turned on, tuned in or dropped out? Young children’s use of television and transmission of social advantage. LSAC Annual Statistical Report 2011, 43-56. (http://goo.gl/LoNhX5) (2015-12-05).

Bjelland, M., & al. (2015). Associations between Parental Rules, Style of Communication and Children’s Screen Time. BMC Public Health, 15(1), 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-015-2337-6

Bucht, C., & Harrie, E. (2013). Young People in the Nordic Digital Media Culture. A Statistical Overview Compiled. Göteborg: Nordicom, Göteborg Universitet.

Buckhingham, D., & Martínez-Rodríguez, J.B. (2013). Jóvenes interactivos: nueva ciudadanía entre redes sociales y escenarios escolares [Interactive Youth: New Citizenship between Social Networks and School Settings]. Comunicar, 40(XX), 10-13. https://doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-00

Cánovas, P., & Sahuquillo, P.M. (2010). Educación familiar y mediación televisiva. Teoría de la Educación, 22(1), 117-140.

Carlsson, U. (2010). Children and Youth in the Digital Media Culture: From a Nordic Horizon. Göteborg: Nordicom, Göteborg Universitet.

Casero-Ripollés, A. (2012). Beyond Newspapers: New Consumption among Young People in the Digital Era [Más allá de los diarios: el consumo de noticias de los jóvenes en la era digital]. Comunicar, 39(XX), 151-158. https://doi.org/10.3916/C39-2012-03-05

Comisión Europea (2013). Libro Verde: Prepararse para la convergencia plena del mundo audiovisual: crecimiento, creación y valores. Bruselas: Comisión Europea. (http://goo.gl/lXcgPe) (2016-05-12).

Condeza, R., Bachmann, I., & Mujica, C. (2014). El consumo de noticias de los adolescentes chilenos: intereses, motivaciones y percepciones sobre la agenda informativa [New Consumption among Chilean Adolescents: Interests, Motivations and Perceptions on the News Agenda]. Comunicar, 43(XXII), 55-64. https://doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-05

Council of the European Union (2008). Council Conclusions of 22 May 2008 on a European Approach to Media Literacy in the Digital Environment (2008/C 140/08). Brussels: Official Journal of the European Union. (http://goo.gl/XS5T7l) (2015-11-23).

França, M.E. (2001). La contribución de las series juveniles de televisión a la formación de la identidad en la adolescencia. Análisis de los contenidos y la recepción de la serie «Compañeros» (Antena 3). Barcelona (España): Tesis Doctoral. Universidad Autónoma de Barceloa. (http://goo.gl/ytT9iw) (2016-08-22).

Guarinos, V. (2009). Fenómenos televisivos «teenagers»: prototipias adolescentes en series vistas en España [Televisual Teenager Phenomena. Adolescent Prototypes in TV Series in Spain]. Comunicar, 33(XVII), 203-211. https://doi.org/10.3916/c33-2009-03-012

Huertas, A., & França, M.E. (2001). El espectador adolescente. Una aproximación a cómo contribuye la televisión en la construcción del yo. Zer, 11, 331-350.

Instituto Nacional de Estadística (2014). Encuesta sobre equipamiento de y uso de TIC en los hogares 2014. Madrid, INE. (http://goo.gl/MyiDqH) (2015-12-06).

Lapuente, M. G. (2011). Recepción televisiva adolescente: gramáticas de reconocimiento y ciclo de vida. Question, 1(23). (http://goo.gl/m8kCNs) (2015-12-12).

López-Vidales, N., González-Aldea, P., & Medina-de-la-Viña, E. (2011). Jóvenes y televisión en 2010: Un cambio de hábitos. Zer, 30(16), 97-113. (http://goo.gl/r3Aq8n) (2016-05-12).

Marta, C., & Gabelas, J.A. (2008). La televisión: epicentro de la convergencia entre pantallas. Enl@ce, 5(1), 11-24. (https://goo.gl/500xbk) (2016-05-12).

Medrano, C. (2005). ¿Se puede favorecer el aprendizaje de valores a través de las narraciones televisivas? Revista de Educación, 338, 245-270.

Medrano, C. Palacios, S., & Aierbe, A. (2007). Los hábitos y preferencias televisivas en jóvenes y adolescentes: un estudio realizado en el País Vasco. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 62, 13-27. (http://goo.gl/E6vTDL) (2016-05-10).

Medrano, C., & Aierbe, A. (2008). Valores y contextos de desarrollo. Psicodidáctica, 13(2), 53-67.

Medrano, C., Aierbe, A., & Orejudo, S. (2010). Television Viewing Profile and Values: Implications for Moral Education. Psicodidáctica, 15(1), 57-76.

Medrano, C., Aierbe, A., & Palacios, S. (2010). El perfil de consumo televisivo en adolescentes, jóvenes y adultos: implicaciones para la educación. Revista de Educación, 352, 545-566.

Medrano, C., Martínez-de-Morentin, J.I., & Apodaca, P. (2015). Perfiles de consumo televisivo: un estudio transcultural. Educación XXI, 18(2), 305-321. https://doi.org/10.5944/educxx1.14606

Oyero, O., & Oyesomi, K.O. (2014). Perceived Influence of Television Cartoons on Nigerian Children’s Social Behaviour. Estudos em Comunicação, 17, 91-116.

Pallarés, M. (2014). Medios de comunicación: ¿Espacio de ocio o agentes de socialización en la adolescencia? Pedagogía Social, 23, 231-252. https://doi.org/10.7179/PSRI_2014.23.10

Pindado, J. (2010). Socialización juvenil y medios de comunicación: algunas cuestiones clave. Educación y Futuro, 22, 71-86. (https://goo.gl/aXMVbl) (2016-05-14).

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. Cross Currents: Cultures, Communities, Technologies. On the Horizon, 9(5), 1-6. (http://goo.gl/teYgUQ) (2015-11-21).

Radanielina, M.L. (2014). Parental Mediation of Media Messages Does Matter: More Interaction about Objectionable Content is Associated with Emerging Adults´ Sexual Attitudes and Behaviors. Health Communication, 30(8), 784-798. https://doi.org/10.1080/10410236.2014.900527

Rodríguez, A., Medrano, C., Aierbe, A., & Martínez-de-Morentin, J.I. (2013). Perfil de consumo televisivo y valores percibidos por los adolescentes: un estudio transcultural. Revista de Educación, 361, 513-538. https://doi.org/10.4438/1988-592X-RE-2013-361-231

Schwartz, S.H., & Boehnke, K. (2003). Evaluating the Structure of Human Values with Confirmatory Factor Analysis. Journal of Research in Personality, 38, 230-255. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0092-6566(03)00069-2

Sihvonen, J. (2015). Media Consumption and the Identity Projects of the Young. Young, 2(23), 171-189. https://doi.org/10.1177/1103308815569391

Tapscott, D. (1998). Growing up Digital. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Tonantzin, A., & Alonso, R. (2012). También heredamos la forma de ver televisión. Fuente, 4(10), 7-13.

Torrecillas, T. (2012). Características de los contextos familiares de recepción televisiva infantil. La responsabilidad mediadora de los padres. Sphera Pública, 12, 127-142.

Torrecillas, T. (2013). Los padres, ante el consumo televisivo de los hijos: Estilos de mediación. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 68, 27-54. https://doi.org/10.4185/RLCS-2013-968

Uribe, R., & Santos, P. (2008). Las estrategias de mediación parental televisiva que usan los padres chilenos. Cuadernos de Información, 2(23), 6-21.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Los profundos cambios acaecidos en la configuración del contexto mediático en los últimos tiempos, han generado cambios tanto en el medio televisivo como en las relaciones establecidas con él. Es por ello que, resulta necesario conocer cómo consumen la televisión los jóvenes actuales en aras de crear estrategias que ayuden a capacitarlos en la utilización de este medio. Con este fin, en esta investigación se han estudiado las pautas de consumo televisivo de 553 adolescentes (267 chicos y 286 chicas) de Irlanda, España y México, de edades comprendidas entre 14 y 19 años. Mediante la aplicación de dos cuestionarios (CH-TV 0.2 y VAL-TV 0.2), se han podido detectar cuatro pautas de consumo generalizables a todos los contextos estudiados. Dos de estas pautas, diferencian el consumo entre hombres (Crítico-Cultural) y mujeres (Social-Conversacional), siendo ellos los que realizan un consumo más cultural e informativo y ellas, más dirigido a entablar conversación con sus amistades. En lo que a las otras dos pautas se refiere, la percepción de un clima conflictivo (consumo Conflictivo-Pasivo) o la de una mediación responsable (consumo Comprometido-Positivo) son algunas de las variables que marcan las diferencias. Además, se han detectado aquellos factores que presentan mayor poder discriminativo en la configuración de estas pautas, siendo la preferencia mostrada hacia los géneros televisivos el factor más discriminante entre los estudiados. Sin embargo, la permanencia, el realismo percibido y el contexto cultural no han resultado ser determinantes.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

La televisión ha sido objeto de múltiples investigaciones a lo largo del siglo XX. La emergente y progresiva expansión de esta pantalla en los hogares creó una gran curiosidad sobre la influencia que este medio podía ejercer, especialmente, sobre los menores. Sin embargo, el contexto mediático ha sufrido cambios considerables con el cambio de siglo. El avance de las nuevas tecnologías y la convergencia de diversas pantallas ha creado un contexto en el que la interacción constante con los medios digitales forma parte de la vida cotidiana de los jóvenes (Buckingham & Martínez-Rodríguez, 2013). Son «nativos digitales» como los llama Prensky (2001), la denominada «Net-generation» (Tapscott, 1998). Pero el hecho de que la televisión comparta espacio con otras pantallas no significa que se haya dejado de ver. En los estudios realizados por Carlsson (2010) o Bucht y Harrie (2013) sobre el consumo mediático de los jóvenes en los países nórdicos señalan que, aunque los jóvenes utilizan mucho Internet, el uso de la televisión sigue ocupando una de las primeras posiciones del ranking. En la misma línea, en una investigación llevada a cabo en Aragón sobre la percepción que los padres tenían del uso las diversas pantallas en el hogar, Marta y Gabelas (2008:11) concluyen que «la televisión sigue siendo la pantalla estelar para los menores en sus tiempos de ocio». Por lo tanto, también en este nuevo contexto, la televisión, sigue formando parte de la vida de los jóvenes. Estos, la escogen principalmente para entretenerse (Medrano, Palacios, & Aierbe, 2007) o incluso, en menor medida, para informarse. En dos investigaciones en las que se pretendía analizar el consumo de noticias en los jóvenes actuales, encontraron que, aunque las redes sociales son el medio principal para consultar información, el uso de la televisión se situaría a continuación de estas (Casero-Ripollés, 2012; Condeza, Bachmann, & Mujica, 2014).

No obstante, es importante tener en cuenta que, el cambio sufrido por el contexto mediático está generando cambios en la relación establecida entre los jóvenes y la pantalla televisiva. Tal y como se afirma en el Libro Verde (Comisión Europea, 2013), los modelos de consumo familiares del siglo XX se están transformando. Lo cual resulta relevante, ya que tanto el contexto familiar (Medrano, Aierbe, & Palacios, 2010; Tonantzin & Alonso, 2012; Torrecillas, 2013) como el clima familiar (Aierbe, Orozco, & Medrano, 2014) y la mediación parental (Radanielina, 2014; Cánovas & Sahuquillo, 2010; Bjelland & al., 2015; Uribe & Santos, 2008) son elementos que influyen en la recepción y procesamiento que los niños y adolescentes hacen de los mensajes televisivos. Por otra parte, el avance de las nuevas tecnologías está modificando los hábitos de consumo televisivo de los jóvenes (López-Vidales, González-Aldea, & Medina-de-la-Viña, 2011) y generando transformaciones en el propio medio (Marta & Gabelas, 2008). La televisión digital es un claro ejemplo de ello, ya que ofrece la posibilidad de acercar programas televisivos de países lejanos a nuestros propios hogares. Oyero y Oyesomi (2014), en un estudio realizado en Nigeria, encuentran que el 90% de los niños dicen ver dibujos animados extranjeros vía satélite exponiéndose continuamente a contenidos de otras culturas. Guarinos (2009), por otra parte, detecta la estandarización de modelos estadounidenses por encima de los españoles en los prototipos de adolescentes de las series y telefilmes que se emiten en España. La importancia de estos resultados se ve reforzada por el constatado carácter socializador de los medios y la televisión (Medrano, Martínez-de-Morentin, & Apodaca, 2015; Pallarés, 2014; Pindado, 2010; Sihvonen, 2015). Esto no es de extrañar si se tiene en cuenta que existen pocos hogares donde no hay, al menos, un televisor (Ackermann & al., 2014; Bittman & Sipthorp, 2012; INE, 2014), siendo este uno de los aparatos que mayor protagonismo cobra en los hogares y en la rutina diaria (Torrecillas, 2012).

Ante este contexto mediático que caracteriza la era digital en la cual están inmersos los adolescentes, surge la preocupación derivada de si los jóvenes están lo suficientemente preparados para interactuar debidamente con los medios (Aguaded & Pérez-Rodríguez, 2012). Por ello, la alfabetización mediática debe de ocupar un lugar prioritario en la educación del siglo XXI (Aguaded, 2013). Coincidiendo con este fin, el 22 de mayo del 2008 se realizó un llamamiento desde el Consejo de la Unión Europea (Council of the European Union, 2008), para que los estados miembros trabajen en pro de la alfabetización mediática incluyéndola, entre otras cosas, en el marco del aprendizaje permanente y proporcionando a los ciudadanos herramientas para el desarrollo de competencias necesarias para una utilización crítica y responsable de los mismos. No existen dudas de que, ante un entorno mediático cada vez más cambiante, la necesidad de una apropiada capacitación mediática de los ciudadanos es indispensable (Aguaded, 2013). Ahora bien, no podemos olvidar que la televisión forma parte de este contexto. Medrano y otros (2015) en un reciente estudio transcultural donde analizaban los perfiles de consumo televisivo de jóvenes de diversos países llegaban a la conclusión de que las narraciones mediáticas deben trabajarse en las aulas, evitando así recepciones pasivas y asegurando una buena decodificación de los mensajes.

Podemos concluir que, en la actualidad, cualquier investigación que tenga como objeto de estudio el medio televisivo, ha de enfrentarse a nuevos retos derivados de la transformación que la relación con este medio ha sufrido en el nuevo contexto mediático. Entre ellos se encuentra el definir las pautas de consumo televisivo de los adolescentes. Como indica Casero-Ripollés (2012), los jóvenes son un sector privilegiado de estudio ya que son nativos digitales, sujetos, que han crecido interactuando y utilizando los medios digitales. Será en ellos donde mejor podamos identificar las características de las pautas de consumo propias de los sujetos que han crecido en entornos digitales. Además, sí reconocemos que es necesario ofrecer a la ciudadanía del siglo XXI las herramientas necesarias para una óptima utilización de los medios a través de la alfabetización mediática (Aguaded, 2013), se deben aunar esfuerzos para llevar a cabo investigaciones empíricas que ayuden a comprender aquellos aspectos que puedan favorecer la calidad de esta alfabetización.

Las aportaciones novedosas que plantea este estudio se centran en conocer las relaciones existentes entre los adolescentes actuales y la pantalla televisiva analizando las variables de consumo televisivo y el papel que juega cada variable. Partimos de la premisa que el consumo televisivo de los adolescentes se ve marcado por gustos diferenciados de otros grupos etarios (Huertas & França, 2001; Lapuente, 2011; Medrano & Aierbe, 2008) y que consta de una cierta homogeneidad en la recepción ya que, se da por imitación (França, 2001). Te­niendo en cuenta todo ello se han planteado dos objetivos: 1) Identificar las pautas de consumo comunes en adolescentes de tres contextos culturales diferentes; 2) Detectar los factores clave en la configuración de estas pautas.

2. Material y métodos

En el estudio han participado un total de 553 adolescentes (267 chicos y 286 chicas) procedentes de cuatro ciudades: Dublín (Irlanda), Guadalajara (México), San Sebastián y Málaga (España). Todos los participantes cuentan con edades comprendidas entre los 14 y 19 años. Debido a limitaciones presupuestarias de este tipo de proyectos la representatividad de la muestra no podía apoyarse en sistemas de selección aleatoria por lo que los países y los centros fueron seleccionados por la participación en el proyecto de investigadores de dichos países que posibilitaban el acceso a la muestra. La muestra, por lo tanto, ha sido de «conveniencia» priorizando la validez ecológica, a la representatividad aleatoria de la misma. Así, los centros se han seleccionado en función de que presentaran óptimas condiciones de accesibilidad y de aplicación de las pruebas y procurando la equivalencia entre los grupos estudiados tomando criterios similares de selección en todos ellos: tipo de centro, edad y curso. Se considera adecuada esta orientación en la selección de la muestra, ya que el estudio no pretende estimar las tasas de población sino realizar comparaciones entre distintos grupos culturales.

Respecto al tipo de centro, la aplicación se ha realizado en uno o dos centros para cada submuestra (ciudades) bien sean centros públicos y/o privados o centros con diferentes niveles socioeconómicos, que no sean extremos. De esta manera, la muestra ha sido recogida en siete centros distribuidos de la siguiente forma: Málaga (dos centros; uno privado y otro público y alumnado de 4º de la ESO y 2º de Bachillerato), San Sebastián (dos centros; uno público y otro privado y alumnado de 4º de la ESO y 2º de Bachillerato), Guadalajara (México) (un único centro privado y alumnado de PREPA y/o 1º y 3º de Bachillerato) y Dublín (dos centros; uno público y otro privado y alumnado de 3º ciclo junior y del 2º nivel del ciclo sénior).

Se ha utilizado un diseño de investigación de tipo ex post-facto, descriptivo-correlacional y transcultural en el que se estudian diferentes variables como: los hábitos televisivos, la identificación, el contexto familiar y los valores percibidos en los personajes televisivos.

Para la recogida de los datos, se utilizaron dos cuestionarios: el Cuestionario de Hábitos Televisivos (CH-TV 0.2) creado y validado por Rodríguez, Medrano, Aierbe y Martínez-de-Morentin (2013) y con una consistencia interna del Alpha de Cronbach de 0,84. El cuestionario consta de siete preguntas iniciales que recogen datos sociodemográficos como: estudio, profesión y situación actual del padre y la madre, número de hermanos, sexo y edad de los mismos, lugar que ocupa entre ellos y otras personas con las que convive. Posteriormente se presentan 24 ítems (puntuación tipo Lickert en una escala del uno al cinco) que recogen un total de 14 variables. El presente estudio se ha centrado en 10 de dichas variables, por ser los referidos al tema de objeto de estudio de la investigación, midiendo así: las razones de identificación con el personaje, la finalidad del visionado, la identificación con el personaje, el realismo percibido, la permanencia, las actividades alternativas a ver televisión, los géneros televisivos, la conversación, la percepción del clima familiar y de la mediación parental. Por otro lado, se utilizó el Cuestionario de Valores Televisivos (VAL-TV 0.2). Se trata de la escala PVQ de Schwartz y Boehnke (2003) adaptada al español por Medrano, Aierbe y Ore­judo (2010). En ella se miden los valores percibidos en los personajes englobados en cuatro dimensiones: autotrascendencia (a=0,87), la apertura al cambio (a=0,80), la conservación (a=0,77) y la autopromoción (a=0,72). Consta de 21 ítems cuyas respuestas puntúan en una escala de tipo Lickert, con valores del uno al seis.

La versión española de ambos cuestionarios fue adaptada para crear dos nuevas versiones: la mexicana y la inglesa (adecuando ejemplos e idioma). Estas nuevas versiones fueron revisadas por cuatro expertos en comunicación y cuatro expertos en educación antes de su elaboración definitiva, quienes, entre otros aspectos, valoraron si las preguntas relacionadas con los hábitos televisivos y las definiciones de los valores eran aplicables a cada cultura. Una vez realizada y comprobada la validez de cada adaptación, se procedió a la aplicación on-line de los cuestionarios en todos los centros mediante la ayuda de un profesor ayudante al que previamente se había formado para la correcta aplicación de los mismos. El profesor ayudante realizaba la prueba con el alumnado en el aula de ordenadores del propio centro escolar en un tiempo estimado de 50-60 minutos. De acuerdo a la capacidad de la sala, la prueba se realizaba en una o dos fases para que todo el alumnado seleccionado pudiera rellenar el cuestionario.

3. Análisis y resultados

Para dar respuesta al primer objetivo, se realizó un análisis de correspondencias múltiples para determinar la relación entre las principales variables de consumo televisivo y definir de este modo, la agrupación de las mismas en pautas de consumo. En el gráfico 1, se puede observar el resultado de los análisis.


Draft Content 925856619-54554 ov-es025.jpg


Draft Content 925856619-54554 ov-es026.jpg

En el plano del gráfico 1, se puede ver la ubicación de las distintas variables estudiadas. El esquema de análisis es interpretar la cercanía entre variables como atracción o asociación entre las mismas y la lejanía como oposición entre ellas. La ubicación en el centro del plano implica que esa variable no muestra ni oposición ni atracción con el resto.

Siguiendo este esquema, se puede observar que existe la presencia de cuatro agrupaciones que, por situarse en la periferia del plano, implican una mayor asociación entre los elementos que la componen. Así, en primer lugar, se puede destacar la agrupación por cercanía formada por las siguientes variables: la finalidad de ver televisión para entretenerse, la percepción de una mediación parental inhibida y un clima familiar conflictivo. Esta sería una tipología multivariable que describe a jóvenes con familias conflictivas, que se inhiben de su función educativa a la hora de regular u orientar el consumo televisivo y, finalmente, su consumo televisivo parece más bien pasivo pues la finalidad principal es la de entretenerse. Definiríamos esta pauta de consumo como «Conflictiva-Pasiva».

Una segunda agrupación a resaltar es la formada por la preferencia de programas televisivos culturales, de humor o dibujos y la categoría hombre. Esta agrupación refiere una pauta de consumo televisivo más crítico y reflexivo. Asimismo, sería un tipo de consumo más apreciado entre los hombres. Aunque de una manera más débil, la finalidad de ver la televisión para informarse también se asocia a este grupo. Los adolescentes que realizan este tipo de consumo pueden ser descritos como un tipo de jóvenes con una postura activa, incluso proactiva, de consumo televisivo. Como satélite de esta agrupación se contempla la categoría individualismo (como valor percibido en el personaje favorito). La lejanía de esta categoría con respecto a la agrupación ahora comentada induce a ser prudentes respecto a la intensidad de la asociación entre esta categoría y el resto. Sin embargo, como puede apreciarse en el plano, la categoría de individualismo no se asocia a ninguna otra agrupación. Por lo tanto, se puede decir que el individualismo sería la categoría de valores que mejor describe la pauta de consumo ahora analizada. En este sentido, cabe completar la descripción de este grupo como formada por personas cuyos personajes favoritos están abiertos al cambio (como opuesto a la conformidad, seguridad...) y están orientados a la autopromoción. Esta segunda pauta de consumo sería una pauta «Crítico-Cultural».

Se detecta una tercera agrupación formada por un clima familiar afectivo, una mediación familiar responsable y un individualismo débil como pa­trón de valores percibidos en el personaje favorito. De forma más débil y periférica se pueden contemplar un bajo nivel de permanencia en días laborales, una orientación formativa como finalidad del visionado, la ciudad de San Sebastián y la trascendencia como valores asignados al personaje favorito. El núcleo central de la pauta de consumo compuesta por este grupo hace referencia a un buen clima familiar y una mediación educativa comprometida por parte de los progenitores a la hora de regular y orientar el consumo televisivo. Aunque los valores adscritos al personaje favorito están poco definidos, tienden a la autotrascendencia y a una moderada apertura al cambio, mientras que, de manera igualmente moderada, se re­chazan los valores de autopromoción y conservación. Esta sería una pauta de consumo «Comprometida-Positiva».

Por último, cabe destacar una cuarta agrupación compuesta por personas que ven la televisión con la finalidad de conversar sobre los contenidos de los programas televisivos. Esta pauta de consumo se asocia a la categoría de sexo mujer y en su periferia se encontraría la categoría de chismes-talk shows. Por lo tanto, describiría una pauta de consumo relacionada con lo social, donde además de mostrar un interés por temáticas propias de la vida social y emocional de la gente, se tendería a compartir este visionado mediante una actividad igualmente social, como es la conversación. Esta pauta de consumo «Social-Conversacional» se ve representada mayormente por mujeres.

Una vez detectadas las pautas de consumo comunes en los adolescentes de las diversas ciudades estudiadas, se abordó el segundo objetivo de investigación, en el que se pretende analizar el papel que cada una de las variables estudiadas juega en la constitución de las pautas de consumo descritas anteriormente. En el gráfico 2, se pueden ver los resultados de este análisis.

En primer lugar, se debe mencionar que el factor sexo ha tomado un papel relevante en la definición de las pautas de consumo, ya que existe una pauta de consumo caracterizada por hombres y otra muy distinta compuesta por mujeres. Sin embargo, el factor ciudad no ha mostrado tener una gran relación con el conjunto de pautas de consumo detectadas. Se debe recordar que este factor no ha participado en la construcción de los ejes o dimensiones al tomar el carácter de «ilustrativo». Esto es debido a que, en análisis previos realizados en esta misma investigación, se ha podido detectar que las pautas de consumo televisivo están sujetas a un progresivo proceso de globalización por lo cual no podríamos hablar de pautas de consumo propias de cada región, sino de pautas de consumo globalizadas que estarían presentes, en mayor o menor medida, en todas las regiones o culturas estudiadas. Esta idea queda apoyada empíricamente por la presencia del conjunto de ciudades en la zona central del plano detectada en el gráfico 1 (lo que indica que no presentan una relación definida con ninguna de las pautas de consumo televisivo identificadas) y por su bajo poder discriminante mostrado en el gráfico 2.

En cuanto al resto de variables, su relevancia puede ser interpretada dependiendo de que su ubicación en el plano bidimensional del gráfico 2 sea más central o periférica. Así, la variable que ha mostrado mayor potencia discriminante es la de perfiles de preferencias de género. En segundo lugar, se situaría la percepción de mediación familiar, seguida de los valores percibidos en el personaje favorito, el sexo y la percepción del clima familiar. La finalidad del visionado muestra un moderado poder discriminativo.

Por el contrario, la permanencia ante el televisor, el realismo percibido en los contenidos que ven y la ciudad en la que viven no han resultado ser factores determinantes en las pautas de consumo encontradas.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

En respuesta al primer objetivo, hemos podido identificar y tipificar, cuatro pautas de consumo generalizables a los adolescentes de todos los contextos estudiados. Una primera pauta de consumo que hemos denominado «Conflictiva-Pasiva», es la compuesta por una percepción de clima familiar conflictivo, una mediación parental inhibida y una finalidad de visionado de entretenimiento. En ella se sitúan, aquellos jóvenes que buscan entretenerse viendo la televisión. Además, utilizan esta como evasión del clima conflictivo que perciben en sus familias donde no perciben ningún tipo de instrucción ni restricción hacia el visionado televisivo. Es en Dublín donde esta pauta de consumo presenta mayor prevalencia. Esto puede quedar explicado por las características propias de los centros escolares donde se han recogido los datos, ya que son centros ubicados en barrios donde el conflicto social y la precariedad económica están presentes en gran medida.

Una segunda pauta de consumo «Comprometida-Positiva» recoge a aquellos jóvenes con familias que intentan formarlos en su relación con las pantallas, que se interesan mayormente por personajes que muestran valores de compromiso social y valoran la libertad de pensamiento. Se constata, por lo tanto, la influencia positiva que una mediación responsable puede generar en el procesamiento de los mensajes que hacen los adolescentes (Radanielina, 2014), así como la importancia del tipo de mediación y el estilo parental en la recepción (Cánovas & Sahuquillo, 2010; Bjelland & al., 2015; Uribe & Santos, 2008). Por otra parte, la relación apuntada por Aierbe y colaboradores (2014), entre el clima familiar y la mediación parental también se ve reflejada en los resultados, señalando una relación positiva entre la percepción de un clima afectivo y una mediación parental responsable.

Se identifica también una tercera pauta de consumo «Crítico-Cultural» representada, sobre todo, por los hombres. Estos se definen por el gusto de programas culturales de humor y dibujos animados. Esta pauta es propia de adolescentes que realizan un consumo selectivo y activo. Buscan, aunque no como único propósito, el informarse y tienen una ligera tendencia a identificarse con personajes que muestran valores de autopromoción y están abiertos al cambio.

La cuarta pauta de consumo «Social-Conversacional» es la que más cerca se encuentra de las mujeres. Esta sería una pauta de consumo definida por la tendencia al visionado de programas de chismes y talk-shows y que tiene como finalidad obtener temas de conversación.

El sexo se ha mostrado como un factor de gran relevancia en el análisis del consumo televisivo. Como se puede observar, en las pautas descritas como más cercanas a los hombres o a las mujeres, los estereotipos sociales de masculinidad y feminidad pueden verse reflejados. Sin embargo, hay que recalcar que el indicador más cercano a las mujeres es el de la conversación y en menor medida el interés por los programas de chismes y los talk-shows.

En lo que a la variable ciudad se refiere, y a diferencia del sexo, no se ha identificado ninguna pauta de relación definida entre las pautas de consumo y las ciudades estudiadas a excepción de Dublín. Esto indica una posible homogeneización entre las pautas de consumo televisivo en las diversas ciudades estudiadas. Las distancias entre ciudades, tanto física como televisivamente hablando, se han reducido en los últimos tiempos, teniendo los adolescentes de San Sebastián (España) la oportunidad de ver los mismos programas que los de Guadalajara (México) y generando una tendencia a establecer patrones de imagen y de comportamiento similares en lugares diversos. Esto plantea nuevos intereses e interrogantes de investigación que sería necesario abordar en futuros trabajos.

Al analizar el poder discriminativo de cada una de las variables estudiadas, tal y como planteaba el segundo objetivo, encontramos que la preferencia de género ha resultado ser el indicador con mayor potencial discriminativo. Son diversas las investigaciones que constatan que los adolescentes tienen gustos marcados y diferenciados de otros grupos etarios en lo que a la programación televisiva se refiere (Huertas & França, 2001; Lapuente, 2011; Medrano & Aierbe, 2008), se puede concluir que estas preferencias son un factor discriminatorio determinante en las pautas de consumo de estos, generando diferencias, sobre todo, entre sexos, tal y como se ha señalado anteriormente.

En un segundo lugar, se situarían la percepción de la mediación parental, la percepción de valores, el sexo y la percepción del clima familiar. Mostrándose así todas estas variables como importantes predictoras de los tipos de consumo. Como resultaba previsible, la percepción de climas familiares conflictivos se relaciona con una percepción de mediaciones parentales de inhibición, mientras que los climas de calidad afectiva tienden a generar mediaciones responsables. La importancia del contexto familiar para el procesamiento adecuado de los mensajes emitidos por televisión por parte de los niños y adolescentes, así como, para la instauración de hábitos y relaciones propicias con el medio (Medrano & al., 2010; Tonantzin & Alonso, 2012; Torrecillas, 2013), hace resaltar la importancia de incidir e intervenir en el ámbito familiar a la hora de establecer pautas educativas para un buen uso del medio televisivo. Por otro lado, los resultados indican que los valores que los adolescentes perciben en la televisión dependerán de la relación establecida entre diversas variables. El tipo de valores percibidos, por lo tanto, será un indicador del tipo de consumo realizado.


Draft Content 925856619-54554 ov-es027.jpg

Por último, y para finalizar con la información que nos ha aportado el análisis de correspondencias realizado, no han resultado ser discriminatorios la permanencia, el realismo percibido y el contexto cultural. Estos datos resultan tan sorprendentes como importantes. Hay que recordar que la relevancia de estas tres variables en la recepción televisiva ha sido constatada en diversas investigaciones, sin embargo, en nuestro estudio, estos factores no se han mostrado como decisivos en la configuración de pautas de consumo. Ya Medrano (2005) señalaba, más allá de ciertos prejuicios, que no existe relación entre el tiempo pasado ante el televisor y el impacto que este produce. Ahora nuestros datos indican que tampoco parece existir una relación directa entre el tiempo que pasan ante el televisor y el tipo de consumo que realizan a niveles generales, situándose esta variable en la periferia de las pautas de consumo con las que se relaciona.

A su vez, los datos aportados por el análisis de correspondencias múltiples, apoyan la idea de la existencia de una posible tendencia homogeneizadora en las pautas de consumo televisivo adolescente. Se confirma que existen pautas de consumo comunes a todos los contextos estudiados y formados por relaciones concretas entre variables mediadoras de la recepción. El conocimiento de qué variables pueden mediar en la composición de consumos más aconsejables ofrece una información importante para definir en qué aspectos debe de incidir la educación mediática. De esta manera, este trabajo señala como variables predictivas del consumo la preferencia de género en primer lugar y la percepción de la mediación parental, el sexo, la percepción del clima familiar y de valores en segundo lugar. En este sentido, los datos muestran que las variables señaladas y, por ende, el tipo de consumo realizado, incide en el tipo de valores que el adolescente percibe de la televisión.

La preferencia de género se ha mostrado como una de las variables que mejor puede predecir el tipo de consumo, siendo las diferencias que surgen en ella moduladas en gran medida por el sexo. Esta puede ser una variable interesante a considerar desde la educación en dos direcciones. Por una parte, la utilización en ámbitos educativos de aquellos géneros televisivos que se perciben como atractivos por los adolescentes para trabajar la competencia mediática y la lectura crítica de los contenidos trasmitidos en los mismos, puede ser una labor interesante a realizar. Por otra, trabajar la curiosidad y el interés hacia aquellos géneros televisivos que los educadores consideren interesantes para los estudiantes, también, sería un trabajo necesario, incidiendo en la reflexión de los porqués de las diferencias tendenciales al respecto entre los diversos sexos. Recursos como el cine fórum o visionado conjunto de programas televisivos previamente seleccionados y su posterior análisis mediante un debate conjunto entre los estudiantes podría ser una estrategia aplicable con este fin.

Por otro lado, la percepción de la mediación parental y el clima familiar se han mostrado como variables discriminatorias importantes. Será, por lo tanto, imprescindible no obviar a este colectivo en los diseños de elaboración de proyectos educativos con el fin de trabajar las competencias mediáticas e informacionales. De este modo, la crea­ción de cursos formativos donde se instruya a las familias en pautas adecuadas de mediación familiar y la relevancia de las mismas será un factor muy importante para que realmente podamos ayudar a instaurar perfiles de consumos adecuados en los adolescentes.

Otro aspecto de interés educativo son las tendencias de estereotipos sociales que se han podido observar en ciertas variables estudiadas. Las mujeres han presentado un tipo de consumo en el que se muestra cierta preferencia por géneros televisivos considerados menos adecuados en cuanto a contenido, como son los talk-shows o los chismes. El sexo ha resultado ser, por lo tanto, un factor discriminante importante en la configuración de pautas de consumo. Este aspecto deberá ser tenido en cuenta desde la perspectiva educativa para poder trabajar en ambos sexos aquellos aspectos considerados relevantes en la etapa de la adolescencia.

No podemos obviar que han existido limitaciones que han de ser tenidas en cuenta en la lectura de estas conclusiones. El hecho de que los cuestionarios utilizados sean autoinformes, conlleva el riesgo de que los adolescentes hayan podido responder influenciados por la deseabilidad social. Por otra parte, el haber utilizado una muestra de conveniencia ha generado un contraste con Dublín que, aunque no se aleja en extremo de las características de las demás ciudades estudiadas, sí ha resultado ser una muestra con características más acuciantes de conflicto social. Sin embargo, esto mismo nos lleva a cuestionarnos si las características socio-económicas y de conflicto social podrían revelarse como un factor más determinante en la composición de pautas de consumo estandarizadas que las características culturales de las diversas ciudades. Este interrogante queda abierto para futuras investigaciones. En cualquier caso, debemos recordar que, al haber utilizado una muestra de conveniencia, los resultados presentados en esta investigación han de ser considerados como indicadores que pueden orientar futuras investigaciones, pero no como conclusiones generalizables a cualquier contexto.

Apoyos

Investigación incluida en un proyecto I+D+I financiado por el Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad EDU 2012-36720 y por el proyecto de Unidades de Formación e Investigación (UFI 11/04) titulado «Psicología y Sociedad en el siglo XXI» de la Universidad del País Vasco.

Referencias

Ackermann, R., & al. (2014). A Randomized Comparative Effectiveness Trial of Using Cable Television to Deliver Diabetes Prevention Programming. Obesity, 22(7), 1601-1607. https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.20762

Aguaded, I. (2013). El programa «Media» de la Comisión Europea, apoyo internacional a la educación de medios [Media Programme (EU) – International Support for Media Education]. Comunicar, 40(XX), 7-8. https://doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-01-01

Aguaded, I., & Pérez-Rodríguez, M.A. (2012). Estrategias para la alfabetización mediática: competencias audiovisuales y ciudadanía en Andalucía. New Approaches in Educational Research, 1(1), 25-30. https://doi.org/10.7821/naer.1.22-26

Aierbe, A., Orozco, G., & Medrano, C. (2014). Family Context, Television and Perceived Values. A Cross-cultural Study with Adolescent. Communication and Society, 2(27), 79-99. (http://goo.gl/YdFQO4) (2016-08-22).

Bittman, M., & Sipthorp, M. (2012). Turned on, tuned in or dropped out? Young children’s use of television and transmission of social advantage. LSAC Annual Statistical Report 2011, 43-56. (http://goo.gl/LoNhX5) (2015-12-05).

Bjelland, M., & al. (2015). Associations between Parental Rules, Style of Communication and Children’s Screen Time. BMC Public Health, 15(1), 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-015-2337-6

Bucht, C., & Harrie, E. (2013). Young People in the Nordic Digital Media Culture. A Statistical Overview Compiled. Göteborg: Nordicom, Göteborg Universitet.

Buckhingham, D., & Martínez-Rodríguez, J.B. (2013). Jóvenes interactivos: nueva ciudadanía entre redes sociales y escenarios escolares [Interactive Youth: New Citizenship between Social Networks and School Settings]. Comunicar, 40(XX), 10-13. https://doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-00

Cánovas, P., & Sahuquillo, P.M. (2010). Educación familiar y mediación televisiva. Teoría de la Educación, 22(1), 117-140.

Carlsson, U. (2010). Children and Youth in the Digital Media Culture: From a Nordic Horizon. Göteborg: Nordicom, Göteborg Universitet.

Casero-Ripollés, A. (2012). Beyond Newspapers: New Consumption among Young People in the Digital Era [Más allá de los diarios: el consumo de noticias de los jóvenes en la era digital]. Comunicar, 39(XX), 151-158. https://doi.org/10.3916/C39-2012-03-05

Comisión Europea (2013). Libro Verde: Prepararse para la convergencia plena del mundo audiovisual: crecimiento, creación y valores. Bruselas: Comisión Europea. (http://goo.gl/lXcgPe) (2016-05-12).

Condeza, R., Bachmann, I., & Mujica, C. (2014). El consumo de noticias de los adolescentes chilenos: intereses, motivaciones y percepciones sobre la agenda informativa [New Consumption among Chilean Adolescents: Interests, Motivations and Perceptions on the News Agenda]. Comunicar, 43(XXII), 55-64. https://doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-05

Council of the European Union (2008). Council Conclusions of 22 May 2008 on a European Approach to Media Literacy in the Digital Environment (2008/C 140/08). Brussels: Official Journal of the European Union. (http://goo.gl/XS5T7l) (2015-11-23).

França, M.E. (2001). La contribución de las series juveniles de televisión a la formación de la identidad en la adolescencia. Análisis de los contenidos y la recepción de la serie «Compañeros» (Antena 3). Barcelona (España): Tesis Doctoral. Universidad Autónoma de Barceloa. (http://goo.gl/ytT9iw) (2016-08-22).

Guarinos, V. (2009). Fenómenos televisivos «teenagers»: prototipias adolescentes en series vistas en España [Televisual Teenager Phenomena. Adolescent Prototypes in TV Series in Spain]. Comunicar, 33(XVII), 203-211. https://doi.org/10.3916/c33-2009-03-012

Huertas, A., & França, M.E. (2001). El espectador adolescente. Una aproximación a cómo contribuye la televisión en la construcción del yo. Zer, 11, 331-350.

Instituto Nacional de Estadística (2014). Encuesta sobre equipamiento de y uso de TIC en los hogares 2014. Madrid, INE. (http://goo.gl/MyiDqH) (2015-12-06).

Lapuente, M. G. (2011). Recepción televisiva adolescente: gramáticas de reconocimiento y ciclo de vida. Question, 1(23). (http://goo.gl/m8kCNs) (2015-12-12).

López-Vidales, N., González-Aldea, P., & Medina-de-la-Viña, E. (2011). Jóvenes y televisión en 2010: Un cambio de hábitos. Zer, 30(16), 97-113. (http://goo.gl/r3Aq8n) (2016-05-12).

Marta, C., & Gabelas, J.A. (2008). La televisión: epicentro de la convergencia entre pantallas. Enl@ce, 5(1), 11-24. (https://goo.gl/500xbk) (2016-05-12).

Medrano, C. (2005). ¿Se puede favorecer el aprendizaje de valores a través de las narraciones televisivas? Revista de Educación, 338, 245-270.

Medrano, C. Palacios, S., & Aierbe, A. (2007). Los hábitos y preferencias televisivas en jóvenes y adolescentes: un estudio realizado en el País Vasco. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 62, 13-27. (http://goo.gl/E6vTDL) (2016-05-10).

Medrano, C., & Aierbe, A. (2008). Valores y contextos de desarrollo. Psicodidáctica, 13(2), 53-67.

Medrano, C., Aierbe, A., & Orejudo, S. (2010). Television Viewing Profile and Values: Implications for Moral Education. Psicodidáctica, 15(1), 57-76.

Medrano, C., Aierbe, A., & Palacios, S. (2010). El perfil de consumo televisivo en adolescentes, jóvenes y adultos: implicaciones para la educación. Revista de Educación, 352, 545-566.

Medrano, C., Martínez-de-Morentin, J.I., & Apodaca, P. (2015). Perfiles de consumo televisivo: un estudio transcultural. Educación XXI, 18(2), 305-321. https://doi.org/10.5944/educxx1.14606

Oyero, O., & Oyesomi, K.O. (2014). Perceived Influence of Television Cartoons on Nigerian Children’s Social Behaviour. Estudos em Comunicação, 17, 91-116.

Pallarés, M. (2014). Medios de comunicación: ¿Espacio de ocio o agentes de socialización en la adolescencia? Pedagogía Social, 23, 231-252. https://doi.org/10.7179/PSRI_2014.23.10

Pindado, J. (2010). Socialización juvenil y medios de comunicación: algunas cuestiones clave. Educación y Futuro, 22, 71-86. (https://goo.gl/aXMVbl) (2016-05-14).

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. Cross Currents: Cultures, Communities, Technologies. On the Horizon, 9(5), 1-6. (http://goo.gl/teYgUQ) (2015-11-21).

Radanielina, M.L. (2014). Parental Mediation of Media Messages Does Matter: More Interaction about Objectionable Content is Associated with Emerging Adults´ Sexual Attitudes and Behaviors. Health Communication, 30(8), 784-798. https://doi.org/10.1080/10410236.2014.900527

Rodríguez, A., Medrano, C., Aierbe, A., & Martínez-de-Morentin, J.I. (2013). Perfil de consumo televisivo y valores percibidos por los adolescentes: un estudio transcultural. Revista de Educación, 361, 513-538. https://doi.org/10.4438/1988-592X-RE-2013-361-231

Schwartz, S.H., & Boehnke, K. (2003). Evaluating the Structure of Human Values with Confirmatory Factor Analysis. Journal of Research in Personality, 38, 230-255. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0092-6566(03)00069-2

Sihvonen, J. (2015). Media Consumption and the Identity Projects of the Young. Young, 2(23), 171-189. https://doi.org/10.1177/1103308815569391

Tapscott, D. (1998). Growing up Digital. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Tonantzin, A., & Alonso, R. (2012). También heredamos la forma de ver televisión. Fuente, 4(10), 7-13.

Torrecillas, T. (2012). Características de los contextos familiares de recepción televisiva infantil. La responsabilidad mediadora de los padres. Sphera Pública, 12, 127-142.

Torrecillas, T. (2013). Los padres, ante el consumo televisivo de los hijos: Estilos de mediación. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 68, 27-54. https://doi.org/10.4185/RLCS-2013-968

Uribe, R., & Santos, P. (2008). Las estrategias de mediación parental televisiva que usan los padres chilenos. Cuadernos de Información, 2(23), 6-21.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/16
Accepted on 31/12/16
Submitted on 31/12/16

Volume 25, Issue 1, 2017
DOI: 10.3916/C50-2017-06
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 4
Views 1
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?