Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

There has been considerable debate about the potential of social media to promote new democratic practices and active citizenship. However, the participation of young people in social networks seems to go in a more playful than ideological direction. This article discusses youngsters’ activity in Twitter simultaneously with the television viewing of two films: «V for Vendetta» and «The Hunger Games». As both films address social and political issues, we intend to identify whether youngsters referred to ideological issues in tweets generated during their viewing, and whether these tweets lead to joint reflection on the current social situation. 1,400 tweets posted during the broadcasts of the films in Spanish TV in 2014 were collected for this purpose. The encoding of messages is carried out following a «coding and counting» approach, typical of the studies of Computer-mediated communication. Then messages are classified based on their content. The results obtained indicate that messages about the social and political content of the films are almost non-existent, since young people prefer to comment on other aspects of the films or their lives. The conclusions have a bearing on the importance of considering popular culture, for its social and political implications, as a motive for reflection, and the importance of boosting a critical media education.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

1.1. Social media and democratic practices

In Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide, Henry Jenkins asks this question: «When will we be capable of participating within the democratic process with the same ease that we have come to participate in the imaginary realms constructed through popular culture?» (2008: 234). His question stems from the passion that popular culture raises in a large part of the population, feeding on amazing book or film stories to the point of appropriating them and making them part of their everyday lives (Sorrells & Sekimoto, 2015). Jenkins examines the effects that a similar response would have in the sphere of politics, leading beyond the detachment and alienation that come as people’s most frequent responses to political processes.

This paper has a similar starting point: people are increasingly using the elements of popular culture to engage in conversation with fans of the same cultural products in media environments. Thus, they give rise to the emergence of affinity spaces (Gee, 2004) in which individuals who have not met are drawn together by strong shared interests. Websites and social media have contributed to the development of affinity spaces by making participation and message exchange easier. Twitter, for instance, offers users hashtags for the grouping of messages about a given topic and their differentiation from messages about other topics.

Although Gee analyses affinity spaces in connection with video gamers, the term has been applied to book or film fan communities, maker movement groups interested in photography, video or the digital arts (Tyner, Gutiérrez, & Torrego, 2015), or even the use of social media for social or political activism. For a few years now, social networking sites and messengers have been used to build social movements and engage in social or political activities, including consumer boycotts, protests and demonstrations (Langman, 2005; Wasserman, 2007; Martin, 2015). They are apt tools to promote collective identities and connect people involved in similar causes, restoring the voice of the silenced masses (Della-Porta & Mosca, 2005; Della-Porta, 2015). In Spain, social and digital media made possible for young people to mobilise and build the social movement known as 15M. As observed by Hernández, Robles y Martínez (2013), youngsters re-appropriated these media to participate in public communication, creating new perspectives in civic education.

According to Sunstein (2007), virtual communities are organised around political or ideological themes, rather than cultural ones. However, although social media have often been used for political purposes – contributing to trigger major political events like the Arab Spring, protests against the Iraq War or 15M, most people engage in communities to talk about their interests or hobbies (Jenkins, 2008). As analysed by Jenkins, participation in affinity spaces to discuss works of popular culture is easier, for it requires less commitment and responsibility than political choices and appears to be removed from the world of politics. In fact, Jenkins insists that the fantasy in the worlds created in popular culture can be a pretext or a starting point to deal with political issues, or even contribute to change one’s stance or overcome ideological barriers.

Furthermore, participation in social media has changed democratic practices and altered state-society relations. In the past decade, there have been countless works on the democratising potential of social media (Hindman, 2008). This has stirred debate over the advantages of social media in encouraging social or political participation. Koku, Nazer, & Wellman (2001), Díez-Rodríguez (2003), or Castells (2004) emphasise the inconclusive nature of data in connection with the potential of technology to make citizen participation a richer experience. Atton (2002) described social media as double-edged, contributing to equality while reproducing the power asymmetries in the reality of society. Díez, Fernández & Anguita (2011) wonder whether the new forms of communication through social media are empowering youngsters, or rather, failing to encourage discussion and active citizenship. The authors think social media do have a large potential for communication and participation but may be also at the service of a specific form of democracy.

1.2. Two dystopias: «V for Vendetta» and «The Hunger Games»

The two films on which this paper focuses, «V for Vendetta» (McTeigue, 2006) and «The Hunger Games» (Ross, 2012), like the books they are based on (Moore & Lloyd, 2005; Collins, 2008), have a strong political component that could invite more serious reflection on political problems and current social issues. Both are set in dystopian universes where revolution is brewing against totalitarian regimes that use terror and control mechanisms to curtail people’s freedom. Both societies, which at first appear to be accepted by citizens, are in fact the result of a dictator’s manoeuvring and control of the media to deprive people of their civil rights. Both V and Katniss Everdeen have been ill-treated by the system, so they decide to stand up against it, becoming leaders of a revolution as they are joined by other citizens. Both films bring dominant capitalism under attack, having the audience witness two (somewhat tamed) revolutions as they could look like in a postmodern world (Mateos-Aparicio, 2014). Both films have lent contemporary society icons used in riots and rebellions around the globe: the Vendetta mask, worn by the members of the Anonymous group and by demonstrators and protesters against oppression, and Katniss’s three finger salute, which became a form of silent resistance to the military coup in Thailand.

Discussions of these two films in affinity spaces could move youngsters to ideological or political reflection, and to subsequent action against social injustice. In the transmedia analysed here, the potential of social media for activism and social change converges with the power of mass media (particularly film and television) to create states of opinion. As pointed out by Giroux (2003) and other authors, films do more than just entertain; they can stir desires and help build or internalise ideologies that constitute the historical realities of power. Moreover, they play an educational role, raising awareness and turning spectators into critical actors who can understand and analyse the aesthetic and political meaning of images.

In the past few years, many novels and graphic novels were published narrating dystopian stories for young adults. Green (2008) associates the boom of these kind of stories with the likelihood that the future is dystopian as a result of contemporary unsustainable lifestyles. Basu, Broad, & Hintz (2013) analyse young adult dystopias, drawing attention to the dynamics between didacticism and escapism, political radicalism and conservatism, and other main discussions. In their anthology, the authors offer insight into this burgeoning genre, understanding it as a phenomenon that is political, cultural, aesthetic and commercial.

Several authors have tackled the issue of the educational element versus the successful formula in young adult dystopias. Simmons (2012) argues that «The Hunger Games» can contribute to stimulate social action in community and encourage young audiences to stand up against injustice and savagery to build a fairer world. Other thinkers (Fisher, 2012; Duane, 2014) refer to the situations of oppression and domination described in the novel, while Latham & Hollister (2014), Ringlestein (2013) and Muller (2012) criticise the manipulation of information, comparing it to the instruments used in today’s world to control the population. Ott (2010) explains that when «V for Vendetta» was premiered in the US, a debate ensued over American policies, arguing that the film stirs audiences away from political apathy and into democratic resistance and rebellion against states that attempt to hush dissidence. Call (2008) sees in the film’s iconography an effective introduction to the symbolic language of postmodern anarchism.

Against the authors who emphasise the educational purpose of the films, others (Benson, 2013; Sloan, Sawyer, Warner & Jones, 2014) criticise the excessive use of violence in the films, which they consider to be the cause of insensitivity to oppression or abuse.

Based on the analyses found in specialised literature, this paper aims at answering the question whether the messages posted by youngsters watching the films have to do with ideological thinking that could lead to joint reflection on the current social and political situation. To do this, it examines the content of the tweets posted when the films were being aired. Twitter is both an apt tool for the development of affinity spaces and a fine example of transmedia pop culture that is combined with television in a multi-screen environment that is bound to alter the audience’s creation of meaning.

2. Materials and methods

Our research approach focuses on computer-mediated communication, defined as verbal interaction in a digital environment (Herring, 2004). Empirical observations are made of a corpus of Twitter messages, framed within computer-mediated discourse analysis.

2.1. Corpus

Our corpus is made of the messages posted on Twitter when the films under study were being aired, taking the social audience into account – another key component in convergence culture (Jenkins, 2008). The combination of social media and second screens (tablets, smartphones, television) produces an audience that interacts in social media. This may lead to a horizontal relationship between users who are physically apart watching the same television broadcast (Quintas & González, 2014). To make comments, users tend to use hashtags that single their messages out. In our corpus, the hashtags are #vdevendetta for «V for Vendetta» and #losjuegosdelhambre for «The Hunger Games».

The tweets in our corpus were posted when «V for Vendetta» was aired by Neox on 23 July 2014 (408,000 viewers; 2.8% shared tweets) and when «The Hunger Games» was premiered by Antena 3 (4,513,000 viewers, 24.3% share, 48,152 tweets) (source: Kantar Media, 2014). The tweets were collected with Tweet Archivist, a Twitter analytics tool to search, archive, analyse, visualise, save and export tweets based on a search term or hashtag. This software uses the API to create files with data containing a hashtag or word. Due to API constraints, not every tweet can be stored. The corpus, however, contains 2800 tweets (1,400 with the hashtag #losjuegosdelhambre and 1,400 with #vdevendetta). Retweets were not included, as they are re-posts of messages posted earlier. Our time frame was the days on which the films were aired, until one hour after they ended.

Regarding the individuals posting the tweets in the corpus, Twitter users are not required to indicate their age in their profiles. 1,000 users tweeting about the films were chosen at random on the basis of their profile pictures, the contents of their messages (mentions of parents or siblings, of school or university, etc.) and the photos they post. These criteria helped us to select teenagers and young adults.

2.2. Methods

The tweets were analysed through «coding and counting», a quantitative method used in computer-mediated communication consisting in encoding the data and then counting the occurrence of a coded item, together with content analysis. The occurrence of a topic in the corpus analysed can be used to make adequate statistical calculations for a deeper understanding of the relationship between variables in the phenomenon being analysed.

The coding and counting method requires key concepts to be operationalisable in empirically measurable terms (Herring, 2004). So we defined the concepts and developed specific codes that could be counted.

The categories used to classify the tweets were:

A) Categories related to the content of the films:

• A1) References to plot events or facts in the film.

• A2) References to film characters.

• A3) References to feelings or empathy with an aspect of the film.

• A4) Expressions denoting like or dislike for the film.

B) Categories unrelated to the content of the films:

• B1) Information about the viewing environment.

• B2) Comments about television or Twitter.

• B3) Comments unrelated to the film.

C) Categories related to the social and political element in the films:

• C1) Social/political quotations from the film.

• C2) Connections between the film and the current social/political situation.

• C3) Other social/political reflections.

All these categories were gathered in an analysis file tested for data record accuracy with other films in order to make all the necessary coding changes before using the file for this research.

One of the disadvantages of using an original and innovative research method is the risk of reductionism vis-à-vis of the reality being studied. There are also the limitations in the analysis of the texts, as every discourse is underpinned by social factors we have no knowledge of. So, the empirical approach to text analysis, based on texts and texts alone forces the researchers to infer social and cognitive information that is far from self-evident.

3. Results

Based on the results obtained after data coding, it is striking that the categories with the smallest number of tweets are those related to the social and political element in the films (C1, C2, C3) (figure 1). Although in «V for Vendetta» they account for 27% of total messages, in «The Hunger Games», the percentage is really low (1%).


Draft Content 762683189-49354-en001.jpg

Figure 1: Number of tweets by category.

As shown in figure 2, the messages about «V for Vendetta» include 178 tweets quoting lines from the film with social or political content, e.g. «[F]airness, justice, and freedom are more than just words, they are perspectives», «An idea can still change the world» or «People should not be afraid of their governments. Government should be afraid of their people». In addition, there are 71 messages connecting the plot to elements of the current social/political situation, as in: «Watching #vdevendetta, I can’t but think about media control, misinformation and the #CanonAEDE [Spanish IP law]»; «We need a speech like that in all TV channels in this country, so that people understand #vdevendetta»; «Has V just said, #LeyMordaza [Spanish Law for Citizen Safey and Protection that is considered to curtail freedom of speech]? #vdevendetta». There are 124 messages referring to the political/social element in the film, expressing a variety of opinions. Some users praise the film for its power to invite reflection and change, and to make a deep ideological impact: «Everyone should have the principles shown in this film. #vdevendetta»; «#vdevendetta: What a film! It makes you think. We should be inspired by it in everyday life»; «What are we waiting for to make a change? If we start moving, they’ll start falling. #vdevendetta». Others complain about inaction in the real world: «Sadly, the people are united only in films like #vdevendetta»; «Those who like #vdevendetta and think of themselves as revolutionaries, and then don’t care about what’s going on around them»; «Couch potatoes watching #vdevendetta. #BigFan». About 50% of the tweets in this category criticise the film and the ideas it conveys: «#vdevendetta is such a boring film, aimed at indoctrinating dupes into violence and communism. Be careful!»; «C`mon, guys, we’re gonna be anti-system anarchists without a clue. C’mon! #vdevendetta»; «#vdevendetta is an anti-system, anarchist ‘candy’ for teenagers».


Draft Content 762683189-49354-en002.jpg

Figure 2: Percentage of messages by category for «V for Vendetta».

As to «The Hunger Games», there are almost no tweets referring to the film’s social/political content (only 21; cf. Figure 3). Likewise, social/political quotations (category C1.) are virtually non-existent (5), as opposed to the «V for Vendetta» case; all of them are based on Katniss’s line, «I’m more than just a piece in their Games». In the category of tweets comparing the film to the current situation (C2.), there are 14 messages: «In #losjuegosdelhambre, rulers change the rules whenever they want to. For «cashflow» and money. If we tighten the rope, we can make it. Together»; «Sorry for being dramatic, but the society in #losjuegosdelhambre is quite similar to Spain today: submissive and servile»; «Don’t you feel that in Spain we’re also playing #losjuegosdelhambre?». The messages focusing on social/political aspects of the film are rare too (3): «#losjuegosdelhambre, or how to subtly tell the people that the solution lies in rebellion»; «We’re actually living in #losjuegosdelhambre. There’ll come a time when we stand up against unfair rules against all Capitols»; «What’s really scary about this film is that it might not be so far away from the reality around us. Just think about it… #losjuegosdelhambre».

Figure 3: Percentage of messages by category for «The Hunger Games».

More than half of the tweets refer to film content (categories A1, A2, A3, A4; 53% in «V for Vendetta» and 73% in «The Hunger Games»). The subcategory with the largest number (a third of tweets for both films) is the group of messages of like and dislike (A4). Tweets like the following are rather frequent: «Loving #losjuegosdelhambre!»; «#losjuegosdelhambre, what a great movie!»; «I’ve loved #vdevendetta: I’d heartily recommend it». Some of the tweets also express dislike, but they are a small portion. The rest of the tweets in this category are about film scenes or facts (A1), feelings triggered by the films (A3) or film characters (A2). Most of them contain trivial information or use the films to make superficial comments: «I’d rather go to #losjuegosdelhambre than to school tomorrow»; «That machine I’d use to make cute guys. Trees, panthers, stupid things? Get off! #losjuegosdelhambre»; «#losjuegosdelhambre is when you are hungry at midnight and open the cupboard and all you have it fattening food and you still give it a go».

Finally, 20% of the tweets about «V for Vendetta» and 27% of the posts about «The Hunger Games» are not related to the films themselves. Instead, the users make comments about their own lives or related topics (like Twitter itself, television, or other cultural products; categories B1, B2, B3) based on the films. For both films, the subcategory with the largest number of tweets is that of comments about the viewing environment or experiences associated with the films (B1): «Because of #losjuegosdelhambre, I’ve bitten the nail of my right little finger too short!»; «So here I am, watching #losjuegosdelhambre instead of getting ready for class early tomorrow». «There’s no better way of calling the day off than by watching #vdevendetta».

Remarkably, these messages trigger virtually no interactions (less than 1%). Most of the tweets are not retweeted or favourited, and they seldom get replies. There is no communication between users. Senders post their messages without expecting a response from other users.


Draft Content 762683189-49354-en003.jpg

4. Discussion and conclusions

New consumers are always connected. They are highly visible and active. The reception and consumption of media contents is an active and collective process, as shown by the large number of tweets posted during the films. Message content analysis shows that there is an urgent need among youngsters to identify themselves as fans of a cultural product and inform their followers of their likes and interests in cultural consumption. Moreover, they do not expect other users to reply or respond, even if they share those likes and interests. Thus, their texts can be framed within the participatory culture (Jenkins, 2008), without an emphasis on creation or mutual learning. Consequently, no affinity spaces are developed among users, given the unwillingness to share, discuss or become attached to other users. Similarly, no knowledge communities emerge (Lévy, 1997) for the discussion and collective development of topic –or interest– sharing follower communities as an alternative to media power.

Although scholars have emphasised the ability of dystopian films or novels like «V for Vendetta» and «The Hunger Games» to encourage critical thinking and social action, tweet analysis shows that youngsters have other interests in relation with pop culture. In the case of these two films, they feel attracted to their charismatic characters and exciting plots (where adventure and intrigue are key ingredients), but that is all. They seldom go beyond the realm of entertainment.

Twitter appears, then, as a tool to express one’s cultural preferences and interests, particularly regarding cultural products in vogue. Even though it has been used to build networks of people interested in social movements and collective intelligence on a variety of social and political issues, in the cases analysed, it is mainly used to keep users and their followers connected to share information on cultural patterns and preferences.

It seems rather obvious that social media can be a powerful communication tool for citizen engagement in situations of conflict, oppression and resistance. However, the inclusion of these situations in the media or as products of pop culture does not lead to similar political or social thinking or even to social outrage vented through the Internet. Social media interventions by youngsters watching situations of injustice confine to the viewing environment itself or focus on shallow details. As a result, the social network becomes a tool for connection rather than reflection.

The tweets posted in those circumstances are spontaneous rather than being the result of brooding. This may be one of the reasons why references to the social/political element in the films are so scarce. Even when these references exist, they are superficial, only reproducing popular quotations. Some of the users note this, accusing fellow Twitter users of being «couch potatoes» daydreaming about the revolution, making frivolous complaints and being fully incapable of sponsoring change in the societies where they live.

Hindman (2008) asks a fundamental question: What kind of learning and citizenships are social media contributing to build? Are people really being empowered or is it just an illusion of power compounded by the trivialisation of public commitment? Based on the results of our study, we agree with Tilly (2004), Tarrow (2005) and Díez, Fernández & Anguita (2011) that even when social media messages can reach an amazing number of people and thus contribute to social mobilisation, in the end they tend to have a limited outcome. In the repercussions of the films studied in this paper, they include a large number of unrelated, disconnected messages that cannot be processed and thus cannot lead to organisation and action.

Popular culture –films like «V for Vendetta» and «The Hunger Games»– affects socialisation and education processes. It should therefore be approached by media education to help consumers understand its meaning and role in society. According to Kellner (2011), cultural products are not mere entertainment or ideological vessels but rather complex artefacts embodying social and political discourse. As such, they should be analysed and understood within the social and political environment where they are produced, circulated and received.

Being part of this environment and partly responsible for the people who should transform it, schools should take on media education among its priorities.

References

Atton, C. (2002). Alternative Media. London: Sage.

Basu, B., Broad, K.R., & Hintz, C. (2013). Contemporary Dystopian Fiction for Young Adults: Brave new teenagers. New York: Routledge.

Call, L. (2008). A is for Anarchy, V is for Vendetta: Images of Guy Fawkes and the Creation of Postmodern Anarchism. Anarchist Studies, 16(2), 154-172. (http://goo.gl/wixxwD) (2015-09-24).

Castells, M. (Ed.) (2004). La sociedad red: una visión global. Madrid: Alianza.

Collins, S. (2008). Los juegos del hambre. Barcelona: Molino.

Della-Porta, D. (2015). Social Movements in Times of Austerity: Bringing Capitalism back into Protest Analysis. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Della-Porta, D., & Mosca, L. (2005). Global-net for Global Movements? A Network of Networks for a Movement of Movements. Journal of Public Policy, 25(1), 165-190. doi: http://dx.doi.org/-10.1017/S0143814X05000255

Díez, E., Fernández, E., & Anguita, R. (2011). Hacia una teoría política de la socialización cívica virtual de la adolescencia. Revista Interuniversitaria de Formación del Profesorado, 71(25,2), 73-100. (http://goo.gl/3gd65W) (2015-09-22).

Díez-Rodríguez, A. (2003). Ciudadanía cibernética. La nueva utopía tecnológica de la democracia. In J. Benedicto, & M.L. Morán (Eds.), Aprendiendo a ser ciudadanos (pp.193-218). Madrid: Injuve.

Duane, A.M. (2014). Volunteering as Tribute: Disability, Globalization and the Hunger Games. En M. Gill, & C.J. Schlund-Vials (Eds.), Disability, Human Rights and the Limits of Humanitarianism (pp. 63-82). Burlington: Ashgate.

Fisher, M. (2012). Precarious Dystopias: The Hunger Games, In Time, and Never Let me Go. Film Quarterly, 65(4), 27-33. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/fq.2012.65.4.27

Gee, J.P. (2004). Situated Language and Learning: A Critique of Traditional Schooling. New York: Routledge.

Giroux, H.A. (2003). Cine y entretenimiento. Elementos para una crítica política del filme. Barcelona: Paidós.

Green, J. (2008). Scary New World. The New York Times, 2015-11-07. (http://goo.gl/nXB9HX) (2015-09-23).

Hernández, E., Robles, M.C., & Martínez, J.B. (2013). Jóvenes interactivos y culturas cívicas: sentido educativo, mediático y político del 15M [Interactive Youth and Civic Cultures: The Educational, Mediatic and Political Meaning of the 15M]. Comunicar, 40, 59-67. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-06

Herring, S. (2004). Computer-Mediated Discourse Analysis: An Approach to Researching Online Behavior. In S.A. Barab, R. Kling, & J.H. Gray (Eds.), Designing for Virtual Communities in the Service of Learning (pp. 338-376). New York: Cambridge University Press.

Hindman, M (2008). The Myth of Digital Democracy. New Jersey: Princenton University Press.

Jenkins, H. (2008). Convergence Culture: La cultura de la convergencia de los medios de comunicación. Barcelona: Paidós.

Kantar Media (2014). Audiencias semanales. (http://goo.gl/J4Zqz6) (2014-11-26).

Kellner, D. (2011). Cultural Studies, Multiculturalism, and Media Culture. En G. Dines, & J. Humez (Eds.), Gender, Race and Class inMedia : A Critical Reader (pp. 7-18). Los Angeles, CA: Sage Publications.

Koku, E., Nazer, N., & Wellman, B. (2001). Netting Scholars: Online and Offline. American Behavioral Scientist, 44, 1.752-1.774. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/00027640121958023

Langman, L. (2005). From Virtual Public Spheres to Global Justice: A Critical Theory of Interworked Social Movements. Sociological Theory, 23(1), 42-74. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.0735-2751. 2005.-00242.x

Latham, D., & Hollister, J. M. (2014). The Games People Play: Information and Media Literacies in the Hunger Games trilogy. Children's Literature in Education, 45(1), 33-46. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10583-013-9200-0

Lévy, P. (1997). A inteligência colectiva. Para uma antropologia do ciberespaço. Lisboa: Instituto Piaget.

Martin, G. (2015). Understanding Social Movements. Nueva York: Routledge.

Mateos-Aparicio, A. (2014). Popularizing Utopia in Postmodern Science Fiction Film: Matrix, V for Vendetta, in Time and Verbo. In E. De-Gregorio-Godeo, & M.M Ramón-Torrijos (Eds.), Multidisciplinary views on popular culture. Proceedings of the 5th International SELICUP Conference (pp. 271-280). Cuenca: Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha.

McTeigue (2006). V de Vendetta. [Cinta cinematográfica]. USA: Warner Bros Pictures.

Moore, A., & Lloyd, D. (2005). V de Vendetta. Barcelona: Planeta DeAgostini.

Muller, V. (2012). Virtually real: Suzanne Collins's the Hunger Games trilogy. International Research in Children's Literature, 5(1), 51-63. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3366/ircl.2012.0043

Ott, B.L. (2010). The visceral politics of V for Vendetta: On Political Affect in Cinema. Critical Studies in Media Communication, 27(1), 39-54. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15295030903554359

Quintas, N., & González, A. (2014). Audiencias activas: participación de la audiencia social en la televisión [Active Audiences: Social Audience Participation in Television]. Comunicar, 43, 83-90. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-08

Ringlestein, Y. (2013). Real or not Real: The Hunger Games as Transmediated Religion. Journal of Religion and Popular Culture, 25(3), 372-387. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/jrpc.25.3.372

Ross, G. (2012). Los juegos del hambre. [Cinta cinematográfica]. USA: Lionsgate.

Simmons, A.M. (2012). Class on Fire Using the Hunger Games Trilogy to Encourage Social Action. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, 56(1), 22-34. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/JAAL.00099

Sloan, E.D., Sawyer, C., Warner, T.D., & Jones, L.A. (2014). Adolescent Entertainment or Violence Training? The Hunger Games. Journal of Creativity in Mental Health, 9(3), 427-435. doi: http://dx.doi.org/ 10.1080/15401383.2014.903161

Sorrells, K., & Sekimoto, S. (2015). Globalizing Intercultural Communication: A Reader. California: Publications.

Sunstein, C.R. (2007). Republic.com 2.0. New Jersey: Princeton University Press.

Tarrow, S. (2005). The New Transnational Activism. New York: Cambridge University.

Tilly, C. (2004). Social Movements 1768-2004. Boulder: Paradigm Publishers.

Tyner, K., Gutiérrez, A., & Torrego, A. (2015). Multialfabetización sin muros en la era de la convergencia. La competencia digital y «la cultura del hacer» como revulsivos para una educación continua. Profesorado, 19(2), 41-56. (http://goo.gl/VkzKR0) (2015-09-22).

Wasserman, H. (2007). Is a New Worldwide Web Possible? An Explorative Comparison of the Use of ICTs by two South African Social Movements. African Studies Review, 50(1), 109-131. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/arw.2005.0144



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Mucho se ha hablado del potencial de las redes sociales para fomentar nuevas prácticas democráticas y de ciudadanía activa. Sin embargo, la participación de los jóvenes parece ir en una dirección más lúdica que ideológica. Se analizan sus intervenciones en Twitter como parte de la situación de visionados de dos películas en televisión: «V de Vendetta» y «Los juegos del hambre». Como en ambas se abordan temas sociales y políticos, a través del análisis de los tuits generados durante su visionado se pretende identificar si en ellos se hace referencia a cuestiones ideológicas y si estas sirven de revulsivo para la reflexión conjunta sobre la situación social y política actual. Para ello, se recogen 1.400 tuits escritos durante las emisiones en cadenas españolas de las dos películas en 2014. Se procede a la codificación de los mensajes siguiendo el enfoque «coding y counting», propio de los estudios de comunicación mediada por ordenador, y se clasifican los mensajes según su contenido. Los resultados obtenidos indican que los mensajes sobre el contenido social y político de los filmes son casi inexistentes puesto que los jóvenes prefieren comentar otros aspectos de las películas o de sus vidas. Las conclusiones alcanzadas tras este análisis inciden en la importancia de considerar la cultura popular, por sus implicaciones sociales y políticas, como motivo de reflexión, y de potenciar una educación mediática capacitadora.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

1.1. Redes sociales y nuevas prácticas democráticas

Jenkins (2008: 234) en su obra «Convergence culture: La cultura de la convergencia de los medios de comunicación» lanza la siguiente pregunta: «¿Cuándo seremos capaces de participar en los procesos democráticos con la misma facilidad con la que hemos llegado a participar en los reinos imaginarios construidos por la cultura popular?». Esta cuestión surge del hecho de que la cultura popular apasiona a una gran parte de la población, que se adentra en historias increíbles creadas en libros o películas y llega incluso a hacerlas suyas y a incorporarlas a sus vida (Sorrells & Sekimoto, 2015). A raíz de esto, Jenkins reflexiona sobre los efectos que tendría el hipotético hecho de que se produjera la misma respuesta en un plano político, donde se superaría el sentimiento de distancia y alienación que la mayoría de las personas experimentan hacia los procesos políticos.

De esta cuestión también partimos en este trabajo puesto que cada vez es más frecuente que las personas empleen los elementos de la cultura popular para entablar conversaciones con otros fans en entornos mediáticos. De esta forma, se crean espacios de afinidad (Gee, 2004) donde individuos, que no se conocen pero que tienen unos gustos determinados, pueden relacionarse con otros fans, compartiendo así un interés común. El surgimiento de sitios webs o redes sociales ha favorecido la creación de estos espacios, que facilitan la participación y el intercambio de mensajes. Este es el caso de la red social Twitter que, mediante el uso de hashtags, permite la diferenciación y agrupación de los mensajes que se están produciendo sobre un tema específico.

Aunque Gee se centra en los espacios de afinidad formados por jugadores de videojuegos, también se ha empleado este término para hablar de comunidades creadas por fans de películas o libros; por grupos del movimiento «maker» en torno a la fotografía, el vídeo y otras artes digitales (Tyner, Gutiérrez, & Torrego, 2015), e incluso para referirse a las redes sociales que fomentan el activismo político y social. Así, desde hace unos años, las redes sociales o los servicios de mensajería se han convertido en una buena herramienta para iniciar y organizar movimientos sociales como el boicot a determinadas marcas, protestas o manifestaciones (Langman, 2005; Wasserman, 2007; Martin, 2015). A través de estos medios se promueve una identidad colectiva y se permite conectar con personas involucradas en las mismas causas, convirtiéndose en un recurso que da voz a masas que habían sido silenciadas (Della-Porta & Mosca, 2005; Della-Porta, 2015). En el caso de España, las redes sociales y otros soportes digitales sirvieron a los jóvenes para movilizarse y dar origen al movimiento social conocido como 15M. Como afirman Hernández, Robles y Martínez (2013), los jóvenes se reapropiaron de estos medios para participar en la comunicación pública y aportaron nuevas perspectivas para la educación ciudadana.

Sunstein (2007) afirma que los grupos virtuales se organizan más en torno a ejes políticos o ideológicos que culturales. Es cierto que se han empleado las redes sociales con fines políticos y han contribuido a la realización de cambios como la primavera árabe, la oposición a la guerra de Irak o el 15M, sin embargo, como afirma Jenkins (2008), la mayoría de las personas participa también en comunidades donde se habla de sus aficiones. Así, para el autor, la participación en espacios de afinidad en los que se habla sobre una obra de la cultura popular es más cómoda puesto que no se necesita el mismo compromiso y responsabilidad que en una elección política y, además, parece alejada de ella. Precisamente, Jenkins defiende que la fantasía de los mundos creados en la cultura popular puede ser un buen pretexto para ser capaces de hablar de cuestiones políticas a partir de ellos e, incluso, de poder cambiar nuestra postura y de superar las diferencias ideológicas.

La participación en las redes sociales ha modificado las prácticas democráticas y la relación entre ciudadanía y Estado. Precisamente, en la última década han proliferado los estudios sobre las potencialidades democratizadoras de las redes sociales (Hindman, 2008). Así, ha surgido un debate sobre las ventajas de las redes sociales para reavivar la participación social y política. Autores como Koku, Nazer y Wellman (2001), Díez-Rodríguez (2003) o Castells (2004) han afirmado que los resultados de las investigaciones no son concluyentes para conocer si el uso de estas tecnologías enriquece la participación ciudadana. Atton (2002) afirma que las redes sociales tienen un doble filo puesto que pueden contribuir a la consecución de un mundo más igualitario pero que también pueden ayudar a mantener los desequilibrios de poder existentes en la realidad social. En el caso de los jóvenes, Díez, Fernández y Anguita (2011) se plantean si las nuevas formas de comunicación en las redes sociales están contribuyendo al empoderamiento de estos o si, por el contrario, no se ha fomentado el debate y el ejercicio de una ciudadanía activa. Así, consideran que es incuestionable que las redes sociales poseen potenciales comunicativos y participativos pero que existe el riesgo de que estas sean puestas al servicio de una determinada forma de democracia.

1.2. Dos distopías: «V de Vendetta» y «Los juegos del hambre»

En las películas en las que nos centramos en este trabajo, «V de Vendetta» (McTeigue, 2006) y «Los juegos del hambre» (Ross, 2012), así como en los libros en los que se basan (Moore & Lloyd, 2008; Collins, 2008), está presente el componente político y podrían dar lugar a una reflexión más profunda, relacionada con los problemas políticos y sociales actuales. Se trata de dos distopías cuyo argumento se centra en la revolución contra un régimen totalitario, que se sirve de los instrumentos de control y del miedo para privar al pueblo de su libertad. Estas sociedades, que al principio parece que son aceptadas por los ciudadanos, son el resultado de las maniobras de un dictador, que a través del control de los medios de comunicación despoja a la población de sus derechos civiles. Los protagonistas, V en «V de Vendetta» y Katniss en «Los juegos del hambre», han sido tan maltratados por el sistema que deciden enfrentarse a él y comenzar de ese modo una revolución a la que se irá sumando el resto del pueblo. Así, estas películas atacan al discurso capitalista dominante y hacen testigos a los espectadores de la revolución –algo domesticada– que podría llevarse a cabo en un mundo postmoderno (Mateos-Aparicio, 2014). Precisamente, de estas dos obras se han extraído algunos iconos que están presentes en las revoluciones actuales, como la máscara que emplea V, que usaron los miembros de Anonymous y que ahora también se ha convertido en las manifestaciones en un símbolo contra la opresión o el saludo que hace Katniss, que fue adoptado como gesto de protesta contra el Golpe de Estado en Tailandia.

El debate sobre estas películas en espacios de afinidad podría llevar a los jóvenes a la reflexión política e ideológica y a la posterior actuación para hacer frente a las injusticias sociales. El potencial de las redes sociales en el activismo y el cambio social converge en la experiencia transmedia que aquí analizamos con el poder de los medios de masas, y en concreto el cine y la televisión, para crear estados de opinión. Como afirma Giroux (2003), entre otros muchos expertos, las películas hacen algo más que entretener, son capaces de movilizar deseos y producen e incorporan ideologías que representan el estado de las realidades históricas de poder. Así, las películas tienen una función pedagógica pues pueden concienciar al espectador para que reaccione en calidad de agente crítico, que sea capaz de analizar y entender el significado estético y político que se muestra en los filmes.

En los últimos años han proliferado las novelas y cómics que narran historias distópicas destinadas a jóvenes adultos. Green (2008) señala que el motivo de este auge puede estar en el futuro al que podríamos enfrentarnos debido a nuestros estilos de vida insostenibles. Ante la aparición de este fenómeno, Basu, Broad y Hintz (2013) realizan un análisis general de las distopías para estudiar cuestiones relativas a la conjunción del placer y el didactismo en estas obras o si en ellas subyace un cambio político radical o si sus ideas progresistas enmascaran ideas conservadoras. La cuestión principal que preocupa a estos autores es si en las distopías existen fines didácticos o si simplemente se quiere sacar provecho de una fórmula que funciona para conseguir éxito comercial.

Varios autores han intentado contestar a esta cuestión basándose en las dos obras que tomamos como referencia en este trabajo. Así, Simmons (2012) afirma que «Los juegos del hambre» puede contribuir a fomentar la acción social en comunidad y a alzarse contra la injusticia y la brutalidad para crear un mundo más justo. Otros autores (Fisher, 2012; Duane, 2014) hacen referencia a las situaciones de opresión y dominación que se describen en esta novela mientras que Latham y Hollister (2014), Ringlestein (2013), y Muller (2012) condenan la manipulación de la información y la comparan con los instrumentos que se emplean actualmente en el mundo para controlar a la población. En el caso de «V de Vendetta», Ott (2010) afirma que cuando se estrenó en Estados Unidos provocó un debate sobre las políticas llevadas a cabo en ese país puesto que es una película que moviliza al espectador para rechazar la apatía política y promulgar una postura democrática de resistencia y rebelión contra los estados que traten de silenciar la disidencia. Call (2008) afirma que, a partir de la iconografía de la película, se proporciona una introducción eficaz al vocabulario simbólico del anarquismo postmoderno.

A pesar de que hay varios autores que consideran que estas películas pueden tener un fin didáctico, otros como Benson (2013) o Sloan, Sawyer, Warner y Jones (2014) critican el uso excesivo de violencia en las películas y creen que este puede causar falta de sensibilidad ante situaciones de abuso u opresión.

A raíz de estos análisis realizados en la literatura científica sobre estas obras, el propósito de este estudio es identificar si en los mensajes escritos por los jóvenes durante la visualización de estas películas se hace referencia a cuestiones ideológicas y/o estas constituyen el inicio para una reflexión conjunta sobre la situación social y política actual. Para ello, se ha analizado el contenido de los mensajes de Twitter producidos durante las emisiones de las películas. Consideramos que el micro-blog o red social Twitter es una buena herramienta para la creación de espacios de afinidad a la par que otro ejemplo de la cultura popular transmedia, que en nuestro caso, como en muchos otros, se une a la televisión en una visualización multipantalla que sin duda modifica la creación de significados por el público.

2. Materiales y métodos

Nuestro enfoque de investigación se centra en la comunicación mediada por ordenador (Computer-mediated communication), que ha sido definida como la interacción verbal que se desarrolla en el ámbito digital (Herring, 2004) y, dentro de esta disciplina, en el «Análisis del discurso mediado por ordenador» puesto que se realizan observaciones empíricas de los mensajes producidos en Twitter.

2.1. Corpus de estudio

Para la formación del corpus de estudio de esta investigación se han recopilado mensajes que se han escrito en Twitter durante la emisión de las citadas películas. Así, se ha tenido en cuenta la audiencia social, que es otro de los hitos del proceso de la cultura de la convergencia (Jenkins, 2008). La combinación de redes sociales, segundas pantallas como tablets o smartphones y televisión ha dado lugar a una audiencia que interactúa en las redes sociales y ocasiona que pueda llegarse a producir una relación horizontal entre usuarios distanciados físicamente que están viendo la misma emisión (Quintas & González, 2014). Los espectadores suelen interactuar empleando un hashtag determinado en sus mensajes y, en este caso, fue #vdevendetta para «V de Vendetta» y #losjuegosdelhambre para «Los juegos del hambre».

En el caso concreto de este estudio, hemos recogido los tuits de la emisión del día 23 de julio de 2014 de «V de Vendetta», que fue programada en Neox y seguida por 408.000 espectadores, con un 2,8 de share. En el caso de «Los juegos del hambre», que se emitió en Antena 3, la audiencia, al ser un estreno y en una cadena más popular, fue de 4.513.000 espectadores, obtuvo una cuota de pantalla del 24,3 y se registraron 48.152 tweets con el hashtag #losjuegosdelhambre (Kantar Media, 2014). Los tuits se recogieron con el programa Tweet Archivist, una herramienta analítica para la búsqueda y seguimiento de los tuits de un hashtag específico. Este programa utiliza la API de búsqueda de Twitter para crear archivos de datos que contienen un hashtag o palabra dada. Hay que señalar que no es posible almacenar todos los tuits debido a las limitaciones de la API de Twitter. Nuestro corpus, sin embargo, es suficientemente amplio ya que se compone en total de 2.800 tuits: 1.400 tuits con el hashtag #losjuegosdelhambre y de 1.400 tuits para #vdevendetta. Hemos recogido las primeras interacciones entre los usuarios, pero no se han tenido en cuenta los retuits por ser repeticiones de un mismo mensaje. El marco temporal en el que se recogieron estos mensajes fue el día de la emisión desde el inicio de la película hasta media hora después de su finalización.

Respecto a las características de los emisores de los mensajes, en el caso de Twitter, los usuarios no tienen la obligación de indicar su edad en el perfil. Sin embargo, hemos analizado al azar perfiles de 1.000 usuarios que han tuiteado sobre las películas siguiendo los siguientes criterios: foto de perfil, temas sobre los que hablan en los mensajes (si citan a sus padres y hermanos, su instituto o universidad…) y fotografías subidas a Twitter. A raíz de este análisis hemos comprobado que todos son jóvenes o adolescentes.

2.2. Métodos

Para el análisis de los tuits, se ha empleado el enfoque cuantitativo «coding y counting» (codificación y conteo), típico de los estudios de Comunicación Mediada por Ordenador. Este enfoque, como su propio nombre indica, parte de la codificación de los fenómenos estudiados para después contar el número de veces que aparecen esos códigos y va unido al Análisis del Contenido. A través de las veces que aparece un determinado tema en los mensajes podemos hacer los cálculos estadísticos adecuados, de tal manera que nos permitan conocer más profundamente la relación entre variables del hecho estudiado.

El enfoque «coding y counting» requiere que los conceptos claves sean operacionables en términos empíricamente medibles (Herring, 2004). Para ello, hemos definido los conceptos estudiados y se han formulado unos códigos concretos que pueden ser contabilizados.

Las categorías utilizadas para clasificar los tweets de los adolescentes fueron:

A) Categorías relacionadas con el contenido de las películas y / o libros

• A1) Referencias a acontecimientos de la trama de la película.

• A2) Referencias a los personajes de la película.

• A3) Expresiones de emoción y empatía con algún aspecto de la película.

• A4) Expresiones de agrado o desagrado por la película.

B) Categorías con ninguna relación con el contenido de las películas.

• B1) Información acerca de la situación del visionado.

• B2) Comentario sobre Twitter o la televisión.

• B3) Comentarios sin relación alguna con las películas.

C) Categorías en las que se alude al contenido social y político abordado por la trama de las películas.

• C1) Repetición de citas de la película con contenido social y político.

• C2) Relación de la película con la situación del mundo actual.

• C3) Otras reflexiones sobre la dimensión política y social.

Estas categorías fueron recogidas en una ficha de análisis que fue probada con anterioridad con otras películas por los investigadores para verificar el registro correcto de los datos e introducir las modificaciones en el sistema de codificación antes de llevarlo a cabo en esta investigación.

Respecto a las limitaciones de emplear una metodología original y novedosa, encontramos que una de las posibles dificultades a las que nos enfrentamos en esta investigación es el reduccionismo respecto a la realidad investigada. A esto hay que sumar la limitación del análisis de las producciones textuales puesto que detrás de los discursos hay otros aspectos sociales que no conocemos. Así, el enfoque empírico, basado totalmente en el texto, nos permite analizar únicamente los aspectos del discurso y somos nosotros los que debemos inferir las informaciones sociales y cognitivas de forma indirecta.

3. Resultados

Si analizamos los resultados obtenidos tras la codificación, llama la atención que en las dos películas, como se observa en la figura 1, la categoría general más pequeña es la que se refiere al tratamiento del contenido social y político de las películas (C1, C.2 y C.3). Si bien es cierto que para «V de Vendetta» el porcentaje respecto al total es mayor (27%) que en «Los juegos del hambre» (1%), el número de tuits es poco numeroso respecto al total.


Draft Content 762683189-49354 ov-es001.jpg

Figura 1. Número de mensajes de cada categoría.

En el caso de «V de Vendetta», como se muestra en la figura 2, hay 178 tuits en los que se citan textualmente frases de contenido social y político de la película, como «Justicia, igualdad y libertad son algo más que palabras, son metas alcanzables», «Una mente abierta puede cambiar el mundo» o «El pueblo no debería temer al gobierno, el gobierno debería temer al pueblo». Además, hay 71 mensajes en los que se asocia la trama de la película a la situación social y política actual, con mensajes como «Viendo #vdevendetta, y no puedo dejar de pensar en el control de los medios, la desinformación y el #CanonAEDE», «Necesitamos un discurso así y que salga en todas las televisiones en este país para que la gente se dé cuenta #vdevendetta» o «¿V acaba de nombrar la #LeyMordaza? #vdevendetta». En cuanto a los mensajes que aluden a la dimensión política y social de la obra, a pesar de ser 124, encontramos disparidad de opiniones. Por un lado, algunos espectadores alaban la película y su poder para la reflexión y el cambio así como su impacto ideológico, con mensajes como «Todo el mundo debería de tener los principios que se enseñan en esta peli. #vdevendetta», «#vdevendetta menuda película. Hace pensar mucho. Espero que nos sirva en nuestro día a día» o «Una pregunta, ¿a qué estamos esperando para hacer el cambio? si nosotros nos movemos, ellos empezarán a caer #vdevendetta» y otros la emplean para quejarse sobre la falta de acción, como «Lo que es triste, es poder ver al pueblo unido solamente en una película #vdevendetta», «Qué gracia me hacen los que flipan con #vdevendetta, van de revolucionarios y luego no se preocupan ni de lo que pasa a su alrededor» o «Revolucionarios de sillón viendo #vdevendetta. #MuyFan». En esta categoría, alrededor de la mitad de los mensajes critica la película y las ideas que transmite, con tuits como «#vdevendetta es una película aburridísima ideal para adoctrinar en la violencia y el comunismo a los incautos. ¡Cuidado!», «Venga chicos. Vamos a ser anarquistas y antisistemas sin tener ni idea. ¡Vamos! #vdevendetta» o «#vdevendetta es el «caramelo» anarquista y antisistema para los adolescentes».


Draft Content 762683189-49354 ov-es002.jpg

Figura 2. Porcentaje de mensajes por categoría para «V de Vendetta».

En lo que respecta a «Los juegos del hambre», como se aprecia en la figura 3, los tuits que hacen referencia al contenido social y político tratado en la película son casi inexistentes puesto que el total es de 21. En cuanto a las citas textuales (categoría C.1.), mientras que en «V de Vendetta» eran muy numerosas, aquí solamente hay 5, que se basan en esta frase pronunciada por Katniss: «Me niego a ser una pieza de sus juegos». En la subcategoría de mensajes que comparan la película con la situación del mundo actual (C.2.), encontramos 14 mensajes, que dicen, por ejemplo, «#losjuegosdelhambre los gobernantes cambian las normas cuando les da la gana. Por «caja» y dinero. Si tensamos la cuerda, entre todos podemos», «Y sí, siento ser tan trágico, pero identifico a la sociedad de #losjuegosdelhambre con la de la España actual... sumisa y borreguil» o «¿No tenéis la impresión de que en España estamos jugando a #losjuegosdelhambre?». También hay mensajes centrados en los aspectos políticos y sociales de la obra (C.3) pero son muy pocos, solamente 3: «#losjuegosdelhambre o, lo que es lo mismo, cómo decirle al pueblo de forma sutil que la solución está en la rebelión», «Realmente vivimos como en #losjuegosdelhambre. Llegará la hora en la que nos rebelemos ante las reglas injustas y contra todos los Capitolios» o «Realmente da miedo esta película porque quizás no esté tan alejada de una realidad próxima, pensadlo... #losjuegosdelhambre».

Figura 3. Porcentaje de mensajes por categoría para «Los juegos del hambre».

Una gran parte de los mensajes, más de la mitad en los dos casos, alude a otro contenido de la película (categorías A.1, A.2, A.3, A.4), un 53% en «V de Vendetta» y un 72% en «Los juegos del hambre». La subcategoría con mayor número de mensajes, que son un tercio del total en el caso de las dos películas, es la de expresión de agrado o desagrado por la película (categoría A.4). Por ello, es frecuente encontrar tuits como «¡#losjuegosdelhambre me encantan!», «#losjuegosdelhambre peliculón!» o «#vdevendetta me ha encantado, la recomiendo bastante». También encontramos algunos tuits en los que se expresa el desagrado por las películas pero son bastante minoritarios. En el resto de subcategorías encontramos tuits en los que se habla de momentos de la película (A.1), de las emociones que estos producen (A.3) y de los personajes (A.2). La mayoría de los tuits contiene información trivial e incluso, en algunos, se frivoliza sobre la situación: «Prefiero ir mañana a #losjuegosdelhambre que al instituto», «Yo esa máquina la utilizaría para crear tíos buenos, nada de arbolitos, panteras o chuminadas. #losjuegosdelhambre» o «#losjuegosdelhambre es cuando te entra hambre a las 12 de la noche vas al armario y ves que todo lo que hay ahí engorda y te la juegas».

Por último, un 20% de los mensajes del corpus sobre «V de Vendetta» y un 27% de «Los juegos del hambre» no hacen referencia al contenido de las películas y los emplean para hablar sobre la propia vida del espectador o temas relacionados como Twitter, la televisión u otros productos culturales (B.1, B.2 y B.3). En los dos casos, la subcategoría mayor es la de los tuits que informan sobre la situación en la que se está viendo la película o sobre aspectos relacionados con experiencias vividas en torno a esas películas (B.1) con mensajes como «Por culpa de #losjuegosdelhambre me he mordido la uña meñique de la mano derecha», «Y aquí estoy, viendo #losjuegosdelhambre cuando mañana tengo clase a primera hora» o «No hay mejor manera de terminar el día #vdevendetta».

Otro de los aspectos que llama la atención es que no se producen casi interacciones; estas no llegan ni al 1% del total de los mensajes. La mayoría de los tuits no tienen retuits, ni han sido marcados como favoritos por lo que no se produce comunicación entre los usuarios. Los emisores escriben sus mensajes sin esperar que haya una respuesta.


Draft Content 762683189-49354 ov-es003.jpg

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Los nuevos consumidores están permanentemente conectados, son muy visibles y muy participativos. El consumo y recepción de contenidos mediáticos es un proceso activo y colectivo, como hemos visto en la gran producción de tuits mientras se veían las películas. Después de haber analizado el contenido de los mensajes vemos que prima en ellos la necesidad de los jóvenes de identificarse como fans y de informar a sus seguidores sobre las películas que están consumiendo. De esta forma, se emplean los tuits con la función de informar sobre sus gustos y, dada la escasa aparición de interacciones, no se espera la respuesta de otros usuarios que también comparten esos gustos. Las producciones de estos jóvenes pueden encuadrarse dentro de la cultura de la participación (Jenkins, 2008), pero en la que no hay interés por la creación ni por aprender del conocimiento compartido con los demás. Por lo tanto, no se llegan a crear espacios de afinidad entre usuarios puesto que no hay un interés por compartir, discutir y asociarse con otros seguidores. Tampoco se crean comunidades de conocimiento (Lévy, 1997), en las que se discuta y se busque el desarrollo colectivo de una comunidad de seguidores de un mismo tema que busque una alternativa al poder mediático.

A pesar de que desde el ámbito académico se ha realzado la capacidad de estas dos distopías para fomentar la reflexión crítica y la acción social hemos comprobado tras el análisis de los tuits que son otros los intereses de los jóvenes respecto a estos productos de la cultura popular. En ambos casos, los jóvenes se sienten atraídos por unos personajes carismáticos y por una historia que conjuga la aventura y la intriga y les hace emocionarse, pero poco más: todo queda en el ámbito del entretenimiento.

De esta forma, Twitter se perfila como una herramienta en la que expresar el gusto por un producto cultural que actualmente está de moda. Si bien es cierto que esta red social ha servido para construir redes entre personas interesadas en diferentes movimientos sociales y para construir una inteligencia colectiva sobre temas sociales y políticos, en este caso, Twitter es mayoritariamente empleado para estar conectados permanentemente con sus seguidores e informarles sobre sus hábitos y preferencias.

Aunque parece evidente que en situaciones de conflicto, de opresión y de resistencia las redes sociales se convierten en una poderosa herramienta de comunicación y de participación ciudadana, la presentación de ese tipo de situaciones en los medios de comunicación, o como productos de la cultura popular, no genera las mismas reflexiones político-sociales, ni apenas indignación en la Red. La participación de los jóvenes en las redes sociales durante el visionado de situaciones injustas se centra más en las circunstancias del visionado o detalles accesorios; se convierte en una herramienta de conexión y no de reflexión.

Los tuits no son fruto de la reflexión sino que parecen escritos espontáneamente. Este puede ser uno de los motivos por los que casi no se hace alusión al contenido social y político de las películas y, cuando se hace, es citando frases populares de la película o sin llegar a profundizar. En este sentido, incluso hay personas que acusan en sus tuits a otros usuarios de ser revolucionarios de sillón, de quejarse de forma frívola en sus tuits y no ser capaces de organizarse para promover el cambio en la sociedad en la que viven.

Hindman (2008) se pregunta qué tipo de aprendizaje y construcción de ciudadanía están posibilitando las redes sociales y sobre si se está produciendo un empoderamiento efectivo de las personas o si es únicamente una ilusión de poder conjugada con la banalización del compromiso cívico. A partir de los resultados de nuestra investigación coincidimos con autores como Tilly (2004), Tarrow (2005), o Díez, Fernández y Anguita (2011) en que, si bien el alcance de los mensajes puede ser impresionante y puede contribuir a las movilizaciones, los efectos finales pueden ser muy limitados. En nuestro caso, el ruido provocado por la cantidad enorme de mensajes, que no pueden ser procesados y que no guardan relación entre ellos, dificulta cualquier forma de acción y organización.

Los productos de la cultura popular, en nuestro caso «V de Vendetta» y «Los juegos del hambre», condicionan los procesos de socialización y de educación. Sería, por tanto, necesario abordarlos desde la educación mediática para que sus consumidores pudiesen comprender su significado y su papel en la sociedad. Kellner (2011) afirma que los productos no son simplemente entretenimiento ni vehículos para la ideología dominante sino que son un artefacto complejo que encarna discursos políticos y sociales. Por ello, es esencial aprender a analizarlos e interpretarlos dentro del entorno social y político en el que son producidos, en el que circulan y donde son recibidos.

La escuela, como parte de ese entorno, y, más aún, si cabe, como responsable de preparar a las personas para transformar ese entorno, debe asumir la educación mediática como una de sus prioridades.

Referencias

Atton, C. (2002). Alternative Media. London: Sage.

Basu, B., Broad, K.R., & Hintz, C. (2013). Contemporary Dystopian Fiction for Young Adults: Brave new teenagers. New York: Routledge.

Call, L. (2008). A is for Anarchy, V is for Vendetta: Images of Guy Fawkes and the Creation of Postmodern Anarchism. Anarchist Studies, 16(2), 154-172. (http://goo.gl/wixxwD) (2015-09-24).

Castells, M. (Ed.) (2004). La sociedad red: una visión global. Madrid: Alianza.

Collins, S. (2008). Los juegos del hambre. Barcelona: Molino.

Della-Porta, D. (2015). Social Movements in Times of Austerity: Bringing Capitalism back into Protest Analysis. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Della-Porta, D., & Mosca, L. (2005). Global-net for Global Movements? A Network of Networks for a Movement of Movements. Journal of Public Policy, 25(1), 165-190. doi: http://dx.doi.org/-10.1017/S0143814X05000255

Díez, E., Fernández, E., & Anguita, R. (2011). Hacia una teoría política de la socialización cívica virtual de la adolescencia. Revista Interuniversitaria de Formación del Profesorado, 71(25,2), 73-100. (http://goo.gl/3gd65W) (2015-09-22).

Díez-Rodríguez, A. (2003). Ciudadanía cibernética. La nueva utopía tecnológica de la democracia. In J. Benedicto, & M.L. Morán (Eds.), Aprendiendo a ser ciudadanos (pp.193-218). Madrid: Injuve.

Duane, A.M. (2014). Volunteering as Tribute: Disability, Globalization and the Hunger Games. En M. Gill, & C.J. Schlund-Vials (Eds.), Disability, Human Rights and the Limits of Humanitarianism (pp. 63-82). Burlington: Ashgate.

Fisher, M. (2012). Precarious Dystopias: The Hunger Games, In Time, and Never Let me Go. Film Quarterly, 65(4), 27-33. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/fq.2012.65.4.27

Gee, J.P. (2004). Situated Language and Learning: A Critique of Traditional Schooling. New York: Routledge.

Giroux, H.A. (2003). Cine y entretenimiento. Elementos para una crítica política del filme. Barcelona: Paidós.

Green, J. (2008). Scary New World. The New York Times, 2015-11-07. (http://goo.gl/nXB9HX) (2015-09-23).

Hernández, E., Robles, M.C., & Martínez, J.B. (2013). Jóvenes interactivos y culturas cívicas: sentido educativo, mediático y político del 15M [Interactive Youth and Civic Cultures: The Educational, Mediatic and Political Meaning of the 15M]. Comunicar, 40, 59-67. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-06

Herring, S. (2004). Computer-Mediated Discourse Analysis: An Approach to Researching Online Behavior. In S.A. Barab, R. Kling, & J.H. Gray (Eds.), Designing for Virtual Communities in the Service of Learning (pp. 338-376). New York: Cambridge University Press.

Hindman, M (2008). The Myth of Digital Democracy. New Jersey: Princenton University Press.

Jenkins, H. (2008). Convergence Culture: La cultura de la convergencia de los medios de comunicación. Barcelona: Paidós.

Kantar Media (2014). Audiencias semanales. (http://goo.gl/J4Zqz6) (2014-11-26).

Kellner, D. (2011). Cultural Studies, Multiculturalism, and Media Culture. En G. Dines, & J. Humez (Eds.), Gender, Race and Class inMedia : A Critical Reader (pp. 7-18). Los Angeles, CA: Sage Publications.

Koku, E., Nazer, N., & Wellman, B. (2001). Netting Scholars: Online and Offline. American Behavioral Scientist, 44, 1.752-1.774. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/00027640121958023

Langman, L. (2005). From Virtual Public Spheres to Global Justice: A Critical Theory of Interworked Social Movements. Sociological Theory, 23(1), 42-74. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.0735-2751. 2005.-00242.x

Latham, D., & Hollister, J. M. (2014). The Games People Play: Information and Media Literacies in the Hunger Games trilogy. Children's Literature in Education, 45(1), 33-46. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10583-013-9200-0

Lévy, P. (1997). A inteligência colectiva. Para uma antropologia do ciberespaço. Lisboa: Instituto Piaget.

Martin, G. (2015). Understanding Social Movements. Nueva York: Routledge.

Mateos-Aparicio, A. (2014). Popularizing Utopia in Postmodern Science Fiction Film: Matrix, V for Vendetta, in Time and Verbo. In E. De-Gregorio-Godeo, & M.M Ramón-Torrijos (Eds.), Multidisciplinary views on popular culture. Proceedings of the 5th International SELICUP Conference (pp. 271-280). Cuenca: Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha.

McTeigue (2006). V de Vendetta. [Cinta cinematográfica]. USA: Warner Bros Pictures.

Moore, A., & Lloyd, D. (2005). V de Vendetta. Barcelona: Planeta DeAgostini.

Muller, V. (2012). Virtually real: Suzanne Collins's the Hunger Games trilogy. International Research in Children's Literature, 5(1), 51-63. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3366/ircl.2012.0043

Ott, B.L. (2010). The visceral politics of V for Vendetta: On Political Affect in Cinema. Critical Studies in Media Communication, 27(1), 39-54. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15295030903554359

Quintas, N., & González, A. (2014). Audiencias activas: participación de la audiencia social en la televisión [Active Audiences: Social Audience Participation in Television]. Comunicar, 43, 83-90. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-08

Ringlestein, Y. (2013). Real or not Real: The Hunger Games as Transmediated Religion. Journal of Religion and Popular Culture, 25(3), 372-387. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/jrpc.25.3.372

Ross, G. (2012). Los juegos del hambre. [Cinta cinematográfica]. USA: Lionsgate.

Simmons, A.M. (2012). Class on Fire Using the Hunger Games Trilogy to Encourage Social Action. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, 56(1), 22-34. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/JAAL.00099

Sloan, E.D., Sawyer, C., Warner, T.D., & Jones, L.A. (2014). Adolescent Entertainment or Violence Training? The Hunger Games. Journal of Creativity in Mental Health, 9(3), 427-435. doi: http://dx.doi.org/ 10.1080/15401383.2014.903161

Sorrells, K., & Sekimoto, S. (2015). Globalizing Intercultural Communication: A Reader. California: Publications.

Sunstein, C.R. (2007). Republic.com 2.0. New Jersey: Princeton University Press.

Tarrow, S. (2005). The New Transnational Activism. New York: Cambridge University.

Tilly, C. (2004). Social Movements 1768-2004. Boulder: Paradigm Publishers.

Tyner, K., Gutiérrez, A., & Torrego, A. (2015). Multialfabetización sin muros en la era de la convergencia. La competencia digital y «la cultura del hacer» como revulsivos para una educación continua. Profesorado, 19(2), 41-56. (http://goo.gl/VkzKR0) (2015-09-22).

Wasserman, H. (2007). Is a New Worldwide Web Possible? An Explorative Comparison of the Use of ICTs by two South African Social Movements. African Studies Review, 50(1), 109-131. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/arw.2005.0144

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/03/16
Accepted on 31/03/16
Submitted on 31/03/16

Volume 24, Issue 1, 2016
DOI: 10.3916/C47-2016-01
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 11
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?