Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The current paper aims to analyze how certain Facebook settings, model of new Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), have turned into an infringement of some existing privacy Ethical principles. This totally changed and modern paradigm has its clearest expression in recent Web 2.0., and omnipotent Communication Technology, and implies the reconsideration of each Ethical Principles, especially those related to Intimacy and Image Protection. Our research explains not just how these areas are affected by technological changes but also the way these imperative ethical principles are violated because users ignorance and confidence. This carefree attitude and the increasing communicative relevance have given networking precedence over Intimacy protection. The result of this action has been denominated «Extimacy» according to the author Jacques Lacan, a concept which can be translated as public Intimacy through networking activities, namely, exposed Intimacy. The goal we aim to achieve is to illustrate the different ways our Privacy can be damaged by some Facebook measures (as Privacy Policies Change, collecting tendencies of consumption, the use of private data and revealing users confidence). Likewise these arguments will be endorsed by international researches focused on Facebook privacy violations, which we are going to expose to understand how citizens can carry out different actions to defend our Intimacy and Image Rights.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

In the Information Age the boundaries of privacy have been dissolved. Ethical principles assumed as inalienable are subject to new ways of infringement so that the majority of states do not have legal formulations for eradicating them. That happens with personal privacy, whose conventional outline has been distorted by social networking and new communication reality «as hypothesized (the majority of Facebook users) perceive benefits of online social networking as outweighing risks of disclosing personal information» (Debatin, Lovejoy & al. 2009: 100). The users seem to be unaware of the use of their private data, their searches in browsers, products they acquire or links they visit. This information is stored and used without any consent or knowledge. As we examine, Facebook technology for Information Monitoring is specifically invasive in this field. Its architecture contributes to the reduction of users’ control of their privacy though some settings and measures – such as privacy policy changes, collecting tendencies on consumption, the use of private data, a new Face Recognition feature and revealing users´ confidence. This improper violation of the users´ right to privacy has forced some countries like Ireland, the United States, Canada or Germany to elaborate reports about the full implications of this contravention. Facebook users do not know where their data goes and the uses to which they are put. This personal information is not relevant because it is private but also because it provides unnoticed details to unknown people. Although «we can definitively state that there is a positive relationship between certain kinds of Facebook use and the maintenance and creation of social capital» (Ellison, Steinfield, & al. 2007: 1.161), the fact is that the risks involved in terms of Privacy exceed its benefits and violate ethical precepts currently in force.

2. Procedure, materials and method

As stated in the introduction, we observe the infringement of ethical principles of privacy and personal data/image through a content analysis of the most relevant reports carried out by international organizations. We support our results on scientific papers and press articles relating to intimacy infringement and privacy violation. We also employ reports published by states which have gone ahead, illustrating how Social Networking Sites invade users’ personal privacy. Such reports have been made public by the Hamburg Office of Data Protection and Freedom of Information (Germany), the Federal Trade Commission (United States), the Privacy Commissioner of Canada and the Office of the Data Protection Commissioner of Ireland, which are going to contribute to the shaping of the outlines of privacy abuse through Social Networking Sites. In order to discover the particular characteristics of the Facebook Privacy System we employ a qualitative and deductive method, analysing different categories relating to the keywords «privacy», «intimacy» and «personal image», items that allow us to determine which categories are given priority in each country. These international organizations belong to the only four countries which have intervened in connection with Facebook personal privacy violation, in order to discover if the company guarantees any level of data security. Finally, we support our results on previous studies carried out by international researchers and published in prestigious journals such as the ARPN Journal of Systems and Software, Cyberpsychology, Behaviour and Social Networking, Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication and Harvard Business Review.

3. Social networking sites as context: the age of global communication

Human activities are necessarily social and this fact results in a conglomeration of networks which provides us with interpersonal interaction circuits. This interconnection is not a reality arisen from our present context, not in vain, trade, communication and interpersonal contact belong to our nature, although in the age of new technologies, intercommunication becomes global:

A new kind of relationships with no bounds is arising between people. Globalization is transforming our lives. This characteristic defines our current society and gives it its most distinctive feature (Javaloy & Espelt, 2007: 642).

With the Internet humanity is «increasingly interconnected» (Ehrlich & Ehrlich, 2013: 1) and that makes global communication possible. Interconnection and data transmission are now qualitative and quantitative far better than they were before. Since Tim O´Reilly defined the Online Communication model in «What is the Web 2.0. Patterns and Business Models for the Next Generation of Software», the Internet has spurred a renewed communication system that goes beyond the traditional concept of linking: «As synapses form in the brain, with associations becoming stronger through repetition or intensity, the web of connections grows organically as an output of the collective activity of all web users» (O´Reilly, 2007: 22). Therefore, connectivity is now more real than ever: There’s been a corresponding burst of interest in network science. Researchers are studying networks of people, companies, boards of directors, computers, financial institutions –any system that comprises many discrete but connected components– to look for the common principles. (Morse, 2003: 1).

In the age of the Web 2.0 network interconnection implies a continuous feedback between people, although it also entails a constant distortion of the privacy concept by users, who judge more important to show their intimacy than to protect it: The way we constitute and define ourselves as subjects has changed. Introspective view is deteriorated. We increasingly define ourselves as what we exhibit and what the others can see. Intimacy is so important to shape who we are that we have to show it. (Pérez-Lanzac & Rincón, 2009).

This debilitation of the introspective process was already enunciated by Jacques Lacan (1958) under the revolutionary concept of «extimacy», a term linked to the expression of once-private information through social networks:

«Extimacy» breaks the inside-outside binary and gives an external centre to a symbolic area, which produces a rupture in the very heart of the identity, an emptiness that cannot be fulfilled (Extimidad, El curso de orientación lacaniana, 2012).

«Extimacy» and the increase of data transmission in the age of Social Networking Sites have generated an enormous amount of useful personal information. In this sense:

The Internet became the Bible of publicists who track potential consumers among the most relevant online communities identifying opinion leaders and carrying out Social Media Monitoring. […] the Internet offers increasingly precise information about features and preferences of these new niches of spectators (Lacalle, 2011: 100).

These data not only inform about users´ preferences, but also reveal an important segment of their intimacy. Therefore, users’ information does not only allow «to articulate and make visible their friendship networks» (Kanai, Bahrami, & al., 2012), or to establish «connections between individuals that would not otherwise be made» (Boyd & Ellison, 2007: 210), but also provides «some predictive power» (Jones, Settle & al., 2013) about tendencies and attitudes. Even when «some individuals prefer to keep intimate details such as their political preferences or sexual orientation private» (Horvát, Hanselmann & Hamprecht, 2012), the information revealed by his/her contacts can divulge what the user prefer to conceal. Although many people consider that the most serious risk of the Social Networking Sites lies in their capability to «facilitate behaviours associated with obsessive relational intrusion» (Marshall, 2012: 521), another unnoticed threat lies in their own formulation and their unauthorized compilation of personal information.

3.1. Social networking sites and Facebook

Users’ remoteness and a constant technological renewal define Social Networking Sites: «The social conversation propelled by a deep and continue communication technologies metamorphosis is becoming more and more prominent on the Web 2.0» (Ruiz & Masip, 2010: 9). In this context appears Facebook, the most prominent Social Network Site on the Internet. Although GeoCities or MySpace were consolidated sites, Facebook (created by Mark Zuckerberg in 2003) was implanted transforming the concept of interaction: «users create, share and consume information in a very different way than before» (Yuste, 2010: 86), and this situation has «created a favourable atmosphere for making intermediary disappear –users have direct access to information sources– and for generating an abundant content of a diverse origin» (Yuste, 2010: 86).

According to the report «Spanish Habits and Social Networking», Facebook has replaced the rest of Social Networks in our country (Libreros, 2011), being used by a 95 percent of users (followed by YouTube, Tuenti and Twitter), who utilize it for sending private messages (60%) and public messages (50%), for sharing and uploading pictures (37%), for updating their profile (32%) and becoming a fan or to follow commercial trademarks (26%) (Libreros, 2011). These particular five activities will be relevant in order to categorize users, to discover tendencies and to establish parameters of their profiles.

3.2. Infringement of the right to privacy and data protection

To be connected to the Internet and to have a power source are the two required elements for accessing our personal information from all over the world. New communication technologies offer an uncontrollable data reproducibility and they allow accessing this extremely up-to-date information not just for consulting it, but also for using it: The current erosion of users´ privacy from numerous fronts is perturbing, the cause stems from three vast forces: the first one is the technology itself, which makes possible to be on anyone’s track with instantaneous precision […] The second one is the pursuit of profits, which makes companies monitor consumer’s tastes and habits in order to personalize advertising. At last we find Governments which collect many of these data in their own servers (Garton, 2010).

When a user indicates a preference, declares her/his interest to an advertisement or chooses an airline, she/he leaves «traces» which illustrates inclinations and consumption habits. What used to be personal becomes now collective: «the massification on Social Networking Sites has generalized a concept denominated «extimacy», something like revealing intimacy with its roots in the rise of ‘Reality Shows’ and the Web 2.0» (Pérez-Lanzac & Rincón, 2009). If we assume that intimacy means personal information which should not be revealed (Kieran, 1998: 83), or information that «we seriously and legitimately protect from being published» (Olen, 1988: 61), the fact that our presence on the Internet could be tracked, implies an infringement of our civil rights: To renounce intimacy in our online purchases may seem to be mild. To renounce intimacy buying flights may seem reasonable; even a closed television circuit can give the impression of not to be problematic. Nonetheless, when all of them are added up we find that we do not have intimacy at all (Johnson, 2010: 193).

4. Forms of privacy infringement on Facebook

Many aspects of privacy and intimacy are unprotected in Social Network Sites, especially on Facebook, the platform with more access to the users´ personal data. Facebook collects this information through different settings, particularly data derived from profiles and the famous «Like» button: Facebook Likes, can be used to automatically and accurately predict a range of highly sensitive personal attributes including: sexual orientation, ethnicity, religious and political views, personality traits, intelligence, happiness, use of addictive substances, parental separation, age, and gender (Kosinskia, Stillwella & Graepelb, 2013). Although there are more than one hundred fifty-seven patterns of personal data which Facebook can obtain from users (Facebook´s Data Pool, 2012), we are going to analyse uniquely those which have given rise to an international heated debate: «collecting tendencies on consumption», «the use of Private Data» and «Privacy policy changes without consent and Face Recognition Feature».

4.1. Consumption patterns

The monetization of users´ personal data is one of the most controversial aspects of Facebook. It entails not just to reveal personal information, but also to obtain profits revealing it without the consent of the data subjects: «a report was published proving that Facebook had given to advertisers, names, ages and profession of each user that had clicked in its advertisement» (La historia oculta de Facebook, 2010). However, the majority of Facebook users do not know that the firm provides information to third party companies with their own purposes. According to Mark Zuckerberg: «I have over 4,000 emails, pictures, addresses, SNS. People just submitted it. I don't know why. They trust me» (La historia oculta de Facebook, 2010). In 2009 this excessive processing of private data prompted controversy and the rise of critical positions claiming the right of the users to control their privacy. In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) received a large number of denounces of users who demanded to be informed about which sort of data patterns Facebook collected and shared:

The proposed settlement requires Facebook to take several steps to make sure it will live up to its promises in the future, including giving consumers clear and prominent notice and obtaining consumers' express consent before their information is shared beyond the privacy settings they have established (Facebook settles FTC Charges, 2011). The social networking service changed its architecture accordingly, an architecture which allowed the users to personalize their privacy and security level. Although Elliot Schrage, Vice President of Communications, Public Policy and Platform Marketing at Facebook, argued that Facebook had the intention to give more control to the users, the complexity of new tools was uncommon for a Social Network site: «To opt out of full disclosure of most information, it is necessary to click through more than 50 privacy buttons, which then require choosing among a total of more than 170 options» (Bilton, 2010).

4.2. Unnoticed uses of users´ profile data

In the context of Social Network Sites, a profile is equivalent to an identity document, its information concerns personal privacy and it is necessarily confidential without the consent of the data subjects. Nonetheless, Facebook has breached certain data confidentiality offering private information to different advertisers. The rise of interest of third party companies has elicited massification and personalization of unsolicited advertising. This dark data processing was reported by the Privacy Commissioner of Canada in 2009 before determining that this activity infringed the law. In response to the critics, Facebook resolved to amend its Privacy Policy: The Internet portal has announced that from now on applications developed by third parties should specify which data they are going to access as well they should ask prior permission to disclose them. Facebook will demand applications to specify which categories of users´ data they want to access, getting the user consent before they share her/his information (Facebook, 2009).

Nonetheless, the data protection regulation implemented by the company was repeatedly infringed:

Facebook promised that users could restrict their information to a limited audience, using certain privacy settings. But the truth, says the FTC, is that even when a user went to Facebook’s Central Privacy Page, clicked a link to «Control who can see your profile and personal information» and limited access to certain people –for example, «only friends»– the user’s choice was ineffective when it came to third-party apps that users’ friends used (Fair. 2011).

Despite the company pledges, Facebook users are not properly informed about which companies are going to make use of their personal data: People do not know how their personal data can be shared. They end up in sharing their private information with unauthorized people because of their ignorant attitude. We also conclude that complexity of privacy settings and lack of control provided to the user is equally responsible for unintentional information sharing (Zainab & Mamuna, 2012: 124).

This privacy policy allows other companies to access inappropriately to users´ private data: For a significant period of time after Facebook started featuring apps onto its site, it deceived people about how much of their information was shared with apps they used. Facebook said that when people authorized an app, the app would only have information about the users «that it requires to work». Not accurate, says the FTC. According to the complaint, apps could access pretty much all of the user’s information – even info unrelated to the operation of the app (Fair, 2011).

Although Facebook expresses in its statutes that the company will never reveal personal data to any advertiser unless the express agreement between the company and the user, this commitment was violated during the interval between September 2008 and May 2010, when «the User ID of any person who clicked on an ad was shared with the advertiser» (Fair, 2011).

4.3. Privacy policy changes without consent and facial recognition

The Office of the Data Protection Commissioner of Ireland (DPC) reported Facebook in 2011 because its lack of transparency. The company was requested to «revise privacy policy protection for non-American users because the measures adopted were excessively complex and opaque» (Facebook, 2012). However, Ireland is not the only European country to be in conflict with the American company. The Office of Data Protection and Freedom of Information in Hamburg (Germany), has reopened a research into Facebook’s facial recognition software, a controversial technology which has given rise to an intense debate. According to Johannes Caspar, Commissioner in Hamburg: «The social networking giant was illegally compiling a huge database of members’ photos without their consent» (O´Brien, 2012). Despite the efforts to reach a consensus, Facebook refused to change its privacy policies: «We have met repeatedly with Facebook, but have not been able to get their cooperation on this issue, which has grave implications for personal data» (O´Brien, 2012). Although facial recognition contravenes European Union legislation, Facebook has not modified its software in order to adjust its use to European laws:

The company’s use of analytic software to compile photographic archives of human faces, based on photos uploaded by Facebook’s members, has been problematic in Europe, where data protection laws require people to give their explicit consent to the practice (O´Brien, 2012). Even though users are able to remove a tag from a photo or deactivate their accounts, their private data remain on Facebook indefinitely. This fact infringes EU legislation and has caused controversy in the United Kingdom:

Facebook does allow people to 'deactivate' their accounts. This means that most of their information becomes invisible to other viewers, but it remains on Facebook's servers – indefinitely. This is handy for anyone who changes their mind and wants to rejoin. They can just type their old user name and password in, and they will pop straight back up on the site - it will be like they never left. But not everyone will want to grant Facebook the right to keep all their data indefinitely when they are not using it for any obvious purpose. If they do want to delete it permanently, they need to go round the site and delete everything they have ever done. That includes every wall post, every picture, and every group membership. For a heavy Facebook user, that could take hours. Even days. And it could violate the UK's Data Protection Act (King, 2007). This controversy is a response to Facebook Terms of Service, which informs about its right to keep permanently user’s personal data:

You grant us a non-exclusive, transferable, sublicensable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use any IP content that you post on or in connection with Facebook (Facebook Terms of Service, n.d.).

In this matter, Spanish citizens can seek protection in the Law of Cancellation, which allows users to request companies to delete their data once their reciprocal relation has been extinguished: «Personal data that we voluntarily publish on our Social Network Site profile, should be deleted when we remove our consent» (Romero, 2012). Nevertheless, Facebook arrogates to itself the right to change the Privacy Policy conditions without prior warning and without express consent of the Social Network users, even «certain information that users had designated as private –like their friend list– was made public under the new policy» (Fair, 2011). Likewise, it is known that Facebook has designated: Certain user profile info as public when it had previously been subject to more restrictive privacy settings, Facebook overrode users’ existing privacy choices. In doing that, the company materially changed the privacy of users’ information and retroactively applied these changes to information it previously collected. The FTC said that doing that without users’ informed consent was an unfair practice, in violation of the FTC Act (Fair, 2011).

In view of the fact that Facebook has committed excesses with regard to privacy, some citizen’s platforms as «Europe vs Facebook» have emerged for the sole purpose of contributing to increase transparency to the American company processes.

5. Conclusions

In the light of the documentation presented, it is legitimate to claim that Facebook has achieved a privilege status never seen before. However, the infringement of the users’ right to privacy has resulted in international complains destined to demand more transparency for personal data appropriation. It has been observed that the contract signed by each user allows Facebook to collect data about people without their knowledge. This fact has been criticized by Canada and some countries in Europe, despite the American company still maintains its obscurity in the process of treatment, transference and appropriation of users´ data. It has been also analysed how some citizens have decided to palliate such deregulation reporting Facebook excesses to the relevant institutions in different countries. Nevertheless, we have proved that users’ ignorance of their rights and the current tendency to «extimacy» permit on the Web 2.0 to have an effortless access to users´ personal data: «To protect their personal profile», «to remove a tag from a photo» and «to check users´ visibility» (Boutin, 2010), are three essential elements which are not usually considered by users. Moreover, disclosure of personal data, complexity of Facebook´s site architecture, data storage in perpetuity or third party interests, are some of the controversial areas which have not been adjusted to International legislation. In connection with these infringements, the Office of the Data Protection Commissioner of Ireland has carried out a report in which experts recommend some necessary measures in order to improve Facebook´s Privacy Policy:

• (To create) a mechanism for users to convey an informed choice for how their information is used and shared on the site including in relation to third party apps.

• A broad update to the Data Use Policy/Privacy Policy.

• Transparency and control for users via the provision of all personal data held to them on request and as part of their everyday interaction with the site.

• The deletion of information held on users and non-users via what is known as social plug-ins and more generally the deletion of data held from user interactions with the site much sooner than presently.

• Increased transparency and controls for the use of personal data for advertising purposes.

• An additional form of notification for users in relation to facial recognition/«tag suggest» that is considered will ensure Facebook (Ireland) meeting best practice in this area from an (Irish) law perspective.

• An enhanced ability for users to control tagging and posting on other user profiles.

• An enhanced ability for users to control whether their addition to groups by friends (Data Protection Report, 2012).

Until these recommendations will be internationally standardized, the users have to resort to self-regulation, showing a higher knowledge and conscientiousness on the matter of their own privacy: I guess we should resign ourselves to accept that the modern world is like this. «Privacy has died. Get used to», as Scott McNealy, cofounder of Sun Microsystems, said once. Or we can defend ourselves; we can try to recover part of our lost intimacy. We can do it setting our own rules and sharing them with the others. We can do it applying pressure to companies like Facebook, whose users are after all, its source of income. We can also demand three exigencies: to put a curb on citizen’s privacy invasion; to regulate and to control meddling companies […] The same technologies which reduce our right to privacy can also help us defend ourselves (Garton, 2010).

At present, until a unitary regulation will be established, we should demand users to protect their own rights, although it implies to decide on what terms they use Social Networking Sites and in which way they share their personal data.

References

Acebedo, R. (2011). La historia de Facebook desde adentro. La Tercera, 29-01-2011. (www.latercera.com/noticia/tendencias/2011/01/659-341582-9-la-historia-de-facebook-desde-adentro.shtml) (10-11-2012).

Bilton, N. (2010). Price of Facebook Privacy? Start Clicking. The New York Times, 12-05-2010. (www.nytimes.com/2010/05/13/technology/personaltech/13basics.html?_r=0) (10-10-2012).

Boutin, P. (2010). 3 Essential Stops to Facebook Privacy. The New York Times, 13-05-2010. (http//gadgetwise.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/06/21/3-essential-steps-to-facebook-privacy) (05-11-2012).

Boyd, D. & Ellison, N. (2007). Social Network Sites: Definition, History and Schol-arship. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 13, 210-230. (DOI:10.1111/j.1083-6101.2007.00393.x) (28-03-2013).

Debatin, B. Lovejoy, J.P. Horn, A.K. Hughes, B. N. (2009). Facebook and Online Privacy: Attitudes, Behaviors, and Unintended Consequences. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication. Volumen 15, Issue 1, 83-108. (DOI:10.1111/j.1083-6101.2009.01494.x). (02-11-2012).

Ehrlich, P. & Ehrlich A. (2013). Can a Collapse of Global Civilization be Avoided? Pro-ceedings of The Royal Society B. 280: 20122845. Royal Society Publishing. Biological Sciences. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2012.2845) (29-03-2013).

El Mundo (Ed.) (2012). Facebook y Linkedin se comprometen a reforzar su privacidad. El Mundo, 29/06/2012. (www.elmundo.es/elmundo/2012/06/29/navegante/1340955573.html) (04-11-2012).

El País (Ed.) (2009). Más intimidad en Facebook. El País, 27-08-2009. (http//tecnolo-gia.elpais.com/tecnologia/2009/08/27/actualidad/1251363663_850215.html) (01-11-2012).

Ellison, N., Steinfield, L. & Cliff, C. (2007). The Benefits of Facebook «Friends»: Social Capital and College Students’ Use of Online Social Network Sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 12, 1143-1168. (DOI:10.1111/j.1083-6101.2007.00367.x) (27-03-2013).

Facebook (Ed.) (2012). Facebook´s Data Pool. Europe vs Facebook. 03-04-2012. (http//europe-v-facebook.org/EN/Data_Pool/data_pool.html) (03-11-2012).

Fair, L. (2011). The FTC’s settlement with Facebook. Where Facebook went wrong. Federal Trade Commission Protecting America´s Consumers. 29-11-2011. (http//busi-ness.ftc.gov/blog/2011/11/ftc%E2%80%99s-settlement-facebook-where-facebook-went-wrong) (02-11-2012).

Federal Trade Commission (Ed.) (2011).Facebook settles FTC Charges that it deceived consumers by failing to keep Privacy Promises. Federal Trade Commission Protecting America´s Consumers, 29-11-2011. (http//ftc.gov/opa/2011/11/privacysettlement.-shtm) (03-10-2012).

Garton, T. (2010). Facebook: restablecer la privacidad. El País, 11-10-2010. (http//el-pais.com/diario/2010/10/11/opinion/1286748011_850215.html) (04-10-2012).

González-Gaitano, N. (1990). El deber de respeto a la intimidad. Información pública y relación social. Pamplona: EUNSA.

Horvát E.A., Hanselmann M. & al. (2012). One Plus One Makes Three (for Social Net-works). PLoS ONE 7(4), e34740. (DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0034740) (27-03-2013).

Johnson, D.G. (2010). Ética informática y ética e Internet. Madrid: Edibesa.

Jones, J.J., Settle, J.E., Bond R.M. & al. (2013). Inferring Tie Strength from Online Directed Behaviour. PLoS ONE 8(1), e52168. (DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0052168) (29-03-2013).

Kanai, R., Bahrami, B., Roylance, R. & al. (2012): Online Social Network Size is Reflected in Human Brain Structure. Proceedings of The Royal Society B. 280: 20122845. Royal Society Publishing. Biological Sciences, 2012 279. (DOI:10.1098/rspb.2011.1959) (28-03-2013).

Kieran, M. (Ed.). (1998). Media Ethics. London: Routledge.

King, B. (2007). Facebook Data Protection Row. Channel 4. 17-11-2007. (www.channel4.com) (01-11-2012).

Kosinskia M., Stillwella, D. & Graepelb, T. (2013). Private Traits and Attributes are Predictable from Digital Records of Human Behaviour. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). University of California, Berkeley. (DOI:10.1073/pnas.1218772110) (29-03-2013).

La historia oculta de Facebook. El Economista, 30-05-2010. (www.eleconomista.es/Interstitial/volver/acierto/telecomunicacionestecnologia/noticias/2188124/05/10/La-historia-oculta-de-Facebook-La-gente-confia-en-mi-son-tontos-del-culo.html) (04-11-2012).

Lacalle, C. (2011). La ficción interactiva. Televisión y Web 2.0. Ámbitos, 20.

Libreros, E. (2011). Las redes sociales en España 2011. IEDGE, 01-12-2011. (http//-blog.iedge.eu/direccion-marketing/marketing-interactivo/social-media-marketing/eduardo-liberos-las-redes-sociales-en-espana-2011) (02-11-2012).

López-Reyes, Ó. (1995). La ética en el periodismo. Los cinco factores que interactúan en la deontología profesional. República Dominicana: Banco Central.

Marshall, T. (2012): Facebook Surveillance of Former Romantic Partners: Associa-tions with PostBreakup Recovery and Personal Growth. Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, 15, 10 (DOI:10.1089/cyber.2012.0125) (29-03-2013).

Morse, G. & Watts, D. (2003). The Science behind Six Degrees. Harvard Business Review Online, Febrero. (http//hbsp.harvard.edu/b02/en/hbr/hbrsa/current/0302/article) (05-11-2012).

Olen, J. (1988). Ethics in Journalism. Englewood Cliffs. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

O’Brien, K. (2012). Germans Reopen Investigation on Facebook Privacy. The New York Times, 15-08-2012. (www.nytimes.com/2012/08/16/technology/germans-reopen-facebook-privacy-inquiry.html) (01-11-2012).

O´Reilly, T. (2007). What is the Web 2.0. Design Patterns and Business Models for the Next Generation of Software. Munich Personal RePEc Archive (MPRA), 4580, 07-11-2007. (http//mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/4580) (05-11-2012).

Pérez-Lanzac, C. & Rincón, R. (2009). Tu «extimidad» contra mi intimidad. El País, 24-03-09. (www.elpais.com) (20-10-2012).

Report of Data Protection Audit of Facebook Ireland Published (2012). Oficina del Comisionado de Protección de Datos de Irlanda (www.dataprotection.ie/viewdoc.asp?-DocID=1175) (02-11-2012).

Romero, Pablo (2012). A las redes sociales les cuesta 'olvidar'. El Mundo, 05-03-2012. (www.elmundo.es/elmundo/2012/02/20/navegante/1329751557.html) (03-11-2012).

Romero-Coloma, A.M. (1987). Derecho a la intimidad, a la información y proceso penal. Madrid: Colex.

Ruiz, C., Masip, P., Micó, JL. & al. (2010). Conversación 2.0 y democracia. Análisis de los comentarios de los lectores en la prensa. Comunicación y Sociedad, XXIII, 2.

Varios (2007). Psicología social. Madrid: McGraw Hill.

Varios (Ed.). Declaración de licencia y términos de uso del sitio web de Facebook. (www.facebook.com/legal/terms) (05-11-2012).

Warren, S. & Brandeis, L. (1890). El derecho a la intimidad. Madrid: Civitas.

Watts, D.J. (2004). Six Degrees. The Science of a Connected Age. (Primera edición de 1971). New York: W.W. Norton & Company.

Yuste, B. (2010). Twitter, el nuevo aliado del periodista. Cuadernos de Periodistas, diciembre, 86. Madrid: Asociación de la Prensa de Madrid.

Zainab, A. & Mamuna, K. (2012). Users’ Perceptions on Facebook’s Privacy Policies. ARPN Journal of Systems and Software, 2, 3. (http//scientific-journals.org) (DOI.-10.1111/j.1083-6101.2009.01494.x).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

El presente trabajo analiza cómo ciertas herramientas de Facebook, modelo de las nuevas tecnologías de la información, han derivado en la vulneración de algunos planteamientos éticos vigentes hasta el momento. Este paradigma comunicativo que encuentra su máxima expresión en las redes sociales y la tecnología 2.0, implica un replanteamiento de los principios de la ética informativa relativos a la salvaguarda de la intimidad, la protección de la vida privada y el resguardo de la propia imagen. Esta investigación estudia cómo estas áreas no solo se ven afectadas por los cambios tecnológicos y la propia naturaleza de la fuente informativa, sino por la confianza y desconocimiento de los usuarios, quienes dan primacía a la comunicación por encima de la intimidad. Este fenómeno denominado «extimidad» por Jacques Lacan, se traduce como la intimidad hecha pública a través de las nuevas redes de comunicación o intimidad expuesta. En nuestro análisis expondremos los resortes a través de los cuales se quebranta nuestra privacidad en Facebook, especialmente por medio de la captación de pautas de comportamiento, el empleo de datos derivados de los perfiles, los cambios en la política de privacidad y el reconocimiento facial, avalando su transgresión con documentación derivada de investigaciones realizadas por organismos internacionales. En resumen, analizar la vulneración de la intimidad en las redes sociales y entender qué medidas pueden implementarse para defender nuestros derechos son el objetivo de esta comunicación.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

En la era de las nuevas tecnologías los límites de la intimidad y la vida privada se han visto diluidos. Principios éticos asumidos por la sociedad como inalienables se han visto sometidos a nuevas maneras de vulneración, de suerte que la mayor parte de los estados no poseen fórmulas legales para combatirlas o erradicarlas. Tal es el caso de la intimidad y la vida privada de las personas, cuyos contornos se han distorsionado al verse sus marcos de actuación convencionales superados por la nueva realidad comunicativa: «como hipnotizados, los beneficios percibidos de las redes sociales tienen más peso que los riesgos de la información personal revelada» (Debatin, Lovejoy & al. 2009: 100). La generalidad de los usuarios desconoce que sus datos personales, las elecciones que realiza en los distintos buscadores, los productos que compra o los enlaces que visita son almacenados y empleados para fines de variada naturaleza sin su consentimiento ni conocimiento. Tal como ilustraremos, específicamente invasivas serán las técnicas empleadas para monitorizar la información obtenida en la red social Facebook, cuya arquitectura favorece la pérdida de control de la intimidad a través de la captación de pautas de comportamiento, el empleo de datos derivados de los perfiles, los cambios en la política de privacidad sin consentimiento y el reconocimiento facial. Estos aspectos insólitos hasta el momento han provocado que países como Irlanda, Estados Unidos, Canadá y Alemania hayan elaborado informes para valorar el grado de intromisión de la compañía norteamericana en la vida privada de los ciudadanos, quienes no tienen conocimiento de adónde van a parar sus datos ni cuál es el objeto que persiguen quienes hacen acopio de ellos. Como mostraremos, estos datos son claves no solo por ser personales, sino porque proporcionan información de los individuos que éstos creen inadvertida, y porque los destinatarios de tales datos son desconocidos por los propios individuos. Pese a que las redes sociales favorecen la interacción promoviendo «el mantenimiento y creación de capital social» (Ellison, Steinfield, & al. 2007: 1.161), lo cierto es que las contraprestaciones de su uso en materia de intimidad, desbordan los preceptos éticos imperantes hasta la actualidad.

2. Material y métodos

La metodología que emplearemos será el análisis de contenido de los informes elaborados por organismos internacionales a colación de la vulneración de los principios éticos de intimidad y vida privada en Facebook, así como los artículos científicos y en prensa relativos a la misma temática. Nos valdremos de los informes publicados por los estados que se han anticipado en la regulación de la intromisión en la intimidad a través de las redes sociales, tales como el Alto Comisionado alemán, la Comisión de Privacidad de Canadá, la Federal Trade Commission de los Estados Unidos y la Comisión de Protección de Datos de Irlanda, los cuales nos otorgarán las líneas de actuación básicas para delinear los contornos de los abusos de Facebook en materia de privacidad. Para ello emplearemos una metodología cualitativa deductiva, obrando de lo general a lo particular, analizando las categorías relativas a los términos clave «intimidad», «privacidad» y «propia imagen» y realizando un análisis de contenido de los aspectos concretos que cada país ha priorizado con respecto a esta temática. Por tanto, analizaremos una muestra limitada pero representativa de la documentación realizada sobre la privacidad en Facebook. El motivo que nos ha empujado a estudiar estos países concretos viene precipitado por el hecho de que son los únicos que han publicado estudios relativos a la intimidad en las redes sociales, entendiendo que en el futuro la senda abierta por estos países se ampliará con nuevas investigaciones. Finalmente, emplearemos como material de apoyo estudios previos realizados en relación con nuestra temática en ARPN Journal of Systems and Software, Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication e igualmente en Harvard Business Review para entender el alcance ético y la importancia de las redes sociales.

3. Análisis y estudio: el contexto de las redes sociales y la comunicación global

Las actividades humanas son sociales, de ello deriva que desde hace siglos se haya desarrollado un conglomerado de redes que proveen circuitos de interacción interpersonal, desde el establecimiento del correo a la generalización de la imprenta. Esta interconexión no es una realidad de nuestra sociedad actual, ya que el comercio, la búsqueda de materias primas y el contacto con otros individuos forma parte de nuestra naturaleza, aunque las tecnologías de que disponemos hoy en día hayan dotado al concepto de intercomunicación de un sentido global:

Está surgiendo un nuevo tipo de relaciones entre las personas que no conoce fronteras. La globalización está transformando nuestras vidas. Esta es la característica que mejor define la sociedad en la que vivimos, la que le imprime un rasgo más distintivo (Javaloy & Espelt, 2007: 642).

Gracias a Internet la comunicación global es posible, «de manera global cada vez estamos más ampliamente interconectados» (Ehrlich & Ehrlich, 2013: 1). La conexión de individuos y la transferencia de datos son ahora tanto cuantitativa como cualitativamente superiores. Desde que Tim O´Reilly definiera el modelo de comunicación on-line en «What is the Web 2.0. Patterns and Business Models for the Next Generation of Software» se ha sobrepasado el concepto de mero vínculo: «Como la forma de las sinapsis en la mente […] la Red de las conexiones crece orgánicamente como resultado de la actividad colectiva de todos los usuarios de la web» (O´Reilly, 2007: 22). Así la conectividad es ahora más real que nunca: «Ha habido un correspondiente arrebato de interés en la ciencia de las redes. Los investigadores están estudiando las redes de personas, compañías, juntas directivas, ordenadores, instituciones financieras –cualquier sistema que conste de muchos componentes conectados– para buscar principios comunes» (Morse, 2003: 1).

El auge de la interconexión en la era de la Web 2.0 implica un continuo feed-back entre emisores y receptores, aunque también supone la perversión del concepto de intimidad por parte de los usuarios, quienes valoran por encima de su salvaguarda, su publicidad: «Ha cambiado la forma en que nos construimos como sujetos, la forma en que nos definimos. Lo introspectivo está debilitado. Cada vez nos definimos más a través de lo que podemos mostrar y que los otros ven. La intimidad es tan importante para definir lo que somos que hay que mostrarla. Eso confirma que existimos» (Pérez-Lanzac & Rincón, 2009).

Esta debilitación del ámbito introspectivo ya fue enunciada por Jacques Lacan en 1958 bajo el término de «extimidad», un concepto que entronca con la manifestación pública en la era de las redes sociales, del contenido otrora íntimo:

El término «extimidad» rompe el binario interior-exterior y designa un centro exterior a lo simbólico, lo que conlleva la producción de un hiato en el seno de la identidad consigo mismo, vacío que la identificación no llegará a colmar. Lo «éxtimo» podría definirse como ese objeto extraño que habita en ese Otro que es el sujeto para sí mismo y que eventualmente puede localizarse afuera en el otro (Extimidad. El curso de orientación lacaniana, 2012).

Esta «extimidad» y el auge de la transferencia de datos personales han derivado en que las redes sociales generen una ingente cantidad de información personal, a la postre útil para quienes basan su profesión en la recopilación de datos de los usuarios. En este sentido:

Internet se ha convertido en la Biblia de los publicitarios, que rastrean a los potenciales consumidores por las comunidades on-line más relevantes, en función del producto que se quiera promocionar, identificando a los líderes de opinión, observando las interacciones de los usuarios (social media monitoring). Frente a la búsqueda del target de los tradicionales estudios de mercado, Internet ofrece de manera creciente una información más precisa sobre las características y las preferencias de esos nuevos nichos de espectadores (Lacalle, 2011:100).

Estos datos además de informar acerca de preferencias de los usuarios, revelan parte de su intimidad. La información de los usuarios no solo permite «articular y hacer visible su red de amistades» (Kanai, Bahrami, & al., 2012), ni establecer «conexiones con otras personas que de cualquier otra manera no podrían ser hechas» (Boyd & Ellison, 2007: 210), sino que «provee de un gran poder predictivo» (Jones, Settle & al., 2013) acerca de tendencias y actitudes. Incluso cuando los «individuos prefieren mantener en la intimidad algunos detalles como sus preferencias políticas o su orientación sexual» (Horvát, Hanselmann & Hamprecht, 2012), la información revelada por sus contactos puede desvelar lo que el usuario elige mantener en secreto. Aunque se considere que el mayor riesgo de las redes radica en que «pueden facilitar comportamientos asociados con intrusiones relacionales obsesivas» (Marshall, 2012: 521), otra amenaza inadvertida para los usuarios se halla en la misma formulación de las redes y en la recopilación de datos que éstas realizan.

3.1. La revolución llega a las redes sociales: el nacimiento de Facebook

La dispersión de los usuarios y la constante reformulación tecnológica definen las redes on-line. Así «la Web 2.0 vuelve a dar protagonismo a la conversación social, impulsada por la metamorfosis profunda y continua de las tecnologías de la comunicación» (Ruiz & Masip, 2010: 9). En este contexto nace Facebook, la mayor red social de Internet. Aunque GeoCities o MySpace fueran espacios consolidados, Facebook (creada en 2003 por Mark Zuckerberg) se implantó revolucionando el concepto de interacción: «La proliferación de medios sociales, donde la audiencia crea, comparte y consume información de forma muy diferente a como lo venía haciendo, ha derivado, por un lado, en la desaparición de la intermediación –hoy los usuarios tienen acceso directo a las fuentes de información– y, por otro, en la generación abundante de contenido de muy diversa procedencia» (Yuste, 2010: 86).

Según el último informe «Hábitos de redes sociales en España», Facebook ha desbancado al resto de redes sociales en nuestro país (Libreros, 2011), siendo empleado por el 95% de los usuarios, (seguido por YouTube, Tuenti y Twitter), para enviar mensajes privados (60%), mensajes públicos (50%), compartir y subir fotos (37%), actualizar el perfil (32%) y hacerse fan o seguir marcas comerciales (26%) (Libreros, 2011). Serán estas cinco actividades las que muestren tendencias y establezcan parámetros de un determinado perfil.

3.2. La vulneración de la intimidad y la protección de datos en Internet

Conexión a Internet y una fuente de alimentación son los dos elementos que se necesitan para acceder a nuestra información desde cualquier parte del mundo. La facilidad que proporcionan las nuevas tecnologías para la reproductibilidad de los datos hace que éstos estén disponibles para todo aquel que desee consultarlos y emplearlos: Es preocupante la erosión de la intimidad en numerosos frentes durante los últimos años. La culpa es de tres grandes fuerzas: está la tecnología en sí, que permite seguir la pista de una vida entera y de cualquier persona con una precisión instantánea ante la que a un general de la Stasi se le haría la boca agua. Luego está la búsqueda de beneficios, que hace que las empresas hagan un seguimiento cada vez más detallado de los gustos y costumbres de sus clientes, para personalizar la publicidad. Y por último están los gobiernos, que encuentran maneras de hacerse con muchos de esos datos, además de reunir montañas de ellos en sus propios servidores (Garton, 2010).

Cuando se marca una preferencia, se muestra interés por un anuncio o se elige una aerolínea, los «rastros» de estas actividades delatan gustos y hábitos de consumo. Lo que antes era personal, ahora se torna colectivo: «La masificación de las redes sociales ha generalizado un concepto que los expertos llaman «extimidad», algo así como hacer externa la intimidad, y que tiene su origen en el auge de los «reality shows» y de la Web 2.0» (Pérez-Lanzac & Rincón, 2009). Si por intimidad entendemos la información personal que no debe ser revelada o hecha pública (Kieran, 1998: 83), o aquello que «seria y legítimamente queremos proteger de la publicación» (Olen, 1988: 61), el que sea posible rastrear nuestra presencia en Internet, nuestra «extimidad», implica la vulneración de nuestros derechos: «Renunciar a la intimidad en las compras por Internet parece benigno. Renunciar a ella en los vuelos puede parecer razonable; incluso puede aparentar no ser problemático un circuito cerrado de televisión que opera en lugares públicos. Sin embargo, cuando todo se suma nos encontramos con que no tenemos ninguna intimidad en absoluto» (Johnson, 2010: 193).

4. Formas de vulneración de la intimidad en Facebook

En las redes sociales muchos aspectos de la intimidad quedan desprotegidos, especialmente en Facebook, la plataforma con mayor acceso a gran cantidad de datos personales. Facebook recopila esta información a través de distintas opciones (settings), entre ellas las solicitadas al cumplimentar los datos del perfil o la exploración a través de su célebre opción «me gusta»: «Los «me gusta» de Facebook pueden ser usados para predecir automáticamente y con exactitud un rango de características personales altamente sensibles, incluidas: la orientación sexual, la etnicidad, las perspectivas políticas y religiosas, rasgos de la personalidad, inteligencia, felicidad, el uso de sustancias adictivas, la separación de los padres, edad y género» (Kosinskia, Stillwella & Graepelb, 2013). Aunque existen más de cincuenta y siete patrones de datos personales susceptibles de ser obtenidos por Facebook (Facebook´s Data Pool, 2012), analizaremos únicamente las medidas que han suscitado la crítica por parte de organismos competentes en distintos países, como la «captación de pautas de comportamiento», el «empleo de datos derivados de los perfiles» y los «cambios en la política de privacidad sin consentimiento y reconocimiento facial».

4.1. Captación de pautas de comportamiento

La monetización de los datos personales es uno de los aspectos más controvertidos de Facebook, ya que implica no solo la revelación de información personal, sino el provecho económico de una información sustraída sin consentimiento expreso de sus propietarios: «En agosto de 2009 se publicó un informe en el que se demostraba que Facebook había enviado a sus anunciantes los nombres, edades y profesión de todos aquellos usuarios que «clickeaban» en sus anuncios» (La historia oculta de Facebook, 2010). Esta cesión de información a empresas con intereses ajenos es, sin embargo, desconocido por la generalidad de usuarios de la red social. En palabras del propio Zuckerberg: «Tengo 4.000 correos electrónicos y sus contraseñas, fotos y números de seguridad social, la gente confía en mí» (La historia oculta de Facebook, 2010). En 2009 el control de datos de los usuarios provocó el surgimiento de críticas en defensa de la autoridad del interesado para reclamar su derecho a la intimidad. La Federal Trade Commission (FTC) de los Estados Unidos recibió un gran número de denuncias de usuarios solicitando medidas para que la empresa explicara qué información iba a ser compartida. La propia Comisión exigió que Facebook asegurase la conservación de la privacidad de sus usuarios, así como: «Cumplir sus promesas en el futuro, incluidas las de ofrecer a los consumidores información clara y prominente y la de obtener el consentimiento expreso de éstos antes de que su información sea compartida más allá de los acuerdos de privacidad que han establecido» (Facebook settles FTC Charges, 2011).

A colación de las críticas emitidas, Facebook lanzó una nueva arquitectura que permitía personalizar el nivel de seguridad. Si bien Elliot Schrage, Vicepresidente de Política Pública, mostró el interés de Facebook en otorgar mayor control al usuario, las nuevas herramientas para el control de la información adquirieron una complejidad inusitada para una red social. Para borrar los datos indeseados: «es necesario hacer click en más de cincuenta botones de privacidad, los cuales requieren elegir entre un total de más de 170 opciones» (Bilton, 2010).

4.2. Empleo de datos derivados de los perfiles

El perfil en las redes sociales es el carnet de identidad del usuario, su información es de carácter privado y en consecuencia confidencial, si no existe consentimiento por parte del interesado. Sin embargo, la confidencialidad de los datos contenidos en el perfil se ha diluido, convirtiéndose en reclamo para las empresas. El aumento de intereses creados por terceras partes ha derivado en la masificación de los mensajes publicitarios, y la personalización de éstos. En vista de ello, la Comisión de Privacidad de Canadá denunció a Facebook por oscuridad en el tratamiento de los datos privados en 2009, advirtiendo que determinaría si su actividad infringía la legalidad. Como respuesta, la empresa resolvió modificar de nuevo su política de privacidad: «El portal ha anunciado que desde ahora las aplicaciones desarrolladas por terceras partes deberán especificar a qué datos personales acceden y solicitar permiso para difundirlos. Facebook exigirá a las aplicaciones que especifiquen las categorías de información de los usuarios a las que desean acceder y que obtengan el consentimiento de éstos antes de que se compartan esos datos» (Más intimidad en Facebook, 2009).

Si bien estas medidas fueron tomadas en 2009, Facebook ha realizado distintas acciones que infringen la normativa de protección de datos asumida por la propia empresa:

Facebook prometió que los usuarios podían restringir su información a una audiencia limitada, empleando ciertas opciones de privacidad. Pero lo cierto es que incluso cuando un usuario entra en la página central de privacidad de Facebook, y en el enlace de controlar quién puede ver su perfil e información personal limita el acceso a cierta gente –por ejemplo, «solo amigos»– la opción del usuario es inefectiva cuando llega a aplicaciones de terceras partes que emplean los amigos del usuario (Fair, 2011).

Esta realidad redunda en el hecho de que los usuarios no son informados oportunamente acerca del destino de sus datos, ni tampoco las empresas que van a hacer uso de ellos: «La gente no sabe cómo pueden ser compartidos sus datos personales. Se acaba compartiendo su información privada con personas no autorizadas por su desconocimiento […] la complejidad de los marcos de privacidad y la ausencia de control otorgado a los usuarios es igualmente responsable de la transferencia involuntaria de información» (Zainab & Mamuna, 2012: 124).

La dación de información a terceras partes hace que otras empresas pueden tener acceso a datos no relacionados con la actividad que persiguen. En lo concerniente a las aplicaciones a las que se pueden acceder a través de Facebook, ha vuelto a surgir controversia por el uso indebido de los datos personales: «Durante un largo período de tiempo después de que Facebook empezara a publicar aplicaciones en su sitio, se engañó a la gente acerca de cuánta información era compartida con las aplicaciones que usaban. Facebook decía que cuando la gente autorizaba una aplicación, ésta solo tendría la información de los usuarios que requiere para trabajar. [Sin embargo] las aplicaciones podían acceder a toda la información del usuario –incluso información sin relación con la operación de la aplicación–» (Fair, 2011).

Si el caso de las aplicaciones resulta llamativo, el de los anunciantes es aún más relevante, ya que en los estatutos de Facebook figura expresamente que la compañía no revelará datos personales a ningún anunciante salvo acuerdo expreso con el usuario. Sin embargo este compromiso fue vulnerado durante el intervalo de septiembre de 2008 a mayo de 2010, período durante el cual se ofreció a anunciantes «la identidad de los usuarios que hicieron click en los anuncios» (Fair, 2011).

4.3. Cambios en la política de privacidad sin consentimiento y reconocimiento facial

En 2011 la Comisión de Protección de Datos de Irlanda (DPC) denunció a Facebook por ausencia de nitidez en sus políticas de protección de privacidad. La empresa, con sede internacional en Irlanda, fue instada «a revisar la protección de la privacidad para los usuarios fuera de Norteamérica, [ya que] sus políticas eran demasiado complejas y les faltaba transparencia» (Facebook y Linkedin se comprometen, 2012). No obstante, el irlandés no ha sido el único país que ha entrado en conflicto con la compañía en Europa. El organismo que regula la protección de datos en Alemania ha reabierto la investigación acerca de la tecnología de reconocimiento de caras de Facebook. Johannes Caspar, el Comisionado en Hamburgo, ha afirmado que «el gigante de las redes sociales está recopilando una inmensa base de datos de usuarios ilegalmente» (O´Brien, 2012). El motivo por el que han reabierto las diligencias se resume en la negativa de la empresa a cambiar sus políticas de privacidad: «nos hemos reunido repetidamente con Facebook pero no hemos sido capaces de conseguir su cooperación en este particular, lo cual tiene graves implicaciones para los datos personales» (O´Brien, 2012). Aunque el reconocimiento facial contraviene la política legal de protección de datos europea, la compañía no ha realizado ninguna modificación para adecuar su software a las leyes comunitarias:

La compañía emplea un software analítico para compilar archivos fotográficos de caras humanas, basado en las fotografías subidas por los miembros de Facebook, el cual ha tenido problemas en Europa, donde las leyes de protección de datos requieren del consentimiento explícito de los individuos para ser llevado a la práctica (O´Brian, 2012).

Pese a que las fotografías pueden desetiquetarse y las cuentas pueden ser desactivadas, la permanencia perenne de la información hace que se mantenga en la base de datos de la compañía indefinidamente, aunque no sea pública. Este hecho, que infringe las leyes de la Unión Europea, ha suscitado controversia en Reino Unido: «Facebook permite a los usuarios «desactivar» sus cuentas. Esto significa que la mayor parte de su información se convertirá en invisible para otros visitantes, pero se almacena en los servidores de Facebook indefinidamente. Esto está a mano de cualquier usuario que cambia de opinión y decide reincorporarse. Puede escribir su antiguo nombre de usuario y contraseña y aparecerá justo en el sitio –será como si nunca lo hubiera dejado–. Pero no todo el mundo quiere otorgar a Facebook el derecho de conservar todos sus datos indefinidamente cuando no los están usando y para otros propósitos obvios. Si quieren borrarla permanentemente, necesitarán dar la vuelta al sitio y borrar todo lo que hayan hecho. Eso incluye cada mensaje en el muro, cada imagen y cada grupo del que fuera miembro. Para un gran usuario de Facebook, esto podría tomarle varias horas. Incluso días. Y esto podría violar el Acta de Protección de Datos de Reino Unido» (King, 2007).

Al crear un perfil en Facebook, el usuario le otorga a la empresa el derecho a almacenar de por vida sus datos. Como menciona la propia Licencia y Términos de uso firmada por cada usuario: «Nos concedes una licencia no exclusiva, transferible, con derechos de sublicencia, libre de derechos de autor, aplicable globalmente, para utilizar cualquier contenido de PI que publiques en Facebook o en conexión con Facebook» (Facebook Licencia y Términos, n.d.).

En la legislación española los usuarios están amparados por el derecho de cancelación, el cual les permite solicitar a las empresas que eliminen sus datos una vez se ha extinguido la relación entre ambos: «La legislación española prevé, especialmente a través del ejercicio del derecho de cancelación, que un ciudadano pueda solicitar el borrado de todos aquellos datos personales cuya retención no esté amparada por otro derecho. En el caso de una red social, los datos que voluntariamente publicamos en nuestros perfiles deberían ser borrados una vez retiramos nuestro consentimiento» (Romero, 2012). Pese a ello, Facebook también se arroga el derecho de variar la política de privacidad sin previo aviso y sin consentimiento expreso de los miembros de la red, incluso: «algunos datos que los usuarios han designado como privados –como las listas de amigos– han sido hechos públicos amparados por la nueva política» (Fair, 2011). Asimismo: «Ha designado cierta información del perfil de los usuarios como pública cuando había sido sujeta previamente a los marcos restrictivos de privacidad [y] anuló las decisiones previas de privacidad de los usuarios. Haciéndolo, la compañía cambió materialmente la privacidad de la información de los usuarios y retrospectivamente aplicó estos cambios a toda la información previamente recogida» (Fair, 2011).

Al albor de los excesos en materia de intimidad y vida privada de la compañía, algunas plataformas ciudadanas como «Europe vs Facebook» han emergido con el único objeto de aportar luz y transparencia a la política de privacidad de la empresa norteamericana.

5. Discusión y conclusiones

En vista de la documentación aportada, es legítimo afirmar que Facebook ha obtenido un estatus de privilegio del que ninguna empresa ha sido valedora hasta el momento. Sin embargo, la vulneración de los derechos de los usuarios ha provocado el reclamo para la red social de un control más cercano por parte de los gobiernos y una reformulación de los protocolos de apropiación de imágenes y contenidos sensibles por parte de la empresa. Hemos comprobado cómo su contrato de cesión de derechos ha sido criticado por distintos estados de Europa y por Canadá, a pesar de que la empresa siga manteniendo oscuridad en el tratamiento, transferencia y apropiación de datos de los usuarios. También que muchos ciudadanos han decidido paliar la desregulación en políticas de privacidad denunciando el abuso a organismos competentes en distintos países. Hemos expuesto cómo el desconocimiento y la «extimidad» de los usuarios han provocado que la recolección de datos personales sea en la Web 2.0 más sencillo que nunca: «Proteger el perfil personal», «mantener el nombre fuera de las fotos» y «comprobar la visibilidad» (Boutin, 2010), son elementos que pocos usuarios tienen en cuenta a la hora de realizar actividades en Facebook. La cesión de datos privados, la complejidad de la arquitectura del sitio, la perpetuidad de almacenamiento o los intereses de terceras empresas, son algunos de los temas controvertidos que implican a Facebook, sin que se haya propuesto un nuevo modelo de regulación de datos privados en la red social. No obstante, la Oficina del Comisionado de Protección de Datos de Irlanda ha realizado un informe donde recoge algunas medidas necesarias para la salvaguarda de los datos privados en Facebook, informe cuyas conclusiones pueden ser generalizadas para amparar la intimidad en la red social, como constituir:

• Un mecanismo de opción informada acerca de cómo es usada y compartida la información de los usuarios en el sitio web, también en relación con aplicaciones de terceras partes.

• Una amplia actualización de la política de usos y privacidad para tener en cuenta las recomendaciones y destino de la información entregada por los usuarios.

• Transparencia y control de los usuarios a través de los llamados plugins sociales y como parte de su interacción diaria con el sitio web.

• La eliminación de la información de usuarios y no usuarios a través de los llamados plugins sociales y más ampliamente el borrado de los datos resultantes de las interacciones del usuario con el sitio web.

• Incremento de transparencia y control del uso de datos personales con fines publicitarios.

• Una forma adicional de notificación para los usuarios en relación con el reconocimiento facial y las sugerencias de etiquetado para que Facebook (Irlanda) se asegure de que se está realizando la mejor práctica según la ley (irlandesa).

• Mejora de la capacidad de control del usuario del etiquetado y publicación en los perfiles de otros usuarios.

• Mejora de la capacidad de control del usuario de su adhesión a grupos por sus amigos […] (Report of Data Protection, 2012).

Hasta que estas medidas se normalicen a nivel internacional, los usuarios pueden recurrir a la autorregulación, mostrando un conocimiento y celo mayores con respecto a las informaciones que quieren difundir: «Supongo que podríamos resignarnos y aceptar que el mundo actual es así. La privacidad ha muerto. Acostúmbrate», como aconsejó en una ocasión Scott McNealy, cofundador de Sun Microsystems. O bien podemos defendernos, intentar recuperar parte de nuestra intimidad perdida. Podemos hacerlo fijando nuestras propias normas y compartiéndolas con otros. Podemos hacerlo ejerciendo presión sobre empresas como Facebook, cuya fuente de ingresos, al fin y al cabo, somos nosotros. También podemos exigir a nuestros Gobiernos tres cosas: que frenen sus intromisiones en nuestra intimidad; que regulen mejor a las empresas entrometidas; y que castiguen las infracciones particulares […] Las mismas tecnologías de redes que reducen nuestra privacidad pueden también ayudarnos a defendernos (Garton, 2010).

En la actualidad, y hasta que exista una regulación unitaria, habrá que reclamar a los usuarios la protección de sus derechos, aunque ello implique decidir en qué términos y de qué modo ceden sus datos.

Referencias

Acebedo, R. (2011). La historia de Facebook desde adentro. La Tercera, 29-01-2011. (www.latercera.com/noticia/tendencias/2011/01/659-341582-9-la-historia-de-facebook-desde-adentro.shtml) (10-11-2012).

Bilton, N. (2010). Price of Facebook Privacy? Start Clicking. The New York Times, 12-05-2010. (www.nytimes.com/2010/05/13/technology/personaltech/13basics.html?_r=0) (10-10-2012).

Boutin, P. (2010). 3 Essential Stops to Facebook Privacy. The New York Times, 13-05-2010. (http//gadgetwise.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/06/21/3-essential-steps-to-facebook-privacy) (05-11-2012).

Boyd, D. & Ellison, N. (2007). Social Network Sites: Definition, History and Schol-arship. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 13, 210-230. (DOI:10.1111/j.1083-6101.2007.00393.x) (28-03-2013).

Debatin, B. Lovejoy, J.P. Horn, A.K. Hughes, B. N. (2009). Facebook and Online Privacy: Attitudes, Behaviors, and Unintended Consequences. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication. Volumen 15, Issue 1, 83-108. (DOI:10.1111/j.1083-6101.2009.01494.x). (02-11-2012).

Ehrlich, P. & Ehrlich A. (2013). Can a Collapse of Global Civilization be Avoided? Pro-ceedings of The Royal Society B. 280: 20122845. Royal Society Publishing. Biological Sciences. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2012.2845) (29-03-2013).

El Mundo (Ed.) (2012). Facebook y Linkedin se comprometen a reforzar su privacidad. El Mundo, 29/06/2012. (www.elmundo.es/elmundo/2012/06/29/navegante/1340955573.html) (04-11-2012).

El País (Ed.) (2009). Más intimidad en Facebook. El País, 27-08-2009. (http//tecnolo-gia.elpais.com/tecnologia/2009/08/27/actualidad/1251363663_850215.html) (01-11-2012).

Ellison, N., Steinfield, L. & Cliff, C. (2007). The Benefits of Facebook «Friends»: Social Capital and College Students’ Use of Online Social Network Sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 12, 1143-1168. (DOI:10.1111/j.1083-6101.2007.00367.x) (27-03-2013).

Facebook (Ed.) (2012). Facebook´s Data Pool. Europe vs Facebook. 03-04-2012. (http//europe-v-facebook.org/EN/Data_Pool/data_pool.html) (03-11-2012).

Fair, L. (2011). The FTC’s settlement with Facebook. Where Facebook went wrong. Federal Trade Commission Protecting America´s Consumers. 29-11-2011. (http//busi-ness.ftc.gov/blog/2011/11/ftc%E2%80%99s-settlement-facebook-where-facebook-went-wrong) (02-11-2012).

Federal Trade Commission (Ed.) (2011).Facebook settles FTC Charges that it deceived consumers by failing to keep Privacy Promises. Federal Trade Commission Protecting America´s Consumers, 29-11-2011. (http//ftc.gov/opa/2011/11/privacysettlement.-shtm) (03-10-2012).

Garton, T. (2010). Facebook: restablecer la privacidad. El País, 11-10-2010. (http//el-pais.com/diario/2010/10/11/opinion/1286748011_850215.html) (04-10-2012).

González-Gaitano, N. (1990). El deber de respeto a la intimidad. Información pública y relación social. Pamplona: EUNSA.

Horvát E.A., Hanselmann M. & al. (2012). One Plus One Makes Three (for Social Net-works). PLoS ONE 7(4), e34740. (DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0034740) (27-03-2013).

Johnson, D.G. (2010). Ética informática y ética e Internet. Madrid: Edibesa.

Jones, J.J., Settle, J.E., Bond R.M. & al. (2013). Inferring Tie Strength from Online Directed Behaviour. PLoS ONE 8(1), e52168. (DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0052168) (29-03-2013).

Kanai, R., Bahrami, B., Roylance, R. & al. (2012): Online Social Network Size is Reflected in Human Brain Structure. Proceedings of The Royal Society B. 280: 20122845. Royal Society Publishing. Biological Sciences, 2012 279. (DOI:10.1098/rspb.2011.1959) (28-03-2013).

Kieran, M. (Ed.). (1998). Media Ethics. London: Routledge.

King, B. (2007). Facebook Data Protection Row. Channel 4. 17-11-2007. (www.channel4.com) (01-11-2012).

Kosinskia M., Stillwella, D. & Graepelb, T. (2013). Private Traits and Attributes are Predictable from Digital Records of Human Behaviour. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). University of California, Berkeley. (DOI:10.1073/pnas.1218772110) (29-03-2013).

La historia oculta de Facebook. El Economista, 30-05-2010. (www.eleconomista.es/Interstitial/volver/acierto/telecomunicacionestecnologia/noticias/2188124/05/10/La-historia-oculta-de-Facebook-La-gente-confia-en-mi-son-tontos-del-culo.html) (04-11-2012).

Lacalle, C. (2011). La ficción interactiva. Televisión y Web 2.0. Ámbitos, 20.

Libreros, E. (2011). Las redes sociales en España 2011. IEDGE, 01-12-2011. (http//-blog.iedge.eu/direccion-marketing/marketing-interactivo/social-media-marketing/eduardo-liberos-las-redes-sociales-en-espana-2011) (02-11-2012).

López-Reyes, Ó. (1995). La ética en el periodismo. Los cinco factores que interactúan en la deontología profesional. República Dominicana: Banco Central.

Marshall, T. (2012): Facebook Surveillance of Former Romantic Partners: Associa-tions with PostBreakup Recovery and Personal Growth. Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, 15, 10 (DOI:10.1089/cyber.2012.0125) (29-03-2013).

Morse, G. & Watts, D. (2003). The Science behind Six Degrees. Harvard Business Review Online, Febrero. (http//hbsp.harvard.edu/b02/en/hbr/hbrsa/current/0302/article) (05-11-2012).

Olen, J. (1988). Ethics in Journalism. Englewood Cliffs. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

O’Brien, K. (2012). Germans Reopen Investigation on Facebook Privacy. The New York Times, 15-08-2012. (www.nytimes.com/2012/08/16/technology/germans-reopen-facebook-privacy-inquiry.html) (01-11-2012).

O´Reilly, T. (2007). What is the Web 2.0. Design Patterns and Business Models for the Next Generation of Software. Munich Personal RePEc Archive (MPRA), 4580, 07-11-2007. (http//mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/4580) (05-11-2012).

Pérez-Lanzac, C. & Rincón, R. (2009). Tu «extimidad» contra mi intimidad. El País, 24-03-09. (www.elpais.com) (20-10-2012).

Report of Data Protection Audit of Facebook Ireland Published (2012). Oficina del Comisionado de Protección de Datos de Irlanda (www.dataprotection.ie/viewdoc.asp?-DocID=1175) (02-11-2012).

Romero, Pablo (2012). A las redes sociales les cuesta 'olvidar'. El Mundo, 05-03-2012. (www.elmundo.es/elmundo/2012/02/20/navegante/1329751557.html) (03-11-2012).

Romero-Coloma, A.M. (1987). Derecho a la intimidad, a la información y proceso penal. Madrid: Colex.

Ruiz, C., Masip, P., Micó, JL. & al. (2010). Conversación 2.0 y democracia. Análisis de los comentarios de los lectores en la prensa. Comunicación y Sociedad, XXIII, 2.

Varios (2007). Psicología social. Madrid: McGraw Hill.

Varios (Ed.). Declaración de licencia y términos de uso del sitio web de Facebook. (www.facebook.com/legal/terms) (05-11-2012).

Warren, S. & Brandeis, L. (1890). El derecho a la intimidad. Madrid: Civitas.

Watts, D.J. (2004). Six Degrees. The Science of a Connected Age. (Primera edición de 1971). New York: W.W. Norton & Company.

Yuste, B. (2010). Twitter, el nuevo aliado del periodista. Cuadernos de Periodistas, diciembre, 86. Madrid: Asociación de la Prensa de Madrid.

Zainab, A. & Mamuna, K. (2012). Users’ Perceptions on Facebook’s Privacy Policies. ARPN Journal of Systems and Software, 2, 3. (http//scientific-journals.org) (DOI.-10.1111/j.1083-6101.2009.01494.x).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/05/13
Accepted on 31/05/13
Submitted on 31/05/13

Volume 21, Issue 1, 2013
DOI: 10.3916/C41-2013-20
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 10
Views 1
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?