Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to reflect critically, using the latest data taken from reports, research, publications and other sources, on how to empower children in their daily Internet browsing given current online risks. These risks faced by children are a real concern for teachers, families and researchers and this article will focus on analyzing those online risks which produce the most emotional distress for children, namely grooming and cyberbullying. The use of the Internet, and the ease with which information or situations can be seen on it, has broken the social taboos associated with the risks that children are exposed to. Data such as 44% of children in Spain having felt sexually harassed on the Internet at any time in 2002, or 20% of U.S. children suffering cyberbullying according to a survey of 4,400 students in 2010, indicates the severity of the problem. Therefore, as stated in UNESCO’s MIL Curriculum for Teachers (Media and Information Literacy), it is necessary to work on the responsible use of the Internet by children and to empower them to reduce the possibility of them becoming future victims or bullies. At the end of the article we will develop a list of recommendations to be considered in the design of educational activities focused on the critical training of the minor’s use of the Internet.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

UNESCO’s MIL Curriculum for Teachers gives special importance to reflecting on the opportunities, risks and challenges the Internet presents, and currently offers, with respect to minors. With this in mind, the document places particular emphasis on the importance, both for children themselves and for teachers, of understanding and reflecting on the concepts and characteristics that define the Internet and especially Web 2.0 applications and everything associated with it. Similarly, the curriculum emphasizes the importance of educational processes as key elements in the apprehension and assimilation by minors of the risks and opportunities offered by cyberspace; hence, special emphasis on the need (perhaps, urgency) for teachers to gain as much knowledge as possible on the wide and varied terminology and trends of minors, as well as their user habits, while on the Internet. Teachers also need education in the area of legislation and rights. They need to find out about the main agreements, declarations, white papers and other documents of national and international importance on the subject. According to Wilson, Grizzle, Tuazon, Akyempong and Cheung (2011: 128), «Children and young people are often well acquainted with its applications and can benefit from its use tremendously, but they are also vulnerable. Risks and threats accompany this positive development, often in parallel to those that already exist in the offline world. […] The best way to help them stay out of harm’s way is to empower and educate them on how to avoid or manage risks related to Internet use».

These objectives are set out in detail in two work units (Unit 1: Young people in the virtual world, Unit 2: Challenges and Risks in the virtual world) which propose an exhaustive work of conceptual reflection on Web 2.0, the main usage habits of minors on the Internet, children’s rights and other international documents related to issues involving cyberspace, among other topics. The learning objectives, according to the curriculum developed by UNESCO, focus on guaranteeing that the teacher is able to understand general patterns of behavior as well as the interests of children when they browse online. Furthermore, it attaches particular importance to the teacher’s ability to develop independently educational methods and tools to generate basic resources for children encouraging the responsible use of the Internet as well as raise awareness of the opportunities, challenges and risks posed by the on-line scenario.

With respect to the objectives of these two units of the curriculum, and to the proposals set out in this research paper, we must emphasize that the data portrays a scenario replete with interrogatives. At the same time, it demands the design, systemization and creation of mechanisms (methods, materials, discussion areas) that contribute to improving the use that minors make of the Internet, the role of teachers in the awareness and learning process and the overall opportunities that cyberspace offers.

In the Spanish context, according to figures from the National Institute of Statistics (Spain), 70% of minors between the ages of 0 and14 use a computer and have access to the Internet at home, 52% of which invest a minimum of five hours a week surfing the Internet¹. More recent studies by Bringué, Sábada and Tolsa (2011) establish that 97% of the homes where children between the ages of 10-18 own a computer, 82% are connected to the Internet. To that information must be added that prior to turning ten, 71% of children claim to have had «experiences» in cyberspace. The same report establishes that most minors spend more than an hour a day on the Internet while 38% claim that during the weekend the time they spend on the Internet exceeds two hours a day.

The place where minors spend time on the Internet is equally important insofar as the «where» and «with whom» is established as these factors condition the on-line content consulted. In this respect, the same study indicates that 89% of Spanish adolescents surf the web at home. And of these, one in every three teenagers has the computer in their bedroom, which is a crucially important factor as it limits the supervision that adults (parents, tutors and guardians) may exercise over their children. 21% have the computer in the living room. According to the data in the report, only 15% of homes with children aged between 10 and 18 have a laptop. The report adds that 29.4% consult the Internet at a friend’s house; 28.5% at school; 24.4% at a family member’s house and 10.2% at a cybercafé. Finally, it is interesting to note that 86.5% of Spanish adolescents that use the Internet are alone in front of the computer. Shared use of a computer with friends is 42.9%; with siblings 26.2%; with mothers 17.7% and with fathers 15.8%. The results of the report establish that close to 45% of minors recognize that their parents ask them about their activity while on the Internet. For their part, more than half of students between the ages of 10 and 18 use a computer and the Internet as a support for their schoolwork. The presence in social networks is especially interesting due to their reach and rapid growth. In the Spanish context, according to the findings of Bringué, Sábada and Tolsa (2011), 70% of users between the ages of 10 and 18 are present in a social network, being Tuenti (three out of five consider it their favorite) and Facebook (one in every five has an account) the more popular choices. The study also introduces relative data with respect to the sensitivity of minors in terms of the risks associated with the Internet. It seems relevant that one in every five users between the ages of 10 and 18 believes that they can upload any video image on the Internet. To this information can be added equally disturbing data that shows that 10% of minors surveyed have admitted to using the Internet to do harm to a peer.

According to the study carried out by Bringué and Sábada (2008) during which 25,000 children between the ages of 6 and 18 were surveyed from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru and Venezuela, 46% of the children affirmed that their parents only asked them what they did while surfing the Internet. On the other hand, 36% indicated that their parents «do nothing» while 27% replied that their parents make it a point to «take a look» at them while they surf the Web on a regular basis. The study establishes that only 9% of those children surveyed replied that their parents «do something together» with them while 5% said that their parents look at their emails or check the sites the children have visited. Furthermore, within the Latin-American context, the study reveals that 45% of minors interviewed between the ages of 6 and 9 prefer the Internet over television and that, among the most valued activities, are sending emails, virtual «meetings» and conversations in real time. The possibility of «having fun alone or with others» at a distance is also highly valued by the children surveyed. In the North American context, a study on the use of the Internet by adolescents establishes that leisure (movies, TV series, music etc.), the search of information and receiving instant messages constitute the most popular activities on the Web. The following table, taken from the «Pew Questionnaire on the Internet and American life for parents and teens, 2006»², allows us to verify this type of activity in cyberspace.

The above table shows the growing tendency of minors to dedicate their leisure time to surfing the Internet. It thus establishes an increase in the time dedicated to cyberspace in detriment to other leisure activities which previously had been analogue in nature. Therefore, by virtue of the percentages indicated in the table above, it is possible to identify different work areas within the context of the use of the Internet by younger audiences.

In all cases, the figure and role of the teacher is crucial in order for minors to attain a critical, analytical and qualitative use of the Internet. This set of goals interconnects with the main objectives established in the curriculum of UNESCO with respect to minors and the use of the Internet. Finally, taking into consideration these aims or trains of thought, we can list the following points to consider:

• Conceptual reflection. There is a need to identify and establish the scope of the main concepts introduced by the Internet, as well as their implications, connections and defining characteristics. This is ultimately a necessary challenge in order to have teachers capable of dealing with the Web 2.0 scenario, and the Internet in general, in a solvent and autonomous way. Similarly, teachers must know the content of the main agreements, treaties, declarations and other documents, international or national, and have contributed to the legislation and / or regulation of questions concerning the presence of children in cyberspace and the potential uses they make of it. Teachers must be able to grasp the possibilities of the Internet in their daily work, applying it in the early stages of investigation, preparation of teaching materials, creation of e-activities etc.

• Establishing mechanisms of mediation in the consulting process. The characteristics of the Internet, tied to the uses that children make of it, call for the creation and application of mechanisms that guarantee, through mediation, the use that children make of the Internet. This raises the need to reflect on the most appropriate ways in order to achieve complete digital media literacy among these users.

• Track design for autonomous learning. The changing nature of the Internet calls for the design of strategies and spaces (especially virtual) that reinforces the autonomous training of teachers in the aspects associated with the Internet and childhood.

• Application of transversal and ongoing issues. The conceiving and design of the curriculum should include a transversal focus that strengthens the presence of elements directed at all times at stimulating critical reflection on the relation between the Internet and children. This continuity will mean that the treatment of internet content with respect to children will not be relegated to a meaningless section of this study.

2. Method and Materials

Keeping in mind everything said thus far, this paper strives to carry out a systematic study and analysis of the most relevant documentation on children and the Internet. We proceed to compile and offer a selection of approaches and proposals that researchers, experts and theorists, especially in the Spanish and international contexts, have presented on this topic, to contrast their views with the focus and proposals included in the curriculum of UNESCO.

The results presented below are the fruits of a literature analysis undertaken on international scientific publications of impact, as well as reports on research related to the topic and on expert social organizations. The choice of material is based mainly on contributions related to the risks of «grooming» and «cyberbullying» and on recommendations on how to empower children and lower the risks they face on the Internet. These results are contrasted with the orientation provided in the MIL Curriculum in order to draw pertinent conclusions and prepare future lines of work in this field.

3. Results

Among the eight risks identified in the MIL Curriculum of UNESCO, two that we consider to be of the greatest social concern present today have been selected, namely grooming and cyberbullying. Both risks, indeed threats, generate a negative impact on the emotional development of children.

Two of the three major themes to work on in the Unit of «Challenges and Risks in the virtual world» are 1) the work of understanding the challenges and risks of Internet use by children and 2) their empowerment through the responsible use of the Internet. It is therefore necessary to train teachers in how to empower children to face these challenges and risks.

The aim of the literature analysis is to offer appropriate recommendations to teachers to facilitate their educational tasks in this subject. The following results are reported: the definition of cyberbullying and ‘grooming’, data on its prevalence in Spain, Europe and the United States and, finally, a selection of scientific and social recommendations are made with respect to the empowerment of children due to the challenges and risks that daily on-line contact brings.

3.1. Understanding current risks and challenges: Prevalence of grooming and cyberbullying

Bullying is defined by harassment between peers. When it is measured by on-line interaction it is known as cyberbullying. According to one of the latest publications (Law, Shapka, Hymel, Olson & Waterhouse, 2012), both offline and on-line harassment are similar, although differences do exist between the process and the consequences. The authors state that in offline harassment situations the roles are more marked: one party perpetrates the aggression while the other suffers its consequences. Some go to the defense of the victim while others support the one who harasses. On the other hand, as Law’s research (2012) indicates, these roles are not as defined in on-line interactions. The possibility of reacting to harassing messages received via Facebook, or other social websites, by posting similar negative comments on the profile of the harasser, allows cyberbullying to become interpersonal violence turning it into reciprocal cyber-aggression.

In recent research from the US, from a sample consisting of 4,400 students aged between 11 and 18, 20% acknowledged having been the victim of cyberbullying while 10% admitted to having been both bully and bullied (Hinduja & Patchin, 2010).

In Spain, according to selected data (Garmendia, Garitaonandia, Martínez & Casado, 2011), 16% of minors between the ages of 9 and 16, claimed to have suffered from bullying both offline and on-line. One of the disturbing facts is the ignorance of parents; 67% of guardians of children who had received nasty or hurtful messages claimed that their children had not received such messages, thereby ignoring the reality experienced by their sons and daughters. In Europe, 19% of children aged between 9 and 16 said they had received such comments in the previous 12 months (Lobe, Livingstone, Ólafsson, & Vodeb, 2011).

This risk, harassment between peers in the way of on-line interactions, can have a very negative impact on the emotional development of children; depression, low self-esteem, and in extreme cases suicide, as evidenced by the Jokin case in 2003 or, more recently, the case of Phoebe Prince in 2010.

Most worrying in recent years is detecting, in accordance with the chosen data, the increase in the number of cases of cyberbullying. This in turn leads us to consider the urgent need to train teachers and educators on this subject. Thomas Ryan (2011) claims that teachers who are participating in his research calling for the inclusion of cyberbullying as a subject in higher education. It also appears that the majority of participating teachers identifies these situations and tries to find solutions in some cases, but recognize that they do not know how to manage it properly.

The second group of risks chosen is grooming. This concept refers to the interactions carried out prior to sexual abuse on the part of the predator to gain the trust of the minor and obtain a date for a sexual encounter which generally ends in abuse (Kierkegaard, 2008; McAlinden, 2006). The grooming is prevalent both off and on-line. One of the myths to overcome is that on-line grooming is only perpetrated by strangers while, in fact, in most cases, it is perpetrated by people known to the victims, as in the case of sexual abuse (Bolen, 2003).

In recent years, the increase in these interactions in cyberspace has led the European Parliament to debate the importance of including on-line grooming as a crime against children. Thus, in the recent European Directive (2011), on-line grooming was added as a criminal offense, among other punitive measures, to protect minors from sexual abuse, while promoting increased investment in prevention programs as well.

In the United States, according to data published in 2006, the percentage of soliciting sex on-line (including grooming) dropped from 19% in the year 2000 to 13% in 2005. However, aggressively soliciting sex on-line from minors rose from 4% in 2000 to 7% in 2005 (Finkelhor, Wolak & Mitchell, 2006). In Europe 15% of children between the ages of 11 and16 say they have seen or received sexual messages online in the last 12 months (Livingstone, Haddon, Görzig & Ólafsson, 2011).

In Spain there are two reports that show a substantial difference in the percentage of children who have felt sexually harassed on the Web. On the one hand, according to one report, 9% of Spanish children between 11 and 16 said they had received sexual messages (Garmendia & al., 2011). On the other hand, in the other report, it noted that 44% of Spanish children had felt sexually harassed on the Internet at any given time, within which 11% admitted to having been victim on several occasions (ACPI / PROTEGELES, 2002). This disparity of percentages indicates the need to design specific research on this type of risk to better the understanding of its prevalence in Spain.

The publication of data on cyberbullying and online grooming clearly demonstrates how both risks are present in the lives of children. What unites all researchers is the need to understand this reality on a deeper level and the best way to address it. According to the authors, we must avoid alarmist speeches and promote positive Internet use among minors. The authors coincide in valuing the use of the media for the benefits it brings to children in terms of their learning and development. But they point out the importance of promoting discerning attitudes and prevention when dealing with the media, not only limited to children but also among the community as a whole, with particular reference to educators and families (Anastasiades & Vitalaki, 2011; Livingstone & Helsper, 2010; Oliver, Soler & Flecha, 2009; Pérez-Tornero & Varis, 2010; UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre, 2011; Wolak, Finkelhor, Mitchell, & Ybarra, 2008).

3.2. Recommendations for empowering children in their responsible use of the Internet

Empowering children against the risks associated with the Internet should be included as one of the basic features of any educational curriculum. This inclusion can be treated as specific content, as is the case in the MIL Curriculum, but also as (an educational overlap) (interdisciplinary), ever-present on a day to day basis in any school and in all subjects taught. Due to the increased use of ICTs by children, the educational community cannot only limit itself to defining the empowerment of children to a few scheduled sessions. On the contrary, global educational strategies must be devised to strengthen competencies related to media and information literacy (Perez-Tornero & Varis, 2010).

Educators, on the other hand, as previously shown, demand orientation in order to address this problem. For this very reason the following recommendations are defined as basic by both authors and social organizations:

• Focusing prevention content on interaction and not just on the publication of data, messages or images. Often, content designed to prevent violent situations such as cyberbullying or grooming concentrates on alerting of the danger which, it is assumed, is conveyed exclusively by data or images on the Internet without exploring the ‘why’ of such information. Researchers warn that using language of prohibition and more so with minors and adolescents, is counterproductive. Therefore, the most important factor is to focus on content of prevention within on-line interactions that minors may be exposed to (Valls, Puigvert & Duque, 2008; Wolak & al., 2008).

• Designing community-based prevention models that include the entire community, especially family members. As previously shown, both teachers and families need training in these risks, but also to participate together in the designing of the community models in the prevention of violence (Oliver & al., 2009). Only by jointly coordinating efforts will goals be achieved more effectively. Minors also express their voice with respect to on-line risks at conferences such as the one organized by the CEOP, IYAC (International Youth Advisory Congress), held on July 17, 2008 in London. At the conference critical training in ML within the entire education community was called for; teachers and family, the media as a whole and business in general were requested to get involved in promoting a cyberspace free of violence. When adults acquire more crucial training in dealing with on-line interactions that generate violence, the more children will be inclined to be included and thus empowered in the face of these risks. As a consequence, there will be a more positive impact in the children’s own empowerment.

• Promoting the protagonism of children in the application of prevention programs that address the risks of online interactions. Most documents analyzed indicate how prevention should also focus on the peer group. By empowering children as agents of creative use of the Internet and overcoming on-line risks, training other children or even their own community, one attains more effective programs (UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre, 2011; Wolak & al., 2008). Some examples of international scope that already include direct participation are: the program ThinkUKnow³ from the UK and the international organization I-Safe4. Both are examples that may be useful for teachers. One can browse content designed for families, teachers and children of different ages and establish them as models.

• Designing strategies that include educational and informational media literacy from a humanistic and critical perspective. Media literacy has no meaning unless it is linked to a greater purpose which is the creation of a society based on a culture of peace and ultimately, as stated by Pérez-Tornero (2010: 122), contributes to building a world that is a good place to live, «to create a peaceful and interdependent world that constitutes a good place to live». It is also necessary that children empower themselves in order to be active players in this change, from the building of a society based on a culture of peace, and in the promotion of their creativity to achieve this goal. Therefore, educational strategies must also include this perspective to advance a more humane and less destructive society. Children should be autonomously critical with their use of the media and self-critical with the impact of their use.

Once the main priorities on how to promote the empowerment of children are discussed, the next question is: What steps should a school undertake to achieve this empowerment?

First and foremost, teachers must be trained to confront this critical situation. Their training must be based on the most significant international recommendations with the greatest repercussions within the scientific community, as well as on the social impact it obtains. For instance, having round table discussions (Aubert & al., 2008) on leading articles or books on the subject. Teachers must have access to cutting edge scientific literature in order to exercise their position as critical, intellectual educators (Giroux, 1989). Some topics in their training would be: how to work on media literacy by reflecting on how children themselves use the media; what the real risks are and what they are not; which messages are key to prevention and which are a waste of time. At the same time, teachers need to be encouraged to share their training with families. It is essential to create spaces for debate and interaction between teachers and families so that both groups are better prepared than they are today.

Secondly, design specific and transversal strategies implementing media literacy learning, especially with the idea of further developing critical thinking. To do this it would be necessary to involve the students themselves in the design of educational activities to promote a critical understanding of abusive and violent interactions (either cyberbullying or grooming). Also necessary is the promoting of joint projects based on their creativity and collective intelligence (Levy, 1997) to help overcome such interactions. Teachers have the responsibility to ensure that the design and implementation of the activity are both carried out successfully. Continuous assessment of the activities and initiatives is essential to evaluate their results and impact. Therefore, it is necessary to establish mechanisms for this ongoing evaluation.

Thirdly, the risks discussed are those that affect the emotional development of children, therefore the emotional dimension must not be ignored. Ultimately, both grooming and cyberbullying are interactions that directly affect the self-esteem of victims and their deepest feelings. They also foment a sense of violence within those who carry out and support these acts. Therefore, when we talk about empowering children we also must take into account the interactions between them. Are they repeating social patterns without being aware of it? As teachers, have we given them enough media literacy to recreate their identities regardless of social influences? Finally, up to what point have we offered children the opportunities to learn how to counter on-line violence? A key challenge for media literacy is precisely to include the link between its acquisition as the basis for recreation of the self and values ??of active citizenship, namely nonviolence and solidarity.

4. Conclusions

The implementation of the MIL Curriculum in schools favours the empowerment of children in their use of the media. The acquisition of skills related to media literacy and informational training is essential for their education in a constantly changing world. The inclusion of a specific unit of content related to on-line risks in the MIL Curriculum is considered positive since it is one of the demands of teacher training.

In the unit analyzed the most common risks are identified. In this article we have extended the description of two of them, cyberbullying and grooming. The prevalence of both risks in Europe, Spain and the United States is similar. The data clearly demonstrates the need to work on preventing these risks, including it in the daily education strategy as well as dealing with it in specific sessions.

It is essential that the application of the MIL Curriculum accompany the recommendations defined; the critical reflection of on-line interactions, the inclusion of the whole community, the leadership of children in educational activities and, finally, the aim of constructing a society based on a culture of peace with the children being the builders of a better and more just world to live in.

Footnotes

1 Questionnaire on information technologies in the home. First semester of 2006 (National Institute of Statistics). (www.ine.es/jaxi/menu.do?type=pcaxis&path=/t25/p450/a2006s1&file=pcaxis) (12-1-2012).

2 Survey Parents and Teens (2006). Pew Internet & American Life Project. Research carried out by Pew Research Centre. (www.pewinternet.org/Shared-Content/Data-Sets/2006/November-2006—Parents-and-Teens.aspx) (12-1-2012).

3 www.thinkuknow.co.uk (12-1-2012).

4 www.isafe.org/channels/?ch=ai (12-1-2012).


Draft Content 489196589-26669-es013.jpg

References

ACPI/PROTEGELES (Ed.) (2002). Seguridad infantil y costumbres de los menores en Internet. Madrid: Defensor del Menor en la Comunidad de Madrid.

Anastasiades, P.S. & Vitalaki, E. (2011). Promoting Internet Sa fety in Greek Primary Schools: The Teacher’s Tole. Educational Technology & Society, 14(2), 71-80.

Aubert, A., Flecha, A., García, C., Flecha, R. & Racionero, S. (2008). Aprendizaje dialógico en la sociedad de la información. Barcelona: Hipatia Editorial.

Bolen, R.M. (2003). Child Sexual Abuse: Prevention or Pro mo tion? Social Work, 48(2), 174.

Bringué, X. & Sádaba, C. (2008). La generación interactiva en Ibe roa mérica 2008. Niños y adolescentes ante las pantallas. Ma drid: Fundación Interactiva.

Bringué, X., Sádaba, C. & Tolsa, J. (2011). La generación inter ac tiva en Iberoamérica 2010. Niños y adolescentes ante las pantallas. Madrid: Foro Generaciones Interactivas.

Directive of the European Parliament and of The Council (2004). Combating the Sexual Abuse and Sexual Exploitation of Children and Child Pornography, and Replacing Council Frame work Decision 2004/68/JHA (2011).

Finkelhor, D., Wolak, J. & Mitchell, K. (2006). Online Victi mization of Youth: Five Years Later. Funding by Funded by the U.S. Congress through a Grant to the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children.

Garmendia, M., Garitaonandia, C., Martínez, G. & Casado, M.A. (2011). Riesgos y seguridad en Internet. Los menores españoles en el contexto europeo. Bilbao: Universidad del País Vas co/ Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, EU Kids Online.

Giroux, H.A. (1989). Los profesores como intelectuales. Barce lo na: Paidós.

Hinduja, S. & Patchin, J. (2010). Cyberbullying. Identification, Prevention, and Response. Cyberbullying Research Center. (www.cyberbullying.us/Cyberbullying_Identification_Prevention_Response_Fact_Sheet.pdf) (12-1-2012)

Kierkegaard, S. (2008). Cybering, Online Grooming and Ageplay. Computer Law & Security Review, 24(1), 41-55. (DOI: 10. 10 16/ j.clsr.2007.11.004).

Law, D.M., Shapka, J.D., Hymel, S., Olson, B.F. & Water house, T. (2012). The Changing Face of Bullying: An Empirical Comparison between Traditional and Internet Bullying and Victi mization. Computers in Human Behavior, 28(1), 226-232. (DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2011.09.004).

Lévy, P. (1997). Collective Intelligence: Makind’s Emerging Wordl in Cyberspace. Plenum Trade: New York, USA.

Livingstone, S. & Helsper, E. (2010). Balancing Opportunities and Risks in Teenagers’ Use of the Internet: The Role of Online Skills and Internet Self-efficacy. New Media & Society, 12(2), 309-329. (DOI: 10.1177/1461444809342697).

Livingstone, S., Haddon, L., Görzig, A. & Ólafsson, K. (2011). Risks and Safety on the Internet: The Perspective of European Children. Full findings. LSE, London: EU Kids Online.

Lobe, B., Livingstone, S., Ólafsson, K. & Vodeb, H. (2011). Cross-national Comparison of Risks and Safety on the Internet. Initial Analysis from the EU Kids Online Survey of European Children. London: EU Kids Online, LSE.

McAlinden, A. (2006). Setting ‘em up: Personal, Familial and Ins titutional Grooming in the Sexual Abuse of Children. Social & Legal Studies, 15(3), 339-362. (DOI: 10.1177/096466390 60 66 613).

Oliver, E., Soler, M. & Flecha, R. (2009). Opening schools to all (women): Efforts to Overcome Gender Violence in Spain. British Journal of Sociology of Education, 30(2), 207-218. (DOI: 10.10 80/ 01425690802700313).

Pérez-Tornero, J. & Varis, T. (2010). Media Literacy and New Humanism. Moscow: UNESCO. Institute for Information Tech nologies in Education.

Ryan, T., Kariuki, M. & Yilmaz, H. (2011). A Comparative Ana lysis of Cyberbullying Perceptions of Preservice Educators: Canada and Turkey. Turkish Online Journal of Educational Tech nology, 10(3), 1-12.

UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre (Ed.) (2011). Child Sa fety Online. Global Challenges and Strategies. Florence: UNICEF.

Valls, R., Puigvert, L. & Duque, E. (2008). Gender Violence among Teenagers - Socialization and Prevention. Violence Against Women, 14(7), 759-785. (DOI: 10.1177/1077801208320365).

Wilson, C., Grizzle, A., Tuazon, R., Akyempong, K. & Che ung, C.K. (2011). Media and Information Literacy Curri culum for Teachers. Paris: UNESCO.

Wolak, J., Finkelhor, D., Mitchell, K.J. & Ybarra, M.L. (2008). Online ‘Predators’ and their Victims: Myths, Realities, and Implications for Prevention and Treatment. American Psychologist, 63(2), 111.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

El objetivo de este artículo es reflexionar críticamente, a partir de una selección de últimos informes, investigaciones, publicaciones y otras fuentes, sobre las orientaciones de cómo «empoderar» a los y las menores frente a los riesgos on-line actuales. Entre los diferentes riesgos quisiéramos destacar los que más violencia emocional producen; las situaciones de «grooming» o ciberacoso, cada vez más visibles y urgentes de prevenir conjuntamente. El uso de Internet y la facilidad de visibilizar cualquier información o situación ha permitido romper el tabú social respecto a estos riesgos. Datos como el que el 44% de menores en España se había sentido acosado sexualmente en Internet en alguna ocasión en el 2002, o el que el 20% de niños en Estados Unidos sufría ciberacoso, según una encuesta realizada a 4.400 estudiantes en el 2010, nos indican la gravedad de la problemática. Por ello, tal y como se recoge en el Currículum MIL de la UNESCO para profesores (Media and Information Literacy), es necesario trabajar el uso responsable de Internet por parte de los y las menores, para empoderarlos evitando que puedan convertirse en futuras víctimas o acosadores. A partir de los riesgos reales que pueden padecer, así como las respuestas científicas y sociales que se han dado al respecto, elaboraremos una serie de recomendaciones a tener en cuenta en el diseño de actividades educativas enfocadas a la capacitación crítica de los y las menores en cuanto su uso de Internet.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

El Currículum MIL de la UNESCO para profesores (Media and Information Literacy: alfabetización mediática e informacional) confiere una especial importancia a la reflexión sobre las oportunidades, los riesgos y los desafíos que Internet presenta y ofrece actualmente con relación a los menores. En este sentido, el documento hace especial hincapié en la importancia –tanto para los propios menores como para los docentes– de conocer y reflexionar en torno a los conceptos y características que definen la Red y, en especial, la Web 2.0 y el conjunto de aplicaciones que ésta conlleva. Del mismo modo, el currículum enfatiza la relevancia de los procesos educativos como elementos decisivos en la aprehensión y en la asimilación por parte de los menores de los riesgos y oportunidades que les ofrece el ciberespacio. Por ello, se hace especial hincapié en la necesidad –quizás, urgencia– de que los docentes adquieran un acervo de conocimientos amplio y variado sobre la terminología, las tendencias y hábitos de uso de los menores en la Red, e igualmente, sobre el contenido que, en materia de legislación, derechos, etc., introducen los principales acuerdos, declaraciones, libros blancos y otros documentos de cariz nacional e internacional sobre la materia. Según Wilson, Grizzle, Tuazon, Akyempong y Cheung (2011: 128), «los niños y los jóvenes suelen estar bien familiarizados con estas aplicaciones y pueden beneficiarse de su uso fácilmente, pero son también vulnerables. Riesgos y amenazas se entrecruzan en su desarrollo, a menudo en paralelo a las que ya existen en el mundo off-line. [...]. La mejor manera de ayudarles a mantenerse fuera de peligro consiste en formarlos y educarlos sobre cómo evitar o controlar los riesgos de Internet».

Este conjunto de objetivos se recogen, de forma detallada, en dos unidades de trabajo (Unit 1: «Jóvenes en el mundo virtual» (Young people in the virtual world); Unit 2: «Cambios y riesgos en el mundo virtual» (Challenges and risks in the virtual world) que proponen un trabajo exhaustivo de reflexión conceptual sobre la Web 2.0, los principales hábitos de uso de los menores en la Red, los derechos del niño y otros documentos internacionales que tienen relación con cuestiones vinculadas con el ciberespacio, entre otros asuntos. Los objetivos del aprendizaje, según el currículum elaborado por UNESCO, se centran en garantizar que los docentes sean capaces de comprender los patrones de conducta generales, así como los intereses de los niños en su navegación on-line. Además, se confiere especial importancia a la capacidad del profesor para desarrollar de forma autónoma métodos educativos, utilizar herramientas y generar recursos básicos para fomentar en los niños el uso responsable de Internet, así como la sensibilización de éstos frente a las oportunidades, desafíos y riesgos del escenario on-line.

Con relación a los objetivos de estas dos unidades del currículum, y en relación a los planteamientos del presente artículo de investigación, cabe señalar que los datos dibujan un escenario que inaugura numerosos interrogantes, al tiempo que exige el diseño, la sistematización y la creación de mecanismos (métodos, materiales, espacios de debate, etc.) que contribuyan a mejorar el uso que los menores y jóvenes hacen de la Red, el papel del docente en los procesos de sensibilización y aprendizaje de las posibilidades del escenario on-line y el aprovechamiento general, de unos y otros, de las oportunidades que ofrece el ciberespacio.

En el escenario español, por ejemplo, según cifras del Instituto Nacional de Estadística, el 70% de los menores entre 0 y 14 años son usuarios de ordenador, tienen acceso a Internet desde casa y, de éstos, más del 52% invierte un mínimo de cinco horas semanales a la navegación por la Red1. Estudios más recientes, como los desarrollados por Bringué, Sádaba y Tolsa (2011), establecen que el 97% de los hogares con hijos de entre 10 y 18 años posee un ordenador y un 82% lo tiene conectado a Internet. A ello, se une que, antes de cumplir los 10 años, el 71% de los niños manifiesta haber tenido «experiencias» en el ciberespacio. El mismo informe establece que la mayoría de los menores dedica más de una hora al día a Internet; mientras que un 38% afirma que, durante el fin de semana, su uso de la Red supera las dos horas al día.

El lugar en el que se produce esta navegación resulta igualmente importante en la medida en que establece «dónde» y «con quién» los menores están consultando contenidos on-line. Con relación a ello, el mismo estudio apunta que el 89% de los adolescentes españoles navega desde casa. De ellos, uno de cada tres posee el ordenador en su propia habitación, aspecto de crucial importancia pues limita las posibilidades de mediación y seguimiento por parte de los adultos (padres, madres, tutores, etc.). Un 21% tiene el ordenador en el salón o cuarto de estar de la vivienda familiar. Según los datos del informe, solo un 15% de los hogares con hijos de entre 10 y 18 años disponen de un ordenador portátil. El informe añade que un 29,4% consulta la Red en casa de un amigo; un 28,5% en el colegio; un 24,4% en casa de un familiar; y un 10,2% en un cibercafé. Finalmente, resulta de interés destacar que un 86,5% de los adolescentes españoles que utilizan Internet están solos frente a la pantalla del ordenador. El uso compartido con los amigos es de un 42,9%; con los hermanos es de un 26,2%; con las madres de un 17,7%; y con los padres de un 15,8%. Los resultados del informe establecen que cerca de un 45% de los menores reconoce que sus padres les preguntan por el tipo de cosas que hacen durante el tiempo que pasan en la Red. Por su parte, se indica además que más de la mitad de los estudiantes, de entre 10 y 18 años, utiliza el ordenador e Internet como apoyo en las tareas escolares. La presencia en las redes sociales resulta especialmente interesante por su alcance y rápido crecimiento. En el contexto español, según apuntan Bringué, Sádaba y Tolsa (2011), el 70% de los usuarios de entre 10 y 18 años está presente en alguna red social, siendo Tuenti (tres de cada cinco la consideran la preferida) y Facebook (el 20% está dado de alta) las que presentan un mayor éxito. El estudio introduce además datos relativos a la sensibilidad de los menores frente a los riesgos de la Red. Respecto a este asunto, resulta relevante que el 20% de usuarios de entre 10 y 18 años considere que puede publicar cualquier vídeofoto en Internet. A ellos, se añaden datos igualmente preocupantes que señalan que el 10% de los menores encuestados reconoce haber utilizado Internet para perjudicar a un compañero.

Según el estudio realizado por los autores Bringué y Sádaba (2008), en el marco del cual se encuestaron a 25.000 niños de entre 6 y 18 años de Argentina, Brasil, Chile, Colombia, México, Perú y Venezuela, el 46% de los menores afirmó que sus padres se limitan a preguntarles «qué hacen mientras navegan por Internet». Por otro lado, un 36% indicó que sus progenitores «no hacen nada» y un 27% señaló que «echan un vistazo» de forma puntual. El estudio establece que únicamente un 9% de los encuestados apuntó que «hacemos algo juntos»; mientras que un 5% indicó que «miran mi e-mail o comprueban los sitios que visité». Además, en el contexto iberoamericano, señala que un 45% de los menores de entre 6 y 9 años, prefiere Internet antes que la televisión y, entre los usos de la Red más valorados, se encuentra el envío de mensajes vía e-mail, el «encuentro» y conversación virtual en tiempo real, y la posibilidad de «divertirse a solas o con otros» desde la distancia. En el contexto norteamericano, un estudio sobre el uso de la Red por el público adolescente establece que el ocio (cine, series de televisión, música, etc.), la búsqueda de información y la recepción y el envío instantáneo de mensajes constituyen las actividades que desarrollan con mayor frecuencia en la Red. La siguiente tabla, derivada de la «Encuesta Pew sobre Internet y la vida americana de padres y adolescentes, 2006»2, permite comprobar este tipo de usos del ciberespacio:

La tabla anterior demuestra la tendencia creciente de los menores a destinar su tiempo de ocio a navegar por la Red. En este sentido, se establece un incremento del tiempo dedicado al ciberespacio, en detrimento de otras actividades lúdicas y de entretenimiento que anteriormente se venían desarrollando en escenarios de naturaleza analógica.

Por todo ello, y en virtud del conjunto de datos porcentuales expuestos anteriormente, es posible señalar diferentes ámbitos de trabajo en el contexto del uso de Internet por el público más joven. En todos ellos, la figura y el rol del docente y de la institución educativa se presentan como figuras de una crucial y especial trascendencia en aras de alcanzar, por parte de nuestros menores, un uso crítico, analítico y cualitativo de la red de redes. Este conjunto de metas enlazan con los objetivos principales que el Currículum UNESCO establece con relación a los menores y el uso de la Red. En definitiva, entre estos hitos o líneas de reflexión, podríamos apuntar los siguientes:

• Reflexión conceptual. Se plantea la necesidad de determinar y establecer el alcance de los principales conceptos que introduce la red de redes, así como de sus implicaciones, conexiones y características definitorias. Se trata, en definitiva, de un reto necesario para poder contar con docentes capaces de manejarse con solvencia y autonomía en el escenario que introduce la Web 2.0 y, en general, Internet. Del mismo modo, el profesor debe conocer el contenido de los principales acuerdos, tratados, declaraciones y otro tipo de documentos que, a nivel internacional o nacional, han contribuido a legislar y/o reglamentar las cuestiones relativas a la presencia y los posibles usos de los niños en el ciberespacio. El docente debe ser capaz de aprehender las posibilidades de la red de redes en su quehacer cotidiano, aplicándolas en las etapas de indagación, elaboración de materiales didácticos, creación de e-actividades, etc.

• Establecimiento de mecanismos de mediación en el proceso de consulta. Las características de la red de redes, unidas al tipo de usos que los menores realizan de la Red demandan la creación y aplicación de mecanismos que garanticen una acción mediadora en el uso que éstos realizan de Internet. Para ello, se plantea la necesidad de reflexionar sobre las vías más idóneas en aras de alcanzar una correcta y completa alfabetización digital mediática de estos usuarios.

• Diseño de vía para la autonomía en el aprendizaje. El cambiante escenario de la red de redes exige el diseño de estrategias y espacios (especialmente, virtuales) que potencie la formación autónoma de los docentes en los aspectos vinculados con la Red y la infancia.

• Aplicación de planteamientos transversales y continuados. La concepción y diseño del currículum debe contemplar un enfoque transversal que potencie la presencia de elementos dirigidos, en todo momento, a estimular la reflexión crítica en torno a la relación de Internet con el público más joven. Esta continuidad evitará que el tratamiento de los contenidos centrados en los menores no quede relegado a un espacio estanco de este documento curricular.

2. Método y materiales

Con relación a lo expuesto anteriormente, y partiendo de las anteriores propuestas, el presente trabajo se ha elaborado a partir del estudio sistemático y el análisis de la documentación más relevante sobre Internet y niños. En este sentido, se ha procedido a compilar y ofrecer una selección de los planteamientos y propuestas que investigadores, expertos y teóricos, especialmente en el ámbito español e internacional, han presentando en torno a esta temática, para contrastar sus «miradas» con el enfoque y las propuestas que se recogen en el currículum de la UNESCO.

Los resultados que se presentan a continuación son fruto del análisis bibliográfico realizado sobre publicaciones de impacto científico internacional e informes tanto de investigaciones relacionadas con la materia como de organizaciones sociales expertas. La selección de la documentación se ha basado principalmente en las contribuciones relacionadas con los riesgos de «grooming» y «ciberacoso» y las recomendaciones sobre cómo empoderar a los menores frente a estos riesgos. Dichos resultados se han contrastado con las orientaciones ofrecidas en el Currículum MIL para extraer las conclusiones pertinentes y las futuras líneas de trabajo en esta materia.

3. Resultados

Entre los ocho riesgos identificados en el Currículum MIL de la UNESO, se han seleccionado dos de los riesgos con mayor preocupación social presentes a día de hoy: el «grooming» y el ciberacoso. Ambos generan un impacto negativo en el desarrollo emocional de los menores.

Dos de los tres temas importantes a trabajar en la Unidad de «Retos y riesgos del mundo virtual» son; el trabajo de la comprensión de los desafíos y riesgos del uso de Internet por parte de los menores y su empoderamiento a través del uso responsable de Internet. Y por ello, es necesario formar a los formadores en cómo empoderar a los niños y niñas delante de estos desafíos y riesgos.

La finalidad del análisis bibliográfico es ofrecer las recomendaciones adecuadas al profesorado para facilitar su tarea educativa en esta materia. Como resultados se exponen; la definición de ciberacoso y «grooming», datos sobre su prevalencia en España, Europa, y Estados Unidos, y como último una selección de recomendaciones científicas y sociales respecto al empoderamiento de los menores en cuanto a los desafíos y los riesgos derivados del contacto on-line diario.

3.1. Comprender los riesgos y desafíos actuales: Prevalencia del «grooming» y «ciberbullying»

El «bullying» se define como el acoso entre iguales, cuando se media por las interacciones on-line, se conoce como ciberacoso. Según una de las últimas publicaciones (Law, Shapka, Hymel, Olson & Waterhouse, 2012), tanto el acoso offline como on-line son similares, aunque existen también diferencias tanto en el proceso como en las consecuencias. Según los autores, en las situaciones de acoso off-line los roles son más diferenciados, uno es el que ejerce la violencia, y el otro el que la padece, algunos se suman a apoyar al acosador y otros a defender a la víctima. En cambio, según la investigación realizada por Danielle Law y otros (2012), estos roles no están tan delimitados en las interacciones on-line. La posibilidad de reaccionar delante de mensajes acosadores recibidos mediante Facebook u otras redes sociales, publicando comentarios similares en el perfil del acosador, permite que el ciberacoso se convierta según los autores en violencia interpersonal, convirtiéndose así en una ciberagresión recíproca.

En una de las últimas investigaciones en Estados Unidos, la muestra compuesta por 4.400 estudiantes de 11-18 años reconocieron en un 20% haber sido alguna vez víctima de ciberacoso. En la misma muestra un 10% reconoció haber sido tanto acosador como acosado (Hinduja & Patchin, 2010).

En España, según los datos seleccionados (Garmendia, Garitaonandia, Martínez & Casado, 2011), el 16% de los menores entre 9 y 16 años afirmaban haber sufrido «bullying» tanto off-line como on-line. Uno de los datos preocupantes es el desconocimiento de los padres, el 67 % de los tutores legales de los menores que habían recibido mensajes desagradables o hirientes afirmaban que sus hijos no habían recibido este tipo de mensajes, ignorando así la realidad sufrida por sus hijos e hijas. En Europa, el 19% de menores comprendidos entre las edades 9-16 años afirmaban que habían recibido este tipo de comentarios en los últimos 12 meses (Lobe, Livingstone, Ólafsson & Vodeb, 2011).

Este riesgo, el acoso entre iguales mediado por las interacciones on-line, genera un impacto muy negativo en su desarrollo emocional; depresiones, baja autoestima, y en el último extremo el suicidio, como fue el caso de Jokin en el 2003 o más recientemente el caso de Phoebe Prince en el 2010.

Lo más preocupante es detectar cómo en los últimos años, según los datos seleccionados, ha crecido el número de situaciones de ciberacoso, y ello nos lleva a plantearnos la urgencia de una formación crítica de los formadores en esta materia. Según Ryan (2011), el profesorado participante en su investigación reclama la inclusión del ciberacoso como materia en la formación superior. Así mismo, se constata que la mayoría del profesorado participante identifica estas situaciones, e intentan en algunos casos buscar soluciones, pero reconocen que no saben como gestionarlo adecuadamente.

El segundo de los riesgos seleccionados es el «grooming». Este concepto se refiere a las interacciones realizadas previamente al abuso sexual por parte del acosador para ganarse la confianza del menor y así acceder a establecer una cita o encuentro sexual, que generalmente acaba en abuso (Kierkegaard, 2008; McAlinden, 2006). El «grooming» está presente tanto off-line como on-line. Una de las supersticiones a superar es considerar que el «grooming» on-line únicamente está perpetrado por personas extrañas al menor, pero en la mayoría de los casos, son realizadas por personas conocidas por los y las menores (McAlinden, 2006) tal y como sucede en los abusos sexuales (Bolen, 2003).

El aumento de la presencia de estas interacciones en el ciberespacio ha facilitado que en los últimos años el Parlamento Europeo debatiera sobre la importancia de incluirlo como un delito contra los menores. Así es como en la reciente Directiva Europea (2011) se ha añadido como ofensa criminal el «on-line grooming» entre otras mesuras punitivas para proteger a los y las menores frente a los abusos sexuales, así como la promoción de una mayor inversión en programas de prevención.

En Estados Unidos según los datos publicados en el 2006, el porcentaje de solicitaciones sexuales on-line (entre ellas el «grooming») descendió del 19% resultante en el 2000 al 13% en el 2005. Pero en cambio, las solicitaciones sexuales on-line más agresivas hacia las menores subieron de un 4% en el 2000 a un 7% en el 2005 (Finkelhor, Wolak & Mitchell, 2006).

En Europa el 15% de los menores de 11-16 años dicen haber visto o recibido mensajes sexuales en Internet en los últimos 12 meses (Livingstone, Haddon, Görzig & Ólafsson, 2011). En España, tenemos dos informes que muestran una diferencia sustancial en el porcentaje de menores que se han sentido acosados sexualmente en la Red. Por un lado, según uno de los informes, el 9% de los menores españoles entre 11 y 16 años afirmaban haber recibido mensajes sexuales (Garmendia & al., 2011). Por otro lado, en otro de los informes seleccionados se constataba que un 44% de los menores españoles se habían sentido acosados sexualmente en Internet en alguna ocasión, dentro de ellos un 11% reconocía haber sido víctima en diversas ocasiones (ACPI/PROTEGELES, 2002). Esta disparidad de porcentajes indica la necesidad de diseñar investigaciones específicas sobre este tipo de riesgo para profundizar mejor en el conocimiento de su prevalencia en España.

La exposición de los datos de ciberacoso y on-line «grooming» nos indica cómo ambos riesgos están presentes en las vidas de los menores. Lo que une a todos los investigadores es la necesidad de conocer profundamente esta realidad para saber cuál es la mejor manera de abordarla. Según los autores, hay que evitar los discursos alarmistas y promover un uso positivo de Internet entre los menores. Coinciden en valorar el uso de los medios por los beneficios que se extraen en el aprendizaje y el desarrollo de los niños y niñas. Pero señalan la importancia de promover una formación crítica y prevención no solo limitada a los y las menores, sino ampliada a toda la comunidad, especialmente a las personas formadoras y las familias (Anastasiades & Vitalaki, 2011; Livingstone & Helsper, 2010; Oliver, Soler, & Flecha, 2009; Pérez-Tornero & Varis, 2010; UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre, 2011; Wolak, Finkelhor, Mitchell, & Ybarra, 2008).

3.2. Recomendaciones para empoderar a los y las menores en su uso responsable de Internet

El empoderamiento de los menores frente a los riesgos citados debe ser incluido como una de las líneas básicas de cualquier currículum educativo. Esta inclusión puede ser tratada tanto como un contenido específico, tal y como se incluye en el Currículum MIL, pero además como una línea educativa transversal presente en el día a día de cualquier escuela. Debido al incremento del uso de las TIC por parte de los y las menores, la comunidad educativa no puede delimitar únicamente el empoderamiento de los menores a unas sesiones programadas. Al contrario, se deben diseñar estrategias educativas globales para afianzar las competencias relacionadas con la alfabetización mediática (Pérez-Tornero & Varis, 2010) e informacional.

Pero los formadores, tal y como se ha recogido anteriormente, reclaman orientaciones para abordar esta problemática. Por este mismo motivo, se sintetizan a continuación las recomendaciones que tanto autores como organizaciones sociales coinciden en definir como básicas:

• Focalizar los contenidos de prevención en las interacciones y no únicamente en la publicación de datos, mensajes o fotos. A menudo, los contenidos diseñados para prevenir situaciones de violencia, ya sea de ciberbacoso o de «grooming», se centran en alertar del peligro que supone facilitar según qué datos, fotos, etc., en la Red, sin profundizar con ellos el por qué. Los equipos de investigación advierten que utilizar un lenguaje de prohibición, y más con menores y adolescentes, no lleva a ningún resultado. Por ello, lo más importante es focalizar los contenidos de prevención en las interacciones que tienen los y las menores (Valls, Puigvert & Duque, 2008; Wolak & al., 2008).

• Diseñar modelos comunitarios de prevención, incluyendo a toda la comunidad, especialmente a los familiares. Como se ha comprobado en los anteriores apartados, tanto el profesorado como las familias necesitan formarse en estos riesgos, pero también participar conjuntamente en el diseño de modelos comunitarios de prevención de la violencia (Oliver & al., 2009). Sólo coordinándose conjuntamente se logrará una mayor efectividad. Los menores también expresan sus reflexiones y opiniones en este tema de los riesgos en congresos, como el organizado por la CEOP, «IYAC. International Youth Advisory Congress», celebrado el 17 de julio del 2008 en Londres. Así reclamaron la formación crítica de toda la comunidad educativa, profesorado y familiares, así como también de los medios de comunicación y las empresas, además de demandar su implicación en la promoción de una red libre de violencia. Las personas adultas al adquirir una mayor capacitación crítica respecto a las interacciones on-line que generan violencia, favorecen la inclusión de los menores en un entorno más empoderado delante de estos riegos y por consecuente impacta de forma positiva en su propio empoderamiento.

• Promover el protagonismo de los menores en la aplicación de los programas de prevención frente a los riesgos de las interacciones on-line. Otro de los factores de éxito identificados es la promoción del protagonismo de los menores en los programas, acciones, actividades educativas. La mayoría de la documentación analizada indica cómo la prevención debe focalizarse también en el grupo de iguales. Al empoderar a los menores como agentes de promoción de usos creativos de Internet y de superación de los riesgos on-line, formando a otros menores o incluso a su propia comunidad, se consigue una mayor efectividad en los programas (UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre, 2011; Wolak & al., 2008). Algunos de los ejemplos de ámbito internacional que ya incluyen su participación directa son: el programa ThinkUKnow3 del Reino Unido y la organización internacional I-Safe4. Ambos son ejemplos que pueden ser útiles para el profesorado. Se puede consultar los contenidos diseñados tanto para las familias, educadores y menores de diferentes edades y establecerlos como modelos.

• Diseñar estrategias educativas que incluyan la alfabetización mediática e informacional desde una perspectiva humanista y crítica. La alfabetización mediática no tiene sentido si no está vinculada a una finalidad mayor que es la creación de una sociedad basada en la cultura de la paz, y en definitiva, como afirma Pérez-Tornero (2010: 122) contribuya a la construcción de un mundo que sea un buen lugar para vivir. También es necesario que los menores se empoderen para ser protagonistas activos de este cambio, de la construcción de una sociedad basada en la cultura de la paz, y en la promoción de su creatividad para conseguir esta finalidad. Por tanto, las estrategias educativas también deben incluir esta perspectiva para avanzar en una sociedad más humana y menos destructiva. Y por ello, los y las menores deben ser autónomamente críticos con el uso de los medios y autocríticos con su impacto.

Una vez comentadas las principales líneas de actuación respecto a cómo promover el empoderamiento de los y las menores, la siguiente pregunta sería: ¿qué pasos debería dar una escuela para llevar a cabo este empoderamiento?

1) La formación crítica del profesorado. Dicha formación debe basarse necesariamente en las recomendaciones internacionales más significativas y con mayor repercusión en la comunidad científica, y también en el impacto social que se obtiene. Por ejemplo realizando tertulias dialógicas (Aubert & al., 2008) sobre los artículos o libros más punteros sobre la materia. El profesorado debe poder acceder a la literatura científica de mayor rigor y reconocimiento para ejercer su posición de profesores intelectuales críticos (Giroux, 1989). Algunos temas en su formación serían: cómo trabajar las competencias mediáticas desde la reflexión del propio uso que realizan los y las menores, cuáles son los riesgos reales y cuáles no, cuáles son los mensajes clave para la prevención y cuáles son una pérdida de tiempo. A su vez, potenciar que el profesorado implemente esta formación a las familias. Es fundamental generar espacios de debate e interacción entre profesorado y familias, para que ambos colectivos estén mejor preparados de lo que están en la actualidad.

2) Diseñar estrategias transversales y específicas de implementación del aprendizaje de las competencias mediáticas, sobre todo entendidas como base para un mayor desarrollo del pensamiento crítico. Para ello, tal y como se recogen en las recomendaciones científicas comentadas, sería necesario implicar al propio alumnado en el diseño de las actividades educativas para fomentar una comprensión crítica de las interacciones abusivas, violentas (ya sea cyberbullying o el grooming), además de promover proyectos colectivos a partir de su creatividad, e inteligencia colectiva (Lévy, 1997) que contribuyan a superar dichas interacciones. El profesorado tiene la responsabilidad de que tanto el diseño, como la implementación de la actividad se lleve a cabo con éxito. La evaluación continua de las actividades e iniciativas es esencial para evaluar los resultados y el impacto de las mismas, por ello es necesario establecer mecanismos de evaluación continua.

3) No se puede olvidar en ningún momento, que los riesgos comentados son los que afectan más al desarrollo emocional de los menores, por tanto no hay que obviar su dimensión emocional. Al fin y al cabo, tanto el ciberbullying como el grooming, son interacciones que afectan directamente a la autoestima de las víctimas, y a sus más profundos sentimientos, así como también fomentan el sentimiento de violencia en los que acosan y los que los apoyan. Por tanto, cuando hablamos de empoderar a los niños y niñas, no solo hablamos de su empoderamiento frente al mundo externo, sino también a las interacciones que entre ellos tienen, ¿están reproduciendo patrones sociales sin ser conscientes?; como profesorado, ¿les hemos facilitado las competencias mediáticas suficientes para recrear sus identidades independientemente de las influencias sociales? En definitiva, hasta qué punto hemos ofrecido a los menores oportunidades de formación para contrarrestar la violencia. Un reto fundamental para la alfabetización mediática es precisamente incluir en el centro de su aportación el vínculo entre la adquisición de las competencias mediáticas como base de recreación del propio yo, vinculado a valores de la ciudadanía activa, pero sobretodo de la no violencia y la solidaridad.

4. Conclusiones

La implementación de Currículum MIL en las escuelas favorece al empoderamiento de los menores en el uso de los medios. La adquisición de las competencias relacionadas con la alfabetización mediática e informacional es básica para su formación en un mundo constantemente cambiante. La inclusión de una unidad de contenido específica sobre los riesgos on-line en el Currículum MIL se considera positivo, ya que es una de las demandas de formación de los educadores.

En la unidad analizada se identifican cuáles son los riesgos más comunes, en este artículo hemos ampliado la descripción de dos de ellos, ciberacoso y «grooming». La prevalencia de ambos riesgos tanto en Europa, España como Estados Unidos, es similar. Los datos visibilizan la necesidad de trabajar la prevención de estos riesgos, incluyéndola en la estrategia educativa cotidiana además de tratarse en sesiones específicas.

Se considera esencial que la aplicación del currículum se acompañe con las recomendaciones definidas; la reflexión crítica de las interacciones on-line, la inclusión de toda la comunidad, el liderazgo de los menores en las acciones educativas, y como último la finalidad de la construcción de una sociedad basada en la cultura de la paz, siendo constructores de un mundo más justo y bueno para vivir.

Notas

1 Encuesta de tecnologías de la información en los hogares. Primer semestre de 2006. Instituto Nacional de Estadística. (www.ine.es/jaxi/menu.do?type=pcaxis&path=/t25/p450/a2006s1&file=pcaxis) (12-1-2012).

2 Survey Parents and Teens (2006). Pew Internet & American Life Project. Investigación llevada a cabo por Pew Research Centre. (www.pewinternet.org/Shared-Content/Data-Sets/2006/November-2006-Parents-and-Teens.aspx) (12-1-2012).

3 www.thinkuknow.co.uk (12-1-2012).

4 www.isafe.org/channels/?ch=ai (12-1-2012).


Draft Content 489196589-26669 ov-es013.jpg

Referencias

ACPI/PROTEGELES (Ed.) (2002). Seguridad infantil y costumbres de los menores en Internet. Madrid: Defensor del Menor en la Comunidad de Madrid.

Anastasiades, P.S. & Vitalaki, E. (2011). Promoting Internet Sa fety in Greek Primary Schools: The Teacher’s Tole. Educational Technology & Society, 14(2), 71-80.

Aubert, A., Flecha, A., García, C., Flecha, R. & Racionero, S. (2008). Aprendizaje dialógico en la sociedad de la información. Barcelona: Hipatia Editorial.

Bolen, R.M. (2003). Child Sexual Abuse: Prevention or Pro mo tion? Social Work, 48(2), 174.

Bringué, X. & Sádaba, C. (2008). La generación interactiva en Ibe roa mérica 2008. Niños y adolescentes ante las pantallas. Ma drid: Fundación Interactiva.

Bringué, X., Sádaba, C. & Tolsa, J. (2011). La generación inter ac tiva en Iberoamérica 2010. Niños y adolescentes ante las pantallas. Madrid: Foro Generaciones Interactivas.

Directive of the European Parliament and of The Council (2004). Combating the Sexual Abuse and Sexual Exploitation of Children and Child Pornography, and Replacing Council Frame work Decision 2004/68/JHA (2011).

Finkelhor, D., Wolak, J. & Mitchell, K. (2006). Online Victi mization of Youth: Five Years Later. Funding by Funded by the U.S. Congress through a Grant to the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children.

Garmendia, M., Garitaonandia, C., Martínez, G. & Casado, M.A. (2011). Riesgos y seguridad en Internet. Los menores españoles en el contexto europeo. Bilbao: Universidad del País Vas co/ Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, EU Kids Online.

Giroux, H.A. (1989). Los profesores como intelectuales. Barce lo na: Paidós.

Hinduja, S. & Patchin, J. (2010). Cyberbullying. Identification, Prevention, and Response. Cyberbullying Research Center. (www.cyberbullying.us/Cyberbullying_Identification_Prevention_Response_Fact_Sheet.pdf) (12-1-2012)

Kierkegaard, S. (2008). Cybering, Online Grooming and Ageplay. Computer Law & Security Review, 24(1), 41-55. (DOI: 10. 10 16/ j.clsr.2007.11.004).

Law, D.M., Shapka, J.D., Hymel, S., Olson, B.F. & Water house, T. (2012). The Changing Face of Bullying: An Empirical Comparison between Traditional and Internet Bullying and Victi mization. Computers in Human Behavior, 28(1), 226-232. (DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2011.09.004).

Lévy, P. (1997). Collective Intelligence: Makind’s Emerging Wordl in Cyberspace. Plenum Trade: New York, USA.

Livingstone, S. & Helsper, E. (2010). Balancing Opportunities and Risks in Teenagers’ Use of the Internet: The Role of Online Skills and Internet Self-efficacy. New Media & Society, 12(2), 309-329. (DOI: 10.1177/1461444809342697).

Livingstone, S., Haddon, L., Görzig, A. & Ólafsson, K. (2011). Risks and Safety on the Internet: The Perspective of European Children. Full findings. LSE, London: EU Kids Online.

Lobe, B., Livingstone, S., Ólafsson, K. & Vodeb, H. (2011). Cross-national Comparison of Risks and Safety on the Internet. Initial Analysis from the EU Kids Online Survey of European Children. London: EU Kids Online, LSE.

McAlinden, A. (2006). Setting ‘em up: Personal, Familial and Ins titutional Grooming in the Sexual Abuse of Children. Social & Legal Studies, 15(3), 339-362. (DOI: 10.1177/096466390 60 66 613).

Oliver, E., Soler, M. & Flecha, R. (2009). Opening schools to all (women): Efforts to Overcome Gender Violence in Spain. British Journal of Sociology of Education, 30(2), 207-218. (DOI: 10.10 80/ 01425690802700313).

Pérez-Tornero, J. & Varis, T. (2010). Media Literacy and New Humanism. Moscow: UNESCO. Institute for Information Tech nologies in Education.

Ryan, T., Kariuki, M. & Yilmaz, H. (2011). A Comparative Ana lysis of Cyberbullying Perceptions of Preservice Educators: Canada and Turkey. Turkish Online Journal of Educational Tech nology, 10(3), 1-12.

UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre (Ed.) (2011). Child Sa fety Online. Global Challenges and Strategies. Florence: UNICEF.

Valls, R., Puigvert, L. & Duque, E. (2008). Gender Violence among Teenagers - Socialization and Prevention. Violence Against Women, 14(7), 759-785. (DOI: 10.1177/1077801208320365).

Wilson, C., Grizzle, A., Tuazon, R., Akyempong, K. & Che ung, C.K. (2011). Media and Information Literacy Curri culum for Teachers. Paris: UNESCO.

Wolak, J., Finkelhor, D., Mitchell, K.J. & Ybarra, M.L. (2008). Online ‘Predators’ and their Victims: Myths, Realities, and Implications for Prevention and Treatment. American Psychologist, 63(2), 111.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/09/12
Accepted on 30/09/12
Submitted on 30/09/12

Volume 20, Issue 2, 2012
DOI: 10.3916/C39-2012-02-06
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 25
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?