Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Although digital media literacy is recognized as the essential competencies required for living in a new media age, it just starts to gain focus in Taiwan's elementary education. One of the reasons is examination-oriented education, with the result that diverts scarce resources away from this informal learning. The other reason is that educators tend to think digital media education as a series of purely technical operation, which might lead student digital media learning to mindless work. Therefore, this study designed a media exhibition based on Kolb's experiential learning model for teaching students concepts of stop-motion films and techniques of film production. A design experiment involved 247 third-grade elementary students that were grouped to visit the experiential exhibition. The findings suggest that the students have improved their knowledge of stop-motion films. Analysis of these produced films also shows that they have improved their media ability to represent their ideas and communicate with others. Through the analysis of the influence of demographics on the knowledge test, the findings revealed that the experiential exhibition is more effective for female elementary students and students' relevant previous experiences may not affect their acquired knowledge. Given those results and observations, we believe that the proposed experiential exhibition is a promising way to carry out digital media literacy education in elementary schools.Although digital media literacy is recognized as the essential competencies required for living in a new media age, it just starts to gain focus in Taiwan's elementary education. One of the reasons is examination-oriented education, with the result that diverts scarce resources away from this informal learning. The other reason is that educators tend to think digital media education as a series of purely technical operation, which might lead student digital media learning to mindless work. Therefore, this study designed a media exhibition based on Kolb's experiential learning model for teaching students concepts of stop-motion films and techniques of film production. A design experiment involved 247 third-grade elementary students that were grouped to visit the experiential exhibition. The findings suggest that the students have improved their knowledge of stop-motion films. Analysis of these produced films also shows that they have improved their media ability to represent their ideas and communicate with others. Through the analysis of the influence of demographics on the knowledge test, the findings revealed that the experiential exhibition is more effective for female elementary students and students' relevant previous experiences may not affect their acquired knowledge. Given those results and observations, we believe that the proposed experiential exhibition is a promising way to carry out digital media literacy education in elementary schools.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Digital media literacy focuses on the ability to access, analyze, or produce media messages in non-written modes afforded by media communication technologies such as films, video games, online and mobile media, which differs from traditional media literacy (Dezuanni, 2015). Recently, digital media literacy is beginning to be recognized as one dimension of the essential competencies required for living in a new media age (Jenson, Dahya, & Fisher, 2014). Thus, it is necessary to implement digital media literacy in K-12 education because the aims of media education are also the most important ones of traditional education.

Media educators believe that media production is essential for digital media literacy education because it emphasizes students as media makers, allowing them to be more effective media analysts (Dezuanni, 2015), and that production promotes social and cultural participation (Hobbs, 2004; Jenson & al., 2014). Cheung (2005); Hobbs (2004) further noted that students' participation in media production using video cameras or computers could permit a sense of satisfaction when they are engaged in creative, imaginative and aesthetic activities. Therefore, allowing children to participate in media production has now become an invaluable mode of learning just as it is necessary for them to learn to write as well as to read, supplanting the traditional didactic teaching (Frechette, 2002).

Digital media production education has been around for quite some time in the occidental countries, but has only just started to gain acceptance in oriental countries (Cheung, 2009; Ramirez-Garcia & Gonzalez-Fernandez, 2016), particularly in Taiwan (Chang & Liu, 2011). Moreover, in the university, most of the curriculum about media education for young children in primary schools is specifically provided, and remains marginal and is excluded from the formal education (Lopez & Aguaded, 2015). It is thus necessary to utilize theories and methodological approaches that strengthen young people's digital media production skills in Taiwan.

However, the primary media education in Taiwan encounters two main challenges. The one issue is that primary students commonly acquire media education through attending the exhibitions or workshops outside the school. In addition, schools tend to cut field trips because of financial pressures and examination-oriented education (Greene, Kisida, & Bowen, 2014). The other issue is that educators tend to see media education as a series of purely technical operations, which can lead to student media production functioning as mindless work (Hobbs, 2004).

In order to resolve these issues, the study has designed an experiential exhibition toward teaching primary students to make short stop-motion films inside the school. This experiential exhibition specifically featuring artifacts geared is complemented by utilizing Kolb (1984)'s experiential learning theory. It is hypothesized that such activities can instill knowledge of media production into the students and improve their technical abilities about media production.

2. Theoretical background

2.1. Media production

The students equipped with media production ability will construct knowledge to deal with the situation of globalization in the twenty-first century and develop lifelong learning skills -to enjoy learning, enhance effectiveness in communication, develop creativity and to develop a critical and analytical mind (Cheung, 2005). In addition, media production can motivate students' interests in subjects because they are encouraged to demonstrate knowledge and understand technical skill in their productions. Moreover, media production provides students the opportunity to put theory into practice through exploring and doing. Learners can encode and (re)produce knowledge relevant to their real lives through media production. For example, a video camera might be employed by a primary school student to record a nature phenomenon explaining a physical principle. From this perspective, the video camera becomes part of everyday communication and the sharing of an idea or concept rather than being a technology for film production (Jenson & al., 2014). However, technology alone would not engage students in media production and succeed. As argued by Dezuanni (2015), technical production skills have value primarily when they develop students' conceptual knowledge.

2.2. Stop-motion films

With the development of current digital technology (e.g., iPad or mobile phone camera, and free movie-making software (e.g. Windows Movie Maker), stop-motion films have become a simplified way for students to create short films in school classrooms (Fleer, 2013). The stop-motion films employ easy-to-use use feasible techniques by taking still images one-by-one with a digital camera mounted on a hand-held mobile phone and generating a video clip played slowly at two frames per second (Hoban & Nielsen, 2012). This technique is unlike traditional stop-motion animation (e.g. clay animation), which involves manually moving clay models and taking enough photos to play at 25-32 frames/second to continue movement. In other words, this stop-motion technique allows creators to stop, discuss and think about their information while taking each photo (Fleer & Hoban, 2012; Lee, 2015). For example, Wilkerson-Jerde, Gravel and Macrander (2015) emphasize that creating stop-motion films can further engage learners in thinking about the temporal dimensions of phenomena. The benefits of learners' becoming stop-motion film producers have been discussed in previous research. For example, in the context of university teacher education, Hoban and Nielsen (2014); McKnight, Hoban and Nielsen (2011); Vratulis, Clarke, Hoban and Erickson (2011) have demonstrated the adaptability of stop-motion films on supports teachers in learning various science concepts and technological pedagogical content knowledge.

2.3. Experiential learning

According to Kolb's experiential learning model, knowledge results from the interaction between theory and experience because learning is the process of creating knowledge through the transformation of personal experience (Kolb, 1984). It describes four stages in the learning model. Kolb considers that learning takes place in a spiral-like movement where the four stages take turns (Rasanen, 1999). The following describes the four stages of the experiential learning model (Konak, Clark, & Nasereddin, 2014):

1) Concrete experience. Learning starts with having a concrete experience, which means to perform a new task to gain a direct practical experience.

2) Reflective observation. Reflective observation carried through in carried through in activities such as discussion and reflective questions enables students to reflect on their hands-on experiences. The learner's self-reflection plays a central role in linking theory to practice.

3) Abstract conceptualization. From the reflective observations of stage 2, learners are expected to formulate a theoretical model and a generalization of abstract concepts.

4) Testing in new situations. In this stage, learners plan and test for the theoretical implications of concepts in new situations. The results of this testing stage provide new concrete experiences.

To date, experiential learning has been adopted in numerous fields of education (Konak & al., 2014). For example, Pringle (2009) developed a six stages of Meaning Making in the Gallery (MMG) framework based on experiential learning model for gallery education. Moreover, Clemons (2006) modified an experiential interior design project that involved the use of elements and principles of design and an opportunity for self-expression of personal spaces. The research cited above is encouraging, though most focus on university students, suggesting the need for further investigation into elementary students. Also, as suggested by Chang and al. (2011), students' demographic characteristics such as gender differences should be taken into consideration when developing digital media instructional activities. For example, mobile phones may be more suitable to promote male engagement in digital media literacy. Therefore, this study intended to investigate how elementary teachers can play their role as curators to stage the experiential exhibition featuring enjoyable and educative activities.

2.4. Research questions

1) Does the experiential exhibition improve students' knowledge about stop-motion films?

2) Do students' demographic characteristics affect their knowledge about stop-motion films and film production abilities?

3) Does the experiential exhibition improve students' techniques for producing a stop-motion film?

3. Methodology

3.1. Setting

The exhibition takes place at an exhibition room in an animation elementary school located in southern Taiwan. The mission of the school is to develop students into educated and involved animators through a series of programs and exhibitions. K3 students will learn knowledge of animations from this exhibition every year.

3.2 Participators

In this study, we invited 247 third-grade students lacking practical experience in media production for our analysis. Each student has 125 minutes to participate in this event and extra 25 minutes to finish questionnaires. This is an organized program as well as formal classes for students in the elementary school. In Taiwan, except this elementary school, there are hardly formal classes including animation teaching. Most students have to learn animation subject at some specific workshop if they desire to.

3.3. The design of the experiential exhibition

The proposed experiential exhibition was separated into four stalls and designed to teach students the concept of visual persistence and stop-motion film production (see Figure 1). As shown in Figure 1, K3 students from 9 classes were allowed to enter the exhibition room to receive the 100-minute curriculum each time. The exhibition room was mainly divided into four parts: Stall A, Stall B, Stall C, and Stall D (Figure 1).

1) Stall A: First, the stall guide started with a brief introduction regarding visual persistence. Then, the students used mobile cameras to photograph their preferred objects such as birds, cats, dogs, books and flowers. After the teachers had helped the students print these images, they pasted the printed paper on the blank side of the card­board, which has a printed cage on the other side, and pasted the cardboard on the stick. Last, they would be surprised to see the photo and the cage on the stick become an object in the cage by rotating the stick quickly. By means of these activities, the students can learn by themselves and get to build the concept of visual persistence by watching the overlapped images.

2) Stall B: We provide the students with flipbooks made by 4k students at the stall. Each flipbook has an individual story, which consists of a series of pictures that vary gradually from one page to the next. When turning these books rapidly, the students can not only enjoy a great number of stories but also will be surprised to see the pictures appear to animate. The students were grouped by three and were asked to collaboratively record the animation through using mobile cameras. Here, we aim to stimulate kids to observe more phenomena of visual persistence, reinforce their conceptual understanding and thus kindle their interest in frame by frame animations.

3) Stall C: The students first used many pieces of cardboard to draw a single dragon on--Both sides of the cardboard have a body part of the dragon on them, but they are in different directions. Then they punched the cardboards and attached them in order to the wooden frame with rubber bands in order. After working together to finish the handicraft project, they could make the dragon “fly” by keeping flipping these cardboards over quickly. Meanwhile, they were also asked to collaboratively record the phenomenon of visual persistence through using mobile cameras. The stall allowed students to cooperate to get the task done, experience the magical phenomenon of visual persistence further. It goes without saying that they got addicted to the charm of stop-motion animation as we expected.

4) Stall D: First, the teachers demonstrated how to create a stop-motion step by step. Then they divided the students into groups of 3-5 and asked each group to make a short film. Each student played an essential part in the group – at least one task per member. After the students created a story together, someone would work on the shooting script, some would be the actors or actresses, someone would be responsible for taking photos, and some should be in charge of the post-production. In the last stall, the students made the short stop-motion film and then screened it in a space whose main purpose was to enable the students to finish a piece of work on their own by combining the knowledge they just acquired using their creativity.

The activities in four stalls of the experiential exhibition incorporated Kolb's experiential learning cycles, comprised of five stages:

a) Manipulating objects. Students commonly get direct practical experience by performing a new task. In our activities, concrete experience corresponded to manipulation of objects. These hands-on activities can engage students through visual and kinesthetic senses.

b) Observing the phenomenon. Students could easily observe the phenomenon of visual persistence through manipulating the objects. Teachers also posed questions to encourage investigation (e.g. what did you see? How did rotation speed affect the view?). Students were also encouraged to exchange their ideas within the group. Through dialogue, students build a better understanding of the phenomenon.

c) Reflecting on the phenomenon. Teachers initiated the discussion questions such as “How did this phenomenon happen?”, “Why did you think so?” to prompt students to consider how they have arrived at their interpretations. Group discussion is a particularly effective strategy to promote meaningful reflection and engagement in the learning process.

d) Conceptualizing the experience. The visual persistence was conceptualized by connecting learners' previous real-life experience. The utilization of generalization questions is a useful strategy. For example, teachers would request students to connect what they had performed in the activities with the animation movies they had seen before. Also, they could also be asked to list the advantages and disadvantages of media production techniques.

e) Testing on new objects. We designed four sequential stalls to enable learners to transfer the learned concept to new situations. More specifically, the first two stalls differed in numbers of frames. In stall B, the students performed the multiple-frame animation concept following the two-frame animation concept of stall A. In stall C, students were asked to collaboratively perform the multiple-frame animation concept. This collaborative performance provided a new experience for stall D.

3.4. Instruments3.4.1. Demographic questionnaire

To gauge the background information of participants, a demographic questionnaire was designed. The items of questionnaire contain gender the number of visits to media exhibitions, and whether they have the experience of media production or not. The item number of visits to media exhibitions, is intended to understand participants' previous experiences about visiting image, animation, and film exhibitions. The item whether they have any experience of media production or not, is directed to understand participants' previous experiences about making an animated or stop-motion film.

3.4.2. Stop-motion film knowledge test

The knowledge on this test was included in two units: the theory of visual persistence and the techniques of the stop-motion film production. For example, the item “Visual persistence states the phenomenon where the retina retains an image for a short period after the removal of the stimulus that produced it”, was aimed at examining the concept of visual persistence. In addition, the item “Taking digital still photos one by one with the camera, and then playing back photos quickly on the computer is a kind of stop-motion films”, was aimed at examining the techniques of the stop-motion film production. The complete test included 15 true/false test items and was checked by the elementary teacher, who is also the curator of the experiential exhibition.

3.4.3. Scoring rubric in the stop-motion film production

Five experienced elementary teachers were invited to examine the quality of the films produced by students. The examination was based on scoring rubric designed by the curator of the experiential exhibition, who is also the expert in producing stop-motion films. The scoring rubric is comprised of three dimensions. The first dimension stipulates that the running-time for films, shall be no shorter than twenty (20) seconds and no longer than thirty (30) seconds. Failure to meet expectations resulted in automatic deduction of thirty (30) points. The second dimension, requires that there should be no lapses in the scenes for the continuity of films. The scores of the films shall be adjusted according to the numbers of lapses. The final dimension states that the scenes shall flow smoothly from one to another in editing videos. The scores of the films shall be deducted according to the smoothness of the films. The final scores of the films were calculated from an average of five teachers' scores.

3.5. Procedure

Figure 2 shows the experimental procedure. The entire procedure covers three 50-minute classes over a period of successive seven weeks. In the beginning, 247 students were divided into nine groups. In the first week, the stop-motion films which were created by other students from different countries (e.g., “T-shirt War”, “It is a Kinder Magic”, “Deadline post-it”) were selected and showed to students during a regular class session. At the end of the same class, the demographic questionnaire and the knowledge pre-test about stop-motion films were given to the students in all groups. Three weeks later, it was arranged that only one group each time participated in the experiential exhibition during two regular class sessions. The participation of students covered a period of three weeks. The experiential exhibition included was comprised of four stalls. In each stall, the teachers led students to get involved in the activities. And then, the teachers showed students the films created by themselves and made favorable comments on their works. Upon completion of the day's learning activities, students were given 10 minutes to complete a post activity test on their knowledge of stop-motion films.

4. Results and discussion

4.1. Demographics

The results in Table 1 show that the numbers of female and male participants are almost equal. The number of times that students visited the media exhibitions indicated that half of the students had attended the media exhibitions more than ten times. However, no one has the experience of media production yet.

The finding of Table 1 reveals that students participating in this study had previous experience in going to media exhibitions, but lacked experience in media production. The rich experiences of elementary students in visiting media exhibitions can be attributed to the growing trend of emphasizing the cultural and creative industries in Taiwan (Chen, Wang, & Sun, 2012). Many media exhibitions featuring creative objects were staged for public media literacy promotion. However, the finding of lacked of experience in media production also provides the research with the background for this paper: Most children received passive experiences in visiting the exhibitions, lacking active experimentation to be effective media analysts and promote social and culture participation (Clemons, 2006).

4.2. The knowledge test about stop-motion films

The result shows that the difference between students' pre-test and post-test mean scores of knowledge about stop-motion films has a significant difference, t (246)=-21.337, p=<.001. Students' post-test mean scores (M= 10.23, SD=1.81) are higher than their pre-test mean scores (M=13.09, SD=1.3).

The results imply that the designed experiential exhibition can significantly improve their knowledge of stop-motion films. To our knowledge, this is the first study involving elementary students in learning about stop-motion films. Through manipulating concrete objects in the stalls of the experiential exhibition, the abstract concept is physically presented. The elementary students find it easier to relate the new concept to their previous experiences (Santos & al., 2014).

4.3. The influence of demographics on the knowledge test about stop-motion films4.3.1. Gender differences

An ANCOVA was performed to determine how post-test knowledge scores of stop-motion films are influenced by participants' gender while controlling the differences among the students' pre-test knowledge scores of stop-motion animation (Table 2). Significant effects across different gender were found for the post-test knowledge scores, F (1, 244) = 5.32, p = .04. Post hoc analyses of the outcomes show that female students gain higher scores than male students.

The findings of Table 2 are consistent with Chang and Liu (2011); Chang and al. (2011)'s studies that female elementary students tend to be more media literate than male ones. The results can be attributed to two reasons. First, girls may use media in a more balanced way that involves both traditional and new digital media literacies, whereas boys may still be more focused on related new digital media literacy such as mobile devices (Unlusoy, de-Haan, Lese­man, & Van-Kruistum, 2010). Our experiential ex­hibition concerns both traditional paper-based and new digital media activities, and thus girls were more engaged in such activities. Second, boys may view the digital media device as a playful toy, whereas girls may treat it as a tool to accomplish a task (Lee & Yuan, 2010). Therefore, girls may demonstrate a higher level of engagement in the experiential exhibition, allowing them to outscore boys on knowledge test of stop-motion films.

4.3.2. Previous experiences of visiting media exhibitions

An ANCOVA was also performed to determine how post-test knowledge scores of stop-motion animation are influenced by the number of participants’ previous visits to media exhibitions while controlling the differences among the students' pre-test knowledge scores of stop-motion animation. Table 2 indicates that there is no significant difference in post-test knowledge scores across the four visiting times conditions, F(3,242)=1.58, p=.08.

The finding of Table 2 is inconsistent with our hypothesis that students possessing extensive prior experiences of media learning should outperform those possessing poor prior experiences in knowledge about stop-motion films. One explanation is that students were free to roam the exhibitions without an instructional guide (Greene & al., 2014). Students retain little factual information from these exhibitions (Greene & al., 2014; Rasanen, 1999). However, this format is the norm in visiting exhibitions. The other explanation is that exhibition educators (e.g., docents, teachers) interpret the objects based on verbal conceptualization (Rasa­nen, 1999). Students passively received interpretation of objects, lacking active experimentation (Pringle, 2009). Consequently, students' prior experiences cannot facilitate media learning in new situations.

4.4. Stop-motion film production

The scored Format, Continuity, and Sequencing of produced films averaged scores of 30, 17.3 and 23.0 respectively. The scored stop-motion films averaged an overall score of 71.2 (SD = 10.56). The overall scores for these short films reveal that students get to produce good quality films through participating in the exhibitions. As shown in an example from the students (see Figure 3a), they represented a stop-motion film about adopting a hands-off approach to take off an anorak. In particular, the breakdown suggests that all of the groups can cope with the format of films. In other words, students have clear concepts that a stop-motion film is comprised of a sequence of photos and how many photos are necessary to make a 20 to 30-second film. The breakdown also suggests that students had some difficulty in maintaining the continuity of films. Films showed in fig 3b illustrate this the cause of the error could be forgetfulness or carelessness to establish a logical coherence between shots. Moreover, students also found some difficulties in editing a film with a smooth sequence. The common error in students' films that affected their sequencing was that the movement of bodies or objects tended to shrink over time. The tendency may be attributed to either student’s lack of attention to a gradual shift toward movement or the attempt to reduce the amount of photos they needed to shot by making the movement smaller.

The effect can be attributed to the characteristics of stop-motion. While making the stop-motion films, students can take still photos one by one, that allows students to stop, discuss and think about their information (Fleer & Hoban, 2012; V. R. Lee, 2015). In other words, the stall of producing a stop-motion film in the experiential exhibition could provide students with new collaborative experience, which echoes Konak and al. (2014) studies.

5. Limitations of the study

One of the limitations of the research is that we report on a single-group intervention. Furthermore, because this experiential exhibition was held at the end of the school year and faced formal classroom scheduling constraints, we were unable to explore the long-term influences of such approaches over students' digital media literacy. Also, we curated the theme exhibition on stop-motion films. Extending this approach to students' formal learning programs would be interesting. Another limitation of the research is that all the participants were grade 3 students. Therefore, the findings in this research should be generalized with caution. Finally, we also recommend further research considers how to guide the young people to understand and analyze the social and cultural phenomenon through the production process.

6. Pedagogical implication

There are several implications from this study regarding the learning of stop-motion film production through visiting the experiential exhibition. First, this study shows that the new strategy of digital media literacy education can be adopted to instruct students in the knowledge about stop-motion films and further facilitate them to create short films within 100 minutes; above all, it can be fitted into typical elementary education classes. The experiential exhibition may provide opportunities for widespread staging in elementary education classes as a new way to develop digital media literacy.

Second, the simplicity of the slow-motion film production techniques creates additional possibilities for making the valuable use of mobile devices in elementary schools. It is uncommon in modern elementary education due to tight scheduling constraints in courses and the time-consuming nature of making stop-motion films in a traditional way (Fleer, 2013). However, by the use of mobile phone cameras, electronic tablets such as iPads, and built-in generic movie making software, elementary students can learn how to make a stop-motion film during the 1.5 h exhibition. After that, they can also use their personal mobile phones to capture images and create their films at home.

Third, stop-motion films can be made in many subject areas such as science, geography, and geometry (Hoban & Nielsen, 2014). In particular, it is suitable for difficult topics involving change and relative movement such as phases of the moon.

A final implication is that the experiential exhibition offers students a chance to collaboratively reflect and discuss the media concepts within the groups. Furthermore, uploading their films to social websites (on YouTube, for example) for public reviewing is a good way to provide students with an additional option of using multimodal communication to share and respond with other learners.

7. Discussion and conclusions

Current literature has shown the value of university students as media makers, but none of the studies involved elementary students (Hoban & Nielsen, 2014; McKnight & al., 2011; Vratulis & al., 2011). Therefore, the research in this paper designed a media exhibition based on Kolb's experiential learning model to teach them concepts of stop-motion films and techniques of stop-motion film production. Such an experiential exhibition features that learn­ing to constructing knowledge, skills and value through tangible experiences, which is different from the traditional methods of exhibitions that are using verbal conceptualization and delivering abstracted knowledge (Clemons, 2006; Rasanen, 1999; Santos & al., 2014). It is hypothesized that the proposed experiential exhibition is effective to provide an informal learning experience of digital media literacy and can be widely staged in elementary education classes.

A designed experiment involved 247 grade 3 elementary students that were grouped to visit four stalls of an experiential exhibition around the theme of stop-motion techniques and film production. Each stall contained a cycle of hands-on activities that involved students in manipulating objects, observing the phenomenon, reflecting the phenomenon, conceptualizing the concept, testing on new objects. The designed experiment placed students in constructive learning environments and involved multiples cycles of experimenting, reflecting, and conceptualizing in collaboration. These are all keys to digital media literacy, and as demonstrated in this article, can be effectively brought in at the elementary level.

The findings show that students have improved their knowledge of stop-motion films. Analysis of stop-motion films that the students have created also shows that they also improved in their media ability to represent their ideas and communicate with others. Through analysis of the influence of demographics on the knowledge test about stop-motion films, the findings reveal that the experiential exhibition is more effective for female elementary students, and students previous visit experiences may not affect their acquired knowledge. Given those initial results and observations, we believe that the proposed experiential exhibition for digital media literacy education is a promising one.

In Taiwan, art curriculums are commonly taugt to k1-k12 students in classroom. These curriculums usually focus on basic types of artistic creation, such as painting, drawing, and sculpture. Nowadays, to participate in the arts is to get involved and take part, a process which can occur on many levels. Therefore, art learning shouldn’t be limited by formal education and it should happen anywhere. In fact, actually, the source of art creation comes from human beings' awareness and thought, all we have to do is to inspire students.

Funding agency

This research is partially supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan, R.O.C. under Grant no. MOST 105-2511-S-006 -015 -MY2.


Draft Content 101943881-56751-en039.jpg


Draft Content 101943881-56751-en040.jpg


Draft Content 101943881-56751-en041.jpg


Draft Content 101943881-56751-en042.jpg


Draft Content 101943881-56751-en043.jpg

References

Chang, C.S., & Liu, E.Z.F. (2011). Exploring the Media Literacy of Taiwanese Elementary School Students. Asia-Pacific Education Researcher, 20(3), 604-611.

Chang, C.S., Liu, E.Z.F., Lee, C.Y., Chen, N.S., Hu, D.C., & Lin, C.H. (2011). Developing and Validating a Media Literacy Self-evaluation Scale (MLSS) for Elementary School Students. Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology, 10(2), 63-71.

Chen, M.Y.C., Wang, Y.S., & Sun, V. (2012). Intellectual Capital and Organizational Commitment: Evidence from Cultural Creative Industries in Taiwan. Personnel Review, 41(3), 321-339. https://doi.org/10.1108/00483481211212968

Cheung, C.K. (2005). The Relevance of Media Education in Primary Schools in Hong Kong in the Age of MewMedia : A Case Study. Educational Studies, 31(4), 361-374. https://doi.org/10.1080/03055690500237033

Cheung, C.K. (2009). Education Reform as an Agent of Change: The Development of Media Literacy in Hong Kong during the Last Decade. [Reforma educativa y educación en medios como agentes de cambio en Hong Kong]. Comunicar, 32, 73-83. https://doi.org/10.3916/c32-2009-02-006

Clemons, S.A. (2006). Interior Design Supports art Education: A Case Study. International Journal of Art & Design Education, 25(3), 275-285. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-8070.2006.00494.x

Dezuanni, M. (2015). The Building Blocks of Digital Media Literacy: Socio-material Participation and the Production of Media Knowledge. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 47(3), 416-439. https://doi.org/10.1080/00

Fleer, M. (2013). Affective Imagination in Science Education: Determining the Emotional Nature of Scientific and Technological Learning of Young Children. Research in Science Education, 43(5), 2085-2106. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11165-012-9344-8

Fleer, M., & Hoban, G. (2012). Using 'Slowmation' for Intentional Teaching in Early Childhood Centres: Possibilities and Imaginigs. Australasian Journal of Early Childhood, 37(3), 61-70.

Frechette, J.D. (2002). Developing Media Literacy in Cyberspace: Pedagogy and Critical Learning for the Twenty-First-Century Classroom. Westport, CT: Praeger.

Greene, J.P., Kisida, B., & Bowen, D.H. (2014). The Educational Value of Field Trips: Taking Students to an Art Museum Improves Critical Thinking Skills, and More. Education Next, 14(1), 78-86.

Hoban, G., & Nielsen, W. (2012). Using 'Slowmation' to Enable Preservice Primary Teachers to Create Multimodal Representations of Science Concepts. Research in Science Education, 42(6), 1101-1119. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11165-011-9236-3

Hoban, G., & Nielsen, W. (2014). Creating a Narrated Stop-motion Animation to Explain Science: The Affordances of 'Slowmation' for Generating Discussion. Teaching and Teacher Education, 42, 68-78. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2014.04.007

Hobbs, R. (2004). A Review of School-based Initiatives in Media Literacy Education. American Behavioral Scientist, 48(1), 42-59. https://doi.org/10.1177/0002764204267250

Jenson, J., Dahya, N., & Fisher, S. (2014). Valuing Production Values: a 'Do it Yourself' Media Production Club. Learning Media and Technology, 39(2), 215-228. https://doi.org/10.1080/17439884.2013.799486

Kolb, D.A. (1984). Experiential Learning: Experience as the Source of Learning and Development. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Konak, A., Clark, T.K., & Nasereddin, M. (2014). Using Kolb's Experiential Learning Cycle to Improve Student Learning in Virtual Computer Laboratories. Computers & Education, 72, 11-22. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2013.10.013

Lee, C.Y., & Yuan, Y. (2010). Gender Differences in the Relationship between Taiwanese Adolescents' Mathematics Attitudes and their Perceptions toward Virtual Manipulatives. International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, 8(5), 937-950.

Lee, V.R. (2015). Combining High-speed Cameras and Stop-motion Animation Software to Support Students' Modeling of Human Body Movement. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 24(2-3), 178-191. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10956-014-9521-9

López, L., & Aguaded, M.C. (2015). Teaching Media Literacy in Colleges of Education and Communication. [La docencia sobre alfabetización mediática en las Facultades de Educación y Comunicación]. Comunicar, 44, 187-195. https://doi.org/10.3916/c44-2015-20

McKnight, A., Hoban, G., & Nielsen, W. (2011). Using Slowmation for Animated Storytelling to Represent non-Aboriginal Preservice Teachers' Awareness of 'Relatedness to Country'. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 27(1), 41-54.

Pringle, E. (2009). The Artist-led Pedagogic Process in the Contemporary Art Gallery: Developing a Meaning Making Framework. International Journal of Art & Design Education, 28(2), 174-182.

Ramírez-García, A., & González-Fernández, N. (2016). Media Competence of Teachers and Students of Compulsory Education in Spain. [Competencia mediática del profesorado y del alumnado de educación obligatoria en España ]. Comunicar, 49, 49-57. https://doi.org/10.3916/c49-2016-05

Rasanen, M. (1999). Building Bridges: Experiential art Understanding. Journal of Art & Design Education, 18(2), 195-205.

Santos, M.E.C., Chen, A., Taketomi, T., Yamamoto, G., Miyazaki, J., & Kato, H. (2014). Augmented Reality Learning Experiences: Survey of Prototype Design and Evaluation. IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies, 7(1), 38-56. https://doi.org/10.1109/tlt.2013.37

Unlusoy, A., de Haan, M., Leseman, P.M., & van-Kruistum, C. (2010). Gender Differences in Adolescents' Out-of-school Literacy Practices: A Multifaceted Approach. Computers & Education, 55(2), 742-751. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2010.03.007

Vratulis, V., Clarke, T., Hoban, G., & Erickson, G. (2011). Additive and Disruptive Pedagogies: The Use of Slowmation as an Example of Digital Technology Implementation. Teaching and Teacher Education, 27(8), 1179-1188. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2011.06.004

Wilkerson-Jerde, M.H., Gravel, B., & Macrander, C.A. (2015). Exploring Shifts in Middle School Learners' Modeling Activity while Generating Drawings, Animations, and Computational Simulations of Molecular Diffusion. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 24(2-3), 396-415. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10956-014-9497-5



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

A pesar de que la alfabetización digital en medios se reconoce como una de las competencias esenciales necesarias para vivir en una nueva era de los medios de comunicación, solo acaba de empezar a ganar atención en la educación primaria de Taiwán. Una de las razones es la educación orientada a los exámenes, y como consecuencia, el que se desvíe muy pocos recursos para este aprendizaje informal. La otra razón es que los educadores tienden a pensar en la educación en medios digitales como una serie de operaciones puramente técnicas, lo que podría llevar a los estudiantes de medios digitales a aprender a trabajar sin sentido. Por lo tanto, este estudio diseñó una exhibición de contenidos basada en el modelo de aprendizaje experiencial de Kolb con el fin de enseñar a los estudiantes conceptos de videos stop-motion y técnicas de producción cinematográfica. El experimento diseñado involucró a 247 estudiantes de tercer grado de primaria que fueron agrupados para visitar la exposición experiencial. Los hallazgos sugieren una mejora en los estudiantes de su conocimiento de videos stop-motion. El análisis de los vídeos producidos también muestra que han mejorado su capacidad mediática para representar sus ideas y comunicarse con los demás. A través del análisis de la influencia de la demografía en la prueba de conocimiento, los hallazgos revelan que la exposición experiencial es más efectiva para los estudiantes de primaria femeninos, y que las experiencias anteriores relevantes de los estudiantes no deberían afectar a los conocimientos adquiridos. Teniendo en cuenta estos resultados y observaciones, creemos que la exposición experimental propuesta es una forma prometedora de llevar a cabo la educación en alfabetización digital en las escuelas primarias.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

La alfabetización digital en medios se centra en la capacidad de acceder, analizar o producir mensajes de los medios de comunicación en los modos no escritos proporcionados por las tecnologías emergentes como vídeos, videojuegos, medios en línea y móviles, lo que difiere de la alfabetización mediática tradicional (Dezuanni, 2015). Recientemente, la alfabetización mediática digital está empezando a ser reconocida como una dimensión esencial de las competencias necesarias para vivir en una nueva era de los medios de comunicación (Jenson, Dahya, & Fisher, 2014). Por lo tanto, es necesario implementar la alfabetización en medios digitales en la Educación Primaria y Secundaria (K-12) porque los objetivos de la educación mediática coinciden con los más importantes de la educación tradicional.

Los educadores de medios creen que la producción de contenidos es esencial para la alfabetización en medios digitales porque enfatiza a los estudiantes como creadores de medios, permitiéndoles ser analistas de medios más eficaces (Dezuanni, 2015); también consideran que la producción promueve la participación social y cultural (Hobbs & al., 2014). Cheung (2005) y Hobbs (2004) señalaron además que la participación de los estudiantes en la producción de contenidos utilizando cámaras de vídeo u ordenadores podría obtener una sensación de satisfacción cuando se dedican a actividades creativas, imaginativas y estéticas. Por lo tanto, asignar a los niños la producción de contenidos digitales se ha convertido en un modo de aprendizaje muy valioso y necesario también para aprender a leer y a escribir, suplantando la enseñanza didáctica tradicional (Frechette, 2002).

La educación en la producción de contenidos digitales ha existido desde hace bastante tiempo en los países occidentales, pero solo ha empezado a ganar aceptación en los países orientales (Cheung, 2009; Ramírez-García, & González-Fernández, 2016), particularmente en Taiwán (Chang & Liu, 2011). Por otra parte, la mayor parte del plan de estudios que se imparte específicamente en la universidad, y la educación sistémica de los medios para los niños pequeños en las escuelas de Primaria sigue siendo marginal y se excluye de la educación formal (López & Aguaded, 2015). Por lo tanto, es necesario utilizar teorías y enfoques metodológicos que fortalezcan las habilidades de producción de contenidos digitales de los jóvenes en Taiwán.

Sin embargo, la educación de los medios primarios en Taiwán encuentra dos desafíos principales. La primera cuestión es que los estudiantes de Primaria ordinariamente adquieren educación en los medios de comunicación al asistir a las exposiciones o talleres fuera de la escuela. Sin embargo, las escuelas tienden a suprimir las excursiones a causa de las presiones financieras y la educación orientada al examen (Greene, Kisida, & Bowen, 2014). La otra cuestión es que los educadores tienden a ver la educación en medios como una serie de operaciones puramente técnicas, lo que puede llevar a que la producción de contenidos digitales por parte de los estudiantes se valore como un trabajo sin sentido (Hobbs, 2004).

Con el fin de resolver estos problemas, este estudio presenta la exposición experiencial para enseñar a los estudiantes de Primaria a hacer cortometrajes stop-motion dentro de la escuela. Esta exposición experiencial que contiene específicamente los aparatos necesarios para ello se complementa utilizando la teoría del aprendizaje experiencial de Kolb (1984). Se plantea la hipótesis de que tales actividades pueden inculcar el conocimiento de la producción de contenidos en los estudiantes y mejorar sus habilidades técnicas para esta producción.

2. Antecedentes teóricos

2.1. Producción de medios

Los estudiantes dotados de la capacidad de producción de contenidos digitales construirán conocimiento para hacer frente a la situación de la globalización en el siglo XXI y desarrollarán habilidades de aprendizaje permanente con objeto de disfrutar del aprendizaje, mejorar la eficacia en la comunicación, desarrollar la creatividad y desarrollar una mente crítica y analítica (Cheung, 2005). La producción de los contenidos puede motivar los intereses de los estudiantes en estos temas porque se les anima a demostrar su conocimiento y ejercitar la habilidad técnica en sus producciones. Además, la producción de contenidos proporciona a los estudiantes la oportunidad de poner la teoría en práctica a través de la exploración y la realización. Los estudiantes pueden codificar y (re)producir conocimiento relevante para sus vidas reales a través de dicha producción. Por ejemplo, una cámara de vídeo podría ser empleada por un estudiante de la Escuela Primaria para registrar un fenómeno de la naturaleza que explica un principio físico. Desde esta perspectiva, la cámara de vídeo se convierte en parte de la comunicación cotidiana y en el intercambio de una idea o concepto en lugar de ser una tecnología para la producción de vídeos (Jenson y otros, 2014). Sin embargo, la tecnología por sí sola no involucraría a los estudiantes en la producción digital de medios y hacerlo con éxito. Como argumentó Dezuanni (2015), las habilidades técnicas de producción tienen valor principalmente cuando desarrollan el conocimiento conceptual de los estudiantes.

2.2. Vídeos stop-motion

Con el desarrollo de la tecnología digital actual (por ejemplo, iPad o cámara de un teléfono móvil), y software gratuito para hacer películas (Windows Movie Maker), los vídeos stop-motion se han convertido en una manera simplificada para que los estudiantes creen cortometrajes en las aulas escolares (Fleer, 2013). Los vídeos stop-motion utilizan técnicas viables, tomando imágenes fijas, una a una, con una cámara digital montada en un teléfono móvil portátil y generando un videoclip que se reproduce lentamente a dos fotogramas por segundo (Hoban & Nielsen, 2012). Esta técnica es diferente a la animación tradicional de stop-motion (por ejemplo, animación de plastilina), que consiste en mover manualmente modelos de plastilina y tomar suficientes fotos para reproducir a 25-32 fotogramas por segundo para continuar el movimiento. En otras palabras, esta técnica de stop-motion permite a los creadores detenerse, discutir y pensar acerca de su información mientras toman cada foto (Fleer & Hoban, 2012; Lee, 2015). Así, Wilkerson-Jerde, Gravel y Macrander (2015) enfatizan que la creación de vídeos stop-motion puede involucrar a los estudiantes en la reflexión sobre las dimensiones temporales de los fenómenos. Los beneficios de los estudiantes que se convierten en productores de vídeos stop-motion han sido discutidos en investigaciones previas. Por ejemplo, en el contexto de la formación docente universitaria, Hoban y Nielsen (2014), McKnight, Hoban y Nielsen (2011), Vratulis, Clarke, Hoban y Erickson (2011) han demostrado la adaptabilidad de los vídeos stop-motion en cómo la creación de una película stop-motion ayudó a los profesores al aprendizaje de diversos conceptos científicos y conocimientos tecnológicos de contenido pedagógico.

2.3. Aprendizaje experimental

Según el modelo de aprendizaje experiencial de Kolb, el conocimiento resulta de la interacción entre teoría y experiencia porque el aprendizaje es el proceso de creación de conocimiento a través de la transformación de la experiencia personal (Kolb, 1984). En él se describen cuatro etapas en el modelo de aprendizaje. Kolb considera que el aprendizaje tiene lugar en un movimiento en espiral en el que las cuatro etapas se alternan (Rasanen, 1999). A continuación se describen las cuatro etapas del modelo de aprendizaje experiencial (Konak, Clark, & Nasereddin, 2014):

1) Experiencia concreta. El aprendizaje comienza con tener una experiencia concreta, lo que significa realizar una nueva tarea para obtener una experiencia práctica directa.

2) Observación reflexiva. La observación reflexiva llevada a cabo por actividades como la discusión y las preguntas reflexivas tiene como objetivo permitir a los estudiantes reflexionar sobre sus experiencias prácticas. La autorreflexión del alumno desempeña un papel central al vincular la teoría con la práctica.

3) Conceptualización abstracta. A partir de las observaciones reflexivas de la etapa 2, se espera que los estudiantes formulen un modelo teórico y una generalización de conceptos abstractos.

4) Pruebas en situaciones nuevas. En esta etapa, los estudiantes planean y prueban las implicaciones teóricas de conceptos en situaciones nuevas. Los resultados de esta etapa de prueba proporcionan nuevas experiencias concretas. Hasta la fecha, el aprendizaje experiencial ha sido adoptado en numerosos campos de la educación (Konak & al., 2014). Por ejemplo, Pringle (2009) desarrolló seis etapas de creación de significado en la galería (MMG por sus siglas en inglés) marco basado en el modelo de aprendizaje experimental para la educación en galerías de arte. Por otra parte, Clemons (2006) modificó un proyecto experimental de diseño de interiores que implicaba el uso de elementos y principios de diseño y una oportunidad para la autoexpresión de los espacios personales.

La investigación citada anteriormente es alentadora, aunque la mayoría se centra en los estudiantes universitarios, lo que sugiere la necesidad de una mayor investigación en los estudiantes de Primaria. También, como sugieren Chang y otros (2011), las características demográficas de los estudiantes, tales como las diferencias de género, deben tenerse en cuenta al desarrollar actividades de enseñanza de los medios digitales. Por ejemplo, los teléfonos móviles pueden ser más adecuados para promover el compromiso masculino en la alfabetización digital de los medios de comunicación. Por lo tanto, este estudio pretende investigar cómo los maestros de Primaria pueden desempeñar su papel como guías para organizar la exposición experiencial con actividades agradables y educativas.

2.4. Preguntas de investigación

1) ¿La exposición experiencial mejora el conocimiento de los estudiantes sobre los vídeos stop-motion?

2) ¿Las características demográficas de los estudiantes afectan su conocimiento sobre los vídeos stop-motion y las habilidades de producción cinematográfica?

3) ¿La exposición experiencial mejora las técnicas de los estudiantes para producir una película stop-motion?

3. Metodología

3.1. Contexto

La exposición tiene lugar en una sala de exposiciones de una Escuela Primaria de animación ubicada en el sur de Taiwán. La misión de la escuela es convertir a los niños en animadores educados e involucrados a través de una serie de programas y exposiciones. Los estudiantes de 3º de Primaria aprenderán cada año los conocimientos de las animaciones de esta exposición.

3.2. Muestra

En este estudio, invitamos para nuestro análisis a 247 estudiantes de 3º de Primaria sin experiencia práctica en producción de contenidos. Cada estudiante contaba con 125 minutos para participar en este evento y 25 minutos adicionales para terminar los cuestionarios. Se trata de un programa organizado, tal y como son las clases formales para niños en Primaria. En Taiwán, a excepción de esta Escuela Primaria, apenas hay clases formales que incluyan la enseñanza de animación. La mayoría de los niños tienen que aprender la asignatura de animación en algún taller específico si así lo desea.

3.3. El diseño de la exposición experiencial

La exposición experimental expuesta se separó en cuatro puestos y se diseñó para enseñar a los estudiantes el concepto de la persistencia visual y la producción de una película stop-motion (Figura 1). Como se muestra en la Figura 1, se permitió a los estudiantes de 3º de Primaria entrar en la sala de exposición para recibir el programa de estudios de 100 minutos cada vez. La sala de exposición se dividió principalmente en cuatro partes: Puesto A, Puesto B, Puesto C y Puesto D (Figura 1).

1) Puesto A: En primer lugar, la guía del puesto comenzó con una breve introducción sobre la persistencia visual. Luego, los estudiantes usaron cámaras móviles para fotografiar sus objetos preferidos como pájaros, gatos, perros, libros y flores. Pegaron el papel impreso en el lado en blanco del cartón, que en el otro lado tenía una jaula impresa, y luego en el cartón pegaron el palillo. Finalmente, se sorprendían al ver la foto convertirse en un objeto en la jaula mediante la rotación del palo rápidamente. Mediante estas actividades, los estudiantes pueden aprender por sí mismos y llegar a construir el concepto de persistencia visual viendo las imágenes superpuestas.

2) Puesto B: Proporcionamos a los estudiantes libros de lectura hechos por estudiantes de 4º de Primaria en dicho puesto. Cada libro tiene una historia individual, que consiste en una serie de imágenes que varían gradualmente de una página a la siguiente. Al girar rápidamente estos libros, los estudiantes no solo pueden disfrutar de un gran número de historias, sino también sorprenderse al ver que las imágenes parece que se animan. Los estudiantes fueron agrupados de tres en tres y se les pidió que colaborativamente grabaran la animación con cámaras móviles. Aquí nuestro objetivo fue estimular a los niños a observar de nuevo un fenómeno de persistencia visual, reforzar su concepto; de esta forma aumentan su interés por las animaciones fotograma por fotograma...

3) Puesto C: Los estudiantes usaron, por primera vez, muchas piezas de cartón para dibujar un solo dragón en ambos lados de los cartones. Los dos lados de estos cartones tenían una parte del cuerpo del dragón en ellos, pero en diferente dirección. Luego perforaron los cartones y los sujetaron al marco de madera con gomas en orden. Después de trabajar juntos para terminar el proyecto de artesanía, podían hacer que el dragón «volara» tirando rápidamente de estos cartones. Mientras tanto, también se les pidió que registraran de manera colaborativa el fenómeno de la persistencia visual utilizando las cámaras móviles. El puesto permitió a los estudiantes cooperar para hacer la tarea y experimentar el fenómeno mágico de la persistencia visual. Huelga decir que se volvieron adictos al encanto de animación stop-motion, tal y como esperábamos.

4) Puesto D: En primer lugar, los profesores mostraron cómo crear un stop-motion paso a paso. Luego dividieron a los estudiantes en grupos de 3-5 personas y pidieron a cada grupo que hiciera un cortometraje. Cada estudiante jugaba un papel esencial en el grupo –a cada niño le correspondía al menos una tarea–. Después de que los estudiantes crearan juntos una historia, alguien trabajaría en el guion de rodaje, algunos serían los actores o actrices, alguien sería responsable de tomar fotos, y algunos deberían estar a cargo de la post-producción. En el último puesto, los estudiantes hicieron un cortometraje stop-motion, y luego fue proyectado. El objetivo principal era permitir a los estudiantes terminar una obra por su cuenta, combinando el conocimiento que acababan de adquirir con su propia creatividad.

Las actividades en los puestos de la exposición experiencial incorporaron los ciclos de aprendizaje experiencial de Kolb, que consta de cinco etapas:

a) Manipulación de objetos. Los estudiantes suelen obtener experiencia práctica directa mediante la realización de una nueva tarea. En nuestras actividades, la experiencia concreta correspondía a la manipulación de objetos. Estas actividades prácticas pueden involucrar a los estudiantes a través de los sentidos visuales y cinestésicos.

b) Observación del fenómeno. Los estudiantes pueden observar fácilmente el fenómeno de la persistencia visual a través de la manipulación de los objetos. Los maestros también plantearon preguntas para fomentar la investigación (por ejemplo: ¿qué viste?, ¿cómo afectó la velocidad de rotación a la vista?). Los estudiantes también fueron alentados a intercambiar sus ideas dentro del grupo. A través del diálogo, los estudiantes construyeron una mejor comprensión del fenómeno.

c) Reflejar el fenómeno. Los maestros iniciaron las preguntas de discusión tales como: «¿Cómo ocurrió este fenómeno?», «¿por qué piensas eso?» para que los estudiantes consideraran cómo llegaron a sus interpretaciones. La discusión en grupo es una estrategia particularmente eficaz para promover la reflexión y la participación significativa en el proceso de aprendizaje.

d) Conceptualización del concepto. La persistencia visual se conceptualizó conectando la experiencia previa de los alumnos en la vida real. La utilización de preguntas de generalización es una estrategia útil. Por ejemplo, los maestros pedían a los estudiantes que conectaran lo que habían realizado en las actividades con los vídeos de animación que habían visto antes. También se les podría pedir que enumerasen las ventajas y desventajas de las técnicas de producción de contenidos.

e) Prueba de objetos nuevos. Diseñamos cuatro puestos secuenciales para permitir a los estudiantes transferir el concepto aprendido a nuevas situaciones. Más específicamente, los dos primeros puestos difieren en el número de tramas. En el puesto B, los estudiantes realizaron el concepto de animación de cuadros múltiples a partir del concepto de animación de los dos cuadros del puesto A. En el puesto C, se pidió a los estudiantes que realizaran de forma colaborativa el concepto de animación de múltiples tramas. Esta actuación colaborativa proporcionó una nueva experiencia para el puesto D.

3.4 Instrumentos3.4.1. Cuestionario demográfico

Para medir la información de fondo de los participantes, se diseña un cuestionario demográfico. Los ítems del cuestionario recogen el género, el número de visitas a exposiciones de contenidos, y si tienen experiencia o no de la producción de contenidos. El ítem, el número de visitas a exposiciones de contenidos, tiene la intención de comprender las experiencias previas de los participantes sobre la visita de imágenes, animación y exposiciones cinematográficas. El ítem, si tiene la experiencia de la producción de medios o no, se especifica para comprender las experiencias previas de los participantes en la realización de una película animada o stop-motion.

3.4.2. La prueba de conocimiento sobre vídeos stop-motion

La realización de esta prueba se compone de dos partes: la teoría de la persistencia visual y las técnicas de la producción de película stop-motion. Así, la afirmación «La persistencia visual indica el fenómeno en el que la retina retiene una imagen durante un corto período después de la eliminación del estímulo que la produjo», tenía por objeto examinar el concepto de persistencia visual. Y el «Tomar fotos digitales una a una con la cámara y luego reproducir las fotos rápidamente en el ordenador es una especie de película de stop-motion», tenía como objetivo examinar las técnicas de la producción de vídeos stop-motion. La prueba completa incluyó 15 puntos de respuesta verdadero/falso y fue revisada por el maestro de Primaria, quien también es el comisario de la exposición experiencial.

3.4.3. Rúbrica de puntuación en la producción cinematográfica stop-motion

Se invitó a cinco maestros experimentados de Primaria a examinar la calidad de los vídeos producidos por los estudiantes. El examen se basó en la escala de puntuación diseñada por la guía de la exposición experiencial, que es también experto en la producción de vídeos stop-motion. La escala de puntuación se compone de tres dimensiones. En la primera dimensión, el tiempo de duración de los vídeos no debía ser inferior a 20 segundos ni superior a 30 segundos. En la segunda dimensión, no debía haber lapsos de continuidad entre las escenas de los vídeos. Las puntuaciones de los vídeos se hicieron según el número de lapsos. En la dimensión final, las transiciones de una escena a otra debían sucederse con fluidez. Las puntuaciones de los vídeos dependían de la fluidez de los mismos. Las puntuaciones finales de los vídeos se calcularon con la media de las puntuaciones de cinco profesores.

3.5. Procedimiento

La Figura 2 muestra el procedimiento experimental. Todo el procedimiento abarca tres clases de 50 minutos durante un período de siete semanas sucesivas. Al principio, 247 estudiantes se dividieron en nueve grupos. En la primera semana se seleccionaron y mostraron a los estudiantes los vídeos stop-motion que fueron creados por otros estudiantes de diferentes países (por ejemplo, «T-shirt War», «Es un Kinder Magic», «Deadline post-it») durante una sesión de clase regular. Al final de la misma clase, el cuestionario demográfico y el pre-test de conocimiento sobre vídeos stop-motion se pasaron a los estudiantes en todos los grupos. Tres semanas más tarde, se dispuso que solo un grupo participara cada vez en la exposición experiencial durante dos sesiones de clase regulares. La participación de los estudiantes cubrió un período de tres semanas. La exposición experiencial estaba compuesta por cuatro puestos. En cada puesto, los profesores llevaron a los estudiantes a involucrarse en las actividades. Y luego, los profesores mostraron a los estudiantes los vídeos creados por ellos mismos e hicieron comentarios favorables sobre sus obras. Al terminar las actividades de aprendizaje del día, se les dio a los estudiantes 10 minutos para completar el post-test de conocimiento sobre los vídeos de stop-motion.

4. Resultados

4.1. Demografía

Los resultados de la Tabla 1 muestran que el número de participantes femeninos y masculinos es casi igual. El número de veces que los estudiantes visitaron las exposiciones indicó que la mitad de los estudiantes había asistido a las exposiciones de contenidos digitales más de diez veces. Sin embargo, nadie tiene aún la experiencia de la producción de estos contenidos.

El hallazgo de la Tabla 1 revela que los estudiantes que participan en este estudio cuentan con la experiencia previa de asistir a exposiciones de contenidos digitales, pero carecen de experiencia en la producción de contenidos. Las experiencias enriquecedoras de los estudiantes de Primaria en este tipo de ex­posiciones se pueden atribuir a la creciente tendencia de enfatizar las industrias culturales y creativas en Taiwán (Chen, Wang, & Sun, 2012). Muchas exposiciones con objetos creativos se organizaron para la promoción de la alfabetización mediática pública. La mayoría de los niños recibieron experiencias pasivas al visitar las exposiciones, pero carecían de experimentación activa para ser analistas eficaces de los medios de comunicación y promover la participación social y cultural (Clemons, 2006).

4.2. La prueba de conocimiento sobre vídeos stop-motion

El resultado muestra que la diferencia entre las puntuaciones medias de los estudiantes antes y después de la prueba de conocimiento sobre los vídeos de stop-motion tiene una diferencia significativa, t (246)=–21.337, p= <.001. Las puntuaciones medias de los estudiantes después de la prueba (M=10.23, DE=1.81) son más altas que sus puntuaciones medias pre-test (M=13.09, DE=1.3).

Los resultados implican que la exposición experiencial diseñada puede mejorar significativamente su conocimiento de vídeos stop-motion. A nuestro entender, este es el primer estudio que involucra a los estudiantes en el aprendizaje de este concepto de vídeos stop-motion. En la mente de quien manipula objetos concretos en los puestos de la exposición experiencial, el concepto abstracto se representa físicamente. Los estudiantes de Primaria tienen más facilidad para relacionar el nuevo concepto con sus experiencias anteriores (Santos & al, 2014).

4.3. La influencia de la demografía en la prueba de conocimiento sobre vídeos stop-motion4.3.1. Diferencias de género

Se realizó un ANCOVA para determinar si existían diferencias significativas por género en relación a los conocimientos de los participantes en el pre-test y post-test de la prueba de animación stop-motion. Se encontraron efectos significativos a través de diferentes géneros para las puntuaciones de conocimientos posteriores a la prueba, F(1, 244)=5,32, p=0,04. Los análisis post hoc de los resultados muestran que las mujeres obtienen mejores resultados que los estudiantes varones.

Los hallazgos de la Tabla 2 (siguiente página) son coincidentes con Chang y Liu (2011), Chang y colaboradores (2011), quienes sostienen que las alumnas de Primaria tienden a ser más alfabetizadas en los medios que los alumnos. Los resultados pueden atribuirse a dos razones. En primer lugar, las niñas suelen utilizar los medios de comunicación de una manera más equilibrada que abarca tanto la alfabetización de los medios digitales tradicionales como los nuevos, mientras que los niños suelen estar más centrados en la nueva alfabetización de los medios digitales relacionados con los dispositivos móviles (Unlusoy, De-Haan, Leseman, & Van- Kruistum, 2010). Nuestra exposición experiencial se refiere tanto a las actividades tradicionales basadas en el papel como a las nuevas actividades con los medios digitales, por lo que las niñas muestran un mayor nivel en estas actividades. En segundo lugar, los niños acostumbran a ver el dispositivo de medios digitales como un juguete o entretenimiento, mientras que las niñas suelen tratarlo como una herramienta para llevar a cabo una tarea (Lee & Yuan, 2010). Por lo tanto, las niñas demuestran un mayor nivel de compromiso en la exposición experiencial, por lo que superan a los niños en la prueba de conocimiento de vídeos stop-motion.

4.3.2. Experiencias anteriores de visitar exposiciones de contenidos digitales

También se realizó un ANCOVA para determinar cómo las puntuaciones del conocimiento post-test de la animación stop-motion están influenciadas por experiencias anteriores de los participantes en visitas a exposiciones de contenidos, al mismo tiempo que se obtienen las puntuaciones entre las puntuaciones de conocimiento de pre-test de animación stop-motion. La Tabla 2 indica que no hay diferencia significativa en las puntuaciones de los conocimientos posteriores a la prueba en las cuatro condiciones de tiempo de visitas, F(3,242)=1,58, p=0,08.

Los resultados de la Tabla 2 es inconsistente con nuestra hipótesis de que los estudiantes que poseen experiencias extensas previas de aprendizaje de los medios de comunicación deben superar a aquellos que poseen experiencias anteriores superficiales en el conocimiento sobre vídeos stop-motion. Una explicación es que los estudiantes eran libres de recorrer las exposiciones sin una guía de instrucción (Greene & al., 2014). Los estudiantes retienen poca información factual de estas exposiciones (Greene & al., 2014; Rasanen, 1999). Sin embargo, este formato es la norma en las exposiciones que se visitaron. La otra explicación es que los educadores de exposiciones (por ejemplo, docentes, maestros) interpretan los objetos basados en la conceptualización verbal (Rasanen, 1999). Los estudiantes recibieron pasivamente la interpretación de objetos, y no tuvieron experimentación activa (Pringle, 2009). En consecuencia, las experiencias anteriores de los estudiantes no pueden facilitar el aprendizaje de los medios de comunicación en situaciones nuevas.

4.4. Producción cinematográfica de stop-motion

El formato, la continuidad y la secuenciación de los vídeos producidos promediaron las puntuaciones de 30, 17,3 y 23,0, respectivamente. Los vídeos de stop-motion seleccionados promediaron una puntuación global de 71,2 (DE=10,56). Las puntuaciones globales de estos cortometrajes revelan que los estudiantes llegan a producir películas de buena calidad al participar en las exposiciones. Así se muestra en un ejemplo (Figura 3a), donde los estudiantes representan una película stop-motion sobre cómo quitarse de forma fácil un anorak. En particular, el desglose sugiere que todos los grupos pueden conseguir satisfactoriamente el formato de los vídeos. En otras palabras, los estudiantes tienen conceptos claros de que un vídeo stop-motion está compuesto por una secuencia de fotos y conocen cuántas fotos son necesarias para hacer un vídeo de 20 a 30 segundos. El desglose también sugiere que los estudiantes tuvieron la dificultad de mantener la continuidad de los vídeos. Esto se ilustra mediante vídeos que se muestran en la Figura 3b.

El error común en los vídeos de los estudiantes sobre la continuidad fueron los lapsos. La causa del error podría haber sido olvidada o descuidada para establece una coherencia lógica entre tomas. Por otra parte, los estudiantes también encontraron algunas dificultades en la edición de un vídeo con una secuencia fluida. El error común en los vídeos de los estudiantes que afectó su secuenciación fue que el movimiento de sus cuerpos u objetos tendió a ralentizarse en el tiempo. La tendencia se puede atribuir a la falta de atención de los estudiantes ante un cambio gradual del movimiento o al intento de reducir la cantidad de fotos que necesitaban para disparar haciendo el movimiento más pequeño. El efecto puede atribuirse a las características del stop-motion. Al hacer los vídeos stop-motion, los estudiantes pueden tomar fotos una por una, y se les permite detenerse, discutir y pensar acerca de su información (Fleer & Hoban, 2012; Lee, 2015). En otras palabras, el hecho de producir una película stop-motion en la exposición experiencial podría proporcionar a los estudiantes una nueva experiencia de colaboración, tal y como expresaron Konak y otros (2014).

5. Limitaciones del estudio

Una de las limitaciones de la investigación es que los resultados corresponden a un único grupo. Además, debido a que esta exposición experimental se llevó a cabo al final del año escolar y se enfrentó a limitaciones formales de programación en el aula, no pudimos explorar las influencias a largo plazo de tales enfoques sobre la alfabetización digital de los estudiantes. Asimismo, nosotros coordinaríamos la exposición temática sobre vídeos stop-motion. Es interesante extender este enfoque a los programas formales de aprendizaje de los estudiantes. Otra limitación de la investigación es que todos los participantes eran estudiantes de 3º de Primaria. Por lo tanto, los resultados de esta investigación deben generalizarse con precaución. Por último, también alentamos la realización de nuevos estudios sobre cómo guiar a los jóvenes a comprender y analizar el fenómeno social y cultural a través del proceso de producción.

6. Implicación pedagógica

Hay varias implicaciones de este estudio con respecto al aprendizaje de la producción cinematográfica stop-motion a través de la exposición experiencial. En primer lugar, este estudio demuestra que la nueva estrategia de educación en alfabetización digital de medios puede ser adoptada para instruir a los estudiantes en el conocimiento sobre vídeos stop-motion y además facilitar la creación de cortometrajes en 100 minutos; sobre todo, puede integrarse en clases normales de educación elemental. La exhibición experiencial puede proporcionar oportunidades para la puesta en escena generalizada en clases de educación elemental como una nueva manera de desarrollar la alfabetización digital de los medios.

En segundo lugar, la simplicidad de las técnicas de producción de vídeos a cámara lenta crea posibilidades adicionales para hacer valioso el uso de dispositivos móviles en estas escuelas. Es poco frecuente en la educación elemental moderna debido a las restricciones de programación curricular en los cursos y al tiempo que toma la naturaleza de hacer vídeos stop-motion de una manera tradicional (Fleer, 2013). Sin embargo, con el uso de cámaras de teléfonos móviles, tabletas electrónicas como iPads y software genérico para hacer películas, los estudiantes de Primaria pueden aprender cómo hacer una película de stop-motion durante la exposición de una hora y media. A continuación también pueden usar sus teléfonos móviles personales para capturar imágenes y crear sus vídeos en casa.

En tercer lugar, se pueden hacer vídeos stop-motion en muchas áreas temáticas tales como ciencia, geografía y geometría (Hoban & Nielsen, 2014). En particular, es adecuado para temas difíciles que implican el cambio y el movimiento relativo, como las fases de la luna.

Una implicación final es que la exposición experiencial ofrece a los estudiantes la oportunidad de reflexionar y discutir colectivamente los conceptos de los medios dentro de los grupos. Además, el cargar sus vídeos en redes sociales (en YouTube, por ejemplo) para la revisión pública es una buena manera de ofrecer a los estudiantes una opción adicional de usar la comunicación multimodal para compartir e interactuar con otros estudiantes.

7. Discusión y conclusiones

La literatura actual ha demostrado el valor de los estudiantes universitarios como creadores de medios, pero ninguno de los estudios involucró a estudiantes de Primaria (Hobart & Nielsen, 2014; McKnight & al., 2011; Vratulis & al., 2011). Por lo tanto, la investigación en este artículo diseñó la exposición de los contenidos digitales basada en el modelo de aprendizaje experiencial de Kolb para enseñarles conceptos y técnicas de producción de las películas stop-motion. Tal exposición experiencial presenta ese enfoque de aprendizaje para construir el conocimiento, las habilidades y el valor a través de experiencias tangibles, que es diferente de los métodos tradicionales de exposiciones que utilizan la conceptualización verbal y la entrega de conocimiento abstracto (2014). Se plantea la hipótesis de que la exposición experiencial propuesta es eficaz para proporcionar una experiencia de aprendizaje informal de la alfabetización en medios digitales y puede ser generalizada en las clases de Educación Primaria.

El experimento diseñado involucró a 247 estudiantes de 3º de Primaria que fueron agrupados en cuatro grupos en torno a la temática de las técnicas de stop-motion y de producción cinematográfica. Cada grupo contenía un ciclo de actividades prácticas que involucraba a los estudiantes en la manipulación de objetos, observando el fenómeno, reflejando el fenómeno, conceptualizando el concepto y probando nuevos objetos. El experimento diseñado colocó a los estudiantes en entornos de aprendizaje constructivos e introdujo múltiples ciclos de experimentación, reflexión y conceptualización en colaboración. Estas son todas las claves para la alfabetización digital en medios de comunicación y, como se demuestra en este artículo, puede ser efectivamente introducido en el nivel elemental.

Los hallazgos muestran que los estudiantes mejoraron su conocimiento de los vídeos stop-motion. El análisis de vídeos stop-motion que los estudiantes crearon muestra a su vez que también mejoraron en su capacidad mediática para representar sus ideas y comunicarse con otros. A través del análisis de los datos cuantitativos en la prueba de conocimiento sobre vídeos stop-motion, los resultados revelan que la exposición experiencial es más efectiva para las estudiantes de Primaria y que las experiencias de las visitas anteriores de los estudiantes no afectan a sus conocimientos adquiridos. Teniendo en cuenta esos resultados y observaciones iniciales, creemos que la exposición experimental propuesta para la educación en alfabetización en medios digitales es prometedora.

En Taiwán, los currículos de arte se instruyen comúnmente a los estudiantes de Primaria y Secundaria en el aula. Estos currículos suelen centrarse en tipos básicos de creación artística, como la pintura, el dibujo y la escultura. Hoy en día, participar en las artes es involucrarse y formar parte de un proceso que puede ocurrir en muchos niveles. Por lo tanto, el aprendizaje del arte no debe ser limitado a la educación formal y debe producirse en cualquier lugar. En realidad, la fuente de la creación artística proviene de la conciencia y el pensamiento de los seres humanos; todo lo que tenemos que hacer es inspirar a los estudiantes.

Apoyos

Esta investigación está parcialmente financiada por el Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnología de Taiwán (R.O.C. con clave MOST 105-2511-S-006-015-MY2).


Draft Content 101943881-56751 ov-es039.jpg


Draft Content 101943881-56751 ov-es040.jpg


Draft Content 101943881-56751 ov-es041.jpg


Draft Content 101943881-56751 ov-es042.jpg


Draft Content 101943881-56751 ov-es043.jpg

Referencias

Chang, C.S., & Liu, E.Z.F. (2011). Exploring the Media Literacy of Taiwanese Elementary School Students. Asia-Pacific Education Researcher, 20(3), 604-611.

Chang, C.S., Liu, E.Z.F., Lee, C.Y., Chen, N.S., Hu, D.C., & Lin, C.H. (2011). Developing and Validating a Media Literacy Self-evaluation Scale (MLSS) for Elementary School Students. Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology, 10(2), 63-71.

Chen, M.Y.C., Wang, Y.S., & Sun, V. (2012). Intellectual Capital and Organizational Commitment: Evidence from Cultural Creative Industries in Taiwan. Personnel Review, 41(3), 321-339. https://doi.org/10.1108/00483481211212968

Cheung, C.K. (2005). The Relevance of Media Education in Primary Schools in Hong Kong in the Age of MewMedia : A Case Study. Educational Studies, 31(4), 361-374. https://doi.org/10.1080/03055690500237033

Cheung, C.K. (2009). Education Reform as an Agent of Change: The Development of Media Literacy in Hong Kong during the Last Decade. [Reforma educativa y educación en medios como agentes de cambio en Hong Kong]. Comunicar, 32, 73-83. https://doi.org/10.3916/c32-2009-02-006

Clemons, S.A. (2006). Interior Design Supports art Education: A Case Study. International Journal of Art & Design Education, 25(3), 275-285. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-8070.2006.00494.x

Dezuanni, M. (2015). The Building Blocks of Digital Media Literacy: Socio-material Participation and the Production of Media Knowledge. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 47(3), 416-439. https://doi.org/10.1080/00

Fleer, M. (2013). Affective Imagination in Science Education: Determining the Emotional Nature of Scientific and Technological Learning of Young Children. Research in Science Education, 43(5), 2085-2106. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11165-012-9344-8

Fleer, M., & Hoban, G. (2012). Using 'Slowmation' for Intentional Teaching in Early Childhood Centres: Possibilities and Imaginigs. Australasian Journal of Early Childhood, 37(3), 61-70.

Frechette, J.D. (2002). Developing Media Literacy in Cyberspace: Pedagogy and Critical Learning for the Twenty-First-Century Classroom. Westport, CT: Praeger.

Greene, J.P., Kisida, B., & Bowen, D.H. (2014). The Educational Value of Field Trips: Taking Students to an Art Museum Improves Critical Thinking Skills, and More. Education Next, 14(1), 78-86.

Hoban, G., & Nielsen, W. (2012). Using 'Slowmation' to Enable Preservice Primary Teachers to Create Multimodal Representations of Science Concepts. Research in Science Education, 42(6), 1101-1119. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11165-011-9236-3

Hoban, G., & Nielsen, W. (2014). Creating a Narrated Stop-motion Animation to Explain Science: The Affordances of 'Slowmation' for Generating Discussion. Teaching and Teacher Education, 42, 68-78. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2014.04.007

Hobbs, R. (2004). A Review of School-based Initiatives in Media Literacy Education. American Behavioral Scientist, 48(1), 42-59. https://doi.org/10.1177/0002764204267250

Jenson, J., Dahya, N., & Fisher, S. (2014). Valuing Production Values: a 'Do it Yourself' Media Production Club. Learning Media and Technology, 39(2), 215-228. https://doi.org/10.1080/17439884.2013.799486

Kolb, D.A. (1984). Experiential Learning: Experience as the Source of Learning and Development. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Konak, A., Clark, T.K., & Nasereddin, M. (2014). Using Kolb's Experiential Learning Cycle to Improve Student Learning in Virtual Computer Laboratories. Computers & Education, 72, 11-22. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2013.10.013

Lee, C.Y., & Yuan, Y. (2010). Gender Differences in the Relationship between Taiwanese Adolescents' Mathematics Attitudes and their Perceptions toward Virtual Manipulatives. International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, 8(5), 937-950.

Lee, V.R. (2015). Combining High-speed Cameras and Stop-motion Animation Software to Support Students' Modeling of Human Body Movement. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 24(2-3), 178-191. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10956-014-9521-9

López, L., & Aguaded, M.C. (2015). Teaching Media Literacy in Colleges of Education and Communication. [La docencia sobre alfabetización mediática en las Facultades de Educación y Comunicación]. Comunicar, 44, 187-195. https://doi.org/10.3916/c44-2015-20

McKnight, A., Hoban, G., & Nielsen, W. (2011). Using Slowmation for Animated Storytelling to Represent non-Aboriginal Preservice Teachers' Awareness of 'Relatedness to Country'. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 27(1), 41-54.

Pringle, E. (2009). The Artist-led Pedagogic Process in the Contemporary Art Gallery: Developing a Meaning Making Framework. International Journal of Art & Design Education, 28(2), 174-182.

Ramírez-García, A., & González-Fernández, N. (2016). Media Competence of Teachers and Students of Compulsory Education in Spain. [Competencia mediática del profesorado y del alumnado de educación obligatoria en España ]. Comunicar, 49, 49-57. https://doi.org/10.3916/c49-2016-05

Rasanen, M. (1999). Building Bridges: Experiential art Understanding. Journal of Art & Design Education, 18(2), 195-205.

Santos, M.E.C., Chen, A., Taketomi, T., Yamamoto, G., Miyazaki, J., & Kato, H. (2014). Augmented Reality Learning Experiences: Survey of Prototype Design and Evaluation. IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies, 7(1), 38-56. https://doi.org/10.1109/tlt.2013.37

Unlusoy, A., de Haan, M., Leseman, P.M., & van-Kruistum, C. (2010). Gender Differences in Adolescents' Out-of-school Literacy Practices: A Multifaceted Approach. Computers & Education, 55(2), 742-751. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2010.03.007

Vratulis, V., Clarke, T., Hoban, G., & Erickson, G. (2011). Additive and Disruptive Pedagogies: The Use of Slowmation as an Example of Digital Technology Implementation. Teaching and Teacher Education, 27(8), 1179-1188. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2011.06.004

Wilkerson-Jerde, M.H., Gravel, B., & Macrander, C.A. (2015). Exploring Shifts in Middle School Learners' Modeling Activity while Generating Drawings, Animations, and Computational Simulations of Molecular Diffusion. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 24(2-3), 396-415. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10956-014-9497-5

Back to Top
GET PDF

Document information

Published on 31/03/17
Accepted on 31/03/17
Submitted on 31/03/17

Volume 25, Issue 1, 2017
DOI: 10.3916/C51-2017-09
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 1
Views 128
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?