Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The quality of the online resources for parents offering access to open knowledge has hardly received attention despite their increasing number. This paper provides a framework to examine the ethical and content quality of parenting resources. The ethical criteria were based on “the Health on the Net” (HON) framework whereas the content criteria were based on the Positive Parenting framework and the effectiveness of the learning materials used. The criteria were applied to a survey of international websites (n=100) for Spanishspeaking parents. Chisquare analyses showed that websites from Spain, official companies sites and information sites, as compared to South American, parents’ and interactive sites, scored higher in the ethical criteria of privacy, authority, justifiability and financial disclosure. Hierarchical cluster analysis applied to content criteria showed that the High quality websites, unlike the Low quality ones, valued gender equality, a positive parental role, modeled a variety of parenting practices, educational contents with multimedia formats, and made use of experiential, academic and technical information. Privacy, financial disclosure and justifiability were more likely to be found in the High and Medium quality content clusters. In conclusion, the study illustrates some of the challenges of open knowledge and sets out the priority areas for quality improvement for website designers and for professionals who want to help parents develop effective skills for searching for trustworthy sources

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Nowadays, parents use the Internet as an important source of information to support their parenting and better promote their children’s development and family wellbeing (Dworkin, Connell, & Doty, 2013; Niela-Vilén, Axelin, Salanterä, & Melender, 2014; Nieuwboer, Fukkink, & Hermanns, 2013a; 2013b). The use of the Internet and social media for parenting purposes allows parents to obtain information and counseling from experts but also to exchange experiences with other parents and create virtual communities around certain child-rearing topics (Madge & O’Connor, 2006; Myers-Walls & Dworkin, 2015; McDaniel & al., 2011; Muñetón, Suárez, & Rodrigo, 2015). The Internet offers a range of opportunities for e-empowerment, giving means through which parents can increase their competence at personal, social and citizenship levels, perceived self-efficacy and autonomous decision making about child-rearing issues (Amichai-Hamburger & al., 2008). In sum, parents are not only in the hands of experts, but they can produce and communicate information by themselves, heading towards open knowledge models where information is primarily produced in digital formats and consumed through online media (García-Peñalvo, García de Figuerola, & Merlo-Vega, 2010).

Parents’ use of the Internet does not come without risks since they determine when, where, which and how to access information from some websites that may not rely on credible and reliable sources. The responsibility to access high-quality, reliable educational content that used to rest primarily on the expert/educator has been partly transferred to parents, who should be skillful enough to conduct efficient searches and properly evaluate the outcomes (Dworkin & al., 2013; Ebata & Curtiss, 2017; Rothbaum, Martland, & Jannsen, 2008; Suárez, Rodrigo, & Muñetón, 2016). However, the extent to which online parenting resources provide effective support to parents also depends on the quality of the websites browsed. Website designers and online service providers should also take responsibility and offer websites that meet high-quality standards to provide consumers with credible information prepared for general audiences spanning the world.

Notably, quality standards of websites for the parenting domain have not yet been well established or tested on empirical grounds (Myers-Walls & Dworkin, 2016). The present study proposes a framework to evaluate the quality of online parenting resources based on ethical and content criteria, since the design, organization, and user-friendly quality standards of the parenting websites have received more attention in the online parenting literature (Hughes & al., 2012; Myers-Walls & Dworkin, 2015). The idea is to identify ethical and content standards and to empirically test their application to a sample of websites for Spanish-speaking parents. On the practical side, our study would help to reveal differences in the quality of websites offered to parents in the large community of Spanish-speaking Internet users. Spanish is the third-most-spoken language on the Internet and the second on the social networks.

In a recent review, Ebata and Curtiss (2017) listed some criteria that may be helpful in determining if a parenting website has a quality information (e.g., the website has a legitimate authority, the authorship is provided, the purpose of the information is declared, the information is justified on scientific evidence, and the information is current and accurate). However, there is a need to support the selection of the quality standards on a more theoretical basis. Cheung & al. (2008) have proposed a model for the WOM (word-of-mouth) communication defining two important factors for information adoption: source credibility and information quality. Sources credibility involves source expertise and source trustworthiness. Information quality involves relevance, timeliness, accuracy, and comprehensiveness. This model was used in the current study to test the pertinence and relative importance of both factors as quality criteria of parenting websites.

We selected criteria related to source credibility following the ethical standards defined by “Health on the Net” (HON, 2017) (https://goo.gl/JNDPg9) aimed at improving the ethical quality of medical and health information on the Internet. Ethical standards in the Internet context reflect the principles that websites should follow to respect the consumers’ rights in agreement with fairness, accountability and trustworthy issues. The HON system certifies websites based on a code of conduct in widespread use: it covers over 35 languages and has been adapted to cultural differences and regulations around the world (Baujard & al., 2010). For this study, the following criteria were used: authority, privacy, attribution, justifiability, transparency, financial disclosure and advertising policy (see Method, Table 3 for a description).

As for the information content, we selected criteria that reflect aspects related to the adequacy of the information (relevance, timeless and accuracy) and its learnability (comprehensiveness) to provide effective support to parents. Adequacy of the information (a) was assessed following the Council of Europe’s Recommendation 19/2006 (Council of Europe, 2006) on positive parenting, whereas learnability of information (b) was assessed following the literature on the characteristics of parenting websites that may foster effective learning (Dworkin & al., 2013; Hughes & al., 2012; Myers-Walls & Dworkin, 2015; Rothbaum & al., 2008). According to (a), the Council of Europe’s Recommendation provides a modern view of positive parenting, and what is needed for support in our societies. Furthermore, this evidence-based framework is widely accepted and applied in Spain (Rodrigo & al., 2016) and the rest of Europe (Rodrigo & al., 2016) and is gradually spreading to other Spanish-speaking countries (Rodrigo & al., 2015).

Under this framework, it is important to pay attention to several aspects: the sites’ orientation on gender equality and family patterns; whether the view of the parental role was positive (stressing parental capabilities and skills) or negative (stressing difficulties and problems), and whether the website mentioned a variety of child-rearing practices rather than a single positive or negative instance (as simple recipes). According to (b), an important aspect of content quality is that the information provided on the website may foster effective learning (Dworkin & al., 2013; Hughes & al., 2012; Myers-Walls & Dworkin, 2015; Rothbaum, Martland, & Jannsen, 2008). We focused on the following aspects: whether it provides a variety of educational content, a variety of multimedia materials, such as pictures, video, text and animated simulations; a variety of communication tools to support interactive exchanges; and finally, whether it presents mixed information involving personal experiences, concepts, research findings and child-rearing techniques (see Method, Table 4 for a description).

This study addresses a systematic assessment of the ethical and content criteria, based on the model of the information adoption (Cheung & al., 2008), applicable to a sample of parenting websites in Spanish. Our first research question was to identify the website characteristics (type of website, origin, type of entity, purpose, and audience) associated with their ethical quality. We hypothesized that mainly the type of entity (e.g., public agencies) responsible for the website would be related to higher ethical standards to protect the consumers’ rights. Type of entity is also a relevant feature for parents with more proficiency in using the Internet for parenting purposes (Muñetón, Suárez, & Rodrigo, 2015; Suárez, Rodrigo, & Muñetón, 2016). Country of origin could also be relevant due to the huge differences in Internet penetration rates in Spanish-speaking countries involving two continents (e.g., Spain and South-American countries; Live Internet Stats, 2016) that may have an impact on the quality of the websites for parents.

Our second research question was to examine the extent to which the websites’ ethical quality was related to the quality of their content. Both ethical and content criteria could be expected to be relevant and probably mutually related for high-quality websites. Parents deserve that the information available followed ethical standards that guarantee its credibility, and they also deserve the proper informational message that guarantees a positive exercise of parenting.

A person-centered approach (Bergman & al., 2003) was used to identify different groups of websites with similar content criteria configurations, enhancing our knowledge about the potential combination of quality criteria there could be. In what follows, the methodology used to select the websites, the results obtained after the application of the quality criteria and their practical implications are described.


Suarez-Perdomo et al 2018a-62674-en007.jpg

2. Material and methods

2.1. Sampling of websites


Suarez-Perdomo et al 2018a-62674-en008.jpg

The search was carried out in May and June 2016 using Google and Yahoo as search engines, and the strategy involved conducting Boolean searches of various key words related to the parenting domain (Table 1). The criteria for including a resource in the sample were as follows: first, it should be a webpage or blog, as these are the main formats used to convey online parenting information; second, either direct or logged in access should be free; and third, the primary components of the resource should be educational or on family health-related issues. The exclusion criteria were as follows: first, the resource could not be a commercial website; second, the type of entity could not be inaccessible; third, the origin could not be inaccessible; and fourth, formats such as newsletters, magazines, eBooks, and curriculum guides were not included. As a result, 100 websites were selected out of 175 entries, with 48% from Google and 52% from Yahoo with no overlaps in the search results.


Suarez-Perdomo et al 2018a-62674-en009.jpg

2.2. Evaluation checklist and reliability of coding scheme

The evaluation checklist consisted of two sets of criteria: seven ethical criteria (Table 3) and eight content criteria (Table 4).


Suarez-Perdomo et al 2018a-62674-en010.jpg

Descriptions of each criterion and the coding scheme used are provided. All HON criteria were adapted to the parenting field, with the exception of complementarity (information should support, not replace, the doctor-patient relationship), which was excluded, given that it was not easily assessed and/or applied to the parenting domain.

The eight content criteria and respective coding systems were defined by consensus by a panel of four experts in the positive parenting framework and online parenting. Overall, the ethical criteria were evaluated using categorical variables, whereas the content criteria used Likert-scale or cumulative (0-1) values. Two reviewers, other than the authors, independently evaluated the 100 websites. They were trained during 15 hours on how to apply the ethical and content quality criteria using ten websites that were not included in the analyses. Disagreements were resolved through discussion. After reaching a Kappa coefficient > 0.8 in the training period as a recommended value (Bangdiwala, 2017; Cohen, 1960), the two raters started the evaluation of the websites in the sample. Inter-rater reliability (Kappa 0-1) for the ethical criteria was adequate: Authority 0.93; Privacy 0.72; Attribution 0.84; Justifiability 0.91; Transparency 0.88; Financial disclosure 0.86; and Advertising policy 0.88. Inter-rater reliability for the content criteria was adequate: Gender equality 0.91; Family diversity 0.93; Parental role 0.94; Parenting practices 0.88; Educational content 0.87; Multimedia use 0.88; Communication tools 0.83; and Type of information 0.88.

3. Analysis and results

For the first research question, chi-square analyses were used, crossing the characteristics of the sampled websites with each ethical criterion. We used the corrected typified residuals (rz) to further explore the statistically significant differences in the contingency tables (Haberman, 1973). This procedure allowed us to identify the particular cells in which the z scores were greater than +1.96 (above chance levels) or less than -1.96 (below chance levels). Cramer’s v (Agresti, 1996) was used as an indicator of effect size (ES), and significant results with medium and high ES were reported.

For the second research question, a hierarchical cluster analysis was performed on the content criteria scores using Ward’s (1963) method to examine whether it was possible to distinguish different profiles. All variables were standardized to z scores to prevent the different scales from influencing the results. One-way ANOVAs by cluster membership were performed with Scheffe post hoc comparisons to examine whether the profiles significantly differed in the content criteria. The statistic R2 (Cohen, 1988) was used as an indicator of ES. Finally, chi-square analyses were used, crossing the characteristics of the sampled websites and the ethical criteria with the three clusters.

3.1. Characteristics of the online parenting resources modulating ethical quality

On average, Authority was unknown in 9.47% of the sites; experts in education and psychology were the authors in 46.32%, followed by experts in other subjects (22.11%) and parents (22.11%). Information on Privacy and Attribution was present in 68% and 42.11% of the sites, respectively. Information on Justifiability and Transparency was absent in 42.11% and 26.32% of the sites, partially present in 47.37% and 38.95%, and present in full in 10.53% and 34.74%, respectively. Financial disclosure and Advertising policy details were absent in 36.84% and 49.47% of the sites, partially present in 18.95% and 38.95%, and present in full in 44.21% and 11.58%, respectively.


Suarez-Perdomo et al 2018a-62674-en011.jpg

The origin, type of entity, and purpose of the websites modulated most ethical criteria. Concerning origin, websites from Spain, and South America, respected privacy (?2(2)=9.26, p<0.001), provided evidence to justify claims (?2(4)=12.68, p<0.001), and provided financial disclosure (?2(4)=15.88, p<0.001). Concerning type of entity and authority (as ethical criteria), public agencies were more likely to have experts in education as authors. Companies were more likely to have experts in other subjects authoring content, and parents’ websites were more likely to have parents as authors (?2(12)=43.7, p<0.001). Public agencies were more likely to respect privacy, and parents’ websites were less likely to do so (?2(4)=11.22, p<0.001). Companies were more likely to provide financial disclosure, and parents’ websites were less likely to do so (?2(8)=29.42, p<0.001). Finally, regarding purpose and authority, information sites had experts in education as authors whereas interactive sites had parents as authors (?2(3)=17.9, p<0.001). Information sites provided attribution to source data while interactive sites were less likely to do so (?2(1)=9.71, p<0.001); they partially provided evidence to justify claims while interactive sites provided no evidence (?2(2)=10.34, p<0.001), and they provided financial disclosure while interactive sites were less likely to do so (?2(2)=12.57, p<0.001).

3.2. Identifying content criteria profiles

For the second research question, cluster analyses showed an adequate three-cluster solution, since the clusters were theoretically meaningful, evident in the dendrogram (a tree-structured graph used to visualize the result of a hierarchical clustering calculation), and represented the best possible balance between cluster size and differentiation. The hierarchical three-cluster solution was replicated using the iterative partitioning method, k-means (n=95). Mean distances between centroids of clusters 1 and 2 were 2.405 and 3.528, respectively, whereas the main distance between clusters 2 and 3 was 2.435. The mean scores on the clustering variables are shown in Table 5. The clusters differed in all variables, except for communication tools.

Cluster 1, labeled High quality (n=33), was characterized by gender equality, the use of a positive parental role as opposed to the negative role, a great variety of positive and negative parenting practices under analysis, a relatively high variety of educational content, and of multimedia use, and a balanced presentation of experiential, academic and technical information. Cluster 2 was labeled Medium quality (n=25) and was characterized by medium levels of gender equality, relatively high levels of family diversity, medium use of the positive parental role, low use of the negative parental role, medium variety of parental practices and educational content, low multimedia use, low levels of experiential information, high levels of academic information and medium levels of technical information. Cluster 3, Low quality (n=37), was characterized by a low level of gender equality, very low levels of family diversity, very low use of the positive parental role and high use of the negative parental role, a very low variety of parenting practices, very low levels of educational content, medium levels of multimedia use, high levels of experiential information, and low levels of academic and technical information.


Suarez-Perdomo et al 2018a-62674-en012.jpg

3.3. Website characteristics and ethical criteria associated with cluster membership

Chi-square tests revealed that Origin was differentially distributed across the clusters (?2(2)=7.77, p<0.05). Websites from Spain were overrepresented in the High-quality cluster, whereas sites of South American origin were overrepresented in the Low-quality cluster. Type of entity differed by Cluster (?2(8)=20.07, p<0.01). Companies were overrepresented in the High-quality cluster and parents’ websites in the Low-quality cluster. Purpose differed by Cluster (?2(2)=8.83, p<0.01). Information sites were overrepresented in Cluster 2 and interactive sites in Cluster 3. Finally, Figure 1 illustrates the relationship between ethical criteria and cluster distribution. Privacy, Justifiability and Financial disclosure significantly differed by Cluster (?2(2)=12.45, p<0.01; ?2(4)= 13.88, p<.01; ?2(4)=20.77, p< 0.001, respectively). Websites scoring above chance in full Privacy and Financial disclosure were more likely to be found in the High and Medium quality clusters. Websites scoring above chance in full Justifiability were more likely to be found in the High-quality cluster. Websites scoring below chance in full Privacy, Justifiability and Financial disclosure were in the Low-quality cluster.

4. Discussion and conclusions

This study examined, for the first time, a set of ethical and content criteria based on the model of information adoption to be applied in the parenting domain. The results showed that the model used works well in guiding the selection of quality criteria for the evaluation purpose, which should be backed by further studies. Overall, the ethical quality varied according to the criteria. Authority, privacy, transparency and financial disclosure were more likely to be declared and practiced, whereas attribution to source data, justification of the claims based on scientific evidence and a clear advertising policy were practically absent in around half of the sites. The evidence-based movement in the parenting domain is not yet well established in Europe and is still in its infancy in many Spanish-speaking countries (Rodrigo & al., 2016). Therefore, parenting websites in Spanish face a major challenge to reflect this evaluation culture in the materials they offer. Likewise, commercial purposes are likely to be confounded with designers’ genuine interest in supporting parents, which goes against a culture of respect for parents’ rights as consumers.

As expected, the quality of ethical criteria also varied according to the origin, type of entity and purpose of websites. Higher quality was observed in websites from Spain as compared to those from South American countries, as measured by the privacy, justification and financial disclosure. Interestingly, lower Internet penetration rates in Colombia (56.9%), Argentina (69.2%) and Chile (77.8%) than in Spain (82.2%) seem to be accompanied by the designers’ lower awareness of the importance of quality web-based parent support. Websites from North America had an intermediate position, probably because of they were clustered together for geographical proximity, but they show different penetration rates: USA (88.5%) and Mexico (45.1%). However, a more representative and ample sample of websites from Spanish-speaking countries is needed before more solid conclusions can be reached.

The results for the type of entity and purpose also point to an ethical quality gap between public agencies and companies on the one side and parents’ websites on the other. The use of experts, respect for privacy, attribution, justifiability and financial disclosure were typical of public agencies and companies and information sites, whereas parents’ websites and interactive sites scored lower on all these ethical criteria. A possible explanation is that, in principle, parents are not expert designers and may not be aware of these ethical aspects. In fact, when doing their searches, parents seem to pay attention only to the authority and advertising policy, since they trust official websites and parental resources equally, whereas they give less credibility to commercial websites (Dworkin & al., 2013; Muñetón & al., 2015). Another potential explanation is that information carries value and credibility when it is delivered by friends or family in the context of a caring and trusting relationship or by those who share experiences and values similar to one’s own (Ebata & Curtiss, 2017).

Using a person-centred approach, it was possible to distinguish three quality profiles for the websites, which differed meaningfully in two aspects: their view of families and the parenting task (Rodrigo & al., 2016), and the way they foster effective learning (Hughes & al., 2012; Myers-Walls & Dworkin, 2015). The High-quality websites valued gender equality, stressed a positive parental role, modeled a variety of parenting practices, included a variety of educational content and multimedia formats, and made use of experiential, academic and technical information. By contrast, the Low-quality websites provided a biased set of values (gender inequality and an undifferentiated view of the family), a focus on parental problems and single techniques, and a poor learning environment (little educational content, low multimedia use and an overreliance on parental experiences). Websites from Spain, sites run by companies and information sites were overrepresented in the High and Medium quality profiles, whereas sites from South America, parents’ websites and interactive sites were mostly overrepresented in the Low-quality profile. These results showed that the benefits of using the Internet to exchange experiences with other parents and experts (Madge & d O’Connor, 2006; Niela-Vilén & al., 2014), might be put at risk by the comparatively lower ethical and content quality of these parenting resources.

Finally, as expected, we found a relationship between the ethical and content quality. It seems that protection of the visitor’s rights to privacy and confidentiality, reliance on scientific evidence to back up claims or recommendations and fair disclosure of financial interests are important ethical qualities associated with a modern view of family and parenting, and efficient ways to foster the visitor’s learning. This is especially true for the official/expert websites but not so much for the websites run by parents and interactive sites that tended to score lower on ethical criteria, as it is more difficult to ascertain the credibility of the source (like in eWOM communication, Cheung & al., 2008).

As a limitation, the selection of content criteria guided by the Council of Europe’s Recommendation (19/2006) on positive parenting could not be universally accepted in other cultural contexts. The clustering of websites based on the geographical proximity should be refined in further studies using instead the penetration rates of the Internet in each country. Finally, the expert point of view taken in this study should be complemented with the professional and family perspectives to reach a complete consensus on the quality standards.

In conclusion, the Internet has become a crucial information and support source for parents, which provides an interesting example of open knowledge management in an informal educational context. It is in the parenting domain where the danger of exposing consumers to evidence-based contents, biased values, poor e-learning environments and hidden commercial purposes is presumably greater than informal educational contexts. Regrettably, the assessment of the quality of online parenting support and education is still an emerging field. Given the explosion of websites and blogs for parents, it is urgent to arrive at common definitions of ethical and content criteria for the assessment of online resources. Once reached a consensus, these criteria may provide guidelines for those designers who develop websites for parents. Our results showed that there is a large room for improvement both on the ethical and content aspects especially for interactive websites, those authored by parents and those with a South American origin. Professionals may also benefit by adopting quality standards since they also need to know which criteria to employ when judging the quality of Internet-based resources. In this way, professionals may decide on better grounds which websites and online materials should be used to support parents. They may also help parents to develop effective skills for browsing and search for trustworthy sources by themselves. The dissemination of the present results may also benefit parents as users of websites to autonomously scan information and decide whether it is credible, relevant or compelling enough to spend more time on it. To conclude, quality assurance of the websites should be at the forefront of the measures that should be taken for the effective use of informational technology in the parenting domain.

Funding agency

This work was supported by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (MINECO), the European Regional Development Fund (FEDER) under the Grants PSI2015-69971-R and EDU2012-38588.

References

Amichai-Hamburger, Y., McKenna, K.Y., & Tal, S.A. (2008). E-empowerment: Empowerment by the Internet. Computers in Human Behavior, 24(5), 1776-1789. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2008.02.002

Bangdiwala, S.I. (2017). Graphical aids for visualizing and interpreting patterns in departures from agreement in ordinal categorical observer agreement data. Journal of Biopharmaceutical Statistics, 1-11. https://doi.org/10.1080/10543406.2016.1273941

Baujard, V., Boyer, C., & Geissbühler, A. (2010). Evolution of Health Web certification, through the HONcode experience. Swiss Medical Informatics, 26(69), 53-55. (https://goo.gl/RZp5Sg).

Bergman, L.R., Magnusson, D., & El-Khouri, B.M. (2003). Studying individual development in an interindividual context: A person-oriented approach. London: Psychology Press. (https://goo.gl/qsXTD6).

Brady, E., & Guerin, S. (2010). Not the romantic, all happy, coochy coo experience: A qualitive analysis of interactions on an Irish parenting web site. Family relations, 59(1), 14-27. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1741-3729.2009.00582.x

Cheung, M.K., Lee, M.K.O., & Rabjohn, N. (2008). The impact of electronic word-of-mouth-The adoption of online opinions in online customer communities. Internet Research, 18(3), 229-247. https://doi.org/10.1108/10662240810883290

Cohen, J. (1960). A coefficient for agreement for nominal scales. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 20, 37-46. https://doi.org/10.1177/001316446002000104

Cohen, J. (1988). Statistical power analysis for the behavioral sciences. New York: Lawrence Erlbaum, Hillsdale. (https://goo.gl/yeqvLg).

Council of Europe (2006). 19 Recommendation of the Committee of Ministers to member States on policy to support positive parenting. Strasbourg. (https://goo.gl/Sk2BQG).

Dworkin, J., Connell, J., & Doty, J. (2013). A literature review of parents’ online behaviour. Cyberpsychology: Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, 7(2), 1-12. https://doi.org/10.5817/CP2013-2-2

Ebata, A., & Curtiss, S.L. (2017). Family life education on the technological frontier. In S.F. Duncan & H.S. Goddard (Eds.), Family life education: Principles and practices for effective outreach (pp. 236-626). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. (https://goo.gl/5PtQq3).

García-Peñalvo, F. J., García-de-Figuerola, C., & Merlo-Vega, J.A. (2010). Open knowledge: Challenges and facts. Online Information Review, 34(4), 520-539. https://doi.org/10.1108/14684521011072963

Haberman, S.J. (1973). The analysis of residuals in cross-classified tables. Biometrics, 29(1), 205-220. https://doi.org/10.2307/2529686

Healthonnet.org (2017). Heatlh on the Net (HON): HonCode: Principios en español. (https://goo.gl/eP73wT).

Hughes, R., Bowers, J.R., Mitchell, E.T., Curtiss, S., & Ebata, A.T. (2012). Developing online family life prevention and education programs. Family Relations, 61(5), 711-727. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1741-3729.2012.00737.x

Internet Live Stats (2016). Internet Users by country. (https://goo.gl/1xiZfR).

Madge, C., & O'Connor, H. (2006). Parenting gone wired: Empowerment of new mothers on the Internet? Social & Cultural Geography, 7(2), 199-220. https://doi.org/10.1080/14649360600600528

McDaniel, B.T., Coyne, S.M., & Holmes, E.K. (2012). New mothers and media use: Associations between blogging, social networking, and maternal well-being. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 16(7), 1509-1517. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-011-0918-2

Muñetón M., Suárez, A., & Rodrigo, M.J. (2015). El uso de recursos web como apoyo a la educación de los hijos en los padres colombianos. Investigación & Desarrollo, 23(1), 91-116. https://doi.org/10.14482/indes.23.1.6496

Myers-Walls, J.A., & Dworkin, J. (2016). Parenting education without borders. Web-based outreach. In J.J. Ponzetti (Ed.), Evidence-based Parenting Education. A global perspective (pp. 123-139). New York: Routledge. (https://goo.gl/HC2TXm).

Niela-Vilén, H., Axelin, A., Salanterä, S., & Melender, H.L. (2014). Internet-based peer support for parents: a systematic integrative review. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 51(11), 1524-1537. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2014.06.009

Nieuwboer, C.C., Fukkink, R.G., & Hermanns, J.M. (2013a). Peer and professional parenting support on the Internet: a systematic review. Cyberpsychology, Behavioral and Social Networks, 16(7), 518-528. https://doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2012.0547

Nieuwboer, C.C., Fukkink, R.G., & Hermanns, J.M. (2013b). Online programs as tools to improve parenting: a meta-analytic review. Children and Youth Services Review, 35(11), 1823-1829. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2013.08.008

Rodrigo, M.J., Almeida, A., & Reichle, B. (2016). Evidence-based parent education programs: A European perspective. In J. Ponzetti (Ed.), Evidence-based parenting education: A global perspective (pp. 85-104). New York: Routledge. (https://goo.gl/HC2TXm).

Rodrigo, M.J., Byrne, S., & Álvarez, M., (2016). Interventions to promote positive parenting in Spain. In M. Israelashvili, & J.L. Romano (Eds.), Cambridge handbook of international prevention science (pp. 929-956). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. (https://goo.gl/nrYhEk).

Rodrigo, M.J., Máiquez, M.L., Martín, J.C., & Rodríguez, B. (2015). La parentalidad positiva desde la prevención y la promoción. In M.J. Rodrigo, M.L. Máiquez, J.C. Martín, S. Byrne, & B. Rodríguez (Eds.), Manual práctico en parentalidad positiva (pp. 25-44). Madrid: Síntesis. (https://goo.gl/RpHwpB).

Rothbaum, F., Martland, N., & Jannsen, J.B. (2008). Parents’ reliance on the web to find information about children and families: Socio-economic differences in use, skills and satisfaction. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 29(2), 118-128. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appdev.2007.12.002

Sarkadi, A., & Bremberg, S. (2005). Socially unbiased parenting support on the Internet: a cross sectional study of users of a large Swedish parenting website. Child: Care, Health and Development, 31(1), 43-52. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2214.2005.00475.x

Suárez, A., Rodrigo, M.J., & Muñetón, M. (2016). Parental activities seeking online parenting support: Is there a digital skill divide? Revista de Cercetare si Interventie Sociala, 54, 36-54. (https://goo.gl/H5yCxb).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

La calidad de los recursos online para padres que permiten acceder al conocimiento en abierto apenas ha recibido atención a pesar de su incremento. Este estudio analiza la calidad tanto ética como de contenido de dichos recursos. Los criterios éticos están basados en los de «Salud en la Red» (HON), mientras que los de contenido se basan en los principios de la Parentalidad Positiva y la efectividad de los materiales de aprendizaje usados. Los criterios se aplicaron a una muestra de webs internacionales (n=100) para padres y madres hispanohablantes. Los análisis de Chicuadrado mostraron que los sitios web españoles, de empresas oficiales e informativos obtuvieron una calificación más alta en los criterios éticos que los recursos de Sudamérica, de padres e interactivos, en privacidad, autoridad, justificabilidad e información financiera. El Análisis Jerárquico de Clúster aplicado a los criterios de contenido mostró que los sitios web de alta calidad, a diferencia de los de baja calidad, valoraban la igualdad de género, un rol parental positivo, modelaban una variedad de prácticas parentales, contenidos educativos con formatos multimedia y proporcionaban experiencias, información académica y técnicas. La privacidad, la información financiera, y la justificabilidad eran más característicos de los clúster con contenidos de Alta y Media calidad. En conclusión, el estudio ilustra algunos de los retos del conocimiento en abierto y define las áreas prioritarias para la mejora de la calidad para los diseñadores de webs y para los profesionales que quieran ayudar a los padres a desarrollar habilidades para buscar fuentes confiables

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Actualmente, los padres utilizan Internet como una fuente de información para apoyar la parentalidad y para la mejor promoción del desarrollo y bienestar de los hijos y la familia (Dworkin, Connell, & Doty, 2013; Niela-Vilén, Axelin, Salanterä, & Melender, 2014; Nieuwboer, Fukkink, & Hermanns, 2013a; 2013b). El uso de Internet y medios sociales para padres permite a las familias obtener información y asesoramiento de expertos, así como intercambiar experiencias con otros padres y crear comunidades virtuales en torno a ciertos temas relacionados con la educación de los hijos (Madge & O’Connor, 2006; Myers-Walls & Dworkin, 2015; McDaniel & al., 2011; Muñetón, Suárez, & Rodrigo, 2015). Además, Internet ofrece una serie de oportunidades para el empoderamiento digital, proporcionando medios a través de los cuales los padres pueden mejorar su competencia a nivel personal, social y como ciudadanos, su autoeficacia percibida y la toma de decisiones autónoma con respecto a temas de crianza y educación de los hijos (Amichai-Hamburger & al., 2008). En suma, los padres no solo están en manos de expertos sino que son capaces de producir y comunicar información por ellos mismos, lo que conduce a los modelos de conocimiento en abierto donde la información se produce principalmente en formatos digitales y se consume a través de medios online (García-Peñalvo, García-de-Figueroa, & Merlo-Vega, 2010).

El uso de Internet en los padres entraña sus riesgos, ya que ellos determinan dónde, qué y cómo acceden a la información de los recursos web que pueden utilizar fuentes no creíbles ni confiables. Por ello, si antes la responsabilidad de acceder a un contenido educativo confiable y de alta calidad residía en los expertos/educadores, ahora esa responsabilidad se ha visto transferida en parte a los padres, que deben ser lo suficientemente hábiles como para realizar búsquedas eficaces y evaluar adecuadamente los resultados (Dworkin & al., 2013; Ebata & Curtiss, 2017; Rothbaum, Martland, & Jannsen, 2008; Suárez, Rodrigo, & Muñetón, 2016). No obstante, la calidad del apoyo que prestan estos recursos a los padres depende también de la propia calidad de los recursos que rastrean. Los diseñadores web y proveedores de servicios online también deben asumir la responsabilidad y ofrecer sitios web que cumplan con estándares de alta calidad que aseguren a los consumidores obtener información confiable destinada al público en general en cualquier parte del mundo. Cabe destacar que los estándares de calidad de los recursos web para padres todavía no se han establecido ni puestos a prueba empíricamente (Myers-Walls & Dworkin, 2016). El presente estudio propone un marco para evaluar la calidad de los recursos web para padres basado en criterios éticos y de contenido, ya que los estándares sobre el diseño, la organización y la usabilidad de los sitios web para padres han recibido más atención en la literatura de la parentalidad online (Hughes & al., 2012; Myers-Walls & Dworkin, 2015). La idea es identificar los estándares éticos y de contenido y probar empíricamente su aplicación a una muestra de recursos web para padres hispano-hablantes. El presente estudio ayudaría a revelar, desde una perspectiva práctica, las diferencias de calidad que ofrecen los recursos web para padres en la gran comunidad de usuarios de habla hispana en Internet. El español es el tercer idioma más hablado en Internet y el segundo en las redes sociales.

En una reciente revisión, Ebata & Curtiss (2017) enumeraron algunos criterios que pueden ser de utilidad para determinar si el recurso web que se visita contiene información de calidad (por ejemplo, si el recurso web tiene una autoridad legítima, se proporciona información sobre la autoría, se declara el propósito de la información, la información está justificada por evidencia científica y la información es actual y precisa). Sin embargo, es necesario sustentar la selección de los estándares de calidad sobre una base más teórica. Cheung y otros (2008) han propuesto un modelo para la comunicación eWOM (boca a boca) que define dos factores importantes para la adopción de la información: la credibilidad de la fuente y la calidad de la información. La credibilidad de las fuentes comprende la experiencia y confiabilidad de la fuente de información. La calidad de la información implica la relevancia, puntualidad, exactitud y comprensibilidad. Este modelo se utiliza en el presente estudio para probar la pertinencia y relativa importancia de ambos factores como criterios de calidad de los recursos de parentalidad online.

Los criterios relacionados con la credibilidad de la fuente se seleccionaron siguiendo los estándares éticos definidos por «Salud en la Red» (Health on the Net: HON, 2017) (https://goo.gl/JNDPg9) creados con la finalidad de mejorar la calidad de la información médica y sanitaria que existe en Internet. Los estándares éticos reflejan los principios que deben seguir los recursos web para respetar los derechos de los consumidores de acuerdo con la equidad, la responsabilidad y confiabilidad. El sistema HON certifica recursos web basados en un código de conducta de uso generalizado: un código que abarca más de 35 idiomas y ha sido adaptado a diferentes culturas y normativas en todo el mundo (Baujard & al., 2010). Para el presente estudio se utilizaron los siguientes criterios: autoridad, privacidad, atribución, justificabilidad, transparencia, revelación de la financiación y política publicitaria (véase en Método, la Tabla 3 para una descripción más detallada).

En cuanto al contenido de la información, se seleccionaron criterios que reflejan aspectos relacionados con la adecuación de la información (relevancia, actualización y precisión) y su facilitación para el aprendizaje (comprensibilidad) para proporcionar un apoyo efectivo a los padres. La adecuación de la información se evaluó conforme a: a) La Recomendación del Consejo de Europa 19/2006 sobre la parentalidad positiva, en torno a la facilitación para el aprendizaje de la información; b) La literatura sobre las características de los recursos web para padres que fomentan un aprendizaje efectivo (Dworkin & al.; 2013, Hughes & al., 2012; Myers-Walls & Dworkin, 2015; Rothbaum & al., 2008). Según la Recomendación del Consejo de Europa se ofrece una visión moderna de la parentalidad positiva y de lo que se necesita para su apoyo en nuestras sociedades. Además, este marco basado en la evidencia es ampliamente aceptado y aplicado en España (Rodrigo & al., 2016) y en el resto de Europa (Rodrigo & al., 2016) y se está extendiendo gradualmente a otros países latinoamericanos (Rodrigo & al., 2015). En este marco, es importante prestar atención a varios aspectos: la orientación sobre la igualdad de género y diversidad familiar de los recursos web; si el punto de vista del rol parental es positivo (haciendo hincapié en las capacidades y destrezas de los padres) o negativo (haciendo hincapié en las dificultades y los problemas) y si el recurso web menciona una variedad de prácticas parentales en lugar de un simple ejemplo positivo o negativo. Un aspecto importante de la calidad del contenido es que la información proporcionada pueda fomentar un aprendizaje efectivo (Dworkin & al., 2013, Hughes & al., 2012; Myers-Walls & Dworkin, 2015; Rothbaum, Martland, & Jannsen, 2008). Atiende a los siguientes aspectos: si proporciona una variedad de contenidos educativos, una variedad de materiales multimedia tales como imágenes, vídeos, texto y actividades animadas; una variedad de herramientas de comunicación para el apoyo entre iguales, intercambio de información interactiva; y, finalmente, si presenta información mixta que involucre experiencias personales, conceptos y hallazgos de investigación y técnicas sobre la educación de los hijos (véase en el método la Tabla 4 para su descripción).

En este estudio se ha realizado una evaluación sistemática de los criterios éticos y de contenido, basados en el modelo de adopción de información (Cheung & al., 2008), aplicable a una muestra de recursos web para padres en español. La primera cuestión de investigación es identificar las características de los recursos web (tipo de web, procedencia, tipo de entidad, finalidad y audiencia) asociados a la calidad ética. Se hipotetiza que principalmente el tipo de entidad (por ejemplo, las entidades públicas) responsables del recurso web serían las que presentarían los estándares éticos más altos para proteger los derechos de los consumidores. El tipo de entidad es también una característica relevante para los padres con más habilidades en el uso de Internet para la búsqueda de información educativa (Muñetón, Suárez, & Rodrigo, 2015; Suárez, Rodrigo, & Muñetón, 2016). Además, el país de procedencia podría ser relevante debido a las enormes diferencias en las tasas de penetración de Internet de países de habla hispana que involucran a dos continentes (por ejemplo, España y los países de América del Sur, Internet Live Stats, 2016) que pueden tener un impacto en la calidad de los recursos web para padres.

La segunda cuestión es examinar hasta qué punto la calidad ética de los recursos web está relacionada con la calidad de su contenido. Se podría esperar que los criterios éticos y de contenidos sean relevantes y que probablemente ambos criterios estén relacionados entre sí en los recursos de alta calidad. Los padres se merecen tanto que la información disponible siga unas normas éticas que garanticen su credibilidad, como que el mensaje sea adecuado y garantice un ejercicio positivo de la parentalidad. Se ha utilizado un enfoque centrado en la persona (Bergman & al., 2003) para identificar diferentes sub-grupos de recursos web que presenta una configuración similar de criterios de contenidos, potenciando nuestro conocimiento sobre las posibles combinaciones entre criterios de calidad que pueden existir. A continuación, se describe la metodología que se llevó a cabo para la selección de los recursos web evaluados, así como los resultados obtenidos tras la aplicación de los criterios de calidad estandarizados y sus implicaciones prácticas.

2. Material y métodos

2.1. Muestreo de recursos web

La búsqueda de los recursos web a analizar se realizó entre los meses de mayo y junio de 2016, utilizando para ello los motores de búsqueda Google y Yahoo y haciendo uso de la estrategia de búsqueda de los operadores booleanos, utilizando para ello términos relacionados con el dominio de parentalidad (Tabla 1). Los criterios de inclusión de los recursos encontrados para que formaran parte de la muestra fueron los siguientes: en primer lugar, debe ser una página web o blog, ya que estos son los principales formatos utilizados para transmitir la información online sobre la educación de los hijos. En segundo lugar, el acceso directo o por registro debe ser gratuito; y en tercer lugar, los componentes primarios del recurso deben ser educativos o relacionados con la salud familiar. Los criterios de exclusión fueron los siguientes: en primer lugar, el recurso no debe ser un sitio web comercial; segundo, el tipo de entidad no puede ser inaccesible; tercero, el origen no podía ser inaccesible; y en cuarto lugar, no se incluyeron formatos tales como boletines, revistas, eBooks y guías curriculares. Como resultado, se seleccionaron 100 recursos web de 175 entradas, el 48% encontrados en Google y el 52% en Yahoo, sin superposiciones en los resultados de búsqueda.


Suarez-Perdomo et al 2018a-62674 ov-es007.jpg

2.2. Lista de evaluación y fiabilidad del esquema de codificación

La lista de evaluación realizada consistió en dos conjuntos de criterios: siete criterios éticos (Tabla 3) y ocho criterios de contenido (Tabla 4). En dichas Tablas se proporcionan descripciones de cada uno de los criterios y del esquema de codificación que se ha utilizado. Todos los criterios HON fueron adaptados a la temática de la parentalidad, con la excepción de la complementariedad (la información debe apoyar, no reemplazar, la relación médico-paciente), el cual quedó excluido dado que fue imposible evaluar este criterio aplicado a la temática de la parentalidad.


Suarez-Perdomo et al 2018a-62674 ov-es008.jpg

Los ocho criterios de contenido y sus respectivos sistemas de codificación (Tabla 4) fueron definidos por consenso por medio de un panel de cuatro expertos en parentalidad positiva y la educación parental online. En general, los criterios éticos fueron evaluados utilizando variables categóricas, mientras que para los criterios de contenidos se utilizó la escala Likert o valores acumulados (0-1). Dos revisores, diferentes a los autores del presente trabajo, evaluaron de forma independiente los 100 recursos web. Para ello, se les entrenó durante 15 horas sobre la manera de aplicar tanto los criterios de calidad ética como de contenido, mediante diez recursos web que no fueron incluidos en los análisis. Los desacuerdos se resolvieron mediante toma de decisiones consensuada. Después de alcanzar un coeficiente Kappa >0.8 en el período de entrenamiento, como valor recomendado (Bangdiwala, 2017; Cohen, 1960), los dos revisores comenzaron la evaluación de los recursos web que conformaron la muestra. La confiabilidad entre revisores (Kappa 0-1) para los criterios éticos fue adecuada: Autoría 0.93; Confidencialidad 0.72; Atribución 0.84; Garantía 0.91; Transparencia de los autores 0.88; Transparencia de los patrocinadores 0.86; y Honestidad publicitaria 0.88. La fiabilidad entre los revisores para los criterios de contenido fue adecuada: Igualdad de género 0.91; Diversidad familiar 0.93; Rol parental 0.94; Prácticas parentales 0.88; Contenido educativo 0.87; Recursos multimedia 0.88; Herramientas de comunicación 0.83; y Tipo de información 0.88.


Suarez-Perdomo et al 2018a-62674 ov-es009.jpg

3. Análisis y resultados

Para la primera pregunta de investigación se utilizó el análisis de chi-cuadrado, en el cual se cruzaron las características de los recursos web que formaron parte de la muestra con cada criterio ético. Para explorar las diferencias estadísticamente significativas se observaron los residuos tipificados corregidos (rz) en las tablas de contingencia (Haberman, 1973). Este procedimiento permite identificar las puntuaciones en las que z es mayor de +1.96 (por encima de los niveles de probabilidad) o menor de –1.96 (por debajo de los niveles de probabilidad). Además, se utilizó como indicador del tamaño del efecto (ES) el establecido por Cramer’s v (Agresti, 1996) para reportar los resultados significativos del tamaño del efecto de la muestra que tuvieran valores medios y altos.


Suarez-Perdomo et al 2018a-62674 ov-es010.jpg

Para la segunda pregunta de investigación se realizó un análisis jerárquico de clúster, utilizando el método de Ward (1963) para examinar si es posible distinguir diferentes perfiles en las medidas obtenidas. Todas las variables fueron estandarizadas con puntuaciones z para evitar que las diferentes escalas influyeran en los resultados. Se realizaron análisis de ANOVA de un factor para observar la pertenencia al clúster, así como las pruebas de comparación post hoc con Scheffe, para examinar si los perfiles eran significativamente diferentes en los criterios de contenido. Para observar el tamaño del efecto se utilizó el estadístico R2 (Cohen, 1988). Finalmente, se utilizaron análisis de chi-cuadrado, cruzando las características de los recursos web de la muestra y los criterios éticos de los tres grupos.

3.1. Características de los recursos online para padres que modulan la calidad ética

Como promedio, en la revisión de los criterios éticos se observó que en el 9,47% de la muestra la autoría era desconocida, en el 46,32% eran expertos en educación y psicología, seguido de expertos en otras materias (22.11%) y de padres (22,11%). Además, se observó que tanto la Privacidad como de la Atribución estuvo presente en el 68% y el 42,11% de los casos, respectivamente. La Justificabilidad y la Transparencia estaban ausentes en el 42,11% y el 26,32% en cada caso, parcialmente presentes en el 47,37% y el 38,95% y presentes en su totalidad en el 10,53% y el 34,74% de los recursos analizados. Por último, se observó que tanto el 36,84% como el 49,47% de los recursos no ofrecían información sobre la Financiación ni sobre la Política de publicidad, en el 18,95% y 38,95% estaba parcialmente presente dicha información y en el 44,21% y 11,58% estaba la información en su totalidad, respectivamente.

La procedencia, el tipo de entidad y la finalidad del recurso web modulaban la mayoría de los criterios éticos. Con respecto a la procedencia, se observó que las páginas españolas eran las que más respetaban la privacidad a diferencia de las páginas sudamericanas (?2(2)=9,26, p<0.001), así como justificaban las informaciones (?2(4)=12,68, p<0.001) y proporcionaban información financiera sobre los patrocinadores (?2(4)=15,88, p<0.001). Con respecto al tipo de entidad y autoría (como criterio ético), las entidades públicas eran las más propensas a tener expertos en educación como autores de la información, las empresas tenían mayor probabilidad de tener expertos en otras materias y los sitios web de padres solían firmar la información como padres (?2(12)=43,7, p<0.001); asimismo, las entidades públicas mostraban mayor control de la privacidad de la información de sus usuarios y los sitios web de los padres eran los que menos lo hacían (?2(4)=11,22, p<0.001); y las empresas tenían mayor información del patrocinador, a diferencia de los recursos de padres (?2(8)=29,42, p<0.001). Por último, con respecto a la finalidad del recurso y la autoría, los recursos que tenían expertos en educación como autores indicaban que su finalidad era informativa, a diferencia de los recursos de padres que tenían una finalidad interactiva (?2(3)=17,9, p<0.001); los recursos que tenían una finalidad informativa tendían a proporcionar más autoría sobre sus contenidos que los recursos interactivos (?2(1)=9,71, p<0.001); los recursos web con una finalidad informativa mostraban mayor presencia de justificaciones y evidencias para sus contenidos que los recursos con una finalidad más interactiva (?2(2)=10,34, p<0.001); y, finalmente, los recursos informativos desvelaban su fuente de financiación con mayor frecuencia que los recursos interactivos (?2(2)=12,57, p<0.001).

3.2. Identificación de perfiles de los criterios de contenido

Para la segunda cuestión planteada, tras el análisis de clúster realizado se obtuvo una solución adecuada de tres grupos, ya que los conglomerados resultantes eran teóricamente significativos, resultados que se hicieron evidentes al observar el dendograma (representación gráfica estructurada en forma de árbol que se utiliza para visualizar el resultado del cálculo de la agrupación jerárquica) que representaba un mayor equilibrio entre el tamaño de la muestra y el número de recursos por cada grupo. La solución jerárquica de tres grupos se replicó utilizando el método de partición iterativo de k-medias (n=95). La distancia media acumulada entre 1 y 2 fue de 2.405 y 3.528, respectivamente, mientras que la distancia media acumulada entre 2 y 3 fue de 2.435. Las puntuaciones medias de las variables de agrupamiento se muestran en la Tabla 5. Los grupos diferían en todas las variables, con la excepción de las herramientas de comunicación.

El clúster 1, denominado de Alta calidad (n=33), se caracterizaba por mostrar una mayor igualdad de género, uso de un papel parental positivo en oposición al rol negativo, una gran variedad de prácticas parentales positivas, una variedad relativamente alta de contenidos educativos, una gran variedad de recursos multimedia y una representación equilibrada de la información experiencial, académica y técnica. El clúster 2 que se denominó de Media calidad (n=25), se caracterizó por mostrar unos niveles medios de igualdad de género, niveles relativamente altos de diversidad familiar, un uso medio del rol parental positivo, bajo uso del rol parental negativo, una variedad media de prácticas parentales y contenidos educativos, uso bajo de recursos multimedia, así como un uso bajo de información experiencial, alto de información académica y medios de información técnica. Por último, el clúster 3, denominado de Baja calidad (n=37), se caracterizó por mostrar bajos niveles de igualdad de género y diversidad familiar, muy bajo uso del rol parental positivo y alto del rol parental negativo, muy baja variedad de prácticas parentales, bajo uso de contenidos educativos, niveles medios de uso de recursos multimedia, altos niveles de uso de información experiencial y bajos de información académica y técnica.


Suarez-Perdomo et al 2018a-62674 ov-es011.jpg

3.3. Características del recurso web y criterios éticos asociados con la pertenencia al clúster

Las pruebas Chi-cuadrado que se realizaron entre los clústeres y los diferentes criterios éticos indicaron que según la procedencia la muestra se distribuía de manera diferenciada en función de los clústeres (?2(2)=7,77, p<0.05). Los recursos españoles estaban sobrerepresentados en el clúster de alta calidad, mientras que los recursos originarios de Sudamérica lo estaban en el clúster de baja calidad. Con respecto al tipo de entidad, se observó una diferencia significativa (?2(8)=20,07, p<0.01). En este caso, las empresas estaban sobrerepresentadas en el clúster 1 de Alta calidad y los recursos de padres en el clúster 3 de Baja calidad. Asimismo, según la finalidad del recurso se observó una diferencia significativa (?2(2)=8,83, p<0.01). Los recursos que tenían una finalidad informativa estaban sobrerepresentados en el Clúster 2 y los recursos interactivos en el clúster 3. Finalmente, podemos observar en la Figura 1 la relación entre los criterios éticos y la distribución de los clústeres de contenidos. Las websites que puntuaban alto en la Privacidad, Justificabilidad e Información sobre la financiación mostraban diferencias significativas según los clústeres (?2(2)=12,45, p<0.01; ?2(4)=13,88, p<.01; ?2(4)=20,77, p<0.001, respectivamente). Los recursos que puntuaban alto en Privacidad e Información sobre financiación se encontraban con mayor probabilidad en los Clúster de calidad Alta y Media. Los recursos con alta Justificabilidad se encontraban con más probabilidad en el Clúster 1 de Alta calidad. Los clústeres que puntuaban bajo en Privacidad, Justificabilidad e Información sobre financiación estaban en el Clúster de Baja calidad.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

En el presente estudio se examinó, por primera vez, un conjunto de criterios éticos y de contenido basados en el modelo de adopción de la información que se aplica en el ámbito de la parentalidad. Los resultados del estudio muestran que el modelo utilizado funciona de manera adecuada, al ofrecer una guía para la selección de criterios de calidad, que deben ser respaldados por estudios adicionales. En general, la calidad ética varió según los criterios, puesto que tanto la Autoría, la Privacidad, la Transparencia de autores y la Información sobre la financiación eran los que tenían mayor probabilidad de estar presentes en los recursos web para padres, a diferencia de los datos sobre la Atribución, la Justificabilidad basada en evidencias científicas y una clara Política publicitaria estaban prácticamente ausentes en casi la mitad de los recursos analizados. El movimiento basado en la evidencia en el ámbito de la parentalidad no está todavía bien establecido en Europa y todavía está en sus inicios en muchos países de habla hispana (Rodrigo & al., 2016). Por tanto, los recursos web para padres en español se enfrentan a un gran reto para reflejar esta cultura de evaluación de la información en los materiales que ofertan. Del mismo modo, es probable que los propósitos comerciales se confundan con el interés genuino de los diseñadores en apoyar a los padres, lo que está en contra de una cultura del respeto del derecho de los padres como consumidores.


Suarez-Perdomo et al 2018a-62674 ov-es012.jpg

Como era de esperar, la calidad de los criterios éticos también varió según el país de procedencia, el tipo de entidad y la finalidad del recurso web. Así, se observó una mayor calidad en los recursos que eran de origen español, en comparación con los de países sudamericanos, con respecto a la Privacidad, la Atribución y la transparencia en la Información de los patrocinadores. Hay una menor tasa de penetración de Internet en Colombia (56,9%), Argentina (69,2%) y Chile (77,8%) que en España (82,2%) y esto puede estar acompañado de una menor conciencia de los autores de los recursos sobre la importancia de la calidad del apoyo que se le puede ofrecer a los padres interesados en la búsqueda de información sobre la parentalidad. Los recursos web de América del Norte tenían una posición intermedia, probablemente, debido a que se agruparon por motivos de proximidad geográfica pero reflejan tasas de penetración muy diferentes: Estados Unidos (88,5%) y México (45,1%). Sin duda, se necesitaría una muestra más representativa y amplia de recursos web de países de habla hispana para poder llegar a conclusiones más sólidas.

Los resultados obtenidos según el tipo de entidad y la finalidad de los recursos web también mostraron una brecha en la calidad ética entre las entidades públicas y empresas por un lado y los recursos web de padres por el otro. El uso de expertos, el respeto a la privacidad, la atribución, la justificabilidad y la honestidad publicitaria fueron criterios con mayor puntuación tanto de las entidades públicas y empresas como de los recursos con la finalidad de informar, mientras que los recursos creados por padres y los que tenían una finalidad interactiva puntuaron más bajo en todos los criterios éticos descritos. Una posible explicación es que, en principio, los padres no suelen ser diseñadores expertos y pueden no ser conscientes de estos aspectos éticos. De hecho, al hacer sus propias búsquedas, los padres parecen prestar más atención a la autoría y a la honestidad publicitaria, ya que ellos mismos indican que confían en los recursos web de entidades públicas y los recursos realizados por padres por igual, mientras que dan menor credibilidad a los recursos que tienen una clara intención comercial (Muñetón & al., 2015). Otra posible explicación podría ser que la información lleva un valor y credibilidad añadido cuando se accede a ella por medio de amigos o familiares en el contexto de una relación cariñosa y de confianza o por aquellos que comparten experiencias y valores similares a los propios (Ebata & Curtiss, 2017).

Al utilizar un enfoque centrado en la persona, fue posible distinguir tres perfiles de calidad de los recursos web, los cuales diferían significativamente en dos aspectos: su visión de las familias y la tarea de los padres (Rodrigo & al., 2016) y la forma en que fomentan el aprendizaje efectivo (Hughes & al., 2012; Myers-Walls, & Dworkin, 2015). Los recursos web de alta calidad valoraban la igualdad de género, destacaban el rol parental positivo, modelaban una variedad de prácticas parentales, incluían una variedad de contenidos educativos y formatos multimedia y utilizaban información experiencial, académica y técnica. Por el contrario, los recursos web de baja calidad proporcionaban un conjunto de valores sesgados (desigualdad de género y una visión indiferenciada de la familia), un enfoque centrado en los problemas en el desempeño del rol parental y técnicas educativas únicas y un entorno de aprendizaje deficiente (poco contenido educativo, uso de pocos recursos multimedia y un exceso de dependencia en el uso de información basada exclusivamente en la experiencia de los padres). En los perfiles de alta y media calidad, los recursos web españoles, los recursos de empresas y los recursos informativos estaban excesivamente representados, mientras que los recursos sudamericanos, los recursos de padres y con una intención interactiva estaban sobrerrepresentados en el perfil de baja calidad. Estos resultados muestran que los beneficios del uso de Internet para intercambiar experiencias con otros padres y expertos (Madge & O’Connor, 2006; Niela-Vilén & al., 2014) podrían ponerse en riesgo por la baja calidad del contenido ético y de contenido de los recursos parentales.

Finalmente, como se esperaba, se encontró relación entre la calidad ética y de contenido. Parece ser que la protección de los derechos de los usuarios a la privacidad y confidencialidad, la tendencia a respaldar con evidencias científicas la información o recomendaciones y la divulgación justa de los intereses financieros son cualidades éticas asociadas a contenidos con una visión moderna de la familia y la educación de los hijos. Esto es especialmente cierto cuando se trata de los recursos web de entidades públicas y realizados por expertos, pero no lo es tanto para los recursos web dirigidos por padres y con una intención interactiva que tienden a puntuar más bajo en criterios éticos, ya que es más difícil para ellos determinar la credibilidad de la fuente de la información (como en la comunicación eWOM, Cheung & al., 2008).

No obstante, existen limitaciones en el estudio tales como la selección de criterios de contenido guiados por la Recomendación del Consejo de Europa (19/2006) sobre la parentalidad positiva, al no estar aceptada universalmente en otros contextos culturales. La agrupación de los recursos web basados en la proximidad geográfica debe ser refinada en estudios posteriores utilizando en su lugar tasas de penetración de Internet en cada país. Por último, el punto de vista de los expertos de este estudio debe complementarse con las perspectivas profesionales y familiares para llegar a un consenso más completo sobre los estándares de calidad.

En conclusión, Internet se ha convertido en una fuente de información y apoyo crucial para los padres, lo que constituye un interesante ejemplo de gestión del conocimiento en abierto en un contexto informal de educación. Es en el ámbito de la educación de los hijos donde el peligro de exponer a los consumidores a contenidos que no están basados en evidencias, que presentan valores sesgados, entornos de aprendizaje digital pobres y con fines comerciales ocultos es presumiblemente mayor que en contextos formales de educación. Lamentablemente, la evaluación de la calidad de la educación online que ofrece apoyo y formación a los padres sigue siendo todavía un campo emergente. Dado el incremento de las páginas web y blogs para padres, es urgente llegar a definiciones comunes tanto de los criterios éticos como de contenido para la evaluación de los recursos online. Una vez alcanzado un consenso general, estos criterios pueden proporcionar directrices para los diseñadores web que desarrollan los recursos para padres. Los resultados que se han expuesto en el presente trabajo demuestran que existe un amplio margen de mejora tanto en los aspectos éticos como en el de contenido, especialmente para los recursos web con la finalidad de interactuar, los que están elaborados por los propios padres y de procedencia sudamericana. Los profesionales también pueden beneficiarse de la adopción de normas de calidad, ya que también necesitan saber qué criterios son importantes a la hora de juzgar la calidad de los recursos en Internet. De esta manera, los profesionales podrían decidir sobre bases más firmes qué recursos web recomendar para apoyar mejor a los padres. Los profesionales deben ayudar a los padres a desarrollar habilidades efectivas para navegar por Internet y ser capaces de encontrar fuentes confiables por sí mismos. La difusión de los resultados de este estudio también puede beneficiar a los padres como usuarios de recursos web para rastrear de forma autónoma la información y decidir si es creíble, relevante o convincente lo suficientemente como para dedicar más tiempo a la misma. Para concluir, asegurar la calidad de los recursos web debe estar a la vanguardia de las medidas que deben adoptarse para el uso eficaz de la tecnología de la información y la comunicación en el ámbito de la parentalidad.

Apoyos

El presente estudio contó con el apoyo del Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad (MINECO), del Fondo Europeo de Desarrollo Regional (FEDER), en el marco de las subvenciones PSI2015-69971-R y EDU2012-38588.

Referencias

Amichai-Hamburger, Y., McKenna, K.Y., & Tal, S.A. (2008). E-empowerment: Empowerment by the Internet. Computers in Human Behavior, 24(5), 1776-1789. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2008.02.002

Bangdiwala, S.I. (2017). Graphical aids for visualizing and interpreting patterns in departures from agreement in ordinal categorical observer agreement data. Journal of Biopharmaceutical Statistics, 1-11. https://doi.org/10.1080/10543406.2016.1273941

Baujard, V., Boyer, C., & Geissbühler, A. (2010). Evolution of Health Web certification, through the HONcode experience. Swiss Medical Informatics, 26(69), 53-55. (https://goo.gl/RZp5Sg).

Bergman, L.R., Magnusson, D., & El-Khouri, B.M. (2003). Studying individual development in an interindividual context: A person-oriented approach. London: Psychology Press. (https://goo.gl/qsXTD6).

Brady, E., & Guerin, S. (2010). Not the romantic, all happy, coochy coo experience: A qualitive analysis of interactions on an Irish parenting web site. Family relations, 59(1), 14-27. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1741-3729.2009.00582.x

Cheung, M.K., Lee, M.K.O., & Rabjohn, N. (2008). The impact of electronic word-of-mouth-The adoption of online opinions in online customer communities. Internet Research, 18(3), 229-247. https://doi.org/10.1108/10662240810883290

Cohen, J. (1960). A coefficient for agreement for nominal scales. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 20, 37-46. https://doi.org/10.1177/001316446002000104

Cohen, J. (1988). Statistical power analysis for the behavioral sciences. New York: Lawrence Erlbaum, Hillsdale. (https://goo.gl/yeqvLg).

Council of Europe (2006). 19 Recommendation of the Committee of Ministers to member States on policy to support positive parenting. Strasbourg. (https://goo.gl/Sk2BQG).

Dworkin, J., Connell, J., & Doty, J. (2013). A literature review of parents’ online behaviour. Cyberpsychology: Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, 7(2), 1-12. https://doi.org/10.5817/CP2013-2-2

Ebata, A., & Curtiss, S.L. (2017). Family life education on the technological frontier. In S.F. Duncan & H.S. Goddard (Eds.), Family life education: Principles and practices for effective outreach (pp. 236-626). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. (https://goo.gl/5PtQq3).

García-Peñalvo, F. J., García-de-Figuerola, C., & Merlo-Vega, J.A. (2010). Open knowledge: Challenges and facts. Online Information Review, 34(4), 520-539. https://doi.org/10.1108/14684521011072963

Haberman, S.J. (1973). The analysis of residuals in cross-classified tables. Biometrics, 29(1), 205-220. https://doi.org/10.2307/2529686

Healthonnet.org (2017). Heatlh on the Net (HON): HonCode: Principios en español. (https://goo.gl/eP73wT).

Hughes, R., Bowers, J.R., Mitchell, E.T., Curtiss, S., & Ebata, A.T. (2012). Developing online family life prevention and education programs. Family Relations, 61(5), 711-727. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1741-3729.2012.00737.x

Internet Live Stats (2016). Internet Users by country. (https://goo.gl/1xiZfR).

Madge, C., & O'Connor, H. (2006). Parenting gone wired: Empowerment of new mothers on the Internet? Social & Cultural Geography, 7(2), 199-220. https://doi.org/10.1080/14649360600600528

McDaniel, B.T., Coyne, S.M., & Holmes, E.K. (2012). New mothers and media use: Associations between blogging, social networking, and maternal well-being. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 16(7), 1509-1517. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-011-0918-2

Muñetón M., Suárez, A., & Rodrigo, M.J. (2015). El uso de recursos web como apoyo a la educación de los hijos en los padres colombianos. Investigación & Desarrollo, 23(1), 91-116. https://doi.org/10.14482/indes.23.1.6496

Myers-Walls, J.A., & Dworkin, J. (2016). Parenting education without borders. Web-based outreach. In J.J. Ponzetti (Ed.), Evidence-based Parenting Education. A global perspective (pp. 123-139). New York: Routledge. (https://goo.gl/HC2TXm).

Niela-Vilén, H., Axelin, A., Salanterä, S., & Melender, H.L. (2014). Internet-based peer support for parents: a systematic integrative review. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 51(11), 1524-1537. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2014.06.009

Nieuwboer, C.C., Fukkink, R.G., & Hermanns, J.M. (2013a). Peer and professional parenting support on the Internet: a systematic review. Cyberpsychology, Behavioral and Social Networks, 16(7), 518-528. https://doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2012.0547

Nieuwboer, C.C., Fukkink, R.G., & Hermanns, J.M. (2013b). Online programs as tools to improve parenting: a meta-analytic review. Children and Youth Services Review, 35(11), 1823-1829. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2013.08.008

Rodrigo, M.J., Almeida, A., & Reichle, B. (2016). Evidence-based parent education programs: A European perspective. In J. Ponzetti (Ed.), Evidence-based parenting education: A global perspective (pp. 85-104). New York: Routledge. (https://goo.gl/HC2TXm).

Rodrigo, M.J., Byrne, S., & Álvarez, M., (2016). Interventions to promote positive parenting in Spain. In M. Israelashvili, & J.L. Romano (Eds.), Cambridge handbook of international prevention science (pp. 929-956). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. (https://goo.gl/nrYhEk).

Rodrigo, M.J., Máiquez, M.L., Martín, J.C., & Rodríguez, B. (2015). La parentalidad positiva desde la prevención y la promoción. In M.J. Rodrigo, M.L. Máiquez, J.C. Martín, S. Byrne, & B. Rodríguez (Eds.), Manual práctico en parentalidad positiva (pp. 25-44). Madrid: Síntesis. (https://goo.gl/RpHwpB).

Rothbaum, F., Martland, N., & Jannsen, J.B. (2008). Parents’ reliance on the web to find information about children and families: Socio-economic differences in use, skills and satisfaction. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 29(2), 118-128. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appdev.2007.12.002

Sarkadi, A., & Bremberg, S. (2005). Socially unbiased parenting support on the Internet: a cross sectional study of users of a large Swedish parenting website. Child: Care, Health and Development, 31(1), 43-52. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2214.2005.00475.x

Suárez, A., Rodrigo, M.J., & Muñetón, M. (2016). Parental activities seeking online parenting support: Is there a digital skill divide? Revista de Cercetare si Interventie Sociala, 54, 36-54. (https://goo.gl/H5yCxb).

Back to Top
GET PDF

Document information

Published on 31/12/17
Accepted on 31/12/17
Submitted on 31/12/17

Volume 26, Issue 1, 2018
DOI: 10.3916/C54-2018-02
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 4
Views 31
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?