Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This research analyses the contribution of cyberactivism to the political and social change in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya, as well as the opinion of young Arabs on the present context. Meaningful information has been extracted from regular interviews to 30 undergraduates over a five-year period. These students had already participated in the process boosting the Arab Spring in 2011, and they keep practising cyberactivism ever since. The use of a mixed method research allows for carrying out a study where quantitative elements are complemented by qualitative ones. Findings show that Arab countries have not yet shaken off the former structures that supported the regimes preceding 2011, which are those that hamper the consolidation of a modern country. At the moment, there are still two conflicting realities between millenary traditions and values connected to revolutions and symbols of progressivism in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya. In a context where the unity of action action is needed, cyberactivism plays an essential role, as it brings together critical citizens in a common and virtual space. These groups are committed to change, they keep in touch with the outside world and beyond censorship, they make protests visible to the international arena, and monitor government actions.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Tunisian, Egyptian and Lebanese societies witnessed extraordinary events during the Arab uprisings in 2011, which led to the fall of authoritarian regimes (Álvarez-Ossorio & Gutiérrez-de-Terán, 2011; Majdoubi, 2011). Changes generated expectations, but most of them were unfulfilled because the solid structures that maintained governments were not abolished and were integrated into society for a long time (Álvarez-Ossorio, 2015; Morales-Lezcano, 2012). When consolidated power structures are not completely eradicated, this makes modernization and progress difficult. Also, there are always political, economic and social factors involved in project changes, as many citizens find it difficult to get rid of acquired privileges, conquered or inherited, or they just prefer to keep the traditions because they do not want to adapt to a new scenario. (Martín Muñoz & Moure, 2006).

The openness has slowed down in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya because of impediments caused by diverse internal and external factors, which have conditioned the evolution of society in a moment when radical changes had begun and were viewed with suspicion in segments of the population that were critical to the process since the beginning of the uprisings (Shawki, 2014), and also in western countries, which have had their geopolitical and geostrategic alliances jeopardised (Belaali, 2011; Khader, 2015; Martínez-Fuentes, 2015; Michou, Soler-i-Lecha & Ignacio-Torreblanca, 2013). Many of the implemented reforms were designed to give the regime more power and not to consolidate democracy, depriving citizens of rights provided and agreed (Naïr, 2013). The authorities have controlled and persecuted opposing political groups. For instance, in 2013 the Muslim Brotherhood was outlawed in Egypt because their followers represented a movement that questioned norms still in force two years after the triumph of the revolutions in 2011.

The fact that a country is officially a democracy does not guarantee a full development of individual and collective rights, because in many Arab countries elements and operating schemes that promote and tolerate authoritarian attitudes remain hidden (Izquierdo-Brichs, 2009). In a free society, there are co-habitation rules, and citizens have guarantees, and opportunity freedom and equal opportunities, both the individual and the collective are respected, and so what is different. When there is an excessive political and social control, pluralism is reduced, and fundamental rights are no guaranteed, although being the basis of democracy, and citizens rebel and protest, and seek ways to avoid authoritarianism and to denounce injustices (Naïr, 2013).

As noted above, the liberalizing process of Arab countries has encountered different obstacles that have impeded integral and rapid advances. The most non-conformist sectors of society have seen on the Internet and social networks an ideal tool for cyberactivism, from where they can channel criticism against abuses of power by authorities and program and perform protest actions (Majdoubi, 2012; Ortiz-Galindo, 2015). In this context is where it is appropriate to place and analyse the keys of citizen empowerment in Tunisian, Egyptian and Lebanese societies (Peña-López, 2009; Tufte, 2015), an attitude belonging to the renewal process in 2011 initiated by a relevant proportion of citizens with significant involvement, especially youth people, who had references to other forms of government and cohabitation, and also knew the keys of active fight thanks to their contacts with cyberactivism movements in Europe and the Americas (Betancourt, 2011; García Galera, Del Hoyo-Hurtado & Fernández-Muñoz, 2014; González-Lizárraga, Becerra-Traver & Yánez-Díaz, 2016; Menéndez, 2012; Sampedro, 2014; Szmolka, 2012).

Getting in touch with other cultures is a crucial factor when a process of change begins as it makes it possible to know other ways of living (Ortiz-Galindo, 2014). In this regard, the Internet and social networks allowed relations with the outside world and contributed, first, to the social raise that resulted in Arab revolutions in 2011 (Dahlgren, 2011; Roces, 2011), and later to make more visible current protest movements, which are also integrated into cyberactivism (Ortiz-Galindo, 2016a; Tascón & Quintana, 2012).

The most developed societies sometimes work as a mirror and referent for other countries, but the importation of rules is not always possible, as in many cases the necessary conditions to address attitudes that demand radical changes. That is why education, information and knowledge are essential to assimilate values such as tolerance, which works in contexts where democracy is consolidated, where pluralism and diversity exist, and where ideas and ideology are respected (Camacho-Azurduy, 2005).

In Tunisia, Egypt and Libya, as it happens in every country, customs that configure people´s identity are rooted, with transversal connections that cover anthropological and sociological aspects, revealed in living arrangements and coexistence models. That is why we should talk about the dependency to which the transformative process is subjected in Arab countries, as well as the difficulties in living within a society in which millenary and highly conservative customs are installed, absorbed and admitted. Also, rules that prevent or hinder a publicly critical attitude with certain issues and a free behaviour are still in force (Hourani, 1992). In this regard, cyberactivism plays an important role as it allows citizens to communicate beyond official venues (Ortiz-Galindo, 2014; García & Del Hoyo, 2013.) However, this possibility does not imply nor guarantee integration as most of the rule-breaking activities are developed in clandestine spaces and do not have public impact.

Thanks to technology, there exist new forms of access, distribution, and consumption of information. The Internet and social networks are both a tool for communication and content dissemination and, together with WhatsApp, they have changed the way people communicate and relate both in space and time level as technologies have modified spaces and times (Castells, 2012; Sádaba, 2012). One of the contributions of cyberactivism is that it has removed barriers that existed in Arab countries and has improved knowledge (Ortiz-Galindo, 2016).

When a society is subjected to ongoing renewal processes, the commitment undertaken by a critical and active citizenship, who is a transforming agent, the main character of change and the leader of the strengthening of democracy is very important (Delgado-Salazar & Arias-Herrera, 2008; Diani, 2015). The drivers of protest actions in Arab countries are educated and informed citizens, who know their rights and clamor for a common, shared and unrestricted space, with freedom of action and movement, to interact and access on an equal basis to all the material and cultural goods that belong to them. Their proposals are identified with values that stand for economic and social equality of all citizens and reject historic privileges that still exist in countries such as Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya that benefit very specific sectors and foster inequality. And these citizens have found in cyberactivism an appropriate instrument to channel ideas and fight for their goals (Tascón & Quintana, 2012).

2. Material and methods

Arab youth played an important part in the emergence and development of the revolutions in 2011 through the Internet and social networks (Soengas-Pérez, 2013). And we start from the assumption that their contribution to the political and social change remains crucial. For this reason, five years afterward, it is interesting to determine the role of cyberactivism in a convulsed society, and what is the view of those cyberactivists on the present situation. In order to check it, 30 young Tunisian, Egyptian and Lebanese were interviewed, ten by country, aged between 25 and 30 years, who participated in the Internet and social networks in the process that boosted the revolutions in 2011 and continue as cyberactivists ever since.

Young people interviewed have a university education and enough knowledge and ability to rigorously assess and analyse changes, and their profile makes them privileged and qualified observers as they have lived over the past decade between Spain and their countries of origin. This circumstance gives them a suitable perspective, as they have referents that allow them to compare two different realities.

Besides frequency, attention is given to qualitative aspects of messages and actions programmed and made through the Internet and social networks; that is to say, reasons, context, contents, and goals of cyberactivism in Arab countries: why it continues to exist, under which circumstances social networks are used to maintain alive protests, and what are the strategies. And it is also relevant to know needs, aspects with which they are satisfied and of which they are critical, issues with which they have a concern, and obstacles they face and immediate and future goals.

Interviews were conducted online from 2012 to 2016, twice a year, in June and December, to have regular information on all the issues raised in the research. Thus it is possible to assess changes and to observe the evolution of cyberactivism.

The surveys consist of 50 questions related to the various ways of thinking, acting and being fulfilled, which is considered necessary to explore in line with the research objectives.

3. Analysis and results

72% of young people interviewed have had a constant cyberactivity on the Internet and social networks since the beginning of the Arab uprisings, at least three days a week, with greater intensity when there are punctual problems that require special attention ?for instance if a restrictive law is passed or arbitrary detentions take place. 20% reduced their participation after 2011 for over a year, but have progressively taken over the activity once they saw the governments did not make most of the changes initially announced. And the remaining 8% also maintain loyalty to social networks, but collaborate in a regular manner, usually in moments where actions are intensified to put pressure on a particular issue.

By disaggregating data by country, the most active young people in social networks are the Egyptians, who carry out 38% of the activity registered during the research, followed by Tunisian (35%) and Lebanese (27%). If separated by sex, findings show that men spend more time on social networks (65%) than women (35%).

81% assure that they are committed to the process of modernization undertaken by their country responsibility, belief, and duty, and deem cyberactivism necessary because it is effective, relatively safe, and can operate outside political control and regime´s censorship, and it is affordable for most citizens. In addition to being an instrument of struggle, 62% consider the Internet and social networks as release vehicles, enabling them to channel worries and share with citizens with the same concerns.

87% consider themselves privileged because not all their compatriots have the same resources and knowledge. They are connected, but there are many isolated citizens for economic or cultural reasons because isolation responds to many factors. And 81%, as mentioned above, think it is compulsory to fight to make a better society, and a way to do it is to turn cyberactivism into a representative of the most unprotected citizens and to use knowledge, resources, and experience of those who are in a more comfortable position to denounce authoritarianism of governments and overcome corruption and inequalities.

A 75% admit that they are now better coordinated than during the uprisings in 2011 because they have understood the value and capacity of the Internet and social networks, and they have found out that by organizing themselves they are more effective and more protected. Although 73% say that when they expose themselves, they are aware that they take on significant risks, they are usually cautious and are careful that the government does not have access to their plans to prevent a scheduled event or retaliate. The majority of their initiatives bother the regime because they contemplate modifying existing laws that affect individual freedoms and collective rights, and the Government considers them a challenge.

65% value the unity of action, but 52% argue that a person, in order to feel useful, first needs to develop his/her potential as an individual and then as a member of the environment to which he/she belongs.

The strategies of Arab cyberactivists are conditioned by the resources they have and by the range of action they have to avoid risks as recognized by 70% of respondents. That is why they try to optimize the possibilities offered by the network. One of the main objectives of the 63% is to strategically make their actions visible because they think that it is more efficient to use the Internet and social networks to highlight the democratic deficiencies of the country in international forums. A 60% of cyberactivists believe that some foreign governments have great pressure on many Arab countries to force changes, especially those affecting human rights.

In order to rigorously assess the current situation in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya, it is necessary to know the role of the different players. A 78% of the respondents recognize that in these three countries, as in most countries, there is a clash of cultures with different interests, and the forces of each sector vary in a circumstantial way due to the instability of the system. In this context two very different and confronted scenarios arise: first, there is a permanent confrontation between those who represent tradition and those who support modernity and progress, as both tendencies include incompatible values. Second, there is a lack of correspondence between what is official and real, which requires a constant distinction between both realities to understand many actions and positions, especially as regards freedoms and protocols. And 74% qualify that, in addition to the cultural differences that exist between generations, there are some ways of thinking in the private sphere that do not always correspond to public behaviors, and for this reason, conflicts occur at family, social and institutional levels. An 83% of respondents recognize that they act differently in each context. They adapt to circumstances by prudence, fear or respect for customs. For the same reason, a seventy-one percent, when talking about certain topics, express themselves more freely in circles that do not belong to their family, social or work environment because they feel free of many conditioning factors, while other subjects only approach them in intimate circles or of extreme confidence to have no problems. Thus, for a 64% there are a number of constraints, which include ideology, traditions, and religion, which often become barriers, sometimes invisible to external observers that impede social progress and full exercise of individual and collective freedoms.

One of the characteristics of many Arab countries is that there is little social transversality as recognized by 77% of respondents. Most citizens live in small and enclosed environments without contact with other realities. Certain places, both public and private, are only accessible to very specific profiles. Therefore, one of the permanent claims by 91% of cyberactivists is that there is greater permissiveness and there exists a common social space for coexistence. However, they recognize that this would entail the removal of many taboos based on traditions and religion and preserved thanks to politics.

Cyberactivism allows permanent contact with other cultures and 69% consider that external influences are sometimes enriching, but 53% believe that certain foreign contributions clash with traditional values ??and are a risk to the cultural identity of the Arab countries. This identity is based on a way of behaving that, in many cases, is inconsistent with the Western principles, both in public and private spheres since the roles do not always correspond. A 45% argue that most of the ancestral customs that remain in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya do not support norms contemplated in the basic parameters of any Western democracy, and put this down to the fact that more and more voices question that schemes copied from the US and Europe are intended to be implanted in some Arab countries as if they were the only valuable and fair form of government. All the respondents recognize that in most Western countries there are consolidated democracies, but for 53%, as mentioned before, it is a mistake to try to introduce values ??from other places without recognizing the particularities that form part of the essence of each territory. Thus, a 32% regret that, as a result of the uprisings in 2011, the own traditions of Arab countries have been neglected, based on the culture of sharing, and have promoted ways of life from Western countries that invite citizens to compete. A 17% even say that, at present, cultural cohesion in some Arab countries has been lost and society is more unstructured.

For the 80%, the changes in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya are not enough to guarantee a free and modern country, nor do they correspond to the promises made by political parties after 2011. A 74% define the changes as apparent reforms that do not advance at the desired and necessary pace, especially in key sectors, which are strategic and essential. They attribute the slowdown to the links between politics, economy and certain sectors of society, which are interested in maintaining privileges and traditions, and are joining forces to preserve them, and thus hinder full development of democracy. They blame these sectors for maneuvering and influencing so that many projects that were announced never came to fruition. A 34% also claim that governments often play with the population, and at the most critical times, in order to prevent the proliferation of protest acts, governments implement laws that satisfy some demands of cyberactivists and then repeal them shortly. 55% of young people consider this initiative by the authorities a way of implicitly recognizing the importance, influence, and capacity for mobilization and action of cyberactivism. However, they also maintain that this formula causes confusion, as there are advances and then setbacks incomprehensible for part of the citizenship.

83% criticize the timidity of the reforms as has already been said. However, 52%, while recognizing that it is necessary to promote renovators and solid projects, where the separation of powers is clear, say that the population needs time and pedagogy to assimilate and incorporate certain new features into their daily lives. For these young people, some changes were sudden and abrupt, and they report that many Arab citizens, especially the elderly, had to accept and comply with rules that they found strange and that went against their principles because they were accustomed to living in totalitarian regimes where traditions were confused with politics and religion. For 59%, one of the reasons why many changes have not been consolidated is that, apart from the constraints mentioned above, some of the citizens have found a new reality that they have not been able to manage.

91% of respondents, as pointed out earlier, say that at the moment there is lack of a common space of coexistence and they seek to transform a society that is, according to them, dominated by deficiencies, corruption, lack of opportunities, inequalities, repression and hatred, and turn it into a prosperous, fair and free place, where the individual, in a personal way, and citizens, collectively, can develop and feel fulfilled, regardless their religious beliefs, their political preferences, their social status and their economic potential. Almost the same percentage (90%) agree that Egyptians, Tunisian, and Lebanese do not share rights and obligations at the same level because the standards are theoretically common but are not respected by all or applied equally. For 87% it is important to have access to education, to be able to develop the capacities and to have the necessary and adequate resources. 59% admit that a person’s values ??do not always coincide with those set by society, and in that case, the common good must prevail over individual interests. And they add that social profitability can not be assessed using economic parameters and, sometimes, the fruits of actions are obtained in the long term. That is why, although the results are not always the expected, 62% say that the demands must be maintained until the rights of a full democracy are achieved. And they maintain that the Internet and social networks are the adequate platforms to program and carry out the necessary cyber activities until the marked purposes are achieved. That is why they consider it necessary to have a critical mass to keep protests going. However, 32% acknowledge that many of the claims are symbolic because they are impossible in the current political, social and economic context, where many of the structures of the previous regime remain.

The Arab cyberactivists who have participated in this research are realistic and aware of their possibilities, so their actions have short and long term objectives. The interests of young people vary according to circumstances, but 47% agree on priorities. What worries them most is, in this order, political instability, which generates social instability, human rights, individual and collective freedoms, corruption and economic precariousness. And then there are other future purposes: 35% want a more critical society and 42% a consolidated democracy, without losing the identity values, where all citizens have access to resources, knowledge, and freedoms under the same conditions.


Soengas-Perez Assif 2017a-62667-en019.jpg

In the following table, we include a selection of the data that we consider more representative to see the contrasts that exist in the society of Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya. The clashes of feelings, values, and norms, typical of a society in which tradition and modernity coexist, generate numerous personal and social conflicts, which affect decisively the development of the process of change and the construction of modern society. And in this context cyberactivism plays a decisive role.

4. Discussion and conclusions

Cyberactivism has played a key role in Arab revolutions of 2011 and from then on young people that have participated in that process maintain a constant activity in the network. Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya have not made all the expected and agreed changes and, as long as no structures of a modern state that guarantee full individual and collective rights are consolidated, it is important to have an active and critical citizenship.

The Internet and social networks are safe platforms that allow cyber activists to communicate, organize, program and take necessary action to keep alive the social struggle at the local level, apart from the official censorship and the surveillance of the government. Besides, cyberactivism allows to identify shortcomings of the country and to pass on the protests and complaints to international forums, where the impact is greater, and so they are more effective.

In Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya, official media are still controlled by the government, and in a society in which there is an important critical mass and any press freedom, cyberactivism plays a counterweight role against the intense and continuous indoctrination exerted from the Administration. In the Arab spring of 2011, there was already an important phenomenon. For the first time, the communicative flow generated on the Internet and in social networks was outside the control of the Government, as in the network every citizen has the possibility to be an emitter and receiver and, also, to do it from any place and at any time. This makes social networks uncontrollable. And this is where part of the value of cyberactivism lies because governments can not fight against a platform that transcends their capabilities. Currently, the young Arab cyberactivists are aware of the importance and necessity of using Internet and social networks correctly and of properly planning the communication strategies to optimize resources, something that they did not do in 2011.

The scope of the network is not yet universal in Arab countries. In this sense, technology is, at the same time, an integrating and exclusive element because its access and use are limited. In some areas of Tunisia, Egypt and Libya there are problems of coverage, and in other cases, citizens do not have access to the Internet for economic reasons. This gap makes it difficult for cyberactivists to contact many isolated localities and with marginal sectors disconnected due to lack of resources.

The protest movements in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya have to be placed in a context of non-conformism and permanent disenchantment felt by part of their citizens, who have not yet met the expectations created during the 2011 revolutions. Many of the young people interviewed, who are representative of a large section of the population, do not feel valued or protected by the authorities of their country, which they accuse of having interests incompatible with the public service. And marginalization has generated discontent that has resulted in the process of citizen empowerment and a movement of a critical society that channels their concerns through cyberactivism to transform personal demands into a collective struggle.

Most of the changes scheduled during the 2011 revolutions have not yet been consolidated because there are many obstacles. Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya share the same contradictions. In all three countries, tradition and modernity live together permanently, and this contrast generates clashes that hinder or impede the incorporation of new norms that have associated values ??of forms of coexistence that for many Arab citizens are incompatible with its principles and their beliefs as recognized by 78% of cyberactivists. Millennial traditions and customs are rooted in society. Eradicating them completely is now impossible because many structures of the previous regimes that support them remain. These customs are what sustain many moral values, which go beyond ideology because they are transversal. That is why it is difficult to separate politics from the influence of religion and traditions. Also, many citizens are reluctant to lose part of their privileges, and in the social arena, there are difficulties to incorporate progress that will improve individual freedoms and collective rights approved by international standards.

One of the reasons behind the clashes between tradition and modernity is that some changes have occurred suddenly, without time to assimilate them. Reforms, when they are very drastic, require processes of adaptation to the new reality to avoid conflicting episodes. 63% of cyberactivists recognize that in many cases the interests of citizens have not been respected and action has been taken hastily with plans designed and imposed from abroad for political reasons.

As there is no political stability, there is no social stability. The governments of Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya are not stable and do not have freedom of action because they depend on other foreign governments, especially the US, which is accused by 56% of cyberactivists of imposing Western values ??incompatible with many of the Arab cultural traditions. These same young people describe their governments as authoritarian towards citizens and weak towards international pressures.

The ideals of cyberactivism are revolutionary, but also inclusive. Young Arabs believe that it is necessary to fight for a space of coexistence in which all sensitivities are embraced. They want a modern society, without renouncing tradition, because they believe that both are compatible. Cyberactivists advocate a critical citizen participation in which knowledge is valued rather than social position and assume collective responsibility and social commitment, maintain a sense of belonging to a territory and culture, the permanence of cultural identity, and defend individual freedom and collective rights. Their philosophy and social project consist in finding a balance where it is possible to incorporate the necessary changes to improve the welfare of citizens without losing their identity.

From the interviews carried out, it is clear that Arab cyberactivists promote claiming citizen initiatives and have the necessary elements to maintain an active struggle that channels the ideals of a critical citizenry. Besides, they demonstrate attitude, willingness, knowledge, availability of resources.

Funding Agency

Cyberactivism in the process of political and social changes in Arab countries belongs to a line of research integrated into the project funded by the XESCOM Network (REDES 2016 GI-1641 XESCOM), from the Ministry of Culture and Education of the Xunta de Galicia (reference ED341D R2016/019).

References

Álvarez-Ossorio, I. (2015). La primavera árabe revisitada: reconfiguración del autoritarismo y recomposición del islamismo. Pamplona: Aranzadi.

Álvarez-Ossorio, I., & Gutiérrez-de-Terán, I. (Eds.) (2011). Informe sobre las revueltas árabes. Madrid: Ediciones del Oriente y del Mediterráneo.

Belaali, M. (2011). Revolución y contrarrevolución en el mundo árabe. Rebelión. (https://goo.gl/g2Hzx0) (2017-01-08).

Betancourt, V. (2011). Ciberactivismo: ¿Utopía o posibilidad de resistencia y transformación en la era de la sociedad desinformada de la información? Chasqui, 116, 94-97. (https://goo.gl/BuUyFH) (2017-01-20).

Camacho-Azurduy, C.A. (2005). Democratización de la sociedad: entre el derecho a la información y el ejercicio de la ciudadanía comunicativa. Punto Cero, 28-36. (https://goo.gl/By8lGQ) (2017-01-15).

Castells, M. (2012). Redes de indignación y esperanza. Madrid: Alianza.

Dahlgren, P. (2011). Jóvenes y participación política. Los medios en la Red y la cultura cívica. Telos, 89 (https://goo.gl/SD4KCI) (2017-02-06).

Delgado-Salazar, R., & Arias-Herrera, J.C. (2008). La acción colectiva de los jóvenes y la construcción de ciudadanía. Revista Argentina de Sociología, 6(11), 272-296. (https://goo.gl/0G1T8F) (2016-12-05).

Diani, M. (2015). Revisando el concepto de movimiento social. Encrucijadas, 9, 1-16. (https://goo.gl/cVdngg) (2017-01-22).

García-Galera, M.C., & Del-Hoyo-Hurtado, M. (2013). Redes sociales, un medio para la movilización juvenil. Zer, 18(34), 111-125. (https://goo.gl/fTS45z) (2016-11-04).

García-Galera, M.C., Del Hoyo-Hurtado, M., & Fernández-Muñoz, C. (2014). Jóvenes comprometidos en la Red: el papel de las redes sociales en la participación social activa. [Engaged Youth in Internet. The Role of Social Networks in Social Active Participation]. Comunicar, 43(XXII), 35-43. https://doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-03

González-Lizárraga, M.G.; Becerra-Traver, M.T., & Yánez-Díaz, M. B. (2016). Ciberactivismo: nueva forma de participación para estudiantes universitarios [Cyberactivism: A new form of participation for University Students]. Comunicar, 46 (XXIV), 47-54. https://doi.org/10.3916/C46-2016-05

Hourani, A. (1992). Historia de los pueblos árabes. Barcelona: Editorial Ariel.

Izquierdo-Brichs, F. (Ed.) (2009). Poder y regímenes en el mundo árabe contemporáneo. Barcelona: Fundación CIDOB.

Khader, B. (2015). La Unión Europea ante la primavera árabe. In I. Álvarez-Ossorio (Coord.), La primavera árabe revisitada: reconfiguración del autoritarismo y recomposición del islamismo (pp. 55-72). Pamplona: Aranzadi.

Majdoubi-Bahida, E.H. (2011). Las revoluciones democráticas en el mundo árabe. Infoamerican Communication Review (https://goo.gl/4JWX3t) (2016-11-09).

Majdoubi-Bahida, E.H. (2012). Revolución por la dignidad en el mundo árabe. De la indignación al renacimiento. Barcelona: Icaria editorial.

Martín-Muñoz, G., & Moure, L. (2006). El mundo árabe e islámico: experiencia histórica, realidad política y evolución socio-económica. Bizkaia: Universidad del País Vasco.

Martínez-Fuentes, G. (2015). Túnez: revolución y contrarrevolución como claves analíticas. In I. Álvarez-Ossorio (Coord.), La primavera árabe revisitada: reconfiguración del autoritarismo y recomposición del islamismo (pp. 73-100). Pamplona: Aranzadi.

Menéndez, M.C. (2011). Las redes sociales y su efecto político. Telos, 85-93. (https://goo.gl/Vghx8F) (2017-01-25).

Michou, H., Soler-i-Lecha, E., & Ignacio-Torreblanca, J. (2013). Europa y la democracia en el norte de África: una segunda oportunidad. Barcelona: CIDOB.

Morales-Lezcano, V. (2012). Norte de África: rebeliones sociales y opciones políticas. Madrid: Diwan Mayrit.

Naïr, S. (2013). ¿Por qué se revelan? Revoluciones y contrarrevoluciones en el mundo árabe. Madrid: Clave Intelectual.

Ortiz-Galindo, R. (2014). Los cibermovimientos sociales. Nuevas oportunidades comunicativas en la era de Internet y de la Web social, nuevas posibilidades de transformación democrática. (Tesis doctoral). Pamplona: Universidad de Navarra.

Ortiz-Galindo, R. (2015). Los cibermovimientos sociales. Un nuevo entorno comunicativo para la movilización en la era de Internet. In L. Castellón & A. Guillier (Coords.), Comunicación, Redes y Poder (pp. 305-330). Santiago: RIL Editores.

Ortiz-Galindo, R. (2016a). Estrategias de comunicación interpersonal y pública en los movimientos sociales. Transformaciones de las redes informales y de los repertorios en la era de la Web social. OBETS, 11(1), 211-254. https://doi.org/10.14198/OBETS2016.11.1.09

Ortiz-Galindo, R. (2016b). Los cibermovimientos sociales: una revisión del concepto y marco teórico. Comunicación & Sociedad, 29(4). https://doi.org/10.15581/003.29.4.sp.165-183

Peña-López, I. (2009). La red de las personas: cómo Internet puede empoderar a la ciudadanía. In Fundación Cibervoluntarios (Ed.), Innovación para el empoderamiento de la ciudadanía a través de las TIC (pp. 61-65). Madrid: Bubok.

Roces, F. (2011). El nuevo mundo árabe: El papel de las redes sociales y de las televisiones por satélite árabes en la ola de cambios políticos en la región. El nuevo mundo árabe (https://goo.gl/d22etl) (2016-12-11).

Sádaba, I. (2012). Acción colectiva y movimientos sociales en las redes digitales. Aspectos históricos y metodológicos. Arbor, 188(756), 781-794. https://doi.org/10.3989/arbor.2012.756n4011

Sampedro, V. (2014). Ciberactivismo. De Indymedia a Wikileaks y de Chiapas al Cuarto Poder en Red. Telos, 98, 94-96. (https://goo.gl/bfqKB1) (2016-12-03).

Shawki, Y. (2014). El despertar árabe, ¿sueño o pesadilla? Santiago de Compostela: Universidad de Santiago.

Soengas-Pérez, X. (2013). El papel de Internet y de las redes sociales en las revueltas árabes: una alternativa a la censura de la prensa oficial [The Role of the Internet and Social Networks in the Arab Uprisings an Alternative to Official Press Censorship]. Comunicar, 41(XXI), 147-155. https://doi.org/10.3916/C41-2013-14

Szmolka, I. (2012). Factores desencadenantes y procesos de cambio político en el mundo árabe. Documentos CIDOB Mediterráneo y Oriente Medio, 19, 1-27. (https://goo.gl/RthCZW) (2017-01-21).

Tascón, M., & Quintana, Y. (2012). Ciberactivismo. Las nuevas revoluciones de las multitudes conectadas. Madrid: Catarata.

Tufte, T. (2015). Comunicación para el cambio social. La participación y el empoderamiento como base en el desarrollo mundial. Barcelona: Icaria.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Esta investigación analiza la contribución del ciberactivismo al cambio político y social en Túnez, en Egipto y en Libia, y la opinión de los jóvenes árabes sobre la situación actual. Para disponer de información relevante sobre estos hechos se ha entrevistado periódicamente durante los últimos cinco años a 30 universitarios que ya habían participado en el proceso que impulsó las revueltas de 2011 y que siguen siendo ciberactivistas desde entonces. La utilización de una metodología mixta permite realizar un estudio donde los aspectos de carácter cuantitativo se complementan con contenidos cualitativos. Los resultados demuestran que los países árabes todavía no se han desprendido de muchas de las estructuras que sostenían a los regímenes anteriores a 2011, que son las que dificultan la consolidación de un sistema moderno. En este momento en Túnez, en Egipto y en Libia todavía conviven dos realidades que provocan un choque permanente entre las tradiciones milenarias, muy arraigadas en determinados sectores de la sociedad, y los valores asociados a las revoluciones, más progresistas. En un contexto donde es necesaria la unidad de acción, el ciberactivismo juega un papel fundamental porque congrega en un espacio virtual común a la ciudadanía crítica comprometida con el proceso de cambio, permite organizarse, mantener contacto con el exterior al margen de la censura oficial, hacer visibles las protestas en escenarios internacionales y vigilar las acciones del Gobierno.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

La sociedad de Túnez, de Egipto y de Libia vivió unos acontecimientos extraordinarios durante las revueltas árabes de 2011, que provocaron la caída de regímenes autoritarios (Álvarez-Ossorio & Gutiérrez-de-Terán, 2011; Majdoubi, 2011). Los cambios generaron muchas expectativas, pero la mayoría de ellas no se han cumplido porque no se erradicaron las sólidas estructuras que sostenían a los gobiernos, integradas en la sociedad durante mucho tiempo (Álvarez-Ossorio, 2015; Morales-Lezcano, 2012). Y cuando no se erradican completamente las estructuras del poder consolidado dificultan la modernización y el progreso. Además, siempre existen condicionantes políticos, económicos y sociales que intervienen en los proyectos de cambio porque a muchos ciudadanos les cuesta desprenderse de los privilegios adquiridos, conquistados o heredados, o simplemente prefieren mantener las tradiciones porque no quieren adaptarse a un escenario nuevo (Martín-Muñoz & Moure, 2006).

El aperturismo se ha ralentizado en Túnez, en Egipto y en Libia por impedimentos derivados de diversos factores internos y externos, que han condicionado la evolución de la sociedad en un momento en que se empezaban a producir cambios radicales que generaban recelos en sectores de la población críticos con el proceso ya desde el inicio de las revueltas (Shawki, 2014), y también en países occidentales que veían peligrar sus alianzas geopolíticas y geoestratégicas (Belaali, 2011; Khader, 2015; Martínez-Fuentes, 2015; Michou, Soler-i-Lecha, & Ignacio-Torreblanca, 2013). Muchas de las reformas que se hicieron fueron pensadas para otorgar más poder al régimen y no para consolidar la democracia, privando así a los ciudadanos de unos derechos que estaban previstos y consensuados (Naïr, 2013). Las autoridades han controlado y perseguido las formaciones políticas renovadoras, por ejemplo, los Hermanos Musulmanes fueron ilegalizados en Egipto en 2013 porque sus seguidores representaban una corriente que cuestionaba normas que permanecían vigentes dos años después del triunfo de las revueltas de 2011.

El hecho de que exista oficialmente democracia en un país no garantiza un desarrollo pleno de las libertades individuales, ni colectivas, porque en varios países árabes permanecen soterrados elementos y esquemas de funcionamiento que favorecen y toleran comportamientos autoritarios (Izquierdo-Brichs, 2009). En una sociedad libre existen unas normas de convivencia y los ciudadanos tienen garantías e igualdad de oportunidades, se respeta al individuo y también al colectivo, y se acepta lo diferente. Cuando existe un control político y social excesivo se reduce la pluralidad y no se garantizan los derechos fundamentales, que son la base de la democracia, y los ciudadanos se rebelan y protestan, y buscan fórmulas para esquivar el autoritarismo y denunciar las injusticias (Naïr, 2013).

Como ya se ha dicho, el proceso aperturista de los países árabes ha chocado con diferentes obstáculos que han impedido avances integrales y rápidos. Los sectores más inconformistas de la sociedad han encontrado en Internet y en las redes sociales un instrumento ideal para ejercer el ciberactivismo, desde donde pueden canalizar las críticas contra los abusos de poder de las autoridades, programar y realizar acciones reivindicativas (Majdoubi, 2012; Ortiz-Galindo, 2015). En este contexto es donde procede situar y analizar las claves del empoderamiento ciudadano de la sociedad de Túnez, de Egipto y de Libia (Peña-López, 2009; Tufte, 2015), una actitud que forma parte del proceso renovador emprendido en 2011 con gran implicación de una parte importante de los ciudadanos, especialmente los jóvenes, que tenían referencias de otras formas de gobierno y de convivencia y, además, conocían las claves de la lucha activa gracias a los contactos que mantenían con los movimientos de ciberactivismo de Europa y de América (Betancourt, 2011; García-Galera, Del-Hoyo-Hurtado, & Fernández-Muñoz, 2014; González-Lizárraga, Becerra-Traver, & Yánez-Díaz, 2016; Menéndez, 2012; Sampedro, 2014; Szmolka, 2012).

El contacto con otras culturas es un factor determinante cuando se inicia un proceso de cambio porque permite conocer otros modos de vida (Ortiz-Galindo, 2014). En este sentido, Internet y las redes sociales posibilitaron relaciones con el exterior y contribuyeron, primero, al despertar social que desembocó en las revueltas árabes de 2011 (Dahlgren, 2011; Roces, 2011) y, después, a hacer más visibles los movimientos reivindicativos actuales, que también están integrados en el ciberactivismo (Ortiz-Galindo, 2016a; Tascón & Quintana, 2012).

Las sociedades más avanzadas a veces funcionan como espejo y como referente para otros países, pero la importación de normas no siempre es posible porque en muchos casos no se dan las condiciones necesarias para asumir comportamientos que requieren cambios radicales. Por eso la educación, la información y el conocimiento son esenciales para asimilar valores como la tolerancia, que funciona en contextos donde la democracia está consolidada, donde existe la pluralidad y la diversidad, y donde se respetan las ideas y la ideología (Camacho-Azurduy, 2005).

En Túnez, en Egipto y en Libia, como sucede en todos los países, están arraigadas costumbres que configuran la identidad de los pueblos, con conexiones transversales que abarcan aspectos antropológicos y sociológicos, que se manifiestan en los modos de vida y en los modelos de convivencia. Por eso hay que hablar de las dependencias a las que está sujeto el proceso transformador en los países árabes y de las dificultades que supone vivir en una sociedad en la que están instaladas, asimiladas y admitidas costumbres milenarias muy conservadoras. Además, continúan vigentes normas que impiden o dificultan que se tenga en público una actitud crítica con determinados temas y un comportamiento libre (Hourani, 1992). Y en este punto el ciberactivismo juega un papel importante porque permite a los ciudadanos comunicarse al margen de los escenarios oficiales (Ortiz-Galindo, 2014; García & Del Hoyo, 2013). Pero esta posibilidad no implica ni garantiza la integración porque la mayoría de las actividades transgresoras se desarrollan en espacios clandestinos y no tienen repercusión pública.

Gracias a la tecnología, ahora existen nuevas formas de acceso, de distribución y de consumo de la información. Internet y las redes sociales son, a la vez, un instrumento de comunicación y de difusión de contenidos y, junto con whatsapp, han cambiado la forma de comunicarse y de relacionarse, tanto a nivel espacial como temporal, porque las tecnologías han modificado los espacios y los tiempos (Castells, 2012; Sádaba, 2012). Una de las aportaciones del ciberactivismo es que ha suprimido muchas barreras que existían en los países árabes y ha contribuido al conocimiento (Ortiz-Galindo, 2016b).

Cuando una sociedad está sometida a procesos de renovación constantes es muy importante el compromiso que asume la ciudadanía crítica y activa como agente transformador y protagonista del cambio y del fortalecimiento de la democracia (Delgado-Salazar & Arias-Herrera, 2008; Diani, 2015). Los impulsores de las acciones reivindicativas en los países árabes son ciudadanos formados e informados que conocen sus derechos y reclaman un espacio común, compartido y sin restricciones, con libertad de acción y de movimientos, para relacionarse y acceder en igualdad de condiciones a todos los bienes materiales y culturales que les corresponden. Sus propuestas se identifican con unos valores que defienden la igualdad económica y social de todos los ciudadanos y rechazan los privilegios históricos que existen todavía en países como Túnez, Egipto y Libia, que benefician a sectores muy concretos y fomentan la desigualdad. Y estos ciudadanos han encontrado en el ciberactivismo un instrumento adecuado para canalizar sus ideas y luchar por sus objetivos (Tascón & Quintana, 2012).

2. Material y métodos

Los jóvenes árabes han tenido un protagonismo importante en la gestación y en el desarrollo de las revueltas de 2011 a través de Internet y de las redes sociales (Soengas-Pérez, 2013). Y partimos de la hipótesis de que su contribución al cambio político y social a través de las redes sociales sigue siendo determinante. Por eso ahora, pasados más de cinco años, interesa comprobar cuál es el papel del ciberactivismo en una sociedad convulsa, y cuál es la opinión de los ciberactivistas de entonces sobre la situación actual. Para comprobarlo se ha entrevistado a 30 jóvenes de Túnez, de Egipto y de Libia, 10 de cada país, con edades comprendidas entre 25 y 30 años, que participaron a través de Internet y de las redes sociales en el proceso que impulsó las revueltas de 2011 y que siguen siendo ciberactivistas desde entonces.

Los jóvenes entrevistados tienen formación universitaria y disponen de conocimientos suficientes y de capacidad para valorar y analizar con rigor los cambios, y su perfil los convierte en observadores privilegiados y cualificados porque en los últimos diez años han vivido alternativamente entre España y sus países de origen. Esta circunstancia les otorga una perspectiva idónea porque disponen de referentes que les permiten comparar dos realidades distintas.

Además de la frecuencia, interesan los aspectos cualitativos de los mensajes y de las acciones que se programan y realizan a través de Internet y de las redes sociales, es decir, las razones, el contexto, los contenidos y los objetivos del ciberactivismo en los países árabes: porqué sigue existiendo, en qué circunstancias se utilizan las redes sociales para mantener vivas las protestas y cuáles son las estrategias. Y también interesa saber qué carencias tienen los jóvenes, con qué aspectos están satisfechos y con cuáles se muestran más críticos, qué temas les preocupan, cuáles son los obstáculos a los que se enfrentan cada día y cuáles son sus objetivos, inmediatos y futuros.

Las entrevistas se han realizado online desde 2012 hasta 2016, dos veces al año, en junio y en diciembre, para disponer de información periódica de todas las cuestiones planteadas en la investigación. Así es posible valorar los cambios y observar la evolución del ciberactivismo.

Los cuestionarios constan de cincuenta preguntas relacionadas con las diferentes formas de pensar, de actuar y de sentirse realizado que se considera necesario averiguar de acuerdo con los objetivos de esta investigación.

3. Análisis y resultados

El 72% de los jóvenes entrevistados mantiene una ciberactividad constante en Internet y en las redes sociales desde el comienzo de las revueltas árabes, como mínimo tres días a la semana, con mayor intensidad cuando existen problemas puntuales que requieren una atención especial, por ejemplo, si se aprueba alguna ley restrictiva o si se practican detenciones arbitrarias. El 20% redujo su participación después de 2011 durante más de un año, pero ha vuelto a retomarla progresivamente al ver que los gobiernos no realizaban la mayoría de los cambios anunciados inicialmente. Y el 8% también mantiene la fidelidad a las redes sociales, pero colabora de forma puntual, normalmente en momentos en los que se intensifican las acciones para presionar sobre algún tema concreto.

Si separamos los datos por países, los jóvenes más activos en las redes sociales son los egipcios, a quienes corresponde el 38% de la ciberactividad registrada durante la investigación, seguidos de los tunecinos con el 35% y de los libios con el 27%. Y si diferenciamos los resultados por sexo, los varones le dedican más tiempo a las redes (65%) que las mujeres (35%).

El 81% asegura que está comprometido con el proceso de modernización de su país por responsabilidad, por convicción y por obligación, y considera que el ciberactivismo es necesario porque es eficaz, relativamente seguro, puede operar al margen de los controles políticos y de la censura del régimen, y es asequible para la mayoría de los ciudadanos. Además de un instrumento de lucha, para el 62% Internet y las redes sociales son una vía de liberación porque les permiten canalizar sus inquietudes y compartirlas con otros ciudadanos que tienen las mismas preocupaciones.

El 87% se considera privilegiado porque no todos sus compatriotas tienen los mismos recursos, ni los mismos conocimientos. Ellos están conectados, pero hay muchos ciudadanos aislados, por razones económicas o culturales, porque el aislamiento responde a muchos factores. Y el 81%, como se apuntaba antes, cree que es una obligación luchar para mejorar la sociedad, y una forma de hacerlo es convertir el ciberactivismo en portavoz de los ciudadanos más desprotegidos y utilizar los conocimientos, los recursos y la experiencia de los que están en una posición más cómoda para denunciar el autoritarismo de los gobiernos y acabar con la corrupción y con las desigualdades.

El 75% admite que ahora están mejor coordinados que durante las revueltas de 2011 porque han comprendido el valor y la capacidad que tienen Internet y las redes sociales, y han descubierto que organizándose son más eficaces y están más protegidos, aunque el 73% dice que al exponerse son conscientes de que asumen riesgos importantes, pero habitualmente son prudentes y mantienen precauciones para que el Gobierno no tenga acceso previo a sus planes y pueda impedir algún acto programado o tomar represalias. La mayoría de sus iniciativas molestan al régimen porque contemplan modificar normas vigentes que afectan a las libertades individuales y a los derechos colectivos, y el Gobierno los consideran un desafío. El 65% valora la unidad de acción, pero el 52% sostiene que una persona, para sentirse útil, primero necesita desarrollar su potencial como individuo y, luego, como miembro del entorno al que pertenece.

Las estrategias de los ciberactivistas árabes están condicionadas por los recursos de los que disponen y por el margen de actuación que tienen para no correr riesgos, tal como reconoce el 70% de los entrevistados. Por eso procuran optimizar las posibilidades que ofrece la Red. Uno de los objetivos principales del 63% es visibilizar estratégicamente sus acciones porque piensan que es más eficaz utilizar Internet y las redes sociales para poner en evidencia las carencias democráticas del país en foros internacionales. El 60% de los ciberactivistas cree que algunos gobiernos extranjeros tienen gran capacidad de presión sobre muchos países árabes para forzar la implantación de cambios, especialmente los que afectan a los derechos humanos.

Para valorar con rigor la situación actual de Túnez, de Egipto y de Libia es necesario conocer el rol de los diferentes actores. El 78% de los entrevistados reconoce que, en estos tres países, como en la mayoría, hay un choque de culturas, con intereses distintos, y las fuerzas de cada sector varían de forma circunstancial debido a la inestabilidad del sistema. Y en este contexto surgen dos escenarios muy diferentes que conviven confrontados: en primer lugar, existe un enfrentamiento permanente entre quienes representan la tradición y los que abanderan la modernidad y el progreso, porque ambas tendencias incluyen valores incompatibles; y, en segundo lugar, hay una falta de correspondencia entre lo oficial y lo real, algo que obliga a diferenciar ambas realidades en todo momento para comprender muchas acciones y posiciones, sobre todo en temas de libertades y de protocolos. Y el 74% matiza que, además de las diferencias culturales que se dan entre generaciones, existen unas formas de pensar propias de la esfera privada que no se corresponden siempre con los comportamientos públicos, y por esta razón se producen choques a nivel familiar, a nivel social y a nivel institucional. El 83% de los entrevistados reconoce que actúa de forma diferente en cada contexto. Se adaptan a las circunstancias por prudencia, por miedo o por respeto a las costumbres. Por la misma razón, el 71%, a la hora de opinar de determinados temas, se expresa con mayor libertad en círculos que no pertenecen a su entorno familiar, social o laboral porque así se sienten liberados de muchos condicionantes, mientras que otras cuestiones solo las abordan en círculos íntimos o de extrema confianza para no tener problemas. Así, para el 64%, existen una serie de condicionantes, en los que incluyen la ideología, las tradiciones y la religión, que con frecuencia se convierten en barreras, a veces invisibles para los observadores externos, que impiden el progreso social y el ejercicio pleno de las libertades individuales y colectivas.

Una de las características de muchos países árabes es que existe poca transversalidad social, tal como reconoce el 77% de los entrevistados. La mayoría de los ciudadanos viven en entornos reducidos y cerrados, sin contacto con otras realidades. A determinados lugares, tanto públicos como privados, solo acceden perfiles muy concretos, por eso una de las reivindicaciones permanentes del 91% de los ciberactivistas es que haya mayor permisividad y que exista un espacio social común para la convivencia. Pero reconocen que esto implicaría la eliminación de muchos tabúes que se sustentan en las tradiciones y en la religión, y que la política ayuda a conservar.

El ciberactivismo permite un contacto permanente con otras culturas y el 69% considera que las influencias externas algunas veces son enriquecedoras, pero un 53% cree que determinadas aportaciones foráneas chocan con los valores tradicionales y son un riesgo para la identidad cultural de los países árabes, que se basa en una forma de comportarse que, en muchos casos, es incompatible con los principios occidentales, tanto en el ámbito público como en el privado, ya que los roles no se corresponden siempre. El 45% sostiene que la mayoría de las costumbres ancestrales que permanecen vigentes en Túnez, en Egipto y en Libia no admiten normas contempladas en los parámetros básicos de cualquier democracia occidental, y atribuyen a esta circunstancia que cada vez más voces cuestionen que se pretendan implantar en algunos países árabes esquemas copiados de EEUU y de Europa como si fueran la única forma de gobierno válida y justa. Todos los entrevistados reconocen que en la mayoría de los países occidentales existen democracias consolidadas pero para el 53%, como ya se ha dicho antes, es un error pretender introducir valores propios de otros lugares, sin reconocer las particularidades que forman parte de la esencia de cada territorio. Así el 32% lamenta que como consecuencia de las revueltas de 2011 se han descuidado tradiciones propias de los países árabes, basadas en la cultura del compartir, y se han promovido modos de vida de países occidentales que invitan a los ciudadanos a competir. El 17% incluso afirma que ahora, en algunos países árabes, se ha perdido cohesión cultural y la sociedad está más desestructurada.

Para el 80% los cambios llevados a cabo en Túnez, en Egipto y en Libia no son suficientes para garantizar un país libre y moderno, ni se corresponden con las promesas que hicieron los partidos después de 2011. El 74% los define como reformas aparentes que no avanzan al ritmo deseado y necesario, sobre todo en sectores claves, que son estratégicos y esenciales. Atribuyen la ralentización a los vínculos entre la política, la economía y determinados sectores de la sociedad, que les interesa mantener privilegios y tradiciones, y se alían para conservarlos, impidiendo que la democracia se desarrolle de forma plena. Y culpan a esos sectores de maniobrar e influir para que no se activen muchos proyectos que se anunciaron y que nunca llegaron a realizarse. El 34% añade que los gobiernos con frecuencia juegan con la población y en los momentos más críticos, para evitar que proliferen los actos reivindicativos, implantan leyes que satisfacen algunas demandas de los ciberactivistas y luego las derogan al poco tiempo. Para el 55% de los jóvenes este proceder por parte de las autoridades es una forma de reconocer implícitamente la importancia, la influencia y la capacidad de movilización y de acción del ciberactivismo. Pero también sostienen que esta fórmula causa desconcierto porque se producen avances y luego retrocesos que una parte de la población no entiende.

El 80% critica la timidez de las reformas, como ya se ha dicho. Sin embargo, el 52%, aun reconociendo que es necesario impulsar proyectos renovadores y sólidos, donde quede clara la separación de poderes, dice que la población necesita tiempo y pedagogía para asimilar e incorporar determinadas novedades a su vida cotidiana. Para estos jóvenes algunos cambios fueron bruscos y repentinos, y denuncian que muchos ciudadanos árabes, sobre todo las personas mayores, tuvieron que aceptar y cumplir unas normas que les resultaban extrañas y que iban contra sus principios, porque estaban acostumbrados a vivir en regímenes totalitarios donde se confundían las tradiciones con la política y con la religión. Para el 59% una de las razones por las que no se han consolidado muchos cambios es que, al margen de los condicionantes mencionados antes, una parte de los ciudadanos se ha encontrado con una realidad nueva que no han sabido gestionar.

El 91% de los entrevistados, como se apuntaba antes, dice que en este momento falta un espacio común de convivencia y buscan transformar una sociedad en la que predominan, según ellos, las carencias, la corrupción, la falta de oportunidades, las desigualdades, la represión y el odio, y convertirla en un lugar próspero, justo y libre, donde el individuo, de forma personal, y los ciudadanos, de forma colectiva, puedan desarrollarse y sentirse realizados, independientemente de sus creencias religiosas, de sus preferencias políticas, de su estatus social y de sus posibilidades económicas. Casi el mismo porcentaje, el 90% está de acuerdo en que los ciudadanos de Egipto, de Túnez y de Libia no comparten derechos y obligaciones al mismo nivel porque las normas, teóricamente, son comunes pero no son respetadas por todos ni aplicadas siempre igual. Para el 87% es importante acceder a la formación, poder desarrollar las capacidades y disponer de los recursos necesarios y adecuados. El 59% admite que los valores de una persona no coinciden siempre con los fijados por la sociedad y en ese caso debe predominar el bien común por encima de los intereses individuales. Y añaden que la rentabilidad social no se puede medir ni valorar desde parámetros económicos y, a veces, los frutos de las acciones se obtienen a largo plazo. Por eso, aunque los resultados no siempre son los deseados, el 62% dice que hay que mantener las reivindicaciones hasta que se consigan los derechos propios de una democracia plena. Y sostienen que Internet y las redes sociales son la plataforma adecuada para programar y realizar las ciberactividades que sean necesarias hasta que se consigan los propósitos marcados. Por eso consideran necesario que exista una masa crítica que mantenga activas las protestas. De todas formas, el 32% reconoce que muchas de las reivindicaciones son simbólicas porque resultan imposibles en el actual contexto político, social y económico, donde permanecen muchas de las estructuras del régimen anterior.

Los ciberactivistas árabes que han participado en esta investigación son realistas y conscientes de sus posibilidades, por eso sus acciones tienen unos objetivos inmediatos y otros a largo plazo. Los intereses de los jóvenes varían según las circunstancias, pero el 47% coincide en las prioridades. Lo que más les preocupa es, por este orden, la inestabilidad política, que genera inestabilidad social, los derechos humanos, las libertades individuales y colectivas, la corrupción y la precariedad económica. Y luego existen otros propósitos futuros: el 35% desea una sociedad más crítica y el 42% una democracia consolidada, sin perder los valores identitarios, donde todos los ciudadanos tengan acceso a los recursos, al conocimiento y a las libertades en las mismas condiciones.

En la siguiente Tabla incluimos una selección de los datos que consideramos más representativos para visualizar los contrastes que existen en la sociedad de Túnez, de Egipto y de Libia. Los choques de sentimientos, de valores y de normas, propios de una sociedad en la que conviven tradición y modernidad, generan numerosos conflictos personales y sociales, que afectan de una forma determinante al desarrollo del proceso de cambio y a la construcción de una sociedad moderna. Y en este contexto el ciberactivismo juega un papel determinante.


Soengas-Perez Assif 2017a-62667 ov-es019.jpg

4. Discusión y conclusiones

El ciberactivismo ha desempeñado un papel fundamental en las revueltas árabes de 2011 y desde entonces los jóvenes que han participado en aquel proceso mantienen una actividad constante en la Red. En Túnez, en Egipto y en Libia todavía no se han realizado todos los cambios que estaban previstos y consensuados y, mientras no se consoliden las estructuras propias de un Estado moderno que garantice a los ciudadanos libertades individuales y derechos colectivos plenos, es importante que exista una ciudadanía crítica activa.

Internet y las redes sociales constituyen una plataforma segura que permite a los ciberactivistas comunicarse, organizarse, programar y realizar las acciones necesarias para mantener viva la lucha social a nivel local, al margen de la censura oficial y de la vigilancia del Gobierno. Además, a través del ciberactivismo se pueden visibilizar las carencias del país y hacer llegar las protestas y las denuncias a foros internacionales, que es donde tienen más impacto, y así son más efectivas.

En Túnez, en Egipto y en Libia los medios de comunicación oficiales siguen estando controlados por el Gobierno, y en una sociedad en la que existe una masa crítica importante y no hay libertad de prensa, el ciberactivismo asume un rol de contrapeso frente al intenso y continuo adoctrinamiento que se ejerce desde la Administración. En la primavera árabe de 2011 ya se produjo un fenómeno importante. Por primera vez el flujo comunicativo que se generaba en Internet y en las redes sociales estaba fuera del control del Gobierno porque en la Red cada ciudadano tiene la posibilidad de ser emisor y receptor y, además, hacerlo desde cualquier lugar y en cualquier momento, y esta circunstancia convierte a las redes sociales en incontrolables. Y aquí es donde radica parte del valor del ciberactivismo porque los gobiernos no pueden luchar contra una plataforma que trasciende sus capacidades.

Ahora los jóvenes ciberactivistas árabes son conscientes de la importancia y de la necesidad de utilizar correctamente Internet y las redes sociales y de planificar bien las estrategias de comunicación para optimizar los recursos, algo que no hacían en 2011.

El alcance de la Red todavía no es universal en los países árabes. En este sentido, la tecnología es, a la vez, un elemento integrador y excluyente porque el acceso a ella y su uso están limitados. En algunas zonas de Túnez, de Egipto y de Libia existen problemas de cobertura y en otros casos los ciudadanos no tienen acceso a Internet por razones económicas. Esta brecha dificulta el contacto de los ciberactivistas con muchas localidades aisladas y con sectores marginales desconectados por falta de recursos.

Los movimientos contestatarios de Túnez, de Egipto y de Libia hay que situarlos en un contexto de inconformismo y de desencanto permanente que existe en una parte de los ciudadanos de estos países, que todavía no han visto cumplidas las expectativas creadas durante las revueltas de 2011. Muchos de los jóvenes entrevistados, que son representativos de un amplio sector de la población, no se sienten valorados ni protegidos por las autoridades de su propio país, a las que acusan de tener unos intereses incompatibles con el servicio público. Y la marginación ha generado un descontento que ha derivado en un proceso de empoderamiento ciudadano y en un movimiento propio de una sociedad crítica, que canaliza sus inquietudes a través del ciberactivismo para transformar las reivindicaciones personales en una lucha colectiva.

La mayoría de los cambios programados durante las revueltas de 2011 todavía no se han consolidado porque existen muchos obstáculos. Túnez, Egipto y Libia comparten las mismas contradicciones. En los tres países conviven de forma permanente la tradición y la modernidad, y ese contraste genera choques que dificultan o impiden la incorporación de normas nuevas que llevan asociados valores propios de unas formas de convivencia que para muchos ciudadanos árabes resultan incompatibles con sus principios y con sus creencias, tal como reconoce el 78% de los ciberactivistas. Las tradiciones y las costumbres milenarias están arraigadas en la sociedad y erradicarlas completamente de forma repentina resulta imposible porque todavía permanecen muchas estructuras de los regímenes anteriores que las amparan. Esas costumbres son las que sustentan muchos valores morales, que van más allá de la ideología porque son transversales. Por eso resulta complicado separar la política de la influencia de la religión y de las tradiciones. Además, muchos ciudadanos se resisten a perder parte de sus privilegios y en el terreno social existen dificultades para incorporar avances que supongan una mejora definitiva de las libertades individuales y de los derechos colectivos, homologados con los parámetros internacionales.

Una de las razones de los choques entre tradición y modernidad es que algunos cambios se han producido de forma repentina, sin tiempo para asimilar las novedades. Las reformas, cuando son muy drásticas, requieren procesos de adaptación a la nueva realidad para evitar episodios conflictivos. El 63% de los ciberactivistas reconoce que en muchos casos no se han respetado los intereses de los ciudadanos y se ha actuado de forma precipitada con planes diseñados e impuestos desde el extranjero por razones políticas.

Al no haber estabilidad política, no hay estabilidad social. Los gobiernos de Túnez, de Egipto y de Libia no son estables y no tienen libertad de acción porque dependen de otros gobiernos extranjeros, especialmente de EEUU, a quien acusan el 56% de los ciberactivistas de imponer valores occidentales incompatibles con muchas de las tradiciones culturales árabes. Estos mismos jóvenes califican a sus gobiernos como autoritarios ante los ciudadanos y débiles ante las presiones internacionales.

Los ideales del ciberactivismo son renovadores, pero también integradores. Los jóvenes árabes creen que es necesario luchar por un espacio de convivencia en el que tengan cabida todas las sensibilidades. Quieren una sociedad moderna, sin renunciar a la tradición, porque creen que ambas son compatibles. Los ciberactivistas defienden una participación ciudadana crítica en la que se valore el conocimiento en lugar de la posición social, y asumen la responsabilidad colectiva y el compromiso social, mantienen el sentido de pertenencia a un territorio y a una cultura, la permanencia de la identidad cultural, y defienden la libertad individual y los derechos colectivos. Su filosofía y su proyecto social consisten en buscar un equilibrio donde sea posible incorporar los cambios necesarios para mejorar el bienestar de los ciudadanos, sin perder la identidad.

De las entrevistas realizadas se desprende que los ciberactivistas árabes apuestan por iniciativas ciudadanas de carácter reivindicativo y disponen de los elementos necesarios para mantener una lucha activa que canalice los ideales de una ciudadanía crítica. Además, demuestran tener actitud, voluntad, conocimiento, disponibilidad y recursos.

Apoyos

El ciberactivismo en el proceso de cambio político y social en los países árabes forma parte de una línea de investigación que está integrada en el proyecto financiado Red XESCOM (REDES 2016 GI-1641-XESCOM), de la Consellería de Cultura, Educación e Ordenación Universitaria de la Xunta de Galicia, con referencia ED341DR2016/019.

Referencias

Álvarez-Ossorio, I. (2015). La primavera árabe revisitada: reconfiguración del autoritarismo y recomposición del islamismo. Pamplona: Aranzadi.

Álvarez-Ossorio, I., & Gutiérrez-de-Terán, I. (Eds.) (2011). Informe sobre las revueltas árabes. Madrid: Ediciones del Oriente y del Mediterráneo.

Belaali, M. (2011). Revolución y contrarrevolución en el mundo árabe. Rebelión. (https://goo.gl/g2Hzx0) (2017-01-08).

Betancourt, V. (2011). Ciberactivismo: ¿Utopía o posibilidad de resistencia y transformación en la era de la sociedad desinformada de la información? Chasqui, 116, 94-97. (https://goo.gl/BuUyFH) (2017-01-20).

Camacho-Azurduy, C.A. (2005). Democratización de la sociedad: entre el derecho a la información y el ejercicio de la ciudadanía comunicativa. Punto Cero, 28-36. (https://goo.gl/By8lGQ) (2017-01-15).

Castells, M. (2012). Redes de indignación y esperanza. Madrid: Alianza.

Dahlgren, P. (2011). Jóvenes y participación política. Los medios en la Red y la cultura cívica. Telos, 89 (https://goo.gl/SD4KCI) (2017-02-06).

Delgado-Salazar, R., & Arias-Herrera, J.C. (2008). La acción colectiva de los jóvenes y la construcción de ciudadanía. Revista Argentina de Sociología, 6(11), 272-296. (https://goo.gl/0G1T8F) (2016-12-05).

Diani, M. (2015). Revisando el concepto de movimiento social. Encrucijadas, 9, 1-16. (https://goo.gl/cVdngg) (2017-01-22).

García-Galera, M.C., & Del-Hoyo-Hurtado, M. (2013). Redes sociales, un medio para la movilización juvenil. Zer, 18(34), 111-125. (https://goo.gl/fTS45z) (2016-11-04).

García-Galera, M.C., Del Hoyo-Hurtado, M., & Fernández-Muñoz, C. (2014). Jóvenes comprometidos en la Red: el papel de las redes sociales en la participación social activa. [Engaged Youth in Internet. The Role of Social Networks in Social Active Participation]. Comunicar, 43(XXII), 35-43. https://doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-03

González-Lizárraga, M.G.; Becerra-Traver, M.T., & Yánez-Díaz, M. B. (2016). Ciberactivismo: nueva forma de participación para estudiantes universitarios [Cyberactivism: A new form of participation for University Students]. Comunicar, 46 (XXIV), 47-54. https://doi.org/10.3916/C46-2016-05

Hourani, A. (1992). Historia de los pueblos árabes. Barcelona: Editorial Ariel.

Izquierdo-Brichs, F. (Ed.) (2009). Poder y regímenes en el mundo árabe contemporáneo. Barcelona: Fundación CIDOB.

Khader, B. (2015). La Unión Europea ante la primavera árabe. In I. Álvarez-Ossorio (Coord.), La primavera árabe revisitada: reconfiguración del autoritarismo y recomposición del islamismo (pp. 55-72). Pamplona: Aranzadi.

Majdoubi-Bahida, E.H. (2011). Las revoluciones democráticas en el mundo árabe. Infoamerican Communication Review (https://goo.gl/4JWX3t) (2016-11-09).

Majdoubi-Bahida, E.H. (2012). Revolución por la dignidad en el mundo árabe. De la indignación al renacimiento. Barcelona: Icaria editorial.

Martín-Muñoz, G., & Moure, L. (2006). El mundo árabe e islámico: experiencia histórica, realidad política y evolución socio-económica. Bizkaia: Universidad del País Vasco.

Martínez-Fuentes, G. (2015). Túnez: revolución y contrarrevolución como claves analíticas. In I. Álvarez-Ossorio (Coord.), La primavera árabe revisitada: reconfiguración del autoritarismo y recomposición del islamismo (pp. 73-100). Pamplona: Aranzadi.

Menéndez, M.C. (2011). Las redes sociales y su efecto político. Telos, 85-93. (https://goo.gl/Vghx8F) (2017-01-25).

Michou, H., Soler-i-Lecha, E., & Ignacio-Torreblanca, J. (2013). Europa y la democracia en el norte de África: una segunda oportunidad. Barcelona: CIDOB.

Morales-Lezcano, V. (2012). Norte de África: rebeliones sociales y opciones políticas. Madrid: Diwan Mayrit.

Naïr, S. (2013). ¿Por qué se revelan? Revoluciones y contrarrevoluciones en el mundo árabe. Madrid: Clave Intelectual.

Ortiz-Galindo, R. (2014). Los cibermovimientos sociales. Nuevas oportunidades comunicativas en la era de Internet y de la Web social, nuevas posibilidades de transformación democrática. (Tesis doctoral). Pamplona: Universidad de Navarra.

Ortiz-Galindo, R. (2015). Los cibermovimientos sociales. Un nuevo entorno comunicativo para la movilización en la era de Internet. In L. Castellón & A. Guillier (Coords.), Comunicación, Redes y Poder (pp. 305-330). Santiago: RIL Editores.

Ortiz-Galindo, R. (2016a). Estrategias de comunicación interpersonal y pública en los movimientos sociales. Transformaciones de las redes informales y de los repertorios en la era de la Web social. OBETS, 11(1), 211-254. https://doi.org/10.14198/OBETS2016.11.1.09

Ortiz-Galindo, R. (2016b). Los cibermovimientos sociales: una revisión del concepto y marco teórico. Comunicación & Sociedad, 29(4). https://doi.org/10.15581/003.29.4.sp.165-183

Peña-López, I. (2009). La red de las personas: cómo Internet puede empoderar a la ciudadanía. In Fundación Cibervoluntarios (Ed.), Innovación para el empoderamiento de la ciudadanía a través de las TIC (pp. 61-65). Madrid: Bubok.

Roces, F. (2011). El nuevo mundo árabe: El papel de las redes sociales y de las televisiones por satélite árabes en la ola de cambios políticos en la región. El nuevo mundo árabe (https://goo.gl/d22etl) (2016-12-11).

Sádaba, I. (2012). Acción colectiva y movimientos sociales en las redes digitales. Aspectos históricos y metodológicos. Arbor, 188(756), 781-794. https://doi.org/10.3989/arbor.2012.756n4011

Sampedro, V. (2014). Ciberactivismo. De Indymedia a Wikileaks y de Chiapas al Cuarto Poder en Red. Telos, 98, 94-96. (https://goo.gl/bfqKB1) (2016-12-03).

Shawki, Y. (2014). El despertar árabe, ¿sueño o pesadilla? Santiago de Compostela: Universidad de Santiago.

Soengas-Pérez, X. (2013). El papel de Internet y de las redes sociales en las revueltas árabes: una alternativa a la censura de la prensa oficial [The Role of the Internet and Social Networks in the Arab Uprisings an Alternative to Official Press Censorship]. Comunicar, 41(XXI), 147-155. https://doi.org/10.3916/C41-2013-14

Szmolka, I. (2012). Factores desencadenantes y procesos de cambio político en el mundo árabe. Documentos CIDOB Mediterráneo y Oriente Medio, 19, 1-27. (https://goo.gl/RthCZW) (2017-01-21).

Tascón, M., & Quintana, Y. (2012). Ciberactivismo. Las nuevas revoluciones de las multitudes conectadas. Madrid: Catarata.

Tufte, T. (2015). Comunicación para el cambio social. La participación y el empoderamiento como base en el desarrollo mundial. Barcelona: Icaria.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/09/17
Accepted on 30/09/17
Submitted on 30/09/17

Volume 25, Issue 2, 2017
DOI: 10.3916/C53-2017-05
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 3
Views 2
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?