Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Download the PDF version

Resumen

The development of Teacher’s Digital Competence (TDC) should start in initial teacher training, and continue throughout the following years of practice. All this with the purpose of using Digital Technologies (DT) to improve teaching and professional development. This paper presents a study focused on the diagnosis of TDC among ITT senior students from Chile and Uruguay. A quantitative methodology, with a representative sample of 568 students (N=273 from Chile and N=295 from Uruguay) was designed and implemented. TDC was also studied and discussed in relation to gender and educational level. Results showed a mostly basic level for the four dimensions of the TDC in the sample. Regarding the relationship between the variables and the TDC, the planning, organization and management of spaces and technological resources’ dimension is the only one showing significant differences. In particular, male students achieved a higher TDC level compared with female students. Furthermore, the proportion of Primary Education students with a low TDC level was significantly higher than other students. In conclusion, it is necessary, for teacher training institutions in Chile and Uruguay, to implement policies at different moments and in different areas of the ITT process in order to improve the development of the TDC.

Resumen

El desarrollo de la Competencia Digital Docente (CDD) debe iniciarse en la etapa de formación inicial docente (FID) y extenderse durante los años de ejercicio. Todo ello con el propósito de usar las Tecnologías Digitales (TD) de manera que permitan enriquecer la docencia y el propio desarrollo profesional. El presente artículo expone los resultados de un trabajo con estudiantes de último año de FID de Chile y Uruguay para determinar su nivel de CDD. Para realizar el estudio se utilizó una metodología cuantitativa, con una muestra representativa estratificada de 568 estudiantes (n=273, Chile; n=295, Uruguay). Los datos se analizaron en relación al género y nivel educativo. Los resultados mostraron, para las cuatro dimensiones de la CDD, un desarrollo básico. Respecto a la relación entre las variables estudiadas y la CDD, destaca el porcentaje de hombres que alcanza competencias digitales avanzadas para la dimensión de Planificación, organización y gestión de espacios y recursos tecnológicos. También para esta dimensión la proporción de estudiantes de Educación Primaria con un desarrollo de CDD básico es significativamente superior al del resto de estudiantes. Como conclusión destacamos que es necesario que las instituciones formadoras de docentes implementen políticas a diferentes plazos y en diversos ámbitos de la FID como el sistema educativo, la formación y la docencia, para mejorar el nivel de desarrollo de la CDD.

Keywords

ICT standards, digital competence, teachers training, assessment, educational technology, high education, pedagogy, educational system

Keywords

Estándares TIC, competencia digital, formación de profesores, evaluación, tecnología educativa, educación superior, pedagogía, sistema educativo

Introduction

Digital competence (DC) is one of the key competences of the modern citizen. Over a decade ago, the European Commission (2018) considered that citizens should have some key skills to prepare them for adult life, to enable them to actively participate in society and to continue to learn throughout their lives. As one of these skills, DC must be considered broadly, in all educational systems (curricula, resources and support for training, continuous competency updates, teacher training, equity, special needs, educational policies, etc.). In a broader context, UNESCO (2015: 40-47), within the Education 2030 Framework for Action, highlights the potential of digital technology (DT) and the importance of technological skills training as part of programs to enter the labor market. In this reality, the teaching staff plays a key role to ensure that future citizens make effective use of digital technologies for their personal and professional development.

Various international reports highlight the need for well-trained educators in the use the DT for teaching (INTEF, 2017: 2; Redecker & Punie, 2017: 12; UNESCO, 2015: 55; 2017: 20), Teachers with an adequate level of Teacher’s Digital Competence (TDC), which is understood as the “set of abilities, skills, and attitudes that teachers must develop in order to be able to incorporate digital technologies into their practice and their professional development" (Lázaro, Usart, & Gisbert, 2019: 73). This concept is in line with proposals concerning recent developments, which define TDC, and emphasize the need to harness the potential of DT in the learning processes of future citizens of a digital society. Teachers themselves demonstrate, in their training needs, that TDC is one of their priorities (European Commission, 2015: 11). Specifically, the collection of knowledge, attitudes and skills that make up TDC are defined in different frameworks and standards that serve as referents for the training and evaluation of this competency: MINEDUC-Enlaces (2008; 2011), ISTE (2008), Unesco (2008 y 2018), Fraser, Atkins, & Richard (2013), Ministerio Educación Nacional (2013), INTEF (2014; 2017), DigiComp (Redecker & Punie, 2017). If we analyze the dimensions of TDC considered here, we can see that the focus is on didactic-pedagogical aspects, teacher professional development, ethical and safety aspects, search and management of information, and in the creation and communication of content. Most of them are directed toward TDC of in-service teachers, who may be able to assimilate initial or basic levels as a minimum requirement as a student pursuing a degree in education or pedagogy to complete their training at university.

TDC in initial teacher training

In education degree programs, DC has a different hue than in other areas of education. Initial Teacher Training should include digital training for the future teachers, so they are able to use digital technology in their professional activity (Escudero, Martínez-Domínguez, & Nieto, 2018; Papanikolaou, Makri, & Roussos, 2017; Prendes, Castañeda, & Gutiérrez, 2010).

Teacher training is one of the key factors for incorporating DT in pedagogical practices. This aspect takes on greater relevance in ITT, as they could enter the education system with an adequate level of TDC. In this way, future teachers would be able to enrich the learning environments through DT and incorporate them naturally into their future professional practice (Castañeda, Esteve, & Adell, 2018). ITT in Latin America has been incorporating DT in the study plans with little or no guidance and support from the ministries of education. In fact, the policy has focused on delivering infrastructure and training to teachers in the educational system, without offering support and guidance to teacher-training institutions. It is necessary to systematize and share experiences involving the inclusion of DT in the ITT curriculum (Brun, 2011), in alignment with international standards (Brushed & Prada, 2012).

In Chile, given the autonomy of institutions that train teachers and the shortage of policies and guidelines for including DT in ITT, there are a variety of specific subjects on DT distributed along different semesters of the syllabus. However, they are more focused on digital literacy, than on teaching with DT (Rodriguez & Silva, 2006). This fact has not hindered the development of particular initiatives created by some institutions, in line with guiding the development of the TDC. They use some national standards and, at the same time, integrate elements of other international frameworks (Cerda, Huete, Molina, Ruminot & Saiz, 2017). In this context, the level of self-perception of students with regard to TDC (MINEDUC-Enlaces, 2011). It has been observed that the level of TDC development of ITT students is based on technical and ethical aspects, rather than those related to teaching and knowledge management (Badilla, Jiménez, & Careaga, 2013; Ascencio, Garay, & Seguic, 2016). In the case of Uruguay, because there is an entity that controls teacher training, there are two ITT subjects: “Information and education” and “integrating digital technologies,” which include education in TDC of future teachers (Rombys, 2012). In both countries, no specific cross-sectional formulations are observed to guide the integration of DT in other subjects. Their work is subjected to the competencies and skills of the teaching staff itself (Silva & al., 2017).

Evaluation of TDC

Evaluating TDC in ITT presents important challenges that relate to the complexity of evaluating competencies and the assessment system used. Objective assessment tools are required, that are not based only on the perception of the user but measure the level of TDC by solving situations or problems in line with the indicators to be evaluated (Villar & Poblete, 2011: 150). Currently, there are TDC self-assessment tools that are based on self-perception (Redecker & Punie, 2017; Tourón, Martín, Navarro, Pradas & Íñigo, 2018). INTEF (2017) presents a proposal that uses a technological solution and also incorporates the use of a portfolio for evaluation. In our view, the challenge is to use an objective, reliable and valid TDC evaluation test that measures the knowledge of the future teacher. For this purpose, this study sets forth to analyze the development level of TDC in a sample of senior students of ITT in Chile and Uruguay, through a previously validated instrument (see section 2.2), which allows us to make an assessment aligned to TDC, using the indicators and dimensions proposed by Lázaro and Gisbert (2015) (Figure 1). At the same time, through the data obtained, research will also examine the relationship of the TDC level with other key variables.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/2e783cbc-74da-43c2-9d6d-2ad8e3edfb8f/image/a2d6bfca-82c7-407b-a35f-ae509595d843-ueng-03-01.png


Objectives and research questions

In order to determine the development level of TDC of the ITT senior students in Chile and Uruguay, the study will present and discuss the results for a representative sample in both countries, through quantitative analysis of the data obtained using the described instruments, and also with regard to the variables of gender and educational level. Specifically:

  • O1. Assess the level of TDC in a sample of students from Chile and Uruguay.
  • O2. Study the relationship between the level of TDC and the factors of gender and educational level.

The following research questions are established to guide the process and will be used to present and discuss the results:

  • Q1. What is the distribution in the four dimensions of TDC of the sample studied?
  • Q2. Are there significant differences for TDC in terms of gender?
  • Q3. Are there differences in TDC among future teachers of primary and secondary education?

Material and methods

Sample

With the aim of studying the TDC of senior students of ITT in Chile and Uruguay, we chose a representative stratified sample composed of 568 students of both countries. We performed a stratified random sampling with p=5%. The sample was drawn from a population of 2,467 students for Uruguay and an estimated population of 12,928 in Chile, considering the public universities that provide ITT. To perform the stratified sample, the relative weight of the population was taken into account, of the various ITT institutions Uruguay and different public universities in Chile, considering each institution as a stratum.

In the case of Uruguay (there are two institutions —with a center for each stratum— in the capital city of the country, and the remaining 2 institutions with 28 centers scattered throughout the rest of the territory), in 2 of the 4 strata, a multistage sample was conducted, in which the centers were chosen first, and then, the students within these centers. Eleven centers participated of a total of 30. First, the sample was divided by strata, according to the number of students present in each center. Then, depending on feasibility decisions, students were drawn in the institutions of the capital and the centers of the rest of the country. Within these centers, students to be surveyed were drawn by an assigned number in the student lists. To select the individuals of the samples, another 10% was drawn for substitution, respecting the relative weight of each subsample.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/2e783cbc-74da-43c2-9d6d-2ad8e3edfb8f/image/97734021-ed3e-4124-96b1-51be7d335c88-ueng-03-02.png


In the Chilean case, after dividing the sample in strata —by number of students present in each one of them— there was one drawing per university, while the instrument was applied by full classroom, with the participation of seven universities, of a total of 16. The universe and the samples are shown on Table 1. Table 2 characterizes the sample of 568 students who participated in the study. It is made up of 273 Chilean students (48.1%) and 295 Uruguayan students (51.9%).


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/2e783cbc-74da-43c2-9d6d-2ad8e3edfb8f/image/dd012e05-0936-404c-a716-4bd3ff8e8f1d-ueng-03-03.png


Instruments and procedure

To study the TDC of the sample, a test-type assessment instrument was used to present problem situations that novel teachers may encounter during their professional practice. This instrument is composed of closed questions with hierarchical or weighted responses, with several answer options. The responses were scored according to their level of precision: 1, 0.75, 0.5, 0.25 points. This differentiation is explained because, faced with the same problem situation, there may be several correct answers, but with different levels of precision, depending on the situation. This was constructed from an array of indicators to assess TDC in ITT in the Chilean-Uruguayan context (Silva, Miranda, Gisbert, Moral, & Oneto, 2016) based primarily on ICT standards in ITT from MINEDUC-Enlaces (2008) and the proposed TDC rubric by Lázaro & Gisbert (2015).

The specifications table was reviewed by a panel of experts, both in Chile and Uruguay. This is a proposal of TDC contextualized to ITT, which is based on different international standards (Fraser, Atkins & Richard, 2013; INTEF, 2014; ISTE, 2008 and UNESCO, 2008), to ensure the construct validity of the instrument. In order to ensure content validity in the evaluation questionnaire, the 56 initial questions were validated through expert judgment which included nine experts in the field of Higher Education linked to ITT in Uruguay, Chile and Spain (3 per country). This process was carried out through validation matrices, where each expert individually answered yes or no to the conditions of validity of each question.

Of the 56 questions, 51 obtained a quality assessment of over 75%, while only six questions were evaluated with scores under 75%, making them unsuitable for the final evaluation instrument. The assessment instrument was made up of the four top rated questions by experts for each of the 10 indicators. In this way, the final instrument was composed of 40 questions, distributed in four dimensions: D1. Curriculum, Didactics and Methodology: 16 questions; D2. Planning, Organizing and Managing Digital Technology Spaces and Resources: eight questions; D3. Ethical, legal and security aspects: eight questions and D4. Personal and Professional Development: eight questions. Meanwhile, each correct answer was assigned one point and the instrument awarded 40 points maximum.

Below is an example of an item or question: "If you want your students to perform a CIICT (curricular integration of information and communication technologies) activity, which of the following digital technologies do you or would you use: (a) Educational Video (0.50); (b) Blog with curricular topic (0.75); (c) Specific software for the subject (1.00); (d) Presentation with curricular contents (0.25). The internal consistency of the instrument was studied (Silva & al., 2017), and interpreted on the basis of the criterion cited by Cohen, Manion and Morrison (2007). In our case, α=0.60, which indicates "good" internal reliability for scales between 0.6 and 0.8 points.

The process of administering the test took two months. The instrument was administered to the sample of students in the last year of pedagogy in Chile and Uruguay (see Section 2.1) online, from any place and device (tablet, cell phone, computer). Data from the test was downloaded and saved to a Microsoft Excel (2007) spreadsheet, taking into account the ethical aspects relating to anonymity and conformity of data transfer.

Statistical tests

To analyze the implementation results of the instrument and to respond to the research questions, a descriptive data analysis of the assessment instrument for TDC at the level of dimensions and indicators, was performed. Later, different statistical tests were administered. In particular, to perform the analysis, the creation of "Indicators of Teacher’s Digital Competences (ITDC)” was proposed to categorize students in initial teacher training by level of TDC, into: basic, intermediate and advanced, for the dimensions, by crossing of variables: sex and educational level, with the purpose of identifying statistically significant differences with the chi-square (χ2) test and the comparison of distributions (Z test). Data were analyzed with SPSS for Windows, Version 24.

For the construction of each indicator, all the scores obtained for each item were added. The results of this sum of scores were categorized (recoded) according to a theoretical estimate that considers the actual distribution of the scores obtained: minimum score obtained. Analysis, maximum score obtained and the scores in the position 33 and 66 if the scores are sorted in ascending order. Considering the scores for each indicator that make up the dimensions mentioned above, the TDC indicator of classification was created, as described below in Table 3.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/2e783cbc-74da-43c2-9d6d-2ad8e3edfb8f/image/52e7e63f-13c1-4058-bc66-1df38ce3c5d2-ueng-03-04.png


Results

First, we estimated the overall results of the sample by dimension of TDC. The mean of the four dimensions is between 2.0 and 2.3 points, which is equivalent to 51% to 59% of the total points available. These values have standard deviations between 0.3 and 0.6. For all dimensions, it should be noted that relatively similar scores between mean, median and mode enable us to see we are dealing with a normal distribution of data, which was verified through statistical tests. In particular, the results were compared using the Levene test to confirm the normal distribution for each dimension in the total sample. We present the results sorted by research question:

  • Q1. What is the distribution in the four dimensions of TDC for the sample studied?

The results of the distribution in our sample by TDC dimension showed that for the four dimensions, students in the sample are mostly at the basic level (Figure 2), although 1 of every three subjects is at the advanced level.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/2e783cbc-74da-43c2-9d6d-2ad8e3edfb8f/image/7301a34a-46d3-4842-86ec-304617b67ec3-ueng-03-05.png


Only differences that could be statistically significant in D4 are found: “Personal and Professional Development” (Figure 2). To calculate if the differences observed are significant among students with intermediate TDC (28.5%), and basic TDC (38.7%), a Chi-square test was applied to compare the different levels (χ2(2)=10.8 with p<0.01). This result indicates that we must reject the null hypothesis and therefore we can state that there is a statistical difference between these two groups of students. In other words, the distribution of students with low level of D4 is significantly higher than that of students with intermediate competency. Once the dimensions of TDC evaluated in our sample of students is studied, we detail the results for each of the questions that correlate their TDC with the variables of interest:

  • P2. "Are there significant differences for TDC in terms of gender?" was first measured through the descriptive statistical study of the percentages of distribution (Table 4).


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/2e783cbc-74da-43c2-9d6d-2ad8e3edfb8f/image/4b376020-48db-4d47-a755-18146cb19bd1-ueng-03-06.png


The results show that no significant differences were observed with regard to gender in the four dimensions studied. Even so, the percentage of male students that reach advanced digital competences is noteworthy in D2: “Planning, Organization and Management” (39.3%), compared to female students at that same level (28.3%). To evaluate this difference quantitatively, a Chi-square test was applied, which only showed a statistically significant value between these two groups (χ2(1)= 6.61, with p=0.047, <.05). We can say that there is a statistical difference between these two groups of male and female students for D2. In particular, the distribution of male students with an advanced level in this dimension is significantly higher than that of women. In reference to the third research question Q3: Are there differences of TDC among teachers of secondary and primary education? We can see in Table 5 the following percentages of distribution for each group, separated by levels of TDC development.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/2e783cbc-74da-43c2-9d6d-2ad8e3edfb8f/image/792e9fcf-e79f-4321-95bd-42a64e269fc1-ueng-03-07.png


Percentage differences are observed for D1: “Didactic, Curricular and Methodological Dimension”, in which students from educational levels other than Primary and Secondary were mostly advanced TDC (42.9%). The situation is reversed in D2: “Planning, organization and management of spaces and digital technology resources”, where the percentage of Primary Education students with basic TDC development is noteworthy (45.5%). For D3. “Ethical, Legal and Security Aspects” 40.1% of students in Secondary Education has basic TDC development and 40.5% Basic students from other disciplines display intermediate development of TDC. Finally, dimension D4. “Personal and Professional Development” presents high values for students of Primary and Secondary Education at advanced levels (39.2%), but not for other disciplines, in which half of their students have a basic level of TDC development (50%).

To evaluate these differences, once again a Chi-square test was performed, which shows a significant value between groups in the D2 dimension (χ2(2)=14.28 with p<.01). Specifically, the Z-test indicates that the proportion of Primary Education students with basic development of TDC is significantly higher than that of Secondary and other levels of studies. In turn, the proportion of students of Secondary Education with advanced development of TDC is significantly higher than that of students at the Primary Level. Finally, for Dimension 4 there are no statistically significant differences (p=0.056).

Discussion and conclusions

The first general objective of this research was to assess the level of TDC of students in their last year of ITT, for a representative sample in Chile and Uruguay. We proceeded to discuss the results found in the previous section according to the proposed research questions. In particular, starting from the first question, our intention was to analyze the level of TDC in terms of the four dimensions defined, and study the possible differences between levels of development of this competency. The data on the differences between competence groups have shown a low level of development in general, with a significant difference in dimension D4. “Personal and Professional Development”. In particular, in our sample there are more students with low level in this item.

The results for the level of TDC in the sample studied differ from those obtained in studies of perception of this competence in ITT. Here, the level of development appears noticeably higher in the different levels, since students perceive a greater command of DT in relation to the actual level they reach (Badilla, Jiménez, & Careaga, 2013; Prendes, Castañeda, & Gutiérrez. 2010; Banister & Reinhart, 2014; Touron & al., 2018; Gutierrez & Serrano, 2016, Ascencio, Garay, & Seguic, 2016). However, the results are consistent with research that evaluates TDC in pedagogy students, from the results of a test, administered by the Ministry of Education that used simulated environments. This test assesses the technological skills of future teachers of primary education and preschool education, shows that only 58% of the graduates had an acceptable level of DT, 59% in primary education and 55% in preschool education (Canales & Hain, 2017). These data confirm the validity of our assessment instrument, in terms of criterion, which added to the previous study of construct validity and content (Silva & al., 2017), make this an applicable instrument for the evaluation of TDC in students of ITT in Latin American samples. A study of perception by MINEDUC with 3,425 teachers who participated in their formative plans in ICT, in relation to the integration of the pedagogical use of ICT in the classroom and in their own professional development, showed that 0.47% are at an initial level; 21% are at an elementary level; 77% obtained a higher level; and 0.23% are at an advanced level. The results are more optimistic than those observed in this study (MINEDUC, 2016).

The second general objective was to study the correlations between the level of TDC and the gender and educational level factors. This study allows us to analyze the possible personal factors or variables that may influence the development of TDC. Significant differences have appeared in both variables (gender and educational level). In particular, there is a high percentage of male students that reach advanced digital competences in D2: "Planning, Organization and Management" compared to female students. This differs from other studies in Chile with students of pedagogy of the humanities, which indicate that there are no significant differences between the groups compared and that students show homogeneous characteristics when it comes to their approach toward technology (Ayale & Joo, 2019). However, previous studies (Björk, Gudmundsdottir, & Hatlevik, 2018) found, in a sample of teachers in Malta, that men claimed to have more confidence in the use of technology in the classroom than women. Additionally, the study of Ming Te Wang and Degol (2017) among professionals in the technology sector shows that gender stereotypes are socio-cultural factors that may affect cognitive factors, including the perception of competence. Similarly, greater experience in the classroom with the use of technologies, more positive attitudes and self-confidence are generated in the specific case of women (Teo, 2008: 420) and better assessment of their TDC.

In the light of the observed results, it is both a need and a challenge to strengthen the development of TDC in general, and the didactic-pedagogical aspects, in particular, during ITT. To this end, teacher training institutions require guidance that will enable them to achieve improvements in the short, medium and long term, in various areas of ITT, such as the educational system, training and teaching, in order to make progress in the level of development of TDC. These must come from results arising from research, which should feed the diagnosis, evaluation, and accompaniment in developing TDC in ITT.

This study provides evidence that students of initial training, at one step of completing their teacher training, do not possess the TDC required to effectively use DT in their future exercise as teachers. This aspect is of concern because teachers who are not digitally competent will have difficulties in effectively using TDC in their daily practice and in teaching digital competence to their students. This low competence on the part of teachers is one of the main barriers for the use of DT in their teaching work and for their own professional development (UNESCO, 2013). We emphasize, in addition, that there is a positive correlation between the quality of the pedagogical practices and the use of DT in teaching (INTEF, 2016).

Finally, it is considered that the instrument is a good starting point to assess the TDC in students of ITT, because it puts together a set of questions that must be put into play in context, and it is applicable to the local scope of both countries. As proposals for the future, we consider interesting to:

  • Undertake, in future studies, to improve the instrument, extending the battery of questions for each indicator and incorporating questions for indicators of the original matrix validated by experts that were not addressed in this study. Only 10 of the 14 originally approved were considered.
  • Try the assessment instrument in other contexts and teachers in training of other educational levels, such as preschool or special needs education that exist in Latin America.
  • Perform comparative studies between Latin American and European countries, since both contexts, despite differences in education plans, share the same problems with regard to the insertion of DC in ITT.
  • It is also interesting within the same country or in comparison with other countries, to assess the differences, if any, between the training of teachers in public and in private institutions.

References

  1. Ayale-PérezT., Joo-NagataJ., . 2019.digital culture of students of Pedagogy specialising in the humanities in Santiago de Chile&author=Ayale-Pérez&publication_year= The digital culture of students of Pedagogy specialising in the humanities in Santiago de Chile.Computers & Education 133:1-12
  2. AscencioP., GarayM., SeguicE., . 2016.Formación Inicial Docente (FID) y Tecnologías de la Información y Comunicación (TIC) en la Universidad de Magallanes – Patagonia Chilena.Digital Education Review 30:123-134
  3. BadillaM., L.Jiménez, CareagaM., . 2013.Competencias TIC en formación inicial docente: Estudio de caso de seis especialidades en la Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción.Aloma 31(1):89-97
  4. BanisterS., ReinhartR., . 2014.NETS-T performance in teacher candidates: Exploring the Wayfind teacher assessment&author=Banister&publication_year= Assessing NETS-T performance in teacher candidates: Exploring the Wayfind teacher assessment.Journal of Digital Learning in Teacher Education 29(2):59-65
  5. Björk-GudmundsdottirG., HatlevikO.E., . 2018.qualified teachers’ professional digital competence: Implications for teacher education&author=Björk-Gudmundsdottir&publication_year= Newly qualified teachers’ professional digital competence: Implications for teacher education.European Journal of Teacher Education 41(2):214-231
  6. BrunM., . 2011.Las tecnologías de la información y las comunicaciones en la formación inicial docente de América Latina. Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), División de Desarrollo Social, Serie Políticas Sociales.
  7. R.Canales,, A.Hain,, . 2017.de informática educativa en Chile: Uso, apropiación y desafíos a nivel investigativo&author=R.&publication_year= Política de informática educativa en Chile: Uso, apropiación y desafíos a nivel investigativo. In: , ed. al estudio de procesos de apropiación de tecnologías&author=&publication_year= Contribuciones al estudio de procesos de apropiación de tecnologías. Buenos Aires: GatoGris.
  8. CastañedaL., EsteveF., AdellJ., . 2018.qué es necesario repensar la competencia docente para el mundo digital?&author=Castañeda&publication_year= ¿Por qué es necesario repensar la competencia docente para el mundo digital?Revista de Educación a Distancia 56:1-20
  9. CohenL., ManionL., MorrisonK., . 2007.Research methods in education. London: Routledge.
  10. CerdaC., Huete-NahuelJ., Molina-SandovalD., Ruminot-MartelE., SaizJ., . 2017.de tecnologías digitales y logro académico en estudiantes de Pedagogía chilenos&author=Cerda&publication_year= Uso de tecnologías digitales y logro académico en estudiantes de Pedagogía chilenos.Estudios Pedagógicos 54(3):119-133
  11. EscuderoJ.M., Martínez-DomínguezB., NietoJ.M., . 2018.TIC en la formación continua del profesorado en el contexto español&author=Escudero&publication_year= Las TIC en la formación continua del profesorado en el contexto español.Revista de Educación 382:57-78
  12. European Commission (Ed.). 2015.Marco estratégico: Educación y formación, 2020.
  13. European Commission (Ed.). 2018.Proposal for a council recommendation on key competences for lifelong learning.
  14. FraserJ., AtkinsL., RichardH., . 2013.DigiLit leicester. Supporting teachers, promoting digital literacy, transforming learning. Leicester City Council.
  15. GutiérrezI., SerranoJ., . 2016.y desarrollo de la competencia digital de futuros maestros en la Universidad de Murcia&author=Gutiérrez&publication_year= Evaluación y desarrollo de la competencia digital de futuros maestros en la Universidad de Murcia.New Approaches in Educational Research 5:53-59
  16. INTEF (Ed.). 2014. , ed. Común de Competencia Digital Docente&author=&publication_year= Marco Común de Competencia Digital Docente. Madrid: Instituto Nacional de Tecnologías Educativas y de Formación del Profesorado.
  17. INTEF (Ed.). 2016.Resumen Informe. Competencias para un mundo digital.
  18. INTEF (Ed.). 2017.Marco Común de Competencia Digital Docente.
  19. ISTE (Ed.). 2008. , ed. educational technology standards for teachers&author=&publication_year= National educational technology standards for teachers. Washington DC: International Society for Technology in Education.
  20. Lázaro-CantabranaJ.L., Gisbert-CerveraM., . 2015.de una rúbrica para evaluar la competencia digital del docente&author=Lázaro-Cantabrana&publication_year= Elaboración de una rúbrica para evaluar la competencia digital del docente.Universitas Tarraconensis 1(1):48-63
  21. Lázaro-CantabranaJ., Usart-RodríguezM., Gisbert-CerveraM., . 2019.teacher digital competence: The construction of an instrument for measuring the knowledge of pre-service teachers&author=Lázaro-Cantabrana&publication_year= Assessing teacher digital competence: The construction of an instrument for measuring the knowledge of pre-service teachers.Journal of New Approaches in Educational Research 8(1):73-78
  22. Ministerio de Educación Nacional (Ed.). 2013.Competencias TIC para el desarrollo profesional docente.
  23. Mineduc (Ed.). 2008. , ed. TIC para la formación inicial docente: Una propuesta en el contexto chileno&author=&publication_year= Estándares TIC para la formación inicial docente: Una propuesta en el contexto chileno. Santiago de Chile: Ministerio de Educación.
  24. Mineduc (Ed.). 2011. , ed. de competencias y estándares TIC en la profesión docente&author=&publication_year= Actualización de competencias y estándares TIC en la profesión docente. Santiago de Chile: Ministerio de Educación.
  25. Mineduc (Ed.). 2016. , ed. en Chile: Conocimiento y uso de las TIC 2014&author=&publication_year= Docentes en Chile: Conocimiento y uso de las TIC 2014. Santiago de Chile: MINEDUC, Serie Evidencias. 32
  26. PapanikolaouK., MakriK., RoussosP., . 2017.design as a vehicle for developing TPACK in blended teacher training on technology enhanced learning&author=Papanikolaou&publication_year= Learning design as a vehicle for developing TPACK in blended teacher training on technology enhanced learning.International Journal of Educational Technology in Higher Education 14(1):34-41
  27. M.P.Prendes,, L.Castañeda,, I.Gutiérrez,, . 2010.competences of future teachers. [Competencias para el uso de TIC de los futuros maestros&author=M.P.&publication_year= ICT competences of future teachers. [Competencias para el uso de TIC de los futuros maestros]]Comunicar 18(35):175-182
  28. RedeckerC., PunieY., . 2017. , ed. framework for the digital competence of educators: DigCompEdu&author=&publication_year= European framework for the digital competence of educators: DigCompEdu. Luxembourg: Publications Office of the European Union.
  29. RombysD., . 2012.Integración de las TIC para una buena enseñanza: Opiniones, actitudes y creencias de los docentes en un Instituto de Formación de Formadores.Tesis de Maestría, Instituto de Educación. Universidad ORT Uruguay
  30. RodríguezJ., SilvaJ., . 2006.Incorporación de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación en la formación inicial docente el caso chileno.Innovación Educativa 6(32):19-35
  31. RozoA., PradaM., . 2012.Panorama de la formación inicial docente y TIC en la región Andina.Educación y Pedagogía 24(62):191-204
  32. SilvaJ., MirandaP., GisbertM., MoralesM., OnettoA., . 2016.para evaluar la competencia digital docente en la formación inicial en el contexto chileno-uruguayo&author=Silva&publication_year= Indicadores para evaluar la competencia digital docente en la formación inicial en el contexto chileno-uruguayo.Revista Latinoamericana de Tecnología Educativa 15(3):55-68
  33. SilvaJ., RivoirA., OnetoA., MoralesM., MirandaP., GisbertM., SalinasJ., . 2017.Informe de investigación. Estudio comparado de las competencias digitales para aprender y enseñar en docentes en formación de Uruguay y Chile.
  34. SilvaJ., J.Lázaro, MirandaP., RCanales, . 2018.desarrollo de la competencia digital docente durante la formación del profesorado&author=Silva&publication_year= El desarrollo de la competencia digital docente durante la formación del profesorado.Opción 34(86):423-449
  35. TeoT., . 2008.teachers attitudes towards computer use: A Singapore survey&author=Teo&publication_year= Pre-service teachers attitudes towards computer use: A Singapore survey.Australasian Journal of Educational Technology 24(4):413-424
  36. TourónJ., MartínD., NavarroE., PradasS., ÍñigoV., . 2018.de constructo de un instrumento para medir la competencia digital docente de los profesores&author=Tourón&publication_year= Validación de constructo de un instrumento para medir la competencia digital docente de los profesores.Revista Española de Pedagogía 76(269):25-54
  37. UNESCO (Ed.). 2008.Estándares de competencia en TIC para docentes.
  38. UNESCO (Ed.). 2015.Educación 2030: Declaración de Incheon y Marco de Acción para la realización del Objetivo de Desarrollo.
  39. UNESCO (Ed.). 2018.ICT competency framework for teachers.
  40. Villa-SánchezA., Poblete-RuizM., . 2011.Evaluación de competencias genéricas: Principios, oportunidades y limitaciones.Bordón 63(1):147-170
  41. WangM.T., DegolJ.L., . 2017.gap in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM): Current knowledge, implications for practice, policy, and future directions&author=Wang&publication_year= Gender gap in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM): Current knowledge, implications for practice, policy, and future directions.Educational Psychology Review 29(1):119-140



Click to see the English version (EN)

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

Resumen

El desarrollo de la Competencia Digital Docente (CDD) debe iniciarse en la etapa de formación inicial docente (FID) y extenderse durante los años de ejercicio. Todo ello con el propósito de usar las Tecnologías Digitales (TD) de manera que permitan enriquecer la docencia y el propio desarrollo profesional. El presente artículo expone los resultados de un trabajo con estudiantes de último año de FID de Chile y Uruguay para determinar su nivel de CDD. Para realizar el estudio se utilizó una metodología cuantitativa, con una muestra representativa estratificada de 568 estudiantes (n=273, Chile; n=295, Uruguay). Los datos se analizaron en relación al género y nivel educativo. Los resultados mostraron, para las cuatro dimensiones de la CDD, un desarrollo básico. Respecto a la relación entre las variables estudiadas y la CDD, destaca el porcentaje de hombres que alcanza competencias digitales avanzadas para la dimensión de planificación, organización y gestión de espacios y recursos tecnológicos. También para esta dimensión la proporción de estudiantes de Educación Primaria con un desarrollo de CDD básico es significativamente superior al del resto de estudiantes. Como conclusión destacamos que es necesario que las instituciones formadoras de docentes implementen políticas a diferentes plazos y en diversos ámbitos de la FID como el sistema educativo, la formación y la docencia, para mejorar el nivel de desarrollo de la CDD.

ABSTRACT

The development of Teacher’s Digital Competence (TDC) should start in initial teacher training, and continue throughout the following years of practice. All this with the purpose of using Digital Technologies (DT) to improve teaching and professional development. This paper presents a study focused on the diagnosis of TDC among ITT senior students from Chile and Uruguay. A quantitative methodology, with a representative sample of 568 students (N=273 from Chile and N=295 from Uruguay) was designed and implemented. TDC was also studied and discussed in relation to gender and educational level. Results showed a mostly basic level for the four dimensions of the TDC in the sample. Regarding the relationship between the variables and the TDC, the Planning, organization and management of spaces and technological resources’ dimension is the only one showing significant differences. In particular, male students achieved a higher TDC level compared with female students. Furthermore, the proportion of Primary Education students with a low TDC level was significantly higher than other students. In conclusion, it is necessary, for teacher training institutions in Chile and Uruguay, to implement policies at different moments and in different areas of the ITT process in order to improve the development of the TDC.

Keywords

Estándares TIC, competencia digital, formación de profesores, evaluación, tecnología educativa, educación superior, pedagogía, sistema educativo

Keywords

ICT standards, digital competence, teachers training, assessment, educational technology, high education, pedagogy, educational system

Introducción

La competencia digital (CD) es una de las competencias clave del ciudadano moderno. La European Commission (2018) hace más de una década que consideró que los ciudadanos debían poseer unas competencias clave que los preparen para la vida adulta, para poder participar activamente en la sociedad y para seguir aprendiendo durante toda la vida. La CD, como una de ellas, debe tomarse en consideración en todos los sistemas educativos de forma amplia (currículos, recursos y apoyos para la formación, actualización de competencias en forma de formación permanente, formación de profesores, equidad, necesidades especiales, políticas educativas…).

En un contexto más amplio, la UNESCO (2015), en el marco de acción para la educación del 2030, destaca el potencial de las tecnologías digitales (TD) y la importancia de la formación en competencias tecnológicas en los procesos de formación para el acceso al mercado laboral. En esta realidad, el profesorado desempeña un papel fundamental para procurar que los futuros ciudadanos realicen un uso eficaz de las tecnologías digitales para su desarrollo personal y profesional. Diversos informes internacionales ponen de manifiesto la necesidad de disponer de profesorado bien formado en el uso de las TD para la docencia (INTEF, 2017; Redecker & Punie, 2017; Unesco, 2015; 2017), unos docentes con un nivel adecuado de Competencia Digital Docente (CDD) que entendemos como el «conjunto de capacidades, habilidades y actitudes que el docente debe desarrollar para poder incorporar las tecnologías digitales a su práctica y a su desarrollo profesional» (Lázaro, Usart, & Gisbert, 2019: 73). Este concepto está en línea con las propuestas por estos referentes recientes en los que se define la CDD y se pone énfasis en la necesidad de aprovechar el potencial de las TD en los procesos de formación de los futuros ciudadanos de una sociedad digital. Los mismos profesores ponen de manifiesto, en sus necesidades formativas, que la CDD es una de sus prioridades (European Commission, 2015: 11). En concreto, el conjunto de conocimientos, actitudes y habilidades que componen la CDD los encontramos definidos en diferentes marcos y estándares que sirven de referentes para la formación y evaluación de esta competencia: Mineduc-Enlaces (2008; 2011), ISTE (2008), UNESCO (2008; 2018), Fraser, Atkins y Richard (2013), Ministerio Educación Nacional (2013), INTEF (2014; 2017), DigiComp (Redecker & Punie, 2017).

Si analizamos las dimensiones de la CDD consideradas en estos documentos, se pone de manifiesto que el foco se sitúa en los aspectos didáctico-pedagógicos, en el desarrollo profesional docente, en los aspectos éticos y de seguridad, en la búsqueda y gestión de información, y en la creación y comunicación de contenidos. La mayor parte de ellas están orientadas a la CDD del profesor en ejercicio, pudiéndose asimilar los niveles inicial o básico como un mínimo que debería poseer un estudiante del Grado de Educación o Pedagogía al finalizar su formación en la universidad.

La CDD en la formación inicial docente

En los estudios de educación, la CD adquiere un matiz diferente que en el resto de formaciones. La FID debería incluir la formación digital de los futuros profesores de manera que estos sean capaces de utilizar las tecnologías digitales en su actividad profesional (Escudero, Martínez-Domínguez, & Nieto, 2018; Papanikolaou, Makri, & Roussos, 2017; Prendes, Castañeda, & Gutiérrez, 2010).

La formación de los docentes es uno de los factores clave para la incorporación de las TD en las prácticas pedagógicas. Este aspecto cobra mayor relevancia en la FID, ya que esta les ha de permitir incorporarse al sistema educativo con un nivel adecuado de CDD. De este modo, los futuros docentes serán capaces de enriquecer los ambientes de aprendizaje mediados por TD e incorporarlas de forma natural a su futuro ejercicio profesional (Castañeda, Esteve, & Adell, 2018).

La FID en América Latina ha ido incorporando las TD en los planes de estudio con escasas o nulas orientaciones y apoyos desde los ministerios de educación. En efecto, la política se ha centrado en entregar infraestructura y capacitación a los docentes del sistema educativo, sin ofrecer apoyo y orientaciones a las instituciones que forman docentes. Resulta necesario sistematizar y compartir experiencias de inserción de TD en el currículo de FID (Brun, 2011) y alinearlas con estándares internacionales (Rozo & Prada, 2012). En Chile, dada la autonomía de las instituciones que forman docentes y la escasez de políticas y orientaciones para insertar las TD en FID, hay una diversidad de asignaturas específicas sobre TD distribuidas en diferentes semestres de la malla formativa. Si bien, estas están centradas en la alfabetización digital, más que en el enseñar con TD (Rodríguez & Silva, 2006). Este hecho no ha privado el desarrollo de iniciativas particulares que han sido generadas por algunas instituciones, en la línea de orientar el desarrollo de la CDD acorde a algunos estándares nacionales, que a su vez integran elementos de otros marcos internacionales (Cerda, Huete, Molina, Ruminot & Saiz, 2017). En este contexto chileno se ha medido el nivel de autopercepción de los estudiantes frente a las CDD (Mineduc-Enlaces, 2011). Se ha observado que el nivel de desarrollo de las CDD de los estudiantes de FID se centra más en los aspectos técnicos y éticos, que en los pedagógicos y de gestión del conocimiento (Badilla, Jiménez, & Careaga, 2013; Ascencio, Garay, & Seguic, 2016).

En el caso de Uruguay, al existir un ente que controla la formación de docentes, hay dos asignaturas en FID: «informática y educación» e «integración de tecnologías digitales» que incluyen la formación en CDD de los futuros docentes (Rombys, 2012). En ambos países no se observan formulaciones transversales explícitas que orienten la integración de las TD en otras asignaturas, su trabajo está sujeto a las competencias e interés del propio profesorado (Silva & al., 2017).

La evaluación de la CDD

La evaluación de la CDD en FID presenta importantes desafíos, asociado a la complejidad de evaluar las competencias y al sistema de evaluación empleado. Existe la necesidad de disponer de herramientas de evaluación objetiva, no basadas solo en la autopercepción del usuario, sino que midan el nivel de CDD a partir de la solución de situaciones o problemas alineados con los indicadores a evaluar (Villa & Poblete, 2011).

Actualmente existen herramientas de autoevaluación de la CDD que se basan en la autopercepción (Redecker & Punie, 2017; Tourón, Martín, Navarro, Pradas, & Íñigo, 2018). INTEF (2017) presenta una propuesta que utiliza una solución tecnológica y además incorpora el uso de un portafolio para la evaluación. A nuestro juicio, el reto está en utilizar una prueba objetiva de evaluación de la CDD, que mida de forma fiable y válida los conocimientos del futuro docente.

Con este propósito, este estudio pretende analizar el nivel de desarrollo de la CDD en una muestra de estudiantes de último año de FID en Chile y Uruguay, mediante un instrumento previamente validado (ver sección 2.2), que nos permite realizar una evaluación alineada a los indicadores y dimensiones de la CDD propuesta por Lázaro y Gisbert (2015) (Figura 1). A su vez, mediante los datos obtenidos, también se estudiará la relación del nivel de CDD con otras variables clave.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/00a7239f-1292-4615-bb16-b45e9cb51797/image/0355055b-ffb6-41d4-93bb-86926de785a4-u03-01.png


Objetivos y preguntas de la investigación

Con el objetivo de determinar el nivel de desarrollo de la CDD de los estudiantes de último año de FID en Chile y Uruguay, el estudio presenta y discute los resultados para la muestra representativa de los dos países mediante el análisis cuantitativo de los datos obtenidos a partir de los instrumentos, también en relación con las variables de género y nivel educativo. En concreto:

  • O1. Evaluar el nivel de CDD en una muestra de estudiantes de Chile y Uruguay.
  • O2. Estudiar la relación entre el nivel de CDD y los factores de género y nivel educativo.

Se establecen las siguientes preguntas de investigación que guían el proceso y sirven para presentar y discutir los resultados:

  • P1. ¿Cuál es la distribución, en las cuatro dimensiones de la CDD, de la muestra estudiada?
  • P2. ¿Existen diferencias significativas para la CDD en términos de género?
  • P3. ¿Existen diferencias en CDD entre los futuros profesores de Educación Primaria y Secundaria?

Material y métodos

Caracterización de la muestra

Con la finalidad de diagnosticar la CDD de los estudiantes que cursan su último año de FID en Chile y Uruguay, se eligió una muestra representativa estratificada conformada por 568 estudiantes de ambos países. Se realizó un muestreo aleatorio estratificado con p=5%. La muestra se extrajo de una población de 2.467 estudiantes para Uruguay y una población estimada en 12.928 en Chile, considerando las universidades públicas que brindan FID. Para realizar la muestra estratificada se tuvo en cuenta el peso relativo de la población en las distintas instituciones de FID en Uruguay y en las diferentes universidades públicas de Chile, considerando a cada institución como un estrato.

En el caso uruguayo (existen dos instituciones −con un centro por cada estrato− en la capital del país, y las restantes 2 instituciones con 28 centros dispersos en el resto del territorio), en 2 de los 4 estratos se realizó una muestra polietápica, eligiendo primero los centros y luego los estudiantes. Participaron 11 centros de un total de 30. Primero se realizó una división de la muestra en estratos según la cantidad de estudiantes presentes en cada uno de ellos. Luego, de acuerdo a decisiones de factibilidad se realizó el sorteo de estudiantes en las instituciones de la capital y de centros para el resto del país y dentro de estos centros se sortearon los estudiantes a encuestar de acuerdo a una numeración asignada en los listados estudiantiles. Para la selección de los individuos de la muestra se sorteó un 10% más para sustitución respetando el peso relativo de cada submuestra.

En el caso chileno, posteriormente a la división de la muestra en estratos −según la cantidad de estudiantes presentes en cada uno de ellos− se realizó el sorteo por universidad, mientras que la aplicación del instrumento se realizó por clase completa, participando siete Universidades de un total de 16. El universo y las muestras quedan reflejados en la Tabla 1.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/00a7239f-1292-4615-bb16-b45e9cb51797/image/e1a7bb9e-3b39-4cae-8912-a10e4de414fc-u03-02.png


En la Tabla 2 se caracteriza la muestra de 568 estudiantes que participaron del estudio. Se trata de 273 estudiantes chilenos (48,1%) y 295 estudiantes uruguayos (51,9%).


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/00a7239f-1292-4615-bb16-b45e9cb51797/image/d33d8303-4e05-4b83-abcc-031189931d0d-u03-03.png


Instrumentos y procedimiento

Para estudiar la CDD de la muestra se utilizó un instrumento de evaluación tipo test en el que se presentan situaciones problema que un profesor novel puede enfrentarse durante su ejercicio profesional. Este instrumento está compuesto por preguntas cerradas de respuesta jerarquizada o ponderada, con varias opciones de respuesta. Las respuestas se puntuaron según su nivel de precisión, 1; 0,75; 0,5; 0,25 puntos. Esta diferenciación se explica porque frente a una misma situación problemática, pueden existir varias respuestas correctas, aunque con distintos niveles de precisión, según la situación.

Con estos datos se construyó a partir de una matriz de indicadores para evaluar la CDD en la FID en el contexto chileno-uruguayo (Silva, Miranda, Gisbert, Morales, & Oneto, 2016) basada principalmente en los estándares TIC en FID de MINEDUC-ENLACES (2008) y la propuesta de rúbrica de la CDD de Lázaro y Gisbert (2015). Se trata de una propuesta de la CDD contextualizada para FID, que está basada en diferentes estándares internacionales (Fraser, Atkins & Richard, 2013; INTEF, 2014; ISTE, 2008; UNESCO, 2008), para asegurar la validez de constructo del instrumento.

Con la finalidad de asegurar la validez de contenido del cuestionario de evaluación, las 56 preguntas iniciales fueron validadas a través de juicio de expertos. Participaron nueve expertos del ámbito Educación Superior vinculados a la FID, representantes de Uruguay, Chile y España (3 por cada país). Este proceso se realizó a través de matrices de validación, donde cada experto respondió de manera individual con un Sí o un No a las condiciones de validez de cada pregunta. De las 56 preguntas, 51 obtuvieron una valoración de calidad sobre el 75%, mientras que solo seis preguntas fueron evaluadas bajo el 75%, no consideradas aptas para conformar el instrumento de evaluación final.

El instrumento de evaluación se conformó con las cuatro preguntas mejor valoradas por los expertos para cada uno de los diez indicadores. Así, el instrumento definitivo quedó constituido por 40 preguntas, distribuidas en las cuatro dimensiones: D1. Curricular, didáctica y metodológica: 16 preguntas; D2. Planificación, organización y gestión de espacios y recursos tecnológicos digitales: ocho preguntas; D3. Aspectos éticos, legales y de seguridad: ocho preguntas y D4. Desarrollo personal y profesional: ocho preguntas. En tanto, cada respuesta correcta tenía asignado un punto, el instrumento entregaba 40 puntos como máximo.

A continuación, mostramos un ejemplo de ítem o pregunta: «Si desea que sus estudiantes realicen una actividad ICTIC (integración curricular de tecnologías de la información y comunicación), cuál de las siguientes tecnologías digitales utiliza o utilizaría: a) Video educativo (0,50); b) Blog con tema curricular (0,75); c) Software específico de la asignatura (1,00); d) Presentación con contenidos curriculares (0,25).

La consistencia interna del instrumento se estudió (Silva & al., 2017) y se interpretó en función del criterio citado por Cohen, Manion y Morrison (2007). En nuestro caso, α=0,60, lo cual indica una fiabilidad interna «buena» para escalas entre 0,6 y 0,8 puntos. El proceso de aplicación de la prueba abarcó dos meses. El instrumento fue respondido por la muestra de estudiantes de último curso de Pedagogía de Chile y Uruguay (Sección 2.1) en línea y desde cualquier lugar y dispositivo (tableta, celular, computador).

Los datos procedentes del test se descargaron y se guardaron en una hoja de cálculo Microsoft Excel (2007) teniendo en cuenta los aspectos éticos correspondientes a anonimidad y conformidad de cesión de datos.

Pruebas estadísticas

Para analizar los resultados de la aplicación del instrumento y responder a las preguntas de investigación, se realizó primero un análisis descriptivo de los datos del instrumento de evaluación de la CDD a nivel de dimensión y de indicadores. Después se aplicaron diferentes pruebas estadísticas. En concreto, para realizar el análisis, se propuso la creación de «Indicadores de Competencias Digitales Docentes (ICDD)» que permitiese categorizar a los estudiantes de formación inicial docente el nivel de CDD en: básico, medio y avanzado, para las dimensiones; según las variables de cruce: sexo y nivel educativo, con el propósito de identificar diferencias estadísticamente significativas según la prueba chi-cuadrado (χ2); y de comparación de proporciones de columnas (pruebas Z). Los datos se han analizado con SPSS para Windows, ver. 24.

Para la construcción de cada indicador, se realizó una suma de los puntajes obtenidos de cada ítem. Los resultados de dicha suma de puntajes fueron categorizados (recodificados) de acuerdo a una estimación teórica que considera la distribución real de las puntuaciones obtenidas: puntaje mínimo obtenido. Análisis, puntaje máximo obtenido y los puntajes en la posición 33 y 66 si se ordenan las puntuaciones de manera ascendente. Considerando los puntajes de cada indicador que componen las dimensiones señaladas, se creó el Indicador de clasificación de CDD, como a continuación se describe en la Tabla 3.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/00a7239f-1292-4615-bb16-b45e9cb51797/image/6b55031f-9d9b-47ea-8a5b-505df453dfc5-u03-04.png


Análisis y resultados

En primer lugar, calculamos los resultados generales de la muestra por dimensión de la CDD. Las medias de las cuatro dimensiones se encuentran entre 2,0 y 2,3 puntos, lo que equivale al 51% hasta el 59% del total de puntos disponible. Estos valores tienen unas desviaciones estándar entre 0,3 y 0,6. Para todas las dimensiones cabe destacar que las puntuaciones relativamente similares entre media, mediana y moda permiten entrever que estamos frente a una distribución normal de los datos, lo que se comprobó con las pruebas estadísticas correspondientes. En concreto se compararon los resultados utilizando la Prueba de Levene para confirmar la distribución normal para cada dimensión en la muestra total. Presentamos los resultados ordenados según las preguntas de investigación:

  • P1. ¿Cuál es la distribución, en las cuatro dimensiones de la CDD, de la muestra estudiada?

Los resultados de la distribución de la muestra por dimensiones de la CDD mostraron que, para las cuatro dimensiones, los estudiantes de la muestra se encuentran principalmente en un nivel básico (Figura 2), aunque 1 de cada tres sujetos es evaluado como avanzado.

Solo se observan diferencias que podrían ser estadísticamente significativas en la D4: «Desarrollo personal y profesional» (Figura 2). Para calcular si las diferencias observadas son significativas entre los estudiantes con CDD media (28,5%) y CDD Básica (38,7%), se realiza una prueba Chi-cuadrado para comparar los diferentes niveles (χ2(2)=10.8 con p<0.01). Este resultado indica que debemos rechazar la hipótesis nula y por lo tanto podemos afirmar que existe una diferencia estadística entre estos dos grupos de estudiantes. Dicho de otra manera, la distribución de estudiantes con nivel bajo de la D4 es significativamente más elevada que la de estudiantes con competencia media.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/00a7239f-1292-4615-bb16-b45e9cb51797/image/26553221-91fb-43ad-be60-774767317d34-u03-05.png


Una vez estudiadas las dimensiones de la CDD evaluada en nuestra muestra de estudiantes, pasamos a detallar los resultados para cada una de las preguntas correlacionan esta CDD con las variables de interés:

  • P2. «¿Existen diferencias significativas para la CDD en términos de género?» se midió primero a través del estadístico descriptivo de los porcentajes de distribución (Tabla 4).


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/00a7239f-1292-4615-bb16-b45e9cb51797/image/d77f19da-dc9b-414a-a624-db35c9e6a194-u03-06.png


Los resultados muestran que no se observan diferencias elevadas a nivel de género en las cuatro dimensiones estudiadas. Aun así, destaca el porcentaje de estudiantes masculinos que alcanza competencias digitales avanzadas en la D2: «Planificación, organización y gestión» (39,3%), frente a las estudiantes femeninas en ese mismo nivel (28,3%). Para evaluar esta diferencia de manera cuantitativa, se realiza una prueba Chi-cuadrado, que solo muestra un valor estadísticamente significativo entre estos dos grupos (χ2(1)= 6.61 con p=0.047, <.05). Podemos afirmar que existe una diferencia estadística entre estos dos grupos de estudiantes hombres y mujeres para la D2. En concreto, la distribución de estudiantes masculinos con nivel avanzado en esta dimensión es significativamente más elevada que la de mujeres.

En referencia a la tercera pregunta de investigación:

  • P3: ¿Hay diferencias de CDD entre los profesores de educación secundaria y primaria?, podemos observar en la Tabla 5 los siguientes porcentajes de distribución de cada grupo, separado de nuevo por niveles de desarrollo de la CDD.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/00a7239f-1292-4615-bb16-b45e9cb51797/image/9bbfc0c1-9d45-44c6-a1d9-345210eeffab-u03-07.png


Se observan diferencias porcentuales para la D1. «Didáctica, curricular y metodológica», en la que estudiantes de niveles educativos diferentes a Primaria y Secundaria presentan en su mayoría CDD avanzadas (42,9%). Sucede de manera inversa en la D2. «Planificación, organización y gestión de espacios y recursos tecnológicos digitales», donde destaca el porcentaje de estudiantes de Educación Primaria con un desarrollo de la CDD básico (45,5%). Para la D3. «Aspectos éticos, legales y seguridad», el 40,1% de estudiantes de Educación Secundaria tiene un desarrollo de CDD básico y el 40,5% de estudiantes de otras disciplinas presentan un desarrollo intermedio de la CDD. Finalmente, la dimensión D4. «Desarrollo personal y profesional» presenta altos valores para estudiantes de Educación Primaria y Educación Secundaria en CDD avanzadas (39,2% respectivamente), no así para otras disciplinas que la mitad de sus estudiantes se centran en un desarrollo básico de la CDD (50%).

Para evaluar estas diferencias se realiza de nuevo una prueba Chi-cuadrado, que muestra un valor significativo entre los grupos en la dimensión D2 (χ2(2)=14.28 con p<.01). En concreto, la prueba Z indica que la proporción de estudiantes de Educación Básica con desarrollo básico de la CDD es significativamente superior a la de estudiantes de nivel medio y de otros estudios. A su vez, la proporción de estudiantes de Educación Media con desarrollo avanzado de la CDD es significativamente superior a la de estudiantes de Nivel Básico. Finalmente, para la Dimensión 4 no existen diferencias estadísticamente significativas (p=0.056).

Discusión y conclusiones

El primer objetivo general de esta investigación era evaluar el nivel de CDD de los estudiantes de último curso de FID, para una muestra representativa en Chile y Uruguay. Procedemos a discutir los resultados encontrados en el apartado anterior según las preguntas de investigación propuestas. En concreto, a partir de la primera pregunta se pretendía analizar el nivel de CDD en las cuatro dimensiones definidas, y estudiar las posibles diferencias entre niveles de desarrollo de esta competencia. Los datos a nivel de diferencias entre grupos competenciales han evidenciado un nivel de desarrollo bajo en general, con una diferencia significativa en la dimensión D4. «Desarrollo personal y profesional», en concreto, en nuestra muestra hay más estudiantes con nivel bajo en este factor. <i id="emphasis-1"/>

Los resultados para el nivel de CDD en la muestra estudiada se diferencian con los obtenidos en estudios de percepción de esta competencia en FID. En estos, el nivel de desarrollo aparece notoriamente más alto en los diferentes niveles, ya que los estudiantes perciben un manejo de TD mayor en relación al que están realmente capacitados (Badilla, Jiménez, & Careaga, 2013; Prendes, Castañeda, & Gutiérrez. 2010; Banister & Reinhart, 2014; Tourón & al., 2018; Gutiérrez & Serrano, 2016, Ascencio, Garay, & Seguic, 2016). No obstante, los resultados concuerdan con la investigación donde se evalúa la CDD en estudiantes de Pedagogía, a partir de los resultados de una prueba −administrada por el MINEDUC que utilizó ambientes simulados− con la que evalúa las habilidades tecnológicas de los futuros profesores de Educación Básica y Educación Infantil, muestra que sólo el 58% de los egresados presentan habilidades TD de un nivel aceptable, 59% en Básica y 55% en Infantil (Canales & Hain, 2017). Estos datos confirman además la validez de nuestro instrumento de evaluación en términos de criterio que, sumado al estudio de validez de constructo y de contenido previo (Silva & al., 2017), hacen de este un instrumento aplicable para la evaluación de la CDD en estudiantes de FID en muestras latinoamericanas.

En un estudio de autopercepción realizado por el MINEDUC con 3.425 docentes que participaron en sus planes formativos en TIC, en relación a la integración del uso pedagógico de las tecnologías en el aula y en su propio desarrollo profesional, mostró que el 0,47% se encuentra en un nivel inicial, en un 21% presenta un nivel elemental, un 77% obtuvo un nivel superior y un 0,23% presenta un nivel avanzado. Los resultados resultan más optimistas que los observados en este estudio (MINEDUC, 2016).

El segundo objetivo general era estudiar las correlaciones entre el nivel de CDD y los factores género y nivel educativo. Este estudio nos permite analizar los posibles factores o variables personales que pueden incidir en el desarrollo de la CDD. Las diferencias significativas han aparecido en las dos variables (género y nivel educativo).

En concreto, hay un porcentaje elevado de hombres que alcanza competencias digitales avanzadas en la D2: «Planificación, organización y gestión» comparado con las mujeres. Esto difiere de otros estudios realizados en Chile con estudiantes de Pedagogía del área de las humanidades, que señalan que no hay diferencias significativas entre los grupos comparados y que los estudiantes muestran características homogéneas cuando se trata de su enfoque hacia la tecnología (Ayale & Joo, 2019). Sin embargo, estudios anteriores (Björk, Gudmundsdottir, & Hatlevik, 2018) encontraron entre una muestra de maestros de Malta, que los hombres afirman tener más confianza en el uso de la tecnología en el aula que las mujeres. Además, del estudio de Ming Te Wang y Degol (2017) entre profesionales del sector tecnológico, emerge que los estereotipos de género son factores socioculturales que pueden afectar a factores cognitivos, entre ellos la autopercepción competencial. Igualmente, a mayor experiencia en el aula con el uso de las tecnologías, más actitudes positivas y autoconfianza se generan en el caso específico de las mujeres (Teo, 2008) y mejor evaluación de su CDD.

A la luz de los resultados observados, se hace necesario, y presenta un desafío, fortalecer el desarrollo de la CDD en general, y los aspectos didáctico-pedagógicos en particular durante la FID, para lo cual las instituciones formadoras de docentes requieren contar con orientaciones que les permitan alcanzar mejoras a corto, mediano y largo plazo, en diversos ámbitos de la FID como el sistema educativo, la formación y la docencia, para ir progresando en el nivel de desarrollo de la CDD. Estas deben provenir de resultados surgidos desde la investigación, las cuales deberían alimentar el diagnóstico, la evaluación y el acompañamiento en el desarrollo de la CDD durante la FID.

Esta investigación evidencia que los estudiantes de formación inicial, a un paso de finalizar sus estudios de profesorado, no poseen la CDD necesaria para un uso efectivo de las TD en su futuro desempeño como docente. Este aspecto es preocupante, pues un docente que no es competente digitalmente tendrá dificultades a la hora de utilizar las TD de forma efectiva en su práctica diaria y para formar en competencia digital a sus estudiantes. Esta baja competencia por parte del profesorado es una de las principales barreras para el uso de las TD en su labor docente y para su propio desarrollo profesional (UNESCO, 2013). Destacamos, además, que existe una correlación positiva entre la calidad de las prácticas pedagógicas y la utilización de las TD en la docencia (INTEF, 2016).

Finalmente, se considera el instrumento como un buen punto de partida para evaluar la CDD en los estudiantes de FID al conformar un conjunto de preguntas donde debe ponerse en juego el saber hacer contextualizado, aplicable al ámbito local de ambos países.

Como propuestas de futuro consideramos interesante:

  • Abordar en investigaciones futuras mejoras en el instrumento, ampliando la batería de preguntas para cada indicador e incorporando preguntas para los indicadores de la matriz original validadas por expertos que en este estudio no se abordaron. Solo se consideró 10 de los 14 originalmente aprobados.
  • Probar el instrumento de evaluación en otros contextos y docentes en formación de otros niveles educativos, como la Educación Infantil o Especial que existen en Latinoamérica.
  • Realizar estudios comparados entre países latinoamericanos y europeos ya que, en ambos contextos y, a pesar de las diferencias en los planes formativos, se comparte la misma problemática respecto a la inserción de TD en la FID.
  • Resulta también interesante dentro de un mismo país o en comparación con otro, evaluar las diferencias —si es que las hubiese— entre la formación de docentes en instituciones públicas y privadas.

References

  1. Ayale-PérezT., Joo-NagataJ., . 2019.digital culture of students of Pedagogy specialising in the humanities in Santiago de Chile&author=Ayale-Pérez&publication_year= The digital culture of students of Pedagogy specialising in the humanities in Santiago de Chile.Computers & Education 133:1-12
  2. AscencioP., GarayM., SeguicE., . 2016.Formación Inicial Docente (FID) y Tecnologías de la Información y Comunicación (TIC) en la Universidad de Magallanes – Patagonia Chilena.Digital Education Review 30:123-134
  3. BadillaM., L.Jiménez, CareagaM., . 2013.Competencias TIC en formación inicial docente: estudio de caso de seis especialidades en la Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción.Aloma 31(1):89-97
  4. BanisterS., ReinhartR., . 2014.NETS-T performance in teacher candidates: Exploring the Wayfind teacher assessment&author=Banister&publication_year= Assessing NETS-T performance in teacher candidates: Exploring the Wayfind teacher assessment.Journal of Digital Learning in Teacher Education 29(2):59-65
  5. Björk-GudmundsdottirG., HatlevikO.E., . 2018.qualified teachers’ professional digital competence: Implications for teacher education&author=Björk-Gudmundsdottir&publication_year= Newly qualified teachers’ professional digital competence: Implications for teacher education.European Journal of Teacher Education 41(2):214-231
  6. BrunM., . 2011.Las tecnologías de la información y las comunicaciones en la formación inicial docente de América Latina. Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), División de Desarrollo Social, Serie Políticas Sociales.
  7. CanalesR., HainA., . 2017.de informática educativa en Chile: Uso, apropiación y desafíos a nivel investigativo&author=Canales&publication_year= Política de informática educativa en Chile: Uso, apropiación y desafíos a nivel investigativo. Buenos Aires: Gato Gris.
  8. CastañedaL., EsteveF., AdellJ., . 2018.qué es necesario repensar la competencia docente para el mundo digital?&author=Castañeda&publication_year= ¿Por qué es necesario repensar la competencia docente para el mundo digital?Revista de Educación a Distancia 56:1-20
  9. CohenL., ManionL., MorrisonK., . 2007.Research methods in education. London: Routledge.
  10. CerdaC., Huete-NahuelJ., Molina-SandovalD., Ruminot-MartelE., SaizJ., . 2017.de tecnologías digitales y logro académico en estudiantes de Pedagogía chilenos&author=Cerda&publication_year= Uso de tecnologías digitales y logro académico en estudiantes de Pedagogía chilenos.Estudios Pedagógicos 54(3):119-133
  11. EscuderoJ.M., Martínez-DomínguezB., NietoJ.M., . 2018.TIC en la formación continua del profesorado en el contexto español&author=Escudero&publication_year= Las TIC en la formación continua del profesorado en el contexto español.Revista de Educación 382:57-78
  12. European Commission (Ed.). 2015.Marco estratégico: Educación y formación, 2020.
  13. European Commission (Ed.). 2018.Proposal for a council recommendation on key competences for lifelong learning.
  14. FraserJ., AtkinsL., RichardH., . 2013.DigiLit leicester. Supporting teachers, promoting digital literacy, transforming learning. Leicester City Council.
  15. GutiérrezI., J.Serrano,, . 2016.y desarrollo de la competencia digital de futuros maestros en la Universidad de Murcia&author=Gutiérrez&publication_year= Evaluación y desarrollo de la competencia digital de futuros maestros en la Universidad de Murcia.New Approaches in Educational Research 5:53-59
  16. INTEF (Ed.). 2014. , ed. Común de Competencia Digital Docente&author=&publication_year= Marco Común de Competencia Digital Docente. Madrid: Instituto Nacional de Tecnologías Educativas y de Formación del Profesorado.
  17. INTEF (Ed.). 2016.Resumen Informe. Competencias para un mundo digital.
  18. INTEF (Ed.). 2017. , ed. Común de Competencia Digital Docente&author=&publication_year= Marco Común de Competencia Digital Docente. Madrid: Instituto Nacional de Tecnologías Educativas y de Formación del Profesorado.
  19. ISTE (Ed.). 2008. , ed. educational technology standards for teachers&author=&publication_year= National educational technology standards for teachers. Washington DC: International Society for Technology in Education.
  20. Lázaro-CantabranaJ.L., Gisbert-CerveraM., . 2015.de una rúbrica para evaluar la competencia digital del docente&author=Lázaro-Cantabrana&publication_year= Elaboración de una rúbrica para evaluar la competencia digital del docente.Universitas Tarraconensis 1(1):48-63
  21. Lázaro-CantabranaJ., Usart-RodríguezM., Gisbert-CerveraM., . 2019.teacher digital competence: The construction of an instrument for measuring the knowledge of pre-service teachers&author=Lázaro-Cantabrana&publication_year= Assessing teacher digital competence: The construction of an instrument for measuring the knowledge of pre-service teachers.Journal of New Approaches in Educational Research 8(1):73-78
  22. Ministerio de Educación Nacional (Ed.). 2013.Competencias TIC para el desarrollo profesional docente.
  23. Mineduc (Ed.). 2008. , ed. TIC para la formación inicial docente: Una propuesta en el contexto chileno&author=&publication_year= Estándares TIC para la formación inicial docente: Una propuesta en el contexto chileno. Santiago de Chile: Ministerio de Educación.
  24. Mineduc (Ed.). 2011. , ed. de competencias y estándares TIC en la profesión docente&author=&publication_year= Actualización de competencias y estándares TIC en la profesión docente. Santiago de Chile: Ministerio de Educación.
  25. Mineduc (Ed.). 2016. , ed. en Chile: Conocimiento y uso de las TIC 2014&author=&publication_year= Docentes en Chile: Conocimiento y uso de las TIC 2014. Santiago de Chile: MINEDUC, Serie Evidencias. 32
  26. PapanikolaouK., MakriK., RoussosP., . 2017.design as a vehicle for developing TPACK in blended teacher training on technology enhanced learning&author=Papanikolaou&publication_year= Learning design as a vehicle for developing TPACK in blended teacher training on technology enhanced learning.International Journal of Educational Technology in Higher Education 14(1):34-41
  27. M.P.Prendes,, L.Castañeda,, I.Gutiérrez,, . 2010.competences of future teachers. [Competencias para el uso de TIC de los futuros maestros&author=M.P.&publication_year= ICT competences of future teachers. [Competencias para el uso de TIC de los futuros maestros]]Comunicar 18(35):175-182
  28. RedeckerC., PunieY., . 2017.European framework for the digital competence of educators: DigCompEdu.of the European Union
  29. RombysD., . 2012.Integración de las TIC para una buena enseñanza: opiniones, actitudes y creencias de los docentes en un Instituto de Formación de Formadores.Tesis de Maestría, Instituto de Educación. Universidad ORT Uruguay
  30. RodríguezJ., JSilva, . 2006.Incorporación de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación en la formación inicial docente el caso chileno.Innovación Educativa 6(32):19-35
  31. RozoA., PradaM., . 2012.Panorama de la formación inicial docente y TIC en la región Andina.Educación y Pedagogía 24(62):191-204
  32. J.Silva,, P.Miranda,, M.Gisbert,, M.Morales,, A.Onetto,, . 2016.para evaluar la competencia digital docente en la formación inicial en el contexto chileno-uruguayo&author=J.&publication_year= Indicadores para evaluar la competencia digital docente en la formación inicial en el contexto chileno-uruguayo.Revista Latinoamericana de Tecnología Educativa 15(3):55-68
  33. SilvaJ., RivoirA., OnetoA., MoralesM., MirandaP., GisbertM., SalinasJ., . 2017.Informe de investigación. Estudio comparado de las competencias digitales para aprender y enseñar en docentes en formación de Uruguay y Chile.
  34. J.Silva,, J.Lázaro,, P.Miranda,, R.Canales,, . 2018.desarrollo de la competencia digital docente durante la formación del profesorado&author=J.&publication_year= El desarrollo de la competencia digital docente durante la formación del profesorado.Opción 34(86):423-449
  35. TeoT., . 2008.teachers attitudes towards computer use: A Singapore survey&author=Teo&publication_year= Pre-service teachers attitudes towards computer use: A Singapore survey.Australasian Journal of Educational Technology 24(4):413-424
  36. TourónJ., MartínD., NavarroE., PradasS., ÍñigoV., . 2018.de constructo de un instrumento para medir la competencia digital docente de los profesores&author=Tourón&publication_year= Validación de constructo de un instrumento para medir la competencia digital docente de los profesores.Revista Española de Pedagogía 76(269):25-54
  37. Mineduc (Ed.). 2008. , ed. de competencia en TIC para docentes&author=&publication_year= Estándares de competencia en TIC para docentes. Santiago de Chile: Ministerio de Educación.
  38. UNESCO (Ed.) . 2015.Educación 2030: Declaración de Incheon y Marco de Acción para la realización del Objetivo de Desarrollo.
  39. UNESCO (Ed.). 2018.ICT competency framework for teachers.
  40. Villa-SánchezA., Poblete-RuizM., . 2011.Evaluación de competencias genéricas: Principios, oportunidades y limitaciones.Bordón 63(1):147-170
  41. WangM.T., DegolJ.L., . 2017.gap in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM): Current knowledge, implications for practice, policy, and future directions&author=Wang&publication_year= Gender gap in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM): Current knowledge, implications for practice, policy, and future directions.Educational Psychology Review 29(1):119-140
Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/09/19
Accepted on 30/09/19
Submitted on 30/09/19

Volume 27, Issue 2, 2019
DOI: 10.3916/C61-2019-03
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Views 68
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?