Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

University classrooms have been taken over by a new type of student, the «plurimodalicts». This society is characterized by the different ways its students relate to ICTs. This article analyses where, how and for what a sample of 451 students from five Spanish public universities use their laptop computers. The study uses an incidental non-random cluster sample design. Data collection was conducted via questionnaire based on a five-point Likert scale. The questionnaire was divided into three sections: computer use; location and frequency of use of the device; and laptop functions and applications. The study concludes that «plurimodalicts» use their laptops to produce academic work, as well as for exchanging class notes and searching for information. The distance or direct learning methodology and the respondent's gender also determine laptop use for academic tasks, which is greater at distance learning institutions and is more prevalent among women than men. These devices are mainly used at home and, in the case of the younger respondents, also in university libraries. The laptop functions vary according to age group, and the device is mostly used for gaming and as a study tool by the youngest students.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Universities still have pseudo-analogical students who use ICTs in a way that follows the logic, structure and usage of educational resources that existed prior to content digitization. They continue to work according to forms of teaching and learning that accompanied the arrival of Web 1.0, a static network providing one-way transmission of information and knowledge (Santos, Etxeberría, Lorenzo, & Prats, 2012). These students can create their own study models (Tabuenca, Verpoorten, Ternier, Westera, & Specht, 2013) and professional development models (Tabuenca, Verpoorten, Ternier, Westera, & Specht, 2012) in a way that is unaffected by the influence of media.

Pseudo-analogical students, in the main, have been unwilling, unable or simply have not known how to become multimodal literate (González, 2013; Bautista, 2007), multimedia literate (Esteve, Esteve, & Gisbert, 2012), digital literate (Gisbert, 2013; Area, Gutiérrez, & Vidal, 2012; Travieso & Planella, 2008) or media literate (García-Ruiz, Ramírez-García & Rodríguez-Rosell, 2014; Area, 2012; Aguaded, 2012), acquiring skills that would enable them to take an active part in the knowledge society as prosumers (Aguaded & Sánchez, 2013; Villalustre, 2013; Khan, 2012) instead of remaining mere consumers.

Pseudo-analogical students are also joined in the lecture hall by digital immigrants (Wang, Myers, & Sundaram, 2013; Prensky, 2011; Prensky, 2001) and Net visitors (Tabuenca, Ternier, & Specht, 2013). These two groups are passive or non-participatory users of media. Their voluntary telematic inactivity classes them as neither in danger of digital exclusion nor pushes them to the edge of any digital divide (Marciales, 2012; Monclús & Sabán, 2012). They are in fact veteran learners.

Other groups in the lecture hall include the new learners (Gurung & Rutledge, 2014; Thompson, 2013), the new millennium learners (Trinder, Guiller, Margaryan, Littlejohn & Nicol, 2008), the «Instant message generation» (Bautista, Escofet, Forés, López, & Marimon, 2013; Gisbert & Esteve, 2011) the «Net Generation» (Jones, Ramanau, Cross, & Healing, 2010; Tapscott, 1999), digital natives (Wang, Myers, & Sundaram, 2013; Fueyo, 2011; Prensky, 2011), digital literates (González, 2012), technological literates (Ortega, 2009), the student residents (Hernández, Ramírez-Martinell, & Cassany, 2014) prosumers (García-Ruiz, Ramírez-García & Rodríguez-Rosell, 2014) and media prosumers (Ferrés, Aguaded, & García-Matilla, 2012), among others.

This student universe consisting of so many different technological profiles is the base of our investigation. The statistical study of the data collected revealed that the students’ relation to ICTs was plural in nature, so, in our modest attempt to contribute to the knowledge on this subject, we have defined this relationship as «plurimodalict», based on the words plural, modalities and ICTs.

We apply the term «plurimodalict» to all university students who are media citizens, media literates (Sánchez & Aguaded, 2013; Aguaded & Sánchez, 2013; Aguaded, 2012), media humanists (Pérez & Varis, 2012), audiovisual literates and all other possible types of media user previously mentioned here, and who will later appear in the scientific literature.

The main feature of the «plurimodalict» society is the various ways in which university students use media for learning and communication, separately or synchronically. It is by its nature a multifactor polyhedron society reflecting students’ unpredictable stance towards technology, in that it is by no means certain that students use digital tools in their teaching-learning processes although they might use particular technologies in their daily lives. This confusion arises because they do not always want to use the technological tools they manage in their daily lives as learning tools (García, Gros, & Escofet, 2012).

Such behaviour has made this research difficult, for example, when attempting to determine what type of mobile device they normally use. This volatility is influenced by the data package for each device, the student sample selected, the socioeconomic and academic status of the student, place of residence and the academic subject studied.

To find out which mobile digital device is most used by the «plurimodalicts» we consulted official statistics, which offered results that were generic. An extrapolation of figures from the 2014 edition of the annual report from 2013 by the Ministry of Energy and Industry (Urueña, 2014) reveals that the electronic device with Internet access most used by the «plurimodalicts» for academic work is the laptop computer.

2. The laptop computer

Since 2012, it has been the mobile phone that has competed for our attention as the most frequently used device among ICT users (Mihailidis, 2014; Tabuenca, Ternier, & Specht, 2013; Yang, Lu, Gupta, Cao, & Zhang, 2012). These devices can be either smartphones or non-smartphones. Hence researchers need to clarify whether a smartphone is an electronic device for oral communication between two speakers that can also execute apps and connect to the Internet (Ruiz-Olmo & Belmonte-Jiménez, 2014) or whether it is a portable computer that can be used as a phone. By the third quarter of 2013 in Spain, the smartphone had become the most frequently used device among ICT users, although its main specific use remained undefined. That being so, this research team concluded that the laptop computer rather than the smartphone was the device used most by students when doing academic tasks. This is justified by the fact that 87.1% of the population have Internet access at home, and 62.5% of homes have a laptop, while only 53.7%, or half the population have smartphones.

Internet is accessed at home via smartphone by 74.3% of the population, by laptop in 68.4% of cases and by the desktop PC at 66.6% (Urueña, 2014).

The smartphone is for single person use while the laptop and desktop computers can have many users. This multiplicity of users of computers and the greater ergonomic comfort of using a laptop as opposed to a smartphone, with their bigger screens and better resolution, mean that laptops are still the most widely used mobile electronic device. Their only drawback compared to the other digital mobile devices is the quality of the software they support.

Assuming the numerical superiority of the laptop over the smartphone, this article will characterize the uses, functions and the places where laptops are used in Spain by the «plurimodalicts».

3. Methodology

This article addresses the subject of laptop usage in a sample of 451 students from five public universities in Spain: Complutense, Vigo, Oviedo, Granada and the UNED. The research took place at public universities as the study was financed with state funds. The objectives were: to identify the uses of the laptop by «plurimodalicts»; to identify the actions that «plurimodalicts» perform on these devices and to show where these activities take place. To achieve these objectives, we used an incidental non-random cluster sample design. The choice of clusters as a representative sample of the universal population was random, but not the final units. This does not mean the sample is less representative, and it enables us to draw general conclusions from the reference results but not an estimate of the errors on the population parameters. Data were gathered by questionnaire, with a five-point Likert scale to measure responses. The questionnaire was structured in three parts, with laptop use corresponding to 10 items, location and frequency of use 9 items and functions and applications 9 items.

The internal consistency of each scale was measured using the Cronbach Alpha Coefficient. The results for the reliability of each scale were: Cronbach Alpha for the dimension of laptop uses, 0.73; for location and frequency of use, 0.72; for functions and applications, 0.77; the Cronbach Alpha for the instrument overall was 0.81. The scores show the consistency of the questionnaire. The reliability measure for each scale is shown in section 4 of this article.

The sample consisted of 23.7% men and 76.3% women, and the proportions were similar in the five universities studied. The gender imbalance is due to the fact that the respondents studied subjects that are more popular among women than men. In terms of age range, 24.4% were between 18 and 20, 33% between 21 and 23, 10% between 24 and 27, 5.7% between 28 and 31 and 26.9% over 31. The age range corresponds to the level of education on which the participants are studying, with 24.2% studying for a bachelor’s degree, 70.5% as undergraduates, 0.3% for a doctorate, 4.7% for a Master and 0.3% had already graduated. In terms of which university, 5% were from the Complutense University of Madrid, 40% from Oviedo, 10.9% attended the University of Vigo, 18.2% from Granada and 25.8% studied distance learning courses at the UNED.

4. Results and discussion

4.1. Scale: The uses of the laptop

Table 1 shows the results from each item on the first scale. Laptop use among those sampled consists mainly of information search (76.5%), for collaborative tasks (70.1%) and learning (70%). The device was used least for tasks involving innovation (41%) and expression (47.2%). The results vary according to gender, age and university.


Draft Content 274328585-44291-en028.jpg

In terms of gender, women use their laptops to search for information in 78.9% of cases, and men 69.8%. For age range, 97.2% of those between 18 and 20 consider info searches to be the most important use to which they put their laptops while only 28.9% of those over 31 do so. In terms of university, the figures are Complutense (94.4%), Oviedo (89.2%), Vigo (95.6%) and Granada (93.5%), where classes are face-to-face, as opposed to distance learning at the UNED where the figure is 1.4%.

The second most widely applied use of the laptop by students is in collaboration tasks, 70.1%. By gender there is no significant difference: 68.6% for women and 75.5% for men (C=0.063, Sig.=0.202). Neither is there a significant difference for age. Students aged 18 to 20 valued this use at 62.3%, those between 24 and 27 at 78.6% and those 31 and over at 71.9% (C=0.113, Sig.=0.266). In terms of university, the differences are significant: (C=0.258, Sig.=0.000) with scores of 60.2% for Oviedo, 77.8% for Vigo and 90.1% for UNED students.

Using the laptop for learning (70%) reveals no significant statistical differences (C=0.037, Sig.=0.454). This usage type would appear to be more important for women (71.4%) than for men (67.4%). Younger students (18-31) appreciate this usage more (88.9% and 70.1%) than their older colleagues (45.6%). The same occurs at those universities where students attend class: Complutense (65.7%), Oviedo (77.6%), Vigo (82.2%) and Granada (79.2%) compared to UNED (44.4%).

The explanatory factor analysis gives a KMO test score of 0.80 and 771 for the Bartlett sphericity test. There is a significance level of 0.000, which indicates that the dimension reduction model is adequate.

The explained variation of the first three factors with self-values higher than 1 is 62%, meaning that the three-dimensional model can be used satisfactorily. Factor saturations of the variables show that the first factor influences entertainment. They saturate entertainment (0.755), information (0.794) and communication (0.641), while the second factor influences motivation: motivation (0.739), innovation (0.772). The third influences learning; saturation of learning (0.796), collaboration (0.611) and illustration (0.575).


Draft Content 274328585-44291-en029.jpg

Using the saturation coefficients, we calculated the factor scores for the sample subjects in order to obtain the variance analyses and define differences within the gender, age and university variables. The results indicate that the first factor (use of laptop for entertainment) is more important for the youngest respondents (18-20 year olds) (F=51.45, Sig.=0.000) than for the older learners (31 and over) and the distance learners (UNED) (F=146.5, Sig.=0.000). The second factor (motivation) varies according to the university where the participants study (F=3.83, Sig.=0.005). The students with the highest scores are those from the UNED, with Oviedo scoring lowest. The use of the laptop for academic work shows significant differences for age (F=7.02, Sig.=0.000). This is valued less highly by those older than 31. The universities that score highest and lowest in this category are Complutense and UNED, respectively.

4.2. Scale: The activities performed

The data indicate that laptop use for academic tasks (producing work, study, exchanging class notes, searching for academic information) is very frequent or frequent, ranging from 88.7% (producing work) to 55.2% (exchanging class notes), which allows us to state that although learning patterns generated by Web 1.0 and 2.0 are hardly dynamic (Francisco, 2011), the Spanish «plurimodalict» uses the laptop mainly for learning.

The results for gender reveal that 92.5% of women use the laptop for producing academic work as opposed to 77% of men. In terms of age, the statistics are not significantly different (C=0.194, Sig.= 0.422); the 18-20 age group use the device more (92.5%) than those 31 and over (85.3%). The scores by university are also high, with 100% of «plurimodalicts» in Granada and 84.9% in Oviedo using the laptop for academic tasks. The data show that the laptop is often used for other reasons that are not directly academic but which can perhaps be considered educational, such as e-mail communication (87.7%), social networking (71.6%) and entertainment (62.1%). However, the use of laptops for online chats is low (36.9%), possibly because students prefer to use their smartphones for chatting (Quicios, Sevillano, & Ortega, 2013).

Analysing laptop usage for e-mailing, we observe that this activity is greater among women (90.5%) than men (79%), and is very frequent across all the age ranges. Students aged 28 to 31 use the laptop for e-mailing in 95.9% of cases, and those between 18 and 20 score 81.1%. In terms of the universities, the scores range from 93.3% at UNED and 80.5% for Complutense.

The third activity corresponding to laptop use for information purposes is the search for educational information (85.2%). Women use their laptops frequently to find information (89.5%), and men less so (70.2%). The 18-20 year-old students score 91.3% against 70.8% for those aged 24-27. In terms of the five universities, direct or distance learning influences laptop use for information sourcing, with 91.4% of UNED students citing this usage as opposed to 76.4% from Oviedo.

The exploratory factor analysis yielded a KMO score of 0.80, 626.36 for the Bartlett sphericity test and a significance level of 0.000. We then used a dimension reduction model to generate a model containing four factors that explain the 68% variance. The principal components method with Variamax rotation was used to extract those factors.

The saturations of the variables in each of the four factors extracted and rotated indicate that the first factor is related to the use of the laptop computer for carrying out academic activities. Saturations occur in the production of works (0.783), study (0.745), e-mailing (0.537) and searching for academic information (0.726). The second factor is related to facilitating the learning process via contact with colleagues. Saturations affect the exchange of class notes (0.595) and performing group tasks via Skype (0.877). The third factor relates to use of the laptop as a social communication tool. Saturations influence chats (0.861) and social networks (0.777). The fourth factor refers to the laptop as an entertainment tool, with saturations of the search for non-academic information (0.752) and entertainment (0.842).

An ANOVA test was run to check for significant differences between the scores for the subjects in each extracted and rotated factor, and the gender, age and university variables.

In use of the laptop for academic activities the variance analysis of factor scores show that women use the laptop for this task more than men (F=22.54, Sig.=0.000), a result which coincides with the findings of other researchers (García, Gros, & Escofet, 2012) and shows that our research consolidates and categorizes a methodology and a trend.

This article is also valuable as it reinforces the formulation of a new theory by conceptualizing a new type of student society, the «plurimodalict» society, characterized by the relation that students establish with ICTs. The study on which this article is based indicates that age is not a significant variable in the use of the laptop for performing academic activities. So, age is not important as a constituent characteristic of the «plurimodalict».

On the other hand, distance or direct learning as a teaching methodology influences the frequency of use of the laptop for academic activities (F=12, Sig.=0.000). Students in the classroom do not have the same technological necessities as distance learners. This hypothesis is validated by the data. Post-hoc comparisons reveal statistically significantly differences in the scores for this factor in students at the UNED and those from Oviedo and Granada.

4.3. Scale: Location of laptop use

Table 3 presents the response percentages for each item on the third scale.


Draft Content 274328585-44291-en030.jpg

Students hardly ever use their laptops at university, except in the library, and neither do they use them much outside or when commuting. The most usual places for laptop use are at home (70.1%) or at work (23.2%).

A factor analysis of the items on the scale together with the disaggregation of the scores for gender reveal that 93% of women mostly use their laptops at home, while men score 86%. Disaggregated scores for age show that those over 28 (95%) do the same as opposed to 86% of those under 28. For universities, 95% of UNED students use their laptops indoors against an 86% average for the «plurimodalicts» at the four other universities.

The scores for the KMO and Bartlett sphericity tests are 0.73 and 499, respectively, with a significance level of 0.000. A factor analysis of the items on the scale showed that the first four factors explain 70% of the total variance, making the variables on the scale sufficiently representative. The first factor is heavily loaded in relation to the use of the laptop at university; they saturate university cafeteria (0.698), corridors (0.871) and classrooms (0.621). The second factor indicates laptop use at work or in the library, saturating the former (0.815) and the latter (0.700). The third factor refers to laptop use outdoors or on transport, with saturation of leisure areas (0.623), outdoors (0.872) and transport (0.698). The fourth location for laptop use is at home (0.909).

The ANOVA tests for each factor show that the subjects aged 18 to 28 use their laptops at university (cafeteria, corridors, classrooms) more frequently than their elders (F=7.41, Sig.=0.000).

UNED and Granada students use theirs at home more than students from the three other universities (F=3.66, Sig.=0.006). Students at Complutense, Vigo and Oviedo use their laptops more at university (F=15.56, Sig.=0.000).

5. Conclusions

This article deals with a highly contemporary theme, as the extent of the national and international literature on the subject testifies. It is a fertile study area at the moment and our article offers a novel perspective. In the last five years, there has been a lot of research into computer and smartphone use by students but not so much on the content of that usage.

In line with other research on the subject, the results presented in this article scientifically strengthen a principal of global theory on the phenomenon studied (Ruiz-Olmo & Belmonte-Jiménez, 2014; Urueña, 2014; García, Gros, & Escofet, 2012). This article consolidates and categorizes a methodology and a trend, and also contributes to the formulation of a new theory, which is that university students constitute a new type of society that we call «plurimodalicts», a term we have coined from the words plural, modalities and ICTs.

The «plurimodalicts» are an emerging model of university student. This is formed of students who connect to the ever-changing polyhedron ICTs and use a communication device in a number of different ways depending on where they are at the time, the data package and type of relation they have with ICTs.

The verified global results indicate that this society uses the laptop mainly for academic work. In the sample, 88% stated that they use it for producing works, and 55% for exchanging class notes or searching for information. Other uses include communication via e-mail (88%) and social networking (71%). Factor analyses and ANOVA tests revealed that it is women who mainly use the laptop for academic activities.

Further variance analyses showed that the students aged 18 to 28 use their laptops in the university library more than their older counterparts (32%). The locations most widely frequented in terms of laptop use across all age ranges were the home (91%) followed by the workplace (43,8%). The results also show that other spaces such as gardens, transport and the outdoors in general are emerging as student study places thanks to the laptop’s portability.

The variable corresponding to university membership indirectly confirms the validity of our sample and the data collected. Distance learners at the UNED use their laptops at home more than students at the other four classroom-based universities.

Regarding laptop use for non-academic purposes, neither age, gender or university membership were significant in the factor analysis for laptop use for contact with colleagues or as a social communication or leisure tool, although the younger students tend to make more use of theirs for gaming than the older learners.

The factor analyses identified some dimensions related to laptop uses and functions which future works could define as specific user profiles of the «plurimodalict» phenomenon. This study shows that university teaching staff need to design didactic content and activities that fit the «plurimodalict» learning style and the different ways in which «plurimodalicts» use their laptops.

Support and Acknowledgments

This article forms part of the I+D+i project: «Ubiquitous Learning with Mobile Devices: Preparation and Implementation of a Competence Map in Higher Education» (EDU2010-17420).

References

Aguaded, I. (2012). El reto de la competencia mediática de la ciudadanía: Presentación. Icono 14, 10, 3, 1-7. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7195/ri14.v10i3.523

Aguaded, I. (2012). La educomunicación. Una apuesta de mañana, necesaria para hoy. Aularia, 1, 2, 259-261.

Aguaded, I., & Sánchez, J. (2013). El empoderamiento digital de niños y jóvenes a través de la producción audiovisual. Ad-Comunica, 5, 175-196. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.6035/2174-0992.2013.5.11

Area, M. (2012). Sociedad líquida, web 2.0 y alfabetización digital. Aula de Innovación Educativa, 212, 55-59.

Area, M., Gutiérrez, A., & Vidal, F. (2012). Alfabetización digital y competencias informacionales. Barcelona: Ariel.

Bautista, A. (2007). Alfabetización tecnológica multimodal e intercultural. Revista de Educación, 343, 589-600.

Bautista, A., Escofet, A., Forés, A., López, M., & Marimon, M. (2013). Superando el concepto de nativo digital. Análisis de las prácticas digitales del estudiantado universitario. Digital Education Review, 24, 1, 1-22 (http://goo.gl/Qn5NhO) (28-10-2014).

Esteve, F., Esteve, V., & Gisbert, M. (2012). Simul@: El uso de los mundos virtuales para la adquisición de competencias transversales en la Universidad. Universitas Tarraconensis, 37, 2, 7-23.

Ferrés, J., Aguaded, I., & García-Matilla, A. (2012). La competencia mediática de la ciudanía española: dificultades y retos. Icono 14, 10, 3, 23-42. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7195/ri14.v10i3.201

Francisco, A. (2011). Usando la Web 2.0 para informarse e informar. Una experiencia de educación superior. Teoría de la Educación, 12, 1, 145-167.

Fueyo, M.A. (2011). Comunicación y educación en los nuevos entornos: ¿nativos o cautivos digitales? Ábaco, 2-3, 68-69, 22-28.

García, I., Gros, B., & Escofet, A. (2012). La influencia del género en la cultura digital del estudiantado universitario. Athenea Digital, 12, 3, 95-114. (http://goo.gl/xmSFzC) (28-10-2014).

García-Ruiz, R., Ramírez-García, A., Rodríguez-Rosell, M.M. (2014). Educación en alfabetización mediática para una ciudadanía prosumidora. Comunicar, 43, 15-23. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-01

Gisbert, M. (2013). Nuevos escenarios para los aprendices digitales en la universidad. Aloma, 31,1, 55-64.

Gisbert, M., & Esteve, F. (2011). Digital Leaners: la competencia digital de los estudiantes universitarios. La Cuestión Universitaria, 7, 48-59.

González, J. (2013). Alfabetización multimodal: usos y posibilidades. Campo Abierto, 32, 1, 91-113. (http://goo.gl/CrNqDw) (28-10-2014).

González, N. (2012). Alfabetización para una cultura social, digital, mediática y en red. Revista Española de Documentación Científica, 35, 1, 17-45. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3989/redc.2012.mono.976

Gurung, B., & Rutledge, D. (2014). Digital Learners and the Overlapping of Their Personal and Educational Digital Engagement. Computers & Education, 77, 91-100. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2014.04.012

Hernández, D., Ramírez-Martinell, A., & Cassany, D. (2014). Categorizando a los usuarios de sistemas digitales. Píxel-Bit, 44, 113-126. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.12795/pixelbit.2014.i44.08

Jones, C., Ramanau, R., Cross, S., & Healing, G. (2010). Net generation or Digital Natives: Is There a Distinct New Generation Entering University? Computers & Education, 54, 3, 722-732. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2009.09.022

Khan, S. (2012). The One World Schoolhouse: Education Reimagined. New York: Twelve Publishing.

Marciales, G.P. (2012). Competencia informacional y brecha digital: preguntas y problemas emergentes derivados de investigación. Nómadas, 36, 127-142. (http://goo.gl/abnDkO) (28-10-2014).

Mihailidis, P. (2014). A Tethered Generation: Exploring the Role of Mobile Phones in the Daily Life of Young People. Mobile Media & Communication, 2, 58-72. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2050157913505558

Monclús, A., & Saban, C. (2012). La inclusión, la desigualdad y la brecha digital, como problemas y retos para las nuevas tecnologías de la información y de la comunicación. Revista Iberoamericana de Educación, 60, 2, 1-10 (http://goo.gl/g0wAzG) (28-10-2014).

Ortega, I. (2009). La alfabetización tecnológica. Revista Electrónica Teoría de la Educación, 10, 2, 11-24 (http://goo.gl/blNCJ4) (28-10-2014).

Pérez, J.M., & Varis, T. (2012). Alfabetización mediática y nuevo humanismo. Barcelona: UOC.

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants Part 1. On the Horizon, 9, 5, 1-6.

Prensky, M. (2011). Enseñar a nativos digitales. Madrid: SM.

Quicios, M.P., Sevillano, M.L., & Ortega, I. (2013). Educational Uses of Mobile Phones by University Students in Spain. The New Educational Review, 34, 4, 151-163.

Ruiz-Olmo, F.J., & Belmonte-Jiménez, A.M. (2014). Los jóvenes como usuario de aplicaciones de marca en dispositivos móviles. Comunicar, 43, 73-81. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-07

Sánchez, J., & Aguaded, J. I. (2013). El grado de competencia mediática en la ciudadanía andaluza. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico 19, 1, 265280. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5209/rev_ESMP.2013.v19.n1.42521

Santos, M.A., Etxeberría, F., Lorenzo, M., & Prats, E. (2012). Web 2.0 y redes sociales. Implicaciones educativas. SITE, XXXI, 1-34. (http://goo.gl/owsbQ8) (28-10-2014).

Tabuenca, B., Ternier, S., & Specht, M. (2013). Patrones cotidianos en estudiantes de formación continua para la creación de ecologías de aprendizaje. RED, 37. (http://goo.gl/JM1Mgc) (28-10-2014).

Tabuenca, B., Verpoorten, D., Ternier, S., Westera, W., & Specht, M. (2012). Fostering Reflective Practice with Mobile Technologies. Artel/Ec-Tel., 2012, 87-100. (http://goo.gl/0ROJKm) (28-10-2014).

Tabuenca, B., Verpoorten, D., Ternier, S., Westera, W., & Specht, M. (2013). Fomento de la práctica reflexiva sobre el aprendizaje mediante el uso de tecnologías móviles. RED, 37. (http://goo.gl/XcdpHL) (28-10-2014).

Tapscott, D. (1999). Educating the Net Generation. Educational Leadership, 56, 5, 6-11. (http://goo.gl/ucKNyZ) (28-10-2014).

Thompson, P. (2013). The Digital Natives as Learners: Technology Use Patterns and Approaches to Learning. Computers & Education, 65, 12-33. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2012.12.022

Travieso, J.L., & Planella, J. (2008). La alfabetización digital como factor de inclusión social: una mirada crítica. UOC Papers, 6, 2-9. (http://goo.gl/0wte6j) (28-10-2014).

Trinder, K., Guiller, J., Margaryan, A., Littlejohn, A., & Nicol, D. (2008). Learning from Digital Natives: Bridging Formal and Informal Learning. Gasgow: Caledonian University. (http://goo.gl/vgXlHv) (28-10-2014).

Urueña, A. (Coord.) (2014). La sociedad en red. Informe anual 2013. Madrid: Ministerio de Industria, Energía y Turismo.

Villalustre, L. (2013). Aprendizaje por proyectos con la Web 2.0: satisfacción de los estudiantes y desarrollo de competencias. Revista de Formación e Innovación Educativa Universitaria, 6, 3, 186-195.

Wang, Q., Myers, M.D., & Sundaram, D. (2013). Digital Natives und Digital Immigrants. Wirtschaftsinformatik, 55, 6, 409-429. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12599-013-0296-y

Yang, S., Lu, Y., Gupta, S., Cao, Y., & Zhang, R. (2012). Mobile Payment Services Adoption across Time: An Empirical Study of the Effects of Behavioral Beliefs, Social Influences, and Personal Traits. Computers in Human Behavior, 28, 1, 129-142. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2011.08.019



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Las aulas universitarias están ocupadas por un nuevo modelo de sociedad estudiantil denominada «plurimodaltic». Esta sociedad se caracteriza por el conjunto de relaciones que establecen los universitarios con las tecnologías de la información y comunicación (TIC). Este artículo analiza los usos, lugares de utilización y funciones que otorgan 451 estudiantes de cinco universidades públicas españolas al ordenador portátil. El muestreo utilizado para el estudio parte de un diseño muestral incidental no aleatorio y por conglomerados. La recogida de información se ha realizado a través de un cuestionario con respuestas en escala Likert de cinco puntos. Éste se ha estructurado en tres secciones, una para usos del ordenador, otra para lugares y frecuencia de uso del dispositivo y la última para funciones y aplicaciones del ordenador portátil. Las conclusiones obtenidas permiten afirmar que el uso mayoritario del ordenador portátil entre la «plurimodaltic» es académico. Se usa para elaborar trabajos, intercambiar apuntes o buscar información. La metodología de la universidad de procedencia y el género del entrevistado determina el uso académico de los ordenadores portátiles siendo mayor en las universidades no presenciales y entre las mujeres que entre los hombres. El lugar donde mayoritariamente se utilizan estos dispositivos es en los domicilios particulares seguido, entre los entrevistados más jóvenes, por las bibliotecas universitarias. Las funciones otorgadas al ordenador portátil varían con la edad siendo mayoritariamente lúdica e instrumental entre los más jóvenes.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Entre los estudiantes universitarios todavía se encuentran alumnos pseudoanalógicos, estudiantes que utilizan las TIC siguiendo la lógica, estructura y utilidades de los recursos formativos previos a la digitalización de los contenidos, universitarios capaces de seguir los esquemas formativos de la Web 1.0, red estática que transmite información y conocimiento de manera unidireccional (Santos, Etxeberría, Lorenzo, & Prats, 2012). Estos alumnos están capacitados para crear su propio modelo de estudiante (Tabuenca, Verpoorten, Ternier, Westera, & Specht, 2013) y su propio modelo de desarrollo profesional (Tabuenca, Verpoorten, Ternier, Westera, & Specht, 2012) diseñándolos ambos, casi, al margen de la influencia de los medios.

Los estudiantes pseudoanalógicos, en su mayoría, no han querido, podido o sabido desarrollar suficientemente una alfabetización multimodal (González, 2013; Bautista, 2007), una alfabetización multimedia (Esteve, Esteve, & Gisbert, 2012), una alfabetización digital (Gisbert, 2013; Area, Gutiérrez, & Vidal, 2012; Travieso & Planella, 2008) o una alfabetización mediática (García-Ruiz, Ramírez-García, & Rodríguez-Rosell, 2014; Area, 2012; Aguaded, 2012) que les permita tomar parte activa en la sociedad del conocimiento como prosumidores (Aguaded & Sánchez, 2013; Villalustre, 2013; Khan, 2012) pero sí como simples consumidores.

Junto a estos estudiantes ocupan las mismas aulas universitarias inmigrantes digitales (Wang, Myers, & Sundaram, 2013; Prensky, 2011; Prensky, 2001) y estudiantes visitantes de la Red (Tabuenca, Ternier, & Specht, 2013). Ambos grupos se caracterizan por ser usuarios pasivos o no participativos en los medios. Esta voluntaria inactividad telemática no les coloca ni en riesgo de exclusión digital ni en los límites de cualquier modalidad de brecha digital (Marciales, 2012; Monclús & Sabán, 2012). Simplemente les categoriza como antiguos aprendices.

Otros de los numerosos colectivos que ocupan, simultáneamente, las mismas aulas universitarias son los nuevos aprendices (Gurung & Rutledge, 2014; Thompson, 2013), los aprendices del nuevo milenio (Trinder, Guiller, Margaryan, Littlejohn & Nicol, 2008), los estudiantes pertenecientes a la «Instant message generation» (Bautista, Escofet, Forés, López, & Marimon, 2013; Gisbert & Esteve, 2011) y a la «Net Generation» (Jones, Ramanau, Cross, & Healing, 2010; Tapscott, 1999), los nativos digitales (Wang, Myers, & Sundaram, 2013; Fueyo, 2011; Prensky, 2011), los alfabetos digitales (González, 2012), los alfabetos tecnológicos (Ortega, 2009), los estudiantes residentes (Hernández, Ramírez-Martinell, & Cassany, 2014), los prosumidores (García-Ruiz, Ramírez-García, & Rodríguez-Rosell, 2014) y los prosumidores mediáticos (Ferrés, Aguaded, & García-Matilla, 2012), entre otros.

Este universo estudiantil de perfiles tecnológicos diferenciados ha constituido, de manera natural, la muestra de esta investigación. Al proceder a realizar los estudios estadísticos de los datos recogidos se ha constatado que la relación que los estudiantes universitarios establecen con las TIC es plural. Amparados en este hecho y con el objeto de comunicar, modestamente, algo nuevo al campo de conocimiento se ha creado un término específico para nombrar globalmente a todos a los estudiantes universitarios en su relación con las TIC. Así se ha acuñado el neologismo: sociedad «plurimodaltic» que es el resultado de las contracciones de los términos plural, modalidades, tecnologías de la información y la comunicación.

El término sociedad «plurimodaltic» designa al colectivo estudiantil universitario compuesto tanto por ciudadanos mediáticos, como por alfabetos mediáticos (Sánchez & Aguaded, 2013; Aguaded & Sánchez, 2013; Aguaded, 2012), humanistas mediáticos (Pérez & Varis, 2012), alfabetos audiovisuales y todas las posibles calificaciones de usuarios de medios enunciadas previamente en este artículo y todas las que puedan ir apareciendo, con el paso de los meses, en la bibliografía científica.

La característica constitutiva de la sociedad «plurimodaltic» es el conjunto de usos diferenciales que los estudiantes universitarios establecen con los medios tanto en el ámbito formativo como en el comunicativo o relacional de manera sincrónica. Se trata, intrínsecamente, de una sociedad poliédrica y multifactorial. Estas dos características son consecuencia de la actitud impredecible que los universitarios mantienen hacia las tecnologías. La imprevisibilidad surge al no estar garantizado que los estudiantes utilicen las herramientas digitales en su proceso de enseñanza aprendizaje aunque hagan uso frecuente de determinadas tecnologías en su vida diaria. Ese desconcierto aumenta debido a que no siempre desean incorporar las herramientas tecnológicas que emplean en su vida cotidiana como instrumentos de aprendizaje (García, Gros, & Escofet, 2012).

Esta forma de actuar dificulta la investigación. Una muestra de tal dificultad se encuentra al intentar determinar, de manera unívoca, el dispositivo móvil que utilizan mayoritariamente. La prevalencia de un dispositivo sobre otro es ambivalente o cambiante. Tal volatilidad depende, sobre todo, del momento comercial de cada dispositivo, de la muestra seleccionada, del nivel socioeconómico y académico de los estudiantes, de su lugar de residencia y del campo de conocimiento en el que se estén formando.

Ante esta realidad y para focalizar la investigación en el dispositivo digital móvil que mayoritariamente utiliza la «plurimodaltic» para fines académicos se ha acudido a estadísticas oficiales. El resultado obtenido ha sido de carácter genérico. Así se ha optado por extrapolar las cifras ofrecidas en la Edición 2014 del informe anual 2013 del Ministerio de Industria y Energía (Urueña, 2014) y afirmar que el dispositivo electrónico con acceso a Internet utilizado, mayoritariamente, entre la sociedad «plurimodaltic» con usos académicos es el ordenador portátil.

2. Dispositivo estudiado: ordenador portátil

El dispositivo que desde 2012 pugna por ocupar, a nivel mundial, el primer puesto en frecuencia de uso entre los usuarios de TIC es el teléfono móvil (Mihailidis, 2014; Tabuenca, Ternier, & Specht, 2013; Yang, Lu, Gupta, Cao, & Zhang, 2012). En el mercado existen dos modalidades de teléfono móvil, el no inteligente y el smartphone. Ante este hecho, la comunidad científica tiene que clarificar si el smartphone se entiende como un dispositivo electrónico para la comunicación oral entre dos interlocutores, como un elemento capaz de ejecutar aplicaciones y conectarse a Internet (Ruiz-Olmo & Belmonte-Jiménez, 2014) o como un ordenador portátil con uso telefónico.

En España, en el tercer trimestre de 2013, sin identificar su principal utilidad, el smartphone ha conseguido ocupar el primer lugar en frecuencia de uso entre usuarios de TIC. Al no haberse clarificado el uso principal del dispositivo, este equipo de Investigación entiende que el ordenador portátil sigue teniendo, con fines académicos, prevalencia de uso sobre el smartphone. Las razones en las que se apoya son que el 87,1% de la población accede a Internet desde el domicilio particular. El 62,5% de los hogares dispone de ordenador portátil mientras que sólo el 53,7% de la población dispone de smartphone, es decir, la mitad de la población. En los hogares se accede a Internet desde el smartphone (74,3%), desde el ordenador portátil (68,4%) y desde el ordenador fijo (66,6%) (Urueña, 2014).

El smartphone es de uso personal. El ordenador portátil y el fijo admiten múltiples usuarios. Esta multiplicidad de usuarios de los ordenadores unida a la mayor comodidad ergonómica del ordenador portátil frente a los smartphone y al superior tamaño y resolución de las pantallas de los primeros permite mantener al ordenador portátil como dispositivo electrónico móvil de uso mayoritario. Su única limitación, frente a otros dispositivos digitales móviles se encuentra en el software que soporta.

Asumiendo la prevalencia cuantitativa del ordenador portátil sobre el smartphone, en este artículo se clarificarán los usos, lugares de utilización y funciones dadas en España a los ordenadores portátiles por la «plurimodaltic».

3. Metodología

Este artículo expone la utilización dada al ordenador portátil por una muestra formada por 451 estudiantes de cinco universidades públicas españolas: Complutense, Vigo, Oviedo, Granada y UNED. Se decidió estudiar exclusivamente universidades públicas por tratarse de un estudio financiado con fondos públicos. Sus objetivos son: identificar los usos dados por la «plurimodaltic» al ordenador portátil; señalar las actividades realizadas con este dispositivo; y reseñar sus lugares preferentes de uso. Para conseguir estos objetivos se ha realizado un diseño muestral incidental no aleatorio y por conglomerados. La elección de los conglomerados como muestra representativa del universo poblacional ha sido aleatoria, no así la elección de las unidades últimas. Esta falta de aleatoriedad no resta representatividad a la muestra permitiendo generalizar los resultados de referencia, pero no la estimación de errores sobre los parámetros poblacionales. La recogida de información se ha hecho a través de un cuestionario. Se ha utilizado para la valoración de las respuestas una escala Likert de 5 puntos. La parte del cuestionario del que se extraen estos resultados se ha estructurado en tres escalas: usos del ordenador portátil (10 ítems), lugares y frecuencia de uso (9 ítems) y funciones y aplicaciones (9 ítems).

La consistencia interna de cada escala se ha obtenido a través del Coeficiente a de Cronbach. Los resultados referidos a la fiabilidad de cada una de las escalas han sido: a de Cronbach de la dimensión usos del portátil: 0,73; a de Cronbach de la dimensión lugares y frecuencia de usos: 0,72; a de Cronbach de la dimensión funciones y aplicaciones: 0,77; a de Cronbach del total del instrumento: 0,81. Todas las puntuaciones demuestran la fiabilidad del cuestionario. La fiabilidad de cada una de las escalas se expone en el apartado 4 de este artículo.

La muestra de estudio está conformada por 23,7% de hombres y 76,3% de mujeres, mostrando proporciones similares en todas las universidades estudiadas. La desproporción estadística entre sexos es debida a que los campos de conocimiento que tomaron parte en la investigación presentan un porcentaje muy superior de mujeres que de hombres. Atendiendo a sus edades, el 24,4% tiene entre 18 y 20 años, el 33% entre 21 y 23, el 10% entre 24 y 27, el 5,7% entre 28 y 31 y el 26,9% más de 31. La diferencia etaria se corresponde con el nivel de formación que está adquiriendo la muestra, así, el 24,2% está cursando estudios de Licenciatura, un 70,5% de Grado, un 0,3% de Doctorado, un 4,7% de Máster y un 0,3% ya se ha licenciado. En cuanto a las universidades de pertenencia, el 5% se extrae de la Universidad Complutense de Madrid, el 40% de la Universidad de Oviedo, el 10,9% de la Universidad de Vigo, el 18,2% de la de Granada y el 25,8% de la UNED.

4. Resultados y discusión

4.1. Escala: Usos del ordenador portátil

La tabla 1 recoge porcentajes de respuestas obtenidos en cada ítem de la primera escala. Los usos otorgados mayoritariamente al ordenador portátil por la muestra estudiada son: informativo (76,5%), colaborador (70,1%), instructivo (70%). Los menos usados: innovador (41%) y expresivo (47,2%). Estos porcentajes varían en función del género, edad y universidad de pertenencia.


Draft Content 274328585-44291 ov-es028.jpg

Atendiendo al género, se observa que las mujeres lo utilizan con fin informativo en el 78,9% de los casos y los hombres en el 69,8%. Respecto a la edad, es decir, desagregados los resultados, los estudiantes entre 18 y 20 años valoran más el uso informativo (97,2%). Los que menos lo valoran, los mayores de 31 años (28,9%). En cuanto a la metodología de la universidad de pertenencia, los estudiantes de las universidades presenciales valoran más alto el uso informativo: Complutense (94,4%), Oviedo (89,2%), Vigo (95,6%) y Granada (93,5%), que los estudiantes de universidades con educación a distancia, es decir, estudiantes de la UNED (1,4%).

El segundo uso del ordenador portátil es colaborador (70,1%). Desagregados, nuevamente, los resultados por género se presenta una diferencia no significativa: (68,6%) mujeres, (75,5%) hombres (C=0,063, Sig.=0,202). Tampoco presenta diferencia significativa la desagregación por edades. Estudiantes entre 18 y 20 años lo puntúan con 62,3% y estudiantes entre 24-27 años con 78,6%, mientras que los mayores de 31 lo hacen en un 71,9% (C=0,113, Sig.=0,266). Atendiendo a la metodología de la universidad de pertenencia, las diferencias son significativas (C=0,258, Sig.=0,000) con valores del 60,2% para los estudiantes de la Universidad de Oviedo, 77,8% para la Universidad de Vigo y 90,1% para los estudiantes de la UNED.

El uso instructivo (70%), sin diferencias estadísticamente significativas (C=0,037, Sig.=0,454), resulta más importante (71,4%) para las mujeres que para los hombres (67,4%). Los más jóvenes (18-31 años) lo puntúan más alto (88,9% y 70,1%) que los mayores de 31 años (45,6%). Exactamente igual ocurre con los estudiantes de las Universidades presenciales: Complutense (65,7%), Oviedo (77,6%), Vigo (82,2%) y Granada (79,2%) frente a los estudiantes de la UNED (44,4%).

El análisis factorial exploratorio otorga el valor a la prueba KMO de 0,80 y el valor de 771 a la prueba de esfericidad de Bartlett. A su vez arroja un nivel de significación 0,000 indicando la adecuación del modelo de reducción dimensional.

La varianza explicada de los tres primeros factores con auto-valores superiores a 1 es 62% resultando adecuado utilizar un modelo de tres dimensiones. Valorando las saturaciones factoriales de las variables se concluye que el primer factor incide en el uso entretenimiento. Saturan entretenimiento (0,755), informativo (0,794), comunicativo (0,641); el segundo en el uso motivador saturan: motivador (0,739), innovador (0,772). Y el tercero incide en el académico. Saturan instructivo (0,796), colaborador (0,611) e ilustrativo (0,575).


Draft Content 274328585-44291 ov-es029.jpg

Partiendo de los coeficientes de las saturaciones se realiza el cálculo de las puntuaciones factoriales de los sujetos que forman la muestra para obtener los análisis de varianza y determinar diferencias en función de variables género, edad, universidad de pertenencia. Los resultados obtenidos indican que el primer factor (uso entretenimiento) es más importante para los más jóvenes (18-20 años) (F=51,45, Sig.=0,000) que para los más mayores (más de 31 años) y para los universitarios ajenos a la UNED (F=146,5, Sig.=0,000). El segundo factor (uso motivador) varía en función de la universidad de pertenencia (F=3,83, Sig.=0,005). Los estudiantes con puntuaciones más elevadas son los de la UNED. En el extremo contrario, los de Oviedo. El uso académico presenta diferencias significativas en función de las edades (F=7,02, Sig.= 0,000). Es menos valorado por los mayores de 31 años. Las universidades que puntúan más baja y más alta son UNED y Complutense de Madrid, respectivamente.

4.2. Escala: Actividades realizadas

La tabla 2 recoge los porcentajes de respuestas obtenidos en cada ítem de la segunda escala.

Los datos de la tabla indican que la utilización del ordenador portátil para fines académicos (elaboración de trabajos, estudio, intercambio de apuntes, búsqueda de información académica) adquiere valores muy frecuente, y frecuente en una proporción que va del 88,7% (elaboración de trabajos) al 55,2% (intercambio de apuntes) pudiéndose afirmar que, aunque sea bajo los esquemas formativos de la Web 1.0 y 2.0 (Francisco, 2011) la «plurimodaltic» española usa, principalmente, el dispositivo con fines formativos.

Desagregados los resultados por género se concluye que las mujeres utilizan el portátil para elaborar trabajos en un 92,5% y los hombres en un 77%. Particularizados por edades, con diferencias estadísticas no significativas (C=0,194, Sig.=0,422), los jóvenes entre 18 y 20 años lo usan (92,5%) más que los mayores de 31 años (85,3%). Atendiendo a la metodología de la universidad de pertenencia, también se obtienen porcentajes elevados. El 100% de la «plurimodaltic» granadina frente al 84,9% de los universitarios de Oviedo. Los datos de la tabla arrojan que el portátil se utiliza habitualmente para otros fines no directamente académicos pero sí, tal vez, formativos como son la comunicación a través del correo electrónico (87,7%), participación en redes sociales (71,6%) y ocio (62,1%). La frecuencia de uso de chats, sin embargo, es muy discreta (36,9%). Este dato permite aventurar que si los universitarios chatean lo hacen a través del smartphone (Quicios, Sevillano, & Ortega, 2013).

Focalizando el análisis en el uso del correo electrónico se observa que esta actividad de uso comunicativo del ordenador portátil es mayor entre las mujeres (90,5%) que entre los hombres (79%) siendo muy frecuente en todos los grupos de edad. Los universitarios entre 28 y 31 años lo usan en un 95,9%. Los jóvenes entre 18 y 20 años en un 81,1%. Atendiendo a la metodología de la universidad de pertenencia, los resultados de uso del correo electrónico se encuentran entre los extremos de los estudiantes de la UNED (93,9%) y los estudiantes de la Complutense de Madrid (80,5%).

La tercera actividad del uso informativo del ordenador portátil se materializa en la búsqueda de información académica (85,2%). Las mujeres la buscan frecuentemente (89,5%); los hombres menos (70,2%). Los estudiantes entre 18 y 20 años puntúan con 91,3% frente al 70,8% de los estudiantes entre 24-27 años. La metodología de la universidad de pertenencia, también determina los porcentajes de utilización de esta actividad para el 91,4% de los estudiantes de la UNED y el 76,4% de los de la Universidad de Oviedo.

Profundizando más en el estudio, el análisis factorial exploratorio otorga a la prueba KMO el valor 0,80. El valor 626,36 a la prueba de esfericidad de Bartlett y 0,000 al nivel de significación. Estos resultados aconsejan la utilización de un modelo de reducción de dimensiones como el análisis factorial que genera un modelo de cuatro factores que explican el 68% de la varianza. Para extraer esos factores se utiliza el método de los componentes principales con rotación Varimax.

Las saturaciones de las variables en cada uno de los cuatro factores extraídos y rotados indican que el primero de ellos está relacionado con el uso del ordenador en la realización de actividades académicas. Saturan: elaboración de trabajos (0,783), estudio (0,745), ver el correo electrónico (0,537) y búsqueda de información académica (0,726). El segundo factor está relacionado con la facilitación del aprendizaje mediante el contacto con compañeros. Saturan: intercambio de apuntes (0,595), realización de trabajos grupales con Skype (0,877). El tercer factor está relacionado con la utilización del portátil como herramienta de comunicación social. Saturan: chats (0,861) y redes sociales (0,777). El cuarto factor se comprende como instrumento de ocio. Saturan: búsqueda de información no académica (0,752) y ocio (0,842).

Se utiliza la prueba ANOVA para comprobar si existen diferencias significativas entre las puntuaciones obtenidas por los sujetos en cada uno de los factores extraídos y las variables género, edad y universidad de pertenencia. En cuanto al factor uso del ordenador en actividades académicas, los análisis de varianza realizados sobre las puntuaciones factoriales muestran que las mujeres utilizan con mayor frecuencia que los hombres el ordenador para este fin (F=22,54, Sig.= 0,000). A este mismo resultado llegan otros investigadores (García, Gros, & Escofet, 2012) por lo que la presente investigación consolida y categoriza una metodología y una tendencia.

Este artículo, además, tiene el valor de ser un eslabón en la formulación de una nueva teoría al conceptualizar un nuevo tipo de sociedad estudiantil. La sociedad «plurimodaltic» caracterizada por la relación que establecen los universitarios con las TIC. El estudio que sustenta este artículo afirma que la edad no es una variable significativa en el uso del ordenador para realizar actividades de tipo académico. Este motivo permite despreciar la variable edad como característica constitutiva de la «plurimodaltic».

Un cuarto resultado indica que la metodología de la universidad de pertenencia sí que influye en la frecuencia de uso del ordenador para actividades académicas (F=12, Sig.=0,000). El estudiante de una universidad presencial no tiene los mismos requerimientos tecnológicos que el de una universidad con metodología a distancia. Esta hipótesis se valida con los datos obtenidos. Realizadas las comparaciones post hoc, los resultados muestran que se producen diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre las puntuaciones en este factor de los alumnos de la UNED y los de la Universidad de Oviedo y de Granada.

4.3. Escala: lugares de uso del ordenador portátil

La tabla 3 recoge los porcentajes de respuestas obtenidos en cada ítem de la tercera escala.


Draft Content 274328585-44291 ov-es030.jpg

Salvo en las bibliotecas, el portátil se usa con poca frecuencia en los recintos universitarios, en la calle o en los transportes. Las zonas preferentes de uso son el domicilio (70,1 %) y lugar de trabajo (23,2%).

Sometidos los ítems de la escala a un análisis factorial y desagregadas las puntuaciones por género, las mujeres (93%) lo utilizan con mayor frecuencia en el domicilio que los hombres (86%). Teniendo presente los resultados por edad, los mayores de 28 años (95%) frente a los de menos de 28 años (86%). En función de la universidad de procedencia, lo usan principalmente los estudiantes de la UNED (95%) frente al resto de la «plurimodaltic» (86% de media).

El valor de las pruebas KMO y de esfericidad de Bartlett son respectivamente 0,73 y 499 con un nivel de significación de 0,000. Estos valores permiten realizar un análisis factorial a los ítems que componen la escala. Así, los cuatro primeros factores explican el 70% de la varianza total siendo suficientemente representativos de las variables que forman la escala. De esas cargas factoriales se interpreta que el primer factor tiene una elevada carga relacionada con el uso del ordenador en alguna de las dependencias de la facultad; saturan: cafetería universitaria (0,698), pasillos (0,871), aulas (0,621). El segundo factor indica su uso en el lugar de trabajo o en la biblioteca. Saturan: lugar de trabajo (0,815), biblioteca (0,700). El tercer factor indica su uso en zonas al aire libre o medios de transporte. Saturan: zonas de ocio (0.623), calle (0,872), transporte (0,698). El cuarto lugar indica su uso en el domicilio habitual (domicilio: 0,909).

Las pruebas ANOVA realizadas en cada factor indican que los sujetos entre 18 y 28 años utilizan con mayor frecuencia el ordenador en alguna de las dependencias universitarias (cafetería, pasillos, aulas) que aquellos con una edad superior a los 31 años (F= 7,41, Sig.=0,000).

Con respecto a la variable universidad de pertenencia, los alumnos de la UNED y los de Granada usan más el ordenador en casa que los del resto de las universidades (F=3,66, Sig.=0,006). Los estudiantes de la Universidad Complutense, Vigo y Oviedo manifiestan utilizar más el dispositivo en las dependencias de la Facultad (F=15,56, Sig.=0,000).

5. Conclusiones

Este artículo se enmarca en una línea de actualidad universal. Este hecho se constata por la amplitud y vigencia de la bibliografía científica nacional e internacional aportada en su primera parte. Además de encuadrarse en un campo de estudio actual, el tema que se expone en el artículo es novedoso. En los cinco últimos años se ha investigado mucho sobre la temática del artículo pero no tanto sobre los contenidos en él presentados.

En coherencia con hallazgos encontrados en investigaciones sobre la temática, los resultados de este artículo refuerzan científicamente un principio de teoría global sobre los fenómenos estudiados (Ruiz-Olmo & Belmonte-Jiménez, 2014; Urueña, 2014; García, Gros, & Escofet, 2012). Este artículo además de consolidar y categorizar una metodología y una tendencia constituye un eslabón en la formulación de una nueva teoría. Esta teoría defiende que los estudiantes universitarios forman un nuevo tipo de sociedad denominada por los autores «plurimodaltic», neologismo que procede de las contracciones de los términos plural, modalidades, tecnologías de la información y la comunicación.

La «plurimodaltic» es un modelo emergente de sociedad universitaria. Sus componentes son estudiantes que establecen una relación con las TIC poliédrica y cambiante otorgando distintos usos a un mismo dispositivo dependiendo de su momento vivencial, del momento comercial de cada dispositivo y del tipo de relación que establezcan con las TIC, algo visto en la introducción del artículo.

Los resultados globales encontrados y verificados indican que en esta sociedad el ordenador portátil se usa principalmente para usos académicos. El 88% de la muestra lo usa para elaborar trabajos, el 55% para intercambiar apuntes o buscar información. A estos usos le sigue la comunicación vía correo electrónico (88%) y participación en redes sociales (71%). A través de posteriores análisis factoriales exploratorios y pruebas ANOVA se comprueba que las mujeres lo utilizan mayoritariamente para actividades académicas.

Nuevos análisis de varianza indican que los estudiantes entre 18 y 28 años lo utilizan más que sus compañeros más mayores en las bibliotecas universitarias (32%). Los lugares mayoritarios de uso entre los estudiantes de todas las edades son los domicilios (91%), seguidos de los lugares de trabajo (43,8%). Esto no es obstáculo para que espacios como jardines, calle o medios de transporte empiecen a considerarse lugares emergentes de estudio gracias al ordenador portátil.

La variable universidad de pertenencia ha servido para confirmar indirectamente tanto la validez de la muestra como la de la información recogida. El estudio de esta variable determina que los estudiantes de la UNED (Universidad con metodología específica de la educación a distancia) usan más el portátil en el domicilio que los del resto de las universidades presenciales.

Con respecto a los usos no académicos de los ordenadores portátiles, ni la edad ni el género ni la metodología universitaria resultan variables significativas respecto a las puntuaciones factoriales obtenidas en factores como contacto con compañeros, herramienta de comunicación social o instrumento de ocio si bien es cierto que los estudiantes más jóvenes otorgan al dispositivo una función lúdica e instrumental por encima de los estudiantes de más edad.

Los análisis factoriales exploratorios han identificado un pequeño número de dimensiones relacionadas con usos y funciones del ordenador portátil que en trabajos posteriores podrían determinar perfiles concretos de usuarios dentro de la «plurimodaltic». Los resultados de esta investigación colocan a los profesores universitarios ante la urgente necesidad de diseñar contenidos y actividades didácticas acordes a los estilos de aprendizaje de la «plurimodaltic» y al uso diferencial que realizan del ordenador portátil.

Apoyos y agradecimientos

Este artículo se realizó en el marco del Proyecto I+D+i «Aprendizaje ubicuo con dispositivos móviles. Elaboración y desarrollo de un mapa de competencias en educación superior» (EDU2010-17420).

Referencias

Aguaded, I. (2012). El reto de la competencia mediática de la ciudadanía: Presentación. Icono 14, 10, 3, 1-7. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7195/ri14.v10i3.523

Aguaded, I. (2012). La educomunicación. Una apuesta de mañana, necesaria para hoy. Aularia, 1, 2, 259-261.

Aguaded, I., & Sánchez, J. (2013). El empoderamiento digital de niños y jóvenes a través de la producción audiovisual. Ad-Comunica, 5, 175-196. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.6035/2174-0992.2013.5.11

Area, M. (2012). Sociedad líquida, web 2.0 y alfabetización digital. Aula de Innovación Educativa, 212, 55-59.

Area, M., Gutiérrez, A., & Vidal, F. (2012). Alfabetización digital y competencias informacionales. Barcelona: Ariel.

Bautista, A. (2007). Alfabetización tecnológica multimodal e intercultural. Revista de Educación, 343, 589-600.

Bautista, A., Escofet, A., Forés, A., López, M., & Marimon, M. (2013). Superando el concepto de nativo digital. Análisis de las prácticas digitales del estudiantado universitario. Digital Education Review, 24, 1, 1-22 (http://goo.gl/Qn5NhO) (28-10-2014).

Esteve, F., Esteve, V., & Gisbert, M. (2012). Simul@: El uso de los mundos virtuales para la adquisición de competencias transversales en la Universidad. Universitas Tarraconensis, 37, 2, 7-23.

Ferrés, J., Aguaded, I., & García-Matilla, A. (2012). La competencia mediática de la ciudanía española: dificultades y retos. Icono 14, 10, 3, 23-42. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7195/ri14.v10i3.201

Francisco, A. (2011). Usando la Web 2.0 para informarse e informar. Una experiencia de educación superior. Teoría de la Educación, 12, 1, 145-167.

Fueyo, M.A. (2011). Comunicación y educación en los nuevos entornos: ¿nativos o cautivos digitales? Ábaco, 2-3, 68-69, 22-28.

García, I., Gros, B., & Escofet, A. (2012). La influencia del género en la cultura digital del estudiantado universitario. Athenea Digital, 12, 3, 95-114. (http://goo.gl/xmSFzC) (28-10-2014).

García-Ruiz, R., Ramírez-García, A., Rodríguez-Rosell, M.M. (2014). Educación en alfabetización mediática para una ciudadanía prosumidora. Comunicar, 43, 15-23. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-01

Gisbert, M. (2013). Nuevos escenarios para los aprendices digitales en la universidad. Aloma, 31,1, 55-64.

Gisbert, M., & Esteve, F. (2011). Digital Leaners: la competencia digital de los estudiantes universitarios. La Cuestión Universitaria, 7, 48-59.

González, J. (2013). Alfabetización multimodal: usos y posibilidades. Campo Abierto, 32, 1, 91-113. (http://goo.gl/CrNqDw) (28-10-2014).

González, N. (2012). Alfabetización para una cultura social, digital, mediática y en red. Revista Española de Documentación Científica, 35, 1, 17-45. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3989/redc.2012.mono.976

Gurung, B., & Rutledge, D. (2014). Digital Learners and the Overlapping of Their Personal and Educational Digital Engagement. Computers & Education, 77, 91-100. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2014.04.012

Hernández, D., Ramírez-Martinell, A., & Cassany, D. (2014). Categorizando a los usuarios de sistemas digitales. Píxel-Bit, 44, 113-126. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.12795/pixelbit.2014.i44.08

Jones, C., Ramanau, R., Cross, S., & Healing, G. (2010). Net generation or Digital Natives: Is There a Distinct New Generation Entering University? Computers & Education, 54, 3, 722-732. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2009.09.022

Khan, S. (2012). The One World Schoolhouse: Education Reimagined. New York: Twelve Publishing.

Marciales, G.P. (2012). Competencia informacional y brecha digital: preguntas y problemas emergentes derivados de investigación. Nómadas, 36, 127-142. (http://goo.gl/abnDkO) (28-10-2014).

Mihailidis, P. (2014). A Tethered Generation: Exploring the Role of Mobile Phones in the Daily Life of Young People. Mobile Media & Communication, 2, 58-72. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2050157913505558

Monclús, A., & Saban, C. (2012). La inclusión, la desigualdad y la brecha digital, como problemas y retos para las nuevas tecnologías de la información y de la comunicación. Revista Iberoamericana de Educación, 60, 2, 1-10 (http://goo.gl/g0wAzG) (28-10-2014).

Ortega, I. (2009). La alfabetización tecnológica. Revista Electrónica Teoría de la Educación, 10, 2, 11-24 (http://goo.gl/blNCJ4) (28-10-2014).

Pérez, J.M., & Varis, T. (2012). Alfabetización mediática y nuevo humanismo. Barcelona: UOC.

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants Part 1. On the Horizon, 9, 5, 1-6.

Prensky, M. (2011). Enseñar a nativos digitales. Madrid: SM.

Quicios, M.P., Sevillano, M.L., & Ortega, I. (2013). Educational Uses of Mobile Phones by University Students in Spain. The New Educational Review, 34, 4, 151-163.

Ruiz-Olmo, F.J., & Belmonte-Jiménez, A.M. (2014). Los jóvenes como usuario de aplicaciones de marca en dispositivos móviles. Comunicar, 43, 73-81. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-07

Sánchez, J., & Aguaded, J. I. (2013). El grado de competencia mediática en la ciudadanía andaluza. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico 19, 1, 265280. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5209/rev_ESMP.2013.v19.n1.42521

Santos, M.A., Etxeberría, F., Lorenzo, M., & Prats, E. (2012). Web 2.0 y redes sociales. Implicaciones educativas. SITE, XXXI, 1-34. (http://goo.gl/owsbQ8) (28-10-2014).

Tabuenca, B., Ternier, S., & Specht, M. (2013). Patrones cotidianos en estudiantes de formación continua para la creación de ecologías de aprendizaje. RED, 37. (http://goo.gl/JM1Mgc) (28-10-2014).

Tabuenca, B., Verpoorten, D., Ternier, S., Westera, W., & Specht, M. (2012). Fostering Reflective Practice with Mobile Technologies. Artel/Ec-Tel., 2012, 87-100. (http://goo.gl/0ROJKm) (28-10-2014).

Tabuenca, B., Verpoorten, D., Ternier, S., Westera, W., & Specht, M. (2013). Fomento de la práctica reflexiva sobre el aprendizaje mediante el uso de tecnologías móviles. RED, 37. (http://goo.gl/XcdpHL) (28-10-2014).

Tapscott, D. (1999). Educating the Net Generation. Educational Leadership, 56, 5, 6-11. (http://goo.gl/ucKNyZ) (28-10-2014).

Thompson, P. (2013). The Digital Natives as Learners: Technology Use Patterns and Approaches to Learning. Computers & Education, 65, 12-33. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2012.12.022

Travieso, J.L., & Planella, J. (2008). La alfabetización digital como factor de inclusión social: una mirada crítica. UOC Papers, 6, 2-9. (http://goo.gl/0wte6j) (28-10-2014).

Trinder, K., Guiller, J., Margaryan, A., Littlejohn, A., & Nicol, D. (2008). Learning from Digital Natives: Bridging Formal and Informal Learning. Gasgow: Caledonian University. (http://goo.gl/vgXlHv) (28-10-2014).

Urueña, A. (Coord.) (2014). La sociedad en red. Informe anual 2013. Madrid: Ministerio de Industria, Energía y Turismo.

Villalustre, L. (2013). Aprendizaje por proyectos con la Web 2.0: satisfacción de los estudiantes y desarrollo de competencias. Revista de Formación e Innovación Educativa Universitaria, 6, 3, 186-195.

Wang, Q., Myers, M.D., & Sundaram, D. (2013). Digital Natives und Digital Immigrants. Wirtschaftsinformatik, 55, 6, 409-429. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12599-013-0296-y

Yang, S., Lu, Y., Gupta, S., Cao, Y., & Zhang, R. (2012). Mobile Payment Services Adoption across Time: An Empirical Study of the Effects of Behavioral Beliefs, Social Influences, and Personal Traits. Computers in Human Behavior, 28, 1, 129-142. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2011.08.019

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/15
Accepted on 31/12/15
Submitted on 31/12/15

Volume 24, Issue 1, 2016
DOI: 10.3916/C46-2016-09
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 4
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?