Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Emotions have become increasingly important in our time, in all realms of social reality. This revaluation of the affective dimension of the person is revealed in its common presence as subject of research in many fields of knowledge. Also in Media and Communications studies, and specifically in relation to the use of digital technology, there is an academic interest in emotions. This paper maps the field of study where emotions and digital technology converge, specifically in the use of the Internet. There appears a vibrant, wide and complex field of study in which come together approaches of different types, both on the theoretical plane and on the methodological one. The article provides an overview of research carried out in this subject, which includes the study of social media as spaces of interaction where emotions are displayed, the massivescale emotional contagion or the sentiment analysis in the digital platforms, among other topics. We conclude that the Net not only arouses emotions in users and serves as a channel for the expression of affection, but also influences the way in which this affection is modulated and displayed, as well as the configuration of the personal identity of the users of the Internet.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Unlike previous eras, where the affective dimension of the person was usually left in the background and confined to the context of private life, today we are immersed in a strong emotional culture, one that permeates all realms of social life (Bendelow & Williams, 1998). Although throughout the Western tradition the reflection about the nature of human affection has always been present –from the writings of Aristotle, and more recently in Descartes, Spinoza or William James and others (Solomon, 2003)– an «affective turn» has taken place also in academia in recent decades (Clough & Halley, 2007), in the sense that emotions have become the object of study of different scientific disciplines (such as anthropology, economics, linguistics, computer engineering, etc.). Moreover the progress made by neuroscience has contributed to highlight the role that emotions have in mental processes and their importance in the development of brain functions (Ferrés, 2014).

There are, therefore, various theoretical approaches on emotions, which are conceptualised and explained both from neurobiological and sociocultural approaches. In this regard, it should be noted that it does not seem feasible to understand emotions, their experience, expression and communication without taking into consideration the social context in which they are manifested; consequently, one of the most fruitful theoretical approaches is the one developed from the «sociology of emotions» (Turner & Stets, 2007). Conversely, the complex reality of this facet of human nature makes it an object of interdisciplinary study, albeit one about which there is still no comprehensive vision, capable of bringing together and integrating all these different disciplines. There is also no conceptual and terminological consensus about phenomena covered here, such as affection, emotions, feelings or passions.

Parallel to the rise of the affective dimension in social life and in academia in the last two decades, we have also witnessed the growing social acceptance of Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Technology is fully integrated into our daily lives and the adoption, pervasiveness and ubiquity of digital devices are not a mere quantitative issue, because their «wide distribution, customization, and the possibility of permanent connection that they create, contribute to reconfigure various aspects of everyday life and of processes of contemporary subjectivation and socialization» (Lasén, 2014: 7).

There is no doubt, therefore, that today people relate in both offline and online environments; furthermore, social relations are already hybridised into both contexts. At the same time, the digital realm has its own peculiarities, which come from its electronic nature, and that in turn affect the emotional dimension of the person. The traditional social life, which is slower and localised, coexists with the (faster and uprooted) digital social life. Thus, these are two space-time regimes; and each is accompanied by a corresponding emotional regime. The technological emotional regime is primarily a regime of emotional intensities, in which the amount of emotion matters, while in the traditional regime, it is primarily a regime of emotional qualities. Although it does not seem feasible that the technological regime may someday nullify the traditional regime –since the latter is the condition of possibility of the former– it is indisputable, however, «that the coexistence of both emotional regimes generates interference between emotional logic of each system» (González, 2013: 13-14). Such coexistence, moreover, makes the field of analysis of digital technology and emotions broad and complex, as it is to address the implications derived from it both in physical and in the digital world.

2. Material and methods

From a historical perspective, we can say that the relationship of the western world with technology has always been highly emotional. Since technology is always in the realm of novelty, its emergence opens the question of how the new flows into the old, of what is known. This process, as noted by Fortunati and Vincent, «is played in a binary way between the pole of curiosity, rarity, new risk and uncertainty on the one hand, whilst on the other it includes old habits, stability certainty, security and safety» (2009: 6). Additionally, there is the series of meanings, symbols, values associated with technology. Therefore any technological innovation, especially in the beginning, raises a debate between enthusiasts and sceptics or, to put it in terms of Umberto Eco, between «the apocalyptic and the integrated» (Eco, 1964).

Nowadays the coexistence, on one hand, of the growing importance of the affective dimension in social life and, on the other hand, of the role acquired by technology and particularly Internet in everyday interactions, has allowed the field of research at the intersection of both realities to become very abundant and varied. This is true both in terms of theoretical frameworks and methodologies, and in the issues, emotions, social groups or specific technological devices that are the subject of the various studies and publications to this day.

The goal of this paper is to provide, within media and communication studies, an overview of the field of research on Internet and emotions, showing the different areas of study and the most relevant authors and publications in each of them. It´s beyond the scope of this paper to discuss studies focused on the emotional investment that people put in digital technology, especially mobile phones.

Through a comprehensive literature review, I will map this field of research in the following pages. To do this, I will take as reference the academic literature that has explicitly explored emotions in relation to the new field of socialization and emotional projection that is the Internet. First I present a framework with the main theoretical and methodological issues involved in the study of the Net, and have been faced from different disciplinary traditions. Next, I will explore in more detail the expression of emotions in social networks, both at micro level (of interactions between users) and at macro level (the phenomenon of emotional contagion, also known as emotional identification in the field of neuropsychology).

3. Analysis and results

3.1. Theoretical and methodological issues

The analysis of the online realm as a space in which emotions are activated and expressed is an extensive and complex area, as it encompasses many different phenomena and congregates studies from different theoretical trends and disciplines. As Benski and Fisher point out, the Net is a unique laboratory for the analysis of emotions for two main reasons: «First, the Internet is a fertile ground for a huge diversity and amount of communication of all sorts and from a large and diverse group of people. Much of that communication is emotional, reflecting immediate feelings, sometimes as they occur –most use of social media such as Facebook and Twitter is now occurring on mobile devices. Second, these communication acts are all registered (…) When communication data become available, it is relatively easy to analyze since it is likely to be relatively complete and includes meta-data such as time and location, and at times other pieces of important demographic information about the authors of the data such as gender, education or online behaviour» (2014: 6).

This unique character of the Internet as an object of study in relation to emotions has produced abundant and varied literature. Without taking into consideration the studies on the search for affective relationships through Internet (love, as the emotional state par excellence, has been examined in the digital dimension (Ben-Ze’ev, 2004; Kaufmann & Macey, 2012), some studies focus on the analysis of a particular emotion, such as:

• Empathy (sympathising with the tragedies of others, producing videos on YouTube) (Pantti & Tikka, 2014).

• Annoyance (which children and adolescents admit to experience when they find inappropriate content on the Internet) (Livingstone & al., 2014).

• Envy or jealousy (when reading Facebook status updates of contacts) (Muise, Christofides, & Desmarais, 2009; Sagioglou & Greitemeyer, 2014).

• Resentment (of workers in precarious job, who let off steam in the forums) (Risi, 2014).

• Hope (that fosters interactions on dating websites) (Fürst, 2014).

• Hatred (often under anonymous cover that the Net can provide) (Perry & Olson, 2009).

• Grief or mourning expressed online when a loved one dies (Walter & al., 2012; Jakoby & Reiser, 2014).

There are studies that focus on the expressive capabilities of a particular channel of communication such as Skype (Chiyoko-King-O’Riain, 2014) or email (Kato, Kato, & Akahori, 2007); while others focus on specific groups whose activities have a strong emotional charge, such as feminists (Reestorff, 2014), political activists (Knudsen and Stage, 2012) or migrants (Fortunati, Pertierra, & Vincent, 2012). From the point of view of disciplinary traditions, digital emotions have been approached from Cultural Studies (Karatzogianni & Kuntsman, 2012), Screen Studies (Garde-Hansen & Gorton, 2013), Digital Literacy (Moeller, Powers, & Roberts, 2012), Domestication of Technology (Schofield-Clark, 2014), Risk Studies (Roeser, 2010) or Queer Studies (Cefai, 2014), among others.

As noted above, the aim of this paper is to map the state of the field within Media and Communication Studies. Therefore, we will not dwell on works that discuss the subject from other approaches such as Engineering and Computer Science. In this regard, we simply indicate the importance of Affective computing, where computer science, psychology and cognitive science converge, and which studies how to design computers that are able to recognise, interpret and even simulate emotions in order to improve interactions between people and computers (Picard, 2003). Also from an approach of computational linguistics, sentiment analysis is increasingly gaining importance, that is, the type of sentiment (positive, negative or neutral) that a person might feel or try to express when writing some information, and which in the digital realm is applied especially in social networks like Twitter or Facebook.

Two of the background theoretical issues that mark the debate about emotions in the online realm, in both Media and Communication Studies and related disciplines, are: first, how emotions can emerge and be measured in the Internet (Küster & Kappas, 2014) and, second, the differences and similarities between the expression of emotions in face-to-face relationships and relationships mediated by digital technology (Boyns & Loprieno, 2014). Regarding the first, there are «three areas of emotions measurement, each requiring its own unique methods, and each revealing a different facet of the intersection of the Internet and emotions. First, we can investigate large amounts of emotional content readily available online (through qualitative or quantitative content and data analysis). Second, we can inquire into the subjective emotional experience of users (using self-reporting, through interviews or questionnaires). And third, we can record bodily responses indicating emotional states in real-time Internet use» (Benski & Fisher, 2014: 8).

In terms of emotional expression in computer-mediated interactions, we must start from the realisation of the peculiarities of the digital environment, where there is no corporeality that accompanies physical relationships, and the communication between participants is not necessarily synchronous. Since affection has a bodily foundation and it is more difficult to control emotions face to face, the absence of both factors might lead one to believe that the digital realm is emotionally colder, and that it impairs or restricts the expression of emotions. However, in an extensive literature review on this issue, Derks, Fisher and Bos (2008: 780) conclude that «CMC is not characterized by a lack of emotions, on the contrary (…) positive emotions are expressed to the same extent as in F2F interactions, and that more intense negative emotions are even expressed more overtly in CMC».

When the interaction mediated by technology is textual and not visual (and therefore there are no nonverbal cues, which are certainly an element of richness for the expression and interpretation of the affective dimension), Internet users can offset such absence by using emoticons (Jibril & Abdullah, 2013). If the digital interaction through video, and there is therefore mutual facial recognition, expression and interpretation of emotions becomes –in principle– easier (Kappas & Krämer, 2011). Indeed, each of the technological devices, applications or communication channels (video call, instant messaging, etc.) carries with it a particular «affective bandwidth» (Lasén, 2010), i.e., they allow certain amount of emotional information to be transferred. In this sense, the Internet in turn encompasses different socio-technical environments that allow emotions to surface in varying degrees; therefore, the affective dimension is not revealed equally in all interactions and communicative situations taking place in the Net. There are, therefore, some «emotionality factors» (Gómez Cabranes, 2013: 219-223), such as:

• The expressive possibilities of each of those environments (it is not the same if it is a blog, a chat, a social network (and which one in particular), etc.

• Themes and topics around which the interaction revolves.

• The context and purpose of use of people.

• The degree of anonymity or self-revelation in interactions.

• The investment of time or frequency with which users connect to the digital domain.

Thus, although the digital emotional regime is primarily a regime of emotional intensities, these do not occur equally in all applications and contexts of the digital environment, but they are conditioned by the above factors, among others.

3.2. Emotions in social networking sites

Becoming aware of the capabilities of the digital realm as a space and channel for the expression of emotions involves considering the Internet and its applications not as an instrument that we use, but as a place of experience and subjectivity; rather than a means of communication it is a space that we inhabit and that it inhabits us (Lasén, 2014). This is especially evident in, but not limited to, social networks, which are specifically designed to create and maintain links with others, making these sociability platforms one of the most representative examples of Web 2.0. The way in which this design is realised is not an emotionally iniquitous decision, but it conditions the expressive capacity of the user. Such is the case, for example, of Facebook and its single «Like» button, preventing users to express other negative feelings (dislike, anger, grief, etc.) as easily (Wahl-Jorgensen, 2013). The implications of this «emotional architecture of social media» transcend this context, because (as clearly argued by Peyton, 2014), the notion of «liking» has experienced a semiotic change, as it has moved from the intimate and emotional realm of individuals into the public realm. Rather than a feeling, it is now is an action, since «instead of being tied to an internal sensation that reacts tacitly to an external stimulus, to ‘like’ now becomes a conscious rationalized action that connotes an external tag of connection between an individual, a discursive element, and a social stance» (Peyton, 2014: 113).

Within the digital realm, the emotional dimension is closely linked to the configuration of the identity of the person. In social networks, it is worth noticing in the processes of recognition and status negotiation, because as Svensson points out «the more someone links to you, likes you, thumbs up your postings, and comments on them, etc., the higher you will be ranked and listed in the different SNS, news feeds, and tables of suggested links and readings (...) That increase in status is linked to feelings of satisfaction and well-being. Indeed, positive emotions emerge when individuals are able to reaffirm their self-conceptions» (2014: 22). Emotions online are in this way used as resources in the identity work of the user; in a digital medium, marked by interconnectivity and where the person cannot reaffirm self-conceptions without being visible for others.

Moreover, if we consider the habits of news consumption, it is easy to observe that emotions are also on the basis of the act of sharing content and news in the digital environment (Hermida, 2014). Although the emotional component has always been present in the use of mass media and how people process different media messages, whether news or fiction, the novelty is that today, on platforms such as Twitter, the timeline on certain events of political or social nature is a mixture of information, opinion, interpretation and emotions, repeated and amplified by the network itself, giving rise to what Papacharissi (2014) qualifies as «affective news streaming». As seen in the case study of the resignation of Hosni Mubarak as president of Egypt in February 2011, «prominent and popular tweets were reproduced and endorsed, contributing to a stream that did not engage the reader cognitively, but primarily emotionally. Frequently, the same news was repeated over and over again, with little or no new cognitive input, but increasing affective input» (Papacharissi & Oliveira, 2012: 278).

3.3. Emotional contagion

As noted above, the Internet allows researchers to investigate huge amounts of content readily available online. Since sharing emotions is essential for creating and maintaining social ties, somehow the status of social networks revolves around the emotions and feelings that users express about themselves, but at the same time find resonance among their circle of contacts. Therefore, other areas of abundant research and growing importance are those related to the study of emotional contagion through social networks and the viral spread phenomenon.

Recently, in a controversial experiment carried out by researchers from Cornell University with the assistance of Facebook programmers (Kramer, Guillory & Hancock, 2014), the feed of 690,000 users was manipulated for a week. A user group received positive news, while another group were given news full of negative connotations. One of the conclusions was that people who watch less negative stories in their feed are less likely to write a negative post (and vice versa). The study indicates that emotions expressed by others through Facebook influence the emotions of the user; and that for emotional contagion to occur, face-to-face contacts (with non-verbal cues that accompany such interaction) are not essential.

Another research has analysed a period of over two years the status updates on Facebook of about one million users; also noting that both negative and positive posts had some impact on other members of their social circles. The peculiar characteristic of this research is that, starting from the premise that atmospheric phenomena can influence mood, they analysed the correlation between weather reports from different cities and the status updates of users who live in them, and confirmed that on rainy days the number of Facebook posts containing positive expressions declined 1.19%, while the negative posts increased by 1.16%. According to the authors, «For every one person affected directly, rainfall alters the emotional expression of about one to two other people, suggesting that online social networks may magnify the intensity of global emotional synchrony» (Coviello & al., 2014). Ultimately, the research on this subject concludes that the decision of users to update their status is influenced by what happens to their contacts in their social circle.

Large-scale emotional contagion in the digital realm has another focus of interest in the viral spread of content. This is one subject that has been researched especially in the field of advertising and marketing (Dobele & al., 2007; Eckler & Bolls, 2011) where the authors agree that generating emotions –and among these, especially surprise and joy– is a requisite so that a video can be shared in the digital realm. As explained by Dafonte, «the decision to share a viral video is caused, on the one hand by motivations that have to do with the psychological or emotional needs of the user potentially sharing the clip, and on the other, with the motivations related to the viral video itself. The decision to share a viral video ad stems from the meeting of both these spheres in the individual» (2014: 202).

Beyond the strictly advertising realm, there is increasing attention being paid to the phenomenon of memes, that is, contagious images, videos and ideas that circulate virally on the Internet, mobilising the emotions of users both horizontally (through blogs, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter) and vertically, when traditional media also echo the emotional resonance they acquire. Understanding and attempting to predict the dissemination process of this type of content has been analysed by scholars (Sampson, 2012; Spitzberg, 2014).

4. Discussion and conclusions

The popularisation of digital technologies has made them a constant presence with the person; so much so that the sensory contact is the first step to elicit an emotional relationship between the user and the device. The digital sphere –the realm that is accessed through the screens– is also a space where the affective dimension of technology users emerges and is expressed. In other words, Internet is an «affective technology», in the sense that it is a channel for the expression of emotions and it participates in the constitution of subjectivity of the individual. It enables the fixing of emotions, transforming them into «digital inscriptions» (Lasén, 2010), into objects that can be stored, managed, viewed, compared, shared, etc.

An approach from the point of view of emotions, understood as a predominant value of contemporary society, allows us to map, as I have done throughout these pages, a vibrant, broad and complex field of research as part of Media and Communications Studies, where different theoretical approaches converge: from digital literacy to cultural studies, through film and gender studies. Whether at the micro level of interactions across different platforms (social networks, blogs, forums, etc.) and macro (through large-scale emotional contagion), it is clear that Internet not only arouses emotions in users and serves as a channel for the expression of affection, but also influences the way in which this affection is modulated, played out and displayed. From the methodological viewpoint, the challenge of combining qualitative and quantitative techniques to measure and compare emotions in the offline and online worlds still remains.

The convergence of the face-to-face and digital realms (with their respective time-space and emotional regimes), socio-cultural practices associated with the use of technology (along with the technical, legal and market-based conditions), the variety of technological devices (with different emotional potential) or the peculiarities of computer-mediated interactions versus face-to-face contact are some of the issues that articulate the studies on this subject. In this sense, the contributions of research from neuroscience continue shedding light for a more accurate understanding of emotions.

Finally, the recent emergence of wearable devices –which is a step closer towards the bodily adaptation and integration of technology into the user–, advances in the design of social robots (facilitating a more ‘natural’ interaction with humans) and the growing expansion of the so-called ‘Internet of things,’ which are making the presence of technology in daily life more ubiquitous and immersive, are some of several future lines of research that emerge as subjects of interest in the study of emotions in the use of digital technology.

References

Ben-Ze’ev, A. (2004). Love Online. Emotions on the Internet. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Bendelow, G., & Williams, S.J. (Eds.) (1998). Emotions in Social Life: Critical Themes and Contemporary Issues. London: Routled­ge.

Benski, T., & Fisher, E. (2014). Introduction: Investigating Emotions and the Internet. In T. Benski, & E. Fisher (Eds.), Internet and Emotions (pp. 1-14). New York: Routledge.

Boyns, D., & Loprieno, D. (2014). Feeling through Presence: To­ward a Theory of Interaction Rituals and Parasociality in Online Social Works. In T. Benski, & E. Fisher (Eds.), Internet and Emotions (pp. 33-47). New York: Routledge.

Cefai, S. (2014). The Lesbian Intimate: Capacities for Feeling in Convergent Media Context. Participations: Journal of Audience and Reception Studies, 11(1), 237-253.

Chiyoko-King-O’Riain, R. (2014). Transconnective Space, Emo­tions and Skype: The Transnational Emotional Practices of Mixed International Couples in the Republic of Ireland. In T. Benski, & E. Fisher (Eds.), Internet and Emotions (pp. 131-143). New York: Routledge.

Clough, P. T., & Halley, J. (2007). The Affective Turn: Theorizing the Social. Durham: Duke University Press.

Coviello, L., Sohn, Y., & al. (2014). Detecting Emotional Contagion in Massive Social Networks. PLoS ONE, 9(3), e90315. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0090315

Dafonte, A. (2014). Claves de la publicidad viral: De la motivación a la emoción en los vídeos más compartidos. Comunicar, 43, 199-207. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-20

Derks, D., Fischer, A.H., & Bos, A.E. (2008). The Role of Emotion in Computer-mediated Communication: A Review. Computers in Human Behavior, 24(3), 766-785. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.­chb.2007.04.004

Dobele, A., Lindgreen, A., Beverland, M., Vanhamme, J., & Van-Wijk, R. (2007). Why Pass on Viral Messages? Because They Connect Emotionally. Business Horizons, 50, 291-304.

Eckler, P., & Bolls, P. (2011). Spreading the Virus: Emotional Tone of Viral Advertising and its Effect on For-warding Intention and Attitudes. Journal of Interactive Advertising, 11(2), 1-11. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15252019.2011.10722180

Eco, U. (1964). Apocalittici e integrati: comunicazioni di massa e teorie della cultura di massa. Milano: Bompiani.

Ferrés, J. (2014). Las pantallas y el cerebro emocional. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Fortunati, L., & Vincent, J. (2009). Introduction. In J. Vincent, & L. Fortunati (Eds.), Electronic Emotion. The Mediation of Emotion via Information and Communication Technologies (pp. 1-31). Bern: Peter Lang.

Fortunati, L., Pertierra, R., & Vincent, J. (2012). Migration, Dias­pora and Information Technology in Global Societies. London: Routledge.

Fürst, H. (2014). Emotional Socialization on a Swedish Internet Dating Site: The Search and Hope for Happiness. In T. Benski & E. Fisher (Eds.), Internet and Emotions (pp. 99-112). New York: Routledge.

Garde-Hansen, J., & Gorton, K. (2013). Emotion Online. Theoriz­ing Affect on the Internet. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Gómez-Cabranes, L. (2013). Las emociones del internauta. In L. Flamarique, & M. D’Oliveira-Martins (Eds.), Emociones y estilos de vida: Radiografía de nuestro tiempo (pp. 211-243). Madrid: Biblio­teca Nueva.

González, A.M. (2013). Introducción: emociones y análisis social. In L. Flamarique, & M. D’Oliveira-Martins (Eds.), Emociones y estilos de vida: radiografía de nuestro tiempo (pp. 9-24). Madrid: Biblio­teca Nueva.

Hermida, A. (2014). Tell Everyone. Why We Share & Why It Matters. Toronto: Doubleday Canada.

Jakoby, N.R., & Reiser, S. (2014). Grief 2.0: Exploring Virtual Cemeteries. In T. Benski, & E. Fisher (Eds.), Internet and Emo­tions (pp. 65-79). New York: Routledge.

Jibril, T.A., & Abdullah, M.H. (2013). Relevance of Emoticons in Computer-mediated Communication Contexts: An Overview. Asian Social Science, 9(4), 201-207. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5­539/ass.v9n4p201

Kappas, A., & Krämer, N.C. (Eds.) (2011). Face-to-face Commu­nication over the Internet: Emotions in a Web of Culture. Cam­bridge: Cambridge University Press.

Karatzogianni, A., & Kuntsman, A. (Eds.) (2012). Digital Cultures and the Politics of Emotion: Feelings, Affect and Technological Change. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Kato, Y.; Kato, S., & Akahori, K. (2007). Effects of Emotional Cues transmitted in E-mail Communication on the Emotions Experienced by Senders and Receivers. Computers in Human Behavior, 23(4), 1894-1905. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2005.11.005

Kaufmann, J.C., & Macey, D. (2012). Love Online. Cambridge: Polity.

Knudsen, B.T., & Stage, C. (2012). Contagious Bodies. An Inves­tigation of Affective and Discursive Strategies in Contemporary Online Activism. Emotion, Space and Society, 5(3), 148-155. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emospa.2011.08.004

Kramer, A.D., Guillory, J.E., & Hancock J.T. (2014). Experimental Evidence of Massive-scale Emotional Contagion through Social Networks. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS), 111(24), 8.788-8.790.

Küster D., & Kappas, A. (2014). Measuring Emotions in Individuals and Internet Communities. In T. Benski, & E. Fisher (Eds.), Internet and Emotions (pp. 48-61). New York: Routledge.

Lasén, A. (2010). Mobile Media and Affectivity: Some Thoughts about the Notion of Affective Bandwidth. In J.R Höflich, G.F. Kircher, C. Linke, & I. Schlote, (Eds.), Mobile Media and the Change of Everyday Life (pp. 131-154). Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang.

Lasén, A. (2014). Introducción. Las mediaciones digitales de la educación sentimental de los y las jóvenes. In I. Megía Quirós, & E. Ro­dríguez-San-Julián (Coords.), Jóvenes y comunicación. La impronta de lo virtual (pp. 7-16). Madrid: Fundación de Ayuda contra la Drogadicción.

Livingstone, S., Kirwil, L., Ponte, C., & Staksrud, E. (2014). In their Own Words: What Bothers Children Online? European Journal of Communication, 29(3), 271-288. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.117­7/­0267323114521045

Moeller, S., Powers, E., & Roberts, J. (2012). «El mundo desconectado» y «24 horas sin medios»: alfabetización mediática para la conciencia crítica de los jóvenes. Comunicar, 39, 45-52. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C39-2012-02-04

Muise, A., Christofides, E., & Desmarais, S. (2009). More Infor­mation than You Ever Wanted: Does Facebook Bring Out the Green-Eyed Monster of Jealousy? CyberPsychology & Behavior, 12(4), 441-444. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cpb.2008.0263

Pantti, M., & Tikka, M. (2014). Cosmopolitan Empathy and User-Ge­nerated Disaster Appeal Videos on YouTube. In T. Benski, & E. Fisher (Eds.), Internet and Emotions (pp. 178-192). New York: Routledge.

Papacharissi, Z. (2014). Toward New Journalism(s). Affective News, Hybridity, and liminal Spaces. Journalism Studies, 27-40. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1461670X.2014.890328

Papacharissi, Z., & Oliveira, F. (2012). Affective News and Net­worked Publics: The Rhythms of News Storytelling on #Egypt. Journal of Communication, 62(2), 266-282. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1460-2466.2012.01630.x

Perry, B., & Olsson, P. (2009). Cyberhate: the Globalization of Hate. Information & Communication Technology Law, 18(2), 185-199. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13600830902814984

Peyton, T. (2014). Emotion to Action? Deconstructing the Onto­logical Politics of the ‘Like’ Button. In T. Benski, & E. Fisher (Eds.), Internet and Emotions (pp. 113-128). New York: Routledge.

Picard, R.W. (2003). Affective computing: Challenges. Interna­tional Journal of Human Computer Studies, 59(1-2), 55-64. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1071-5819(03)00052-1

Reestorff, C.M. (2014). Mediatised affective activism: The Activist Imaginary and the Topless Body in the Femen Movement. Con­vergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, 20(4), 478-495. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1354­856514541358

Risi, E. (2014). Emerging Resentment in SocialMedia : Job In­security and Plots of Emotions in the New Virtual Environments. In T. Benski, & E. Fisher (Eds.), Internet and Emotions (pp. 161-177). New York: Routledge.

Roeser, S. (Ed.) (2010). Emotions and Risky Technologies. New York: Springer.

Sagioglou, C., & Greitemeyer, T. (2014). Facebook’s Emotional Consequences: Why Facebook Causes a Decrease in Mood and why People Still Use it. Computers in Human Behavior, 35, 359-363. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2014.03.003

Sampson, T. (2012). Virality. Contagion Theory in the Age of Networks. Minessota: University of Minnesota Press.

Schofield-Clark, L. (2014). Mobile Media in the Emotional and Moral Economies of the Household. In G. Goggin, & L. Hjorth (Eds.), The Routledge Companion to Mobile Media (pp. 320-332). New York: Routledge.

Solomon, R.C. (Ed.) (2003). What Is an Emotion? Classic and Contemporary Readings. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Spitzberg, B.H. (2014). Toward a Model of Meme Diffusion (M3D). Communication Theory, 24, 311-339. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/comt.12042

Svensson, J. (2014). Power, Identity, and Feelings in Digital Late Modernity: The Rationality of Reflexive Emotion Displays Online. In T. Benski, & E. Fisher (Eds.), Internet and Emotions (pp. 17-32). New York: Routledge.

Turner, J.H., & Stets, J.E. (Eds.) (2007). Handbook of the So­ciology of Emotions. New York: Springer.

Vincent, J., & Fortunati, L. (Eds.) (2009). Electronic Emotion. The Mediation of Emotion via Information and Communication Technologies. Bern: Peter Lang.

Wahl-Jorgensen, K. (2013). Emotional Architecture of SocialMedia : The Facebook ‘Like’ button. 63rd Annual Conference of the International Communication Association (ICA). London (UK), 17-21/06.

Walter, T., Hourizi, R., Moncur, W., & Pitsillides, S. (2012). Does the Internet Change How We Die and Mourn? Overview and Analysis. Omega: Journal of Death and Dying, 64(4), 275-302.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Las emociones han adquirido una importancia creciente en nuestra época, en todos los ámbitos de la sociedad. Esta revalorización de la dimensión afectiva de la persona se ha reflejado, a su vez, en su inclusión como objeto de estudio en investigaciones de numerosas ramas del saber. También dentro de los estudios en Comunicación, y en concreto en relación con la tecnología digital, existe un interés académico por las emociones. Por medio de una profunda revisión bibliográfica, en este trabajo se traza un mapa del campo de estudio en el que convergen las emociones y la tecnología digital; más concretamente, en el uso de Internet. En él se advierte un campo de investigación vibrante, amplio y complejo, en el que confluyen aproximaciones de diferente tipo, tanto en el plano teórico como en el metodológico. El artículo presenta un panorama de las investigaciones realizadas en esta materia, que abarca desde el estudio de las redes sociales como espacios de interacción en el que las emociones son expresadas, el contagio emocional a gran escala o el análisis de sentimientos en las plataformas digitales. Se concluye que la Red no sólo despierta emociones en sus usuarios y sirve de cauce para la expresión de los afectos, sino que también influye en el modo en que dicho afecto se modula y despliega, así como en la configuración de la identidad de la persona.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

A diferencia de cuanto sucedía en épocas precedentes, donde la dimensión afectiva de la persona habitualmente quedaba desplazada a un plano secundario y confinada a la esfera privada, hoy en día vivimos inmersos en una fuerte cultura emocional, que permea todos los ámbitos de la vida social (Bendelow & Williams, 1998). Aunque a lo largo de la tradición occidental la reflexión sobre la naturaleza del afecto humano siempre ha estado presente –ya desde los escritos de Aristóteles, y más recientemente en Descartes, Spinoza o William James entre otros (Solomon, 2003)– también en el mundo académico se ha producido en las últimas décadas un «giro afectivo» (Clough & Halley, 2007); en el sentido de que las emociones se han convertido en objeto de estudio de diferentes disciplinas científicas (tales como la antropología, economía, lingüística, ingeniería informática, etc.). A ello han contribuido los avances realizados por la neurociencia, que han puesto de relieve el rol que cumplen las emociones en los procesos mentales y su papel capital en el desarrollo de las funciones cerebrales (Ferrés, 2014).

Existen, por tanto, diversas aproximaciones teóricas sobre las emociones, que son conceptualizadas y explicadas tanto desde enfoques neurobiológicos como socioculturales. En este sentido, no parece factible entender las emociones, su vivencia, expresión y comunicación sin tener en cuenta el contexto social en el que éstas se manifiestan, de ahí que una de las aproximaciones teóricas más fructíferas es la desarrollada desde la «sociología de las emociones» (Turner & Stets, 2007). No obstante, la compleja realidad de esta faceta de la naturaleza humana hace de ella un objeto de estudio interdisciplinar, pero sobre el que todavía no hay una visión comprehensiva, capaz de poner en común e integrar todas esas diversas disciplinas. Tampoco existe consenso conceptual y terminológico acerca de los fenómenos aquí englobados, tales como el afecto, las emociones, los sentimientos o las pasiones.

Paralelamente al auge de la dimensión afectiva en la vida social y en el ámbito académico, en las dos últimas décadas hemos asistido también a la creciente implantación social de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación (TIC). La tecnología ya está plenamente integrada en nuestro día a día; y la adopción, omnipresencia y ubicuidad de los dispositivos digitales no es una mera cuestión cuantitativa, ya que, como apunta Lasén (2014: 7), «su amplia difusión, personalización y la posibilidad de conexión permanente que crean, contribuyen a reconfigurar numerosos aspectos de la vida cotidiana y así como de los procesos de subjetivación y socialización contemporáneos».

No hay duda, por tanto, de que en la actualidad las personas ya se relacionan tanto en el entorno off-line como en el on-line; más aún, que las relaciones sociales están ya hibridadas entre ambos contextos. Al mismo tiempo, el ámbito digital presenta peculiaridades propias, que proceden de su condición electrónica y que a su vez afectan a la dimensión emocional de la persona. La vida social tradicional, que es más lenta y localizada, coexiste con la vida social digital (más rápida y desarraigada). Así pues, son dos regímenes espacio-temporales; y cada uno está acompañado de su correspondiente régimen emocional. El régimen emocional tecnológico es, sobre todo, un régimen de intensidades emocionales, en el que importa la cantidad de emoción, mientras que el régimen tradicional es sobre todo un régimen de cualidades emocionales. Aunque no es factible que el régimen tecnológico pueda algún día llegar a anular el tradicional –puesto que éste es la condición de posibilidad de aquél–; es indudable no obstante «que la coexistencia de ambos regímenes emocionales genera interferencias entre las lógicas emocionales propias de cada uno» (González, 2013: 13-14). Dicha coexistencia, por otra parte, provoca que el ámbito de análisis sobre tecnología digital y emociones sea amplio y complejo, pues ha de atender a las implicaciones que de él se derivan tanto en el plano presencial como en el digital.

2. Material y métodos

Desde una perspectiva histórica, la relación del mundo occidental con la tecnología ha sido siempre altamente emocional. Como la tecnología siempre se sitúa en el ámbito de lo novedoso, su irrupción abre la cuestión de cómo lo nuevo fluye dentro de lo antiguo, o de lo ya conocido. Este proceso, como apuntan Fortunati y Vincent (2009: 6), «se juega en un camino binario entre el polo de la curiosidad, la rareza, el nuevo riesgo y la incertidumbre, por un lado; y, por otro lado, los antiguos hábitos, la estabilidad, la seguridad, la certeza». A ello hay que sumarle el conjunto de significados, símbolos y valores que la tecnología lleva asociados. Por eso toda novedad tecnológica, especialmente en sus inicios, suscita un debate entre entusiastas y escépticos o, por decirlo en términos de Eco (1964), entre «apocalípticos e integrados».

Hoy en día, la creciente importancia de la dimensión afectiva en la vida social, por un lado; y, por otro, del papel adquirido por la tecnología y en concreto Internet en las interacciones cotidianas ha propiciado que el campo de investigación en el que confluyen ambas realidades sea muy fértil y variado, tanto en el plano de los enfoques conceptuales y metodologías empleadas como en el de los temas, emociones, colectivos sociales o dispositivos tecnológicos específicos que centran los diversos estudios y publicaciones hasta la fecha.

Con todo ello, el objetivo de este artículo es proporcionar, dentro del ámbito de los estudios de comunicación, un panorama del campo de investigación sobre Internet y emociones, mostrando las diferentes áreas de estudio y las publicaciones más relevantes en cada una de ellas. No abordaremos aquí, pues excede los límites de esta investigación, los estudios que examinan la inversión afectiva que las personas ponen en la tecnología digital, encarnada a través de diversos dispositivos, especialmente los teléfonos móviles.

Así pues, en las páginas siguientes y por medio de una amplia revisión bibliográfica, trazaremos un mapa de este campo, tomando como referencia la literatura académica que de manera explícita ha estudiado las emociones en relación con el nuevo ámbito de socialización y afloramiento emocional que es Internet. Para ello, en primer lugar presentaremos un marco con las principales cuestiones teóricas y metodológicas que intervienen en el estudio de la Red, y que han sido afrontadas desde diversas tradiciones disciplinares. A continuación exploraremos con más detalle la expresión de las emociones en las redes sociales, tanto en el plano micro (de las interacciones entre usuarios) como en el macro (considerando el fenómeno del contagio emocional, también conocido en el ámbito de la neuropsicología como identificación emocional).

3. Análisis y resultados

3.1. Cuestiones teóricas y metodológicas

El análisis de Internet como un espacio en el que las emociones son activadas y expresadas abarca muchos fenómenos diversos. La Red es un laboratorio excepcional para el análisis de las emociones porque, por un lado, ofrece una gran diversidad y cantidad de comunicación (de todo tipo, proveniente de un enorme y diverso grupo de personas), de la que la mayor parte es comunicación emocional. Por otro, estos actos de comunicación quedan registrados y con frecuencia incluyen metadatos como el tiempo y la localización, u otra información demográfica sobre su autor como el género, la edad o el tipo de comportamiento on-line (Benski & Fisher, 2014: 6).

Esta singularidad del ámbito on-line como objeto de estudio en relación con las emociones ha propiciado abundante y variada literatura científica. Dejando a un lado los estudios sobre la búsqueda de relaciones afectivas a través de Internet (el amor, como estado emocional por excelencia) ha sido examinado en su vertiente digital (Ben-Ze’ev, 2004; Kaufmann & Macey, 2012), algunos trabajos se centran en el análisis de una emoción particular:

• Empatía: la de los usuarios que se solidarizan con las tragedias ajenas, produciendo vídeos en YouTube (Pantti & Tikka, 2014).

• Fastidio: confiesan experimentarlo los niños y adolescentes cuando topan con contenido inadecuado en Internet (Livingstone & al., 2014).

• Envidia o celos, al leer el usuario de Facebook las actualizaciones de estado que hacen sus contactos (Muise & al., 2009; Sagioglou & Greitemeyer, 2014).

• Resentimiento: por ejemplo, de los trabajadores con un empleo precario, que se desahogan en diversos foros de Internet (Risi, 2014).

• Esperanza, que alimenta las interacciones en las webs de citas (Fürst, 2014).

• Odio; que se ampara, muchas veces, en el anonimato que puede proporcionar la Red (Perry & Olson, 2009).

• Sentimiento de pena y de duelo, que se expresa en Internet ante el fallecimiento de un ser querido (Walter & al., 2012; Jakoby & Reiser, 2014).

Hay trabajos que se enfocan en las capacidades expresivas de un determinado canal de comunicación, como Skype (Chiyoko-King-O’Riain, 2014) o el e-mail (Kato, Kato, & Akahori, 2007); mientras que otros centran su interés en determinados colectivos cuya actividad tiene una fuerte carga emocional, como las feministas (Reestorff, 2014), los activistas políticos (Knudsen & Stage, 2012) o los inmigrantes (Fortunati, Pertierra, & Vincent, 2012). Desde el punto de vista del marco teórico adoptado, las emociones digitales han sido abordadas desde los estudios culturales (Karatzogianni & Kuntsman, 2012), estudios de comunicación audiovisual (Garde-Hansen & Gorton, 2013), la alfabetización digital (Moeller, Powers, & Roberts, 2012), la domesticación de la tecnología (Schofield-Clark, 2014), los estudios de riesgo (Roeser, 2010) o la teoría «Queer» (Cefai, 2014), entre otros.

Como hemos señalado anteriormente, el objetivo de este trabajo es esbozar el estado del campo de estudio dentro de la disciplina de la Comunicación. Por ello, pasaremos por alto los trabajos que se aproximan desde otros enfoques, como la ingeniería informática. A este respecto, nos limitamos a indicar la importancia del «Affective computing», en el que convergen las ciencias computacionales, la psicología y la ciencia cognitiva y que investiga cómo diseñar ordenadores capaces de reconocer, interpretar e incluso simular emociones con el fin de mejorar las interacciones entre personas y ordenadores (Picard, 2003). También desde una aproximación vinculada a la lingüística computacional es creciente el peso del «análisis de sentimiento», esto es, del tipo de sentimiento (positivo, negativo o neutro) que una persona pudo sentir o intentó expresar al escribir cierta información, y que en el ámbito digital se aplica sobre todo en las redes sociales como Twitter o Facebook.

Dos de las cuestiones teóricas de fondo que marcan el debate en torno a las emociones en la esfera on-line, tanto en los estudios en Comunicación como en disciplinas afines, son: por un lado, cómo las emociones afloran y pueden medirse en Internet (Küster & Kappas, 2014) y, por otro, las diferencias y similitudes entre la expresión de las emociones en las relaciones cara a cara y en las relaciones mediadas por la tecnología digital (Boyns & Loprieno, 2014). Respecto a la primera, como indican Benski y Fisher (2014: 8), existen tres áreas para la medición de las emociones, cada una de las cuales requiere sus propios métodos y revela una faceta diferente de la intersección entre Internet y las emociones. Primero, podemos investigar grandes cantidades de contenido emocional ya disponible on-line (por medio de análisis cualitativo o cuantitativo de datos y de contenido). En segundo lugar, podemos indagar en la experiencia emocional de los usuarios (con autoinformes, empleando entrevistas o cuestionarios). En tercer lugar, podemos registrar respuestas corporales que indiquen estados emocionales en tiempo real, mientras usan Internet.

En cuanto a la expresión emocional en las interacciones mediadas por computador, hay que partir de la constatación de las peculiaridades del entorno digital, donde no existe la corporeidad que sí acompaña las relaciones presenciales ni necesariamente la comunicación entre los participantes es sincrónica. Puesto que el afecto tienen una base corporal y que cara a cara es más difícil controlar las emociones, la ausencia de ambos factores podría llevar a pensar que el ámbito digital es más frío emocionalmente, y que dificulta o limita la expresión de emociones. Sin embargo, en una amplia revisión bibliográfica sobre esta cuestión, Derks, Fischer y Bos (2008: 780) concluyen que «la comunicación mediada por ordenador no se caracteriza por la ausencia de emociones; al contrario (…), las emociones positivas se expresan en la misma medida que en las interacciones cara a cara, y las emociones negativas intensas incluso se expresan más abiertamente por ordenador».

Cuando la interacción mediada por la tecnología es de carácter textual y no visual (y, por tanto, faltan las claves no verbales, que sin duda son un elemento de gran riqueza para la expresión e interpretación de la dimensión afectiva), los internautas pueden paliar dicha ausencia mediante el uso de emoticonos (Jibril & Abdullah, 2013). Si la interacción digital es a través de vídeo, y existe por tanto reconocimiento facial mutuo, en principio es más fácil la expresión e interpretación de emociones (Kappas & Krämer, 2011). En efecto, cada uno de los dispositivos tecnológicos, aplicaciones o canales de comunicación lleva aparejado un particular «ancho de banda afectivo» (Lasén, 2010), esto es, permite pasar una determinada cantidad de información emocional. En este mismo sentido, Internet a su vez engloba diferentes entornos sociotécnicos que permiten que las emociones afloren en mayor o menor grado; por lo que la dimensión afectiva no se revela por igual en todas las interacciones y situaciones comunicativas que tienen lugar en la Red. Existen, por tanto, algunos «factores de emocionalidad» (Gómez-Cabranes, 2013: 219-223), tales como:

• Las posibilidades expresivas de cada de uno de esos entornos (no es lo mismo si es un blog, un chat, una red social –y cuál de ellas, en concreto–, etc.).

• Los temas y tópicos sobre los que gira la interacción.

• El contexto y propósito de uso de las personas.

• Su grado de anonimato o autorrevelación en las interacciones.

• La inversión de tiempo o frecuencia con que los usuarios se conectan al ámbito digital.

Así pues, aunque el régimen emocional digital es principalmente un régimen de intensidades emocionales, éstas no se dan por igual en todos los usos y ambientes del entorno digital, sino que están condicionadas, entre otros, por los factores arriba mencionados.

3.2. Emociones en las redes sociales

Tomar conciencia de las capacidades del ámbito digital como espacio y cauce para la expresión de emociones supone considerar Internet y sus aplicaciones no como un instrumento que usamos, sino como un lugar de experiencia y de subjetivación; más que un medio de comunicación se trata de un espacio que habitamos y nos habita (Lasén, 2014). Esto es especialmente evidente aunque no sólo, en las redes sociales, diseñadas precisamente para crear y mantener vínculos con otros, convirtiendo estas plataformas de sociabilidad en una de las muestras más representativas de la Web 2.0. El modo en que dicho diseño se concrete no es una decisión inicua en materia emocional, sino que condiciona la capacidad expresiva del usuario. Tal es el caso, por ejemplo, de Facebook y su único botón «Me gusta», impidiendo al usuario manifestar otros sentimientos negativos (desagrado, enfado, pena, etc.) con la misma facilidad (Wahl-Jorgensen, 2013). Las implicaciones derivadas de esta arquitectura emocional de las redes sociales van más allá, ya que, como indica Peyton (2014), con dicho botón la noción de gustar ha experimentado un cambio semiótico, pues se ha desplazado desde la esfera íntima y emocional de los individuos hacia la esfera pública. Más que un sentimiento, ahora es una acción, ya que «en lugar de estar vinculado a una sensación interna que reacciona tácitamente a un estímulo externo, ‘gustar’ se ha convertido ahora en una acción racional que connota una conexión externa entre un individuo, un elemento discursivo y una instancia social» (Peyton, 2014: 113).

Dentro del ámbito digital, la dimensión emocional está íntimamente vinculada a la configuración de la identidad de la persona. En las redes sociales cabe advertirlo en los procesos de reconocimiento y negociación del estatus, pues, como apunta Svensson (2014: 22), «cuanto más te enlaza la gente, más le da a ‘me gusta’ en tus publicaciones, más las comenta, etc., más alto apareces en los rankings de listas de lecturas recomendadas, en los flujos de noticias de las redes sociales (…) Ese incremento en el estatus va unido a sentimientos de satisfacción y bienestar. Más aún, las emociones positivas emergen cuando los individuos son capaces de reafirmar su autoconcepto del yo». Las emociones son usadas, en este sentido, como recursos en el trabajo identitario del usuario, en un medio, el digital, marcado por la interconectividad y donde la persona no puede reafirmar su concepto del yo sin ser visible para los demás.

Por otra parte, si atendemos al ámbito del seguimiento de la actualidad informativa, es fácil comprobar que las emociones también están en la base del acto de compartir contenidos y noticias en el entorno digital (Hermida, 2014). Aunque el componente emocional siempre ha estado presente en el procesamiento que hace el ciudadano de los diferentes mensajes mediáticos, ya sean informativos o de ficción, lo novedoso es que hoy en día, en plataformas como Twitter, la conversación colectiva en torno a determinados eventos de carácter político o social es una amalgama de información, opinión, interpretación y emociones, repetidas y amplificadas por la propia red, dando origen a lo que Papacharissi (2014) califica como «flujo de noticias afectivas». En él «no se involucra al lector cognitivamente, sino emocionalmente sobre todo. Con frecuencia, la misma noticia se repite una y otra vez, con poco o ningún input cognitivo nuevo, pero incrementando el input afectivo» (Papacharissi & Oliveira, 2012: 278).

3.3. Contagio emocional a gran escala

Como se ha señalado antes, Internet permite a los investigadores acceder a una enorme cantidad de contenido emocional disponible on-line. Dado que compartir emociones es imprescindible para la creación y mantenimiento de los vínculos sociales, de algún modo el estado de las redes sociales gira en torno a las emociones y sentimientos que manifiestan los usuarios sobre sí mismos, pero que al mismo tiempo pueden hallar eco entre sus círculos de contactos. Por eso, otras áreas de investigación fértiles y de creciente importancia son las relativas al estudio del contagio emocional a través de las redes sociales y, por otra parte, del fenómeno de la viralidad.

Recientemente, en un polémico experimento (Kramer, Guillory, & Hancock, 2014) llevado a cabo por investigadores de la universidad de Cornell, con ayuda de programadores de Facebook, el flujo de noticias de 690.000 usuarios fue manipulado durante una semana. Un grupo de usuarios recibía noticias positivas, mientras que a otro grupo se les proporcionaba noticias cargadas de connotaciones negativas. Una de las conclusiones fue que las personas que observan historias menos negativas en su flujo de noticias son menos propensas a escribir un mensaje negativo (y viceversa). El estudio indica que las emociones expresadas por otros a través de Facebook influyen en las emociones del propio usuario; y que para que se produzca el contagio emocional no son imprescindibles los encuentros cara a cara.

Otra investigación ha analizado durante un período de más de dos años las actualizaciones de estado en Facebook de cerca de un millón de usuarios; constatando también que tanto las publicaciones negativas como las positivas tenían cierta repercusión sobre los demás miembros de sus círculos sociales. Lo peculiar de esta investigación es que, partiendo de la premisa de que los fenómenos atmosféricos pueden influir en el estado anímico, analizaron la correlación entre los partes meteorológicos de diferentes ciudades y la actualización de estado de los usuarios que viven en ellas, comprobando que en los días de lluvia el número de publicaciones en Facebook que contienen expresiones positivas decayó un 1,19%, al tiempo que aumentaban los mensajes negativos en un 1,16%. Según los autores, «por cada persona afectada directamente, la lluvia altera la expresión emocional de entre una y dos personas más» (Coviello & al., 2014), incluso aunque haga buen tiempo en su lugar de residencia. En definitiva, las investigaciones de esta temática concuerdan que en la decisión de actualizar el usuario se ve influido por lo que le sucede a los contactos de su círculo social.

El contagio emocional a gran escala en el ámbito digital tiene otro foco de interés en la difusión viral de contenidos. Un tema que se ha investigado especialmente en el ámbito de la publicidad y el marketing (Dobele & al., 2007; Eckler & Bolls, 2011), donde los autores coinciden en que generar emociones –y, entre éstas, destacan la sorpresa y la alegría– es un requisito necesario para que un vídeo sea compartido en el entorno digital. Como explica Dafonte (2014: 202), en la decisión de compartir un vídeo viral confluyen «por una parte, las motivaciones que tienen que ver con necesidades psicológicas o emocionales del reemisor potencial y, por otra, las motivaciones que tienen que ver con el contenido del vídeo viral. Del encuentro entre ambas esferas en cada individuo surge la decisión de compartir un viral publicitario».

Más allá del ámbito estrictamente publicitario, es creciente la atención prestada al fenómeno de los «memes», esto es, las imágenes, vídeos e ideas contagiosas que circulan viralmente por Internet, movilizando las emociones de los usuarios tanto horizontalmente (a través de los blogs, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter) como verticalmente, cuando los medios tradicionales también se hacen eco de la resonancia emocional que aquellos adquieren. Comprender e intentar predecir el proceso de difusión de este tipo de contenidos ha sido objeto de análisis por parte de los académicos (Sampson, 2012; Spitzberg, 2014).

4. Discusión y conclusiones

La popularización en el uso de las tecnologías digitales ha hecho de ellas una presencia constante junto a las personas; de tal modo que el contacto sensorial con dichos dispositivos es el primer paso para suscitar una relación afectiva. También la esfera digital –el ámbito al que se accede a través de las pantallas– es un espacio en el que aflora y se expresa la dimensión afectiva de los usuarios. Dicho de otro modo, Internet es una «tecnología afectiva», en el sentido de que es cauce para la expresión de emociones y participa en la constitución de la subjetividad de la persona. Permite fijar las emociones, transformándolas en «inscripciones digitales» (Lasén, 2010), en objetos que se pueden almacenar, gestionar, visualizar, comparar, compartir, etc.

Una aproximación a Internet desde el punto de vista de las emociones, entendidas como un valor predominante de la sociedad contemporánea, permite dibujar –como hemos hecho a lo largo de estas páginas– un campo de investigación vibrante, amplio y complejo, en el que confluyen aproximaciones de diferentes tradiciones y escuelas teóricas, desde la alfabetización digital a los estudios culturales, pasando por la comunicación audiovisual o los estudios de género. Ya sea en el nivel micro de las interacciones a través de diferentes plataformas (redes sociales, blogs, foros, etc.) como en el macro (por medio del contagio emocional a gran escala), queda patente que la Red no sólo es un canal para la manifestación de las diversas emociones y afectos de los usuarios, sino que también contribuye a modelarlos y amplificarlos. Desde el punto de vista metodológico, sigue por delante el reto de combinar técnicas cualitativas y cuantitativas que permitan medir y comparar paralelamente las emociones en el mundo off-line y en el on-line.

Esa confluencia de los ámbitos presencial y digital (con sus regímenes espacio-temporales y emocionales propios), las prácticas socioculturales asociadas al uso de la Web (junto con los condicionantes técnicos, legales y de mercado) o las peculiaridades de las interacciones mediadas por ordenador frente a los encuentros cara a cara son algunas de las cuestiones que articulan los estudios en esta materia. En este sentido, los aportes de las investigaciones provenientes de la neurociencia siguen arrojando luz para una mejor comprensión de las emociones.

Por último, y desde un punto de vista más amplio, cabe aventurar que la creciente extensión del llamado «Internet de las cosas», haciendo más ubicua e inmersiva la presencia de la tecnología en la vida diaria, así como la aparición de los dispositivos vestibles (wearables) –que supone un paso más en la adaptación e integración corporal de la tecnología al usuario–, y los avances en el diseño de robots sociales (facilitando una interacción más natural con los humanos), son algunas líneas de investigación futura que despuntan como de interés en el estudio de las emociones en el uso de la tecnología digital.

Referencias

Ben-Ze’ev, A. (2004). Love Online. Emotions on the Internet. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Bendelow, G., & Williams, S.J. (Eds.) (1998). Emotions in Social Life: Critical Themes and Contemporary Issues. London: Routled­ge.

Benski, T., & Fisher, E. (2014). Introduction: Investigating Emotions and the Internet. In T. Benski, & E. Fisher (Eds.), Internet and Emotions (pp. 1-14). New York: Routledge.

Boyns, D., & Loprieno, D. (2014). Feeling through Presence: To­ward a Theory of Interaction Rituals and Parasociality in Online Social Works. In T. Benski, & E. Fisher (Eds.), Internet and Emotions (pp. 33-47). New York: Routledge.

Cefai, S. (2014). The Lesbian Intimate: Capacities for Feeling in Convergent Media Context. Participations: Journal of Audience and Reception Studies, 11(1), 237-253.

Chiyoko-King-O’Riain, R. (2014). Transconnective Space, Emo­tions and Skype: The Transnational Emotional Practices of Mixed International Couples in the Republic of Ireland. In T. Benski, & E. Fisher (Eds.), Internet and Emotions (pp. 131-143). New York: Routledge.

Clough, P. T., & Halley, J. (2007). The Affective Turn: Theorizing the Social. Durham: Duke University Press.

Coviello, L., Sohn, Y., & al. (2014). Detecting Emotional Contagion in Massive Social Networks. PLoS ONE, 9(3), e90315. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0090315

Dafonte, A. (2014). Claves de la publicidad viral: De la motivación a la emoción en los vídeos más compartidos. Comunicar, 43, 199-207. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-20

Derks, D., Fischer, A.H., & Bos, A.E. (2008). The Role of Emotion in Computer-mediated Communication: A Review. Computers in Human Behavior, 24(3), 766-785. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.­chb.2007.04.004

Dobele, A., Lindgreen, A., Beverland, M., Vanhamme, J., & Van-Wijk, R. (2007). Why Pass on Viral Messages? Because They Connect Emotionally. Business Horizons, 50, 291-304.

Eckler, P., & Bolls, P. (2011). Spreading the Virus: Emotional Tone of Viral Advertising and its Effect on For-warding Intention and Attitudes. Journal of Interactive Advertising, 11(2), 1-11. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15252019.2011.10722180

Eco, U. (1964). Apocalittici e integrati: comunicazioni di massa e teorie della cultura di massa. Milano: Bompiani.

Ferrés, J. (2014). Las pantallas y el cerebro emocional. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Fortunati, L., & Vincent, J. (2009). Introduction. In J. Vincent, & L. Fortunati (Eds.), Electronic Emotion. The Mediation of Emotion via Information and Communication Technologies (pp. 1-31). Bern: Peter Lang.

Fortunati, L., Pertierra, R., & Vincent, J. (2012). Migration, Dias­pora and Information Technology in Global Societies. London: Routledge.

Fürst, H. (2014). Emotional Socialization on a Swedish Internet Dating Site: The Search and Hope for Happiness. In T. Benski & E. Fisher (Eds.), Internet and Emotions (pp. 99-112). New York: Routledge.

Garde-Hansen, J., & Gorton, K. (2013). Emotion Online. Theoriz­ing Affect on the Internet. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Gómez-Cabranes, L. (2013). Las emociones del internauta. In L. Flamarique, & M. D’Oliveira-Martins (Eds.), Emociones y estilos de vida: Radiografía de nuestro tiempo (pp. 211-243). Madrid: Biblio­teca Nueva.

González, A.M. (2013). Introducción: emociones y análisis social. In L. Flamarique, & M. D’Oliveira-Martins (Eds.), Emociones y estilos de vida: radiografía de nuestro tiempo (pp. 9-24). Madrid: Biblio­teca Nueva.

Hermida, A. (2014). Tell Everyone. Why We Share & Why It Matters. Toronto: Doubleday Canada.

Jakoby, N.R., & Reiser, S. (2014). Grief 2.0: Exploring Virtual Cemeteries. In T. Benski, & E. Fisher (Eds.), Internet and Emo­tions (pp. 65-79). New York: Routledge.

Jibril, T.A., & Abdullah, M.H. (2013). Relevance of Emoticons in Computer-mediated Communication Contexts: An Overview. Asian Social Science, 9(4), 201-207. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5­539/ass.v9n4p201

Kappas, A., & Krämer, N.C. (Eds.) (2011). Face-to-face Commu­nication over the Internet: Emotions in a Web of Culture. Cam­bridge: Cambridge University Press.

Karatzogianni, A., & Kuntsman, A. (Eds.) (2012). Digital Cultures and the Politics of Emotion: Feelings, Affect and Technological Change. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Kato, Y.; Kato, S., & Akahori, K. (2007). Effects of Emotional Cues transmitted in E-mail Communication on the Emotions Experienced by Senders and Receivers. Computers in Human Behavior, 23(4), 1894-1905. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2005.11.005

Kaufmann, J.C., & Macey, D. (2012). Love Online. Cambridge: Polity.

Knudsen, B.T., & Stage, C. (2012). Contagious Bodies. An Inves­tigation of Affective and Discursive Strategies in Contemporary Online Activism. Emotion, Space and Society, 5(3), 148-155. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emospa.2011.08.004

Kramer, A.D., Guillory, J.E., & Hancock J.T. (2014). Experimental Evidence of Massive-scale Emotional Contagion through Social Networks. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS), 111(24), 8.788-8.790.

Küster D., & Kappas, A. (2014). Measuring Emotions in Individuals and Internet Communities. In T. Benski, & E. Fisher (Eds.), Internet and Emotions (pp. 48-61). New York: Routledge.

Lasén, A. (2010). Mobile Media and Affectivity: Some Thoughts about the Notion of Affective Bandwidth. In J.R Höflich, G.F. Kircher, C. Linke, & I. Schlote, (Eds.), Mobile Media and the Change of Everyday Life (pp. 131-154). Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang.

Lasén, A. (2014). Introducción. Las mediaciones digitales de la educación sentimental de los y las jóvenes. In I. Megía Quirós, & E. Ro­dríguez-San-Julián (Coords.), Jóvenes y comunicación. La impronta de lo virtual (pp. 7-16). Madrid: Fundación de Ayuda contra la Drogadicción.

Livingstone, S., Kirwil, L., Ponte, C., & Staksrud, E. (2014). In their Own Words: What Bothers Children Online? European Journal of Communication, 29(3), 271-288. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.117­7/­0267323114521045

Moeller, S., Powers, E., & Roberts, J. (2012). «El mundo desconectado» y «24 horas sin medios»: alfabetización mediática para la conciencia crítica de los jóvenes. Comunicar, 39, 45-52. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C39-2012-02-04

Muise, A., Christofides, E., & Desmarais, S. (2009). More Infor­mation than You Ever Wanted: Does Facebook Bring Out the Green-Eyed Monster of Jealousy? CyberPsychology & Behavior, 12(4), 441-444. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cpb.2008.0263

Pantti, M., & Tikka, M. (2014). Cosmopolitan Empathy and User-Ge­nerated Disaster Appeal Videos on YouTube. In T. Benski, & E. Fisher (Eds.), Internet and Emotions (pp. 178-192). New York: Routledge.

Papacharissi, Z. (2014). Toward New Journalism(s). Affective News, Hybridity, and liminal Spaces. Journalism Studies, 27-40. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1461670X.2014.890328

Papacharissi, Z., & Oliveira, F. (2012). Affective News and Net­worked Publics: The Rhythms of News Storytelling on #Egypt. Journal of Communication, 62(2), 266-282. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1460-2466.2012.01630.x

Perry, B., & Olsson, P. (2009). Cyberhate: the Globalization of Hate. Information & Communication Technology Law, 18(2), 185-199. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13600830902814984

Peyton, T. (2014). Emotion to Action? Deconstructing the Onto­logical Politics of the ‘Like’ Button. In T. Benski, & E. Fisher (Eds.), Internet and Emotions (pp. 113-128). New York: Routledge.

Picard, R.W. (2003). Affective computing: Challenges. Interna­tional Journal of Human Computer Studies, 59(1-2), 55-64. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1071-5819(03)00052-1

Reestorff, C.M. (2014). Mediatised affective activism: The Activist Imaginary and the Topless Body in the Femen Movement. Con­vergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, 20(4), 478-495. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1354­856514541358

Risi, E. (2014). Emerging Resentment in SocialMedia : Job In­security and Plots of Emotions in the New Virtual Environments. In T. Benski, & E. Fisher (Eds.), Internet and Emotions (pp. 161-177). New York: Routledge.

Roeser, S. (Ed.) (2010). Emotions and Risky Technologies. New York: Springer.

Sagioglou, C., & Greitemeyer, T. (2014). Facebook’s Emotional Consequences: Why Facebook Causes a Decrease in Mood and why People Still Use it. Computers in Human Behavior, 35, 359-363. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2014.03.003

Sampson, T. (2012). Virality. Contagion Theory in the Age of Networks. Minessota: University of Minnesota Press.

Schofield-Clark, L. (2014). Mobile Media in the Emotional and Moral Economies of the Household. In G. Goggin, & L. Hjorth (Eds.), The Routledge Companion to Mobile Media (pp. 320-332). New York: Routledge.

Solomon, R.C. (Ed.) (2003). What Is an Emotion? Classic and Contemporary Readings. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Spitzberg, B.H. (2014). Toward a Model of Meme Diffusion (M3D). Communication Theory, 24, 311-339. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/comt.12042

Svensson, J. (2014). Power, Identity, and Feelings in Digital Late Modernity: The Rationality of Reflexive Emotion Displays Online. In T. Benski, & E. Fisher (Eds.), Internet and Emotions (pp. 17-32). New York: Routledge.

Turner, J.H., & Stets, J.E. (Eds.) (2007). Handbook of the So­ciology of Emotions. New York: Springer.

Vincent, J., & Fortunati, L. (Eds.) (2009). Electronic Emotion. The Mediation of Emotion via Information and Communication Technologies. Bern: Peter Lang.

Wahl-Jorgensen, K. (2013). Emotional Architecture of SocialMedia : The Facebook ‘Like’ button. 63rd Annual Conference of the International Communication Association (ICA). London (UK), 17-21/06.

Walter, T., Hourizi, R., Moncur, W., & Pitsillides, S. (2012). Does the Internet Change How We Die and Mourn? Overview and Analysis. Omega: Journal of Death and Dying, 64(4), 275-302.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/15
Accepted on 31/12/15
Submitted on 31/12/15

Volume 24, Issue 1, 2016
DOI: 10.3916/C46-2016-02
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 13
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?