Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This research analyzes the problematic use of mobile phone, the phenomenon of fear of missing Out (FoMO) and the communication between parents and children in students who attend secondary education in public and private centers of the regions of Canary Islands, Balearic Islands and Valencia. The research involved 569 students aged between 12 and 19 years. The instruments used were the «Mobil phone related experiences questionnaire», the Spanish adaptation of the «Fear of missing out questionnaire» and the communication dimension with parents of the «Parents and peers attachment inventory». The results show that: 1) An increased problematic use of the mobile phone is associated with a higher level of FoMO; 2) The students who frequently use the mobile phone and communicate more with their friends have a higher average score in the «Mobile phone related experiences questionnaire» and in the «Fear of missing out questionnaire»; 3) The students that use the mobile phone for less time has a greater communication with fathers and mothers. We discuss the relevance of the study of FoMO and parents-children communication as factors that affect the problematic use of mobile phone in young people. Centers’ guidance teams, families and teachers have to create a common learning space to promote the responsible use of mobile phone.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Information and communication technologies (ICT) are creating new communication environments (Malo-Cerrato, 2006, Arab & Díaz, 2015). In Spain, the use of ICT among children between 10 to 15 years of age is widespread (92.4%) (INE, 2017). The young people of the «Generation Z,» the first generation born in the 21st century, are characterized by incorporating ICT during their learning/socialization period (Urosa, 2015) and are integrating them at an early age in their daily life (García & Monferrer, 2009).

The use of technology has grown notably in Spanish households: 81.9% had access to the Internet in 2016; this percentage rose to 83.4% in 2017 (National Institute of Statistics (2016, 2017).) The main type of Internet connection is via the mobile phone. 97.4% of households have at least one. The use of technological devices and the place they occupy in the home generates new forms of relationship between the members of the family (Torrecillas-Lacave, Vázquez-Barrio, & Monteagudo-Barandalla, 2017).

The aim of our work is to analyze the problematic use of the mobile phone, the Fear of Missing Out (FoMO) and the parent-child communication in students between 12 and 19 years old. It specifically aims to: a) determine whether there are statistically significant relationships between these variables; b) determine whether there are significant differences in these variables according to sex, age, the frequency of use of the mobile phone, and the type of people whom students communicate most with using the mobile phone.

1.1. Problematic use of the mobile phone

The use of the mobile phone has instrumental and symbolic functions for young people. The mobile phone is a multipurpose tool for communication, expression, leisure, and information (Chóliz, Villanueva, & Chóliz, 2009); it also has a symbolic dimension formed of appearance, prestige, and autonomy. The mobile phone facilitates the possibility of appropriately managing social relations and groups the user belongs to (such as family, peer, or political groups) in real time (García & Monferrer, 2009). On its own, the mobile phone is not harmful, and its proper use can have beneficial effects: it favors children’s development, offers wide possibilities of access to information and enhances learning; it also provides the possibility of parental supervision (Bartau-Rojas, Airbe-Barandiaran, & Oregui-González, 2018). An emerging indicator of the problematic use of the mobile phone is when it is consulted excessively; this generates feelings of insecurity, irritation, evasion, isolation (Beranuy, Oberst, Carbonell, & Chamarro, 2009), states of anxiety and depression, and obsessive-compulsive tendencies (Przybylski, Murayama, DeHaan, & Gladwell, 2013; Roberts, Pullig, & Manolis, 2015). It can also cause problems at school and juvenile delinquency (Lei & Wu, 2007). In short, its misuse has psychophysiological, affective and relational consequences, and it deteriorates personal relationships and communication with the immediate environment (Seo, Park, Kim, & Park, 2016).

Adolescents are the most vulnerable group in the problematic use of mobile phones (Gil, del-Valle, Oberst, & Chamarro, 2015, Przybylski & al., 2013); from their earliest childhood they are exposed to ICT, and they use them without specific training (Berríos, Buxarrais, & Garcés, 2015). Regarding the differences between sexes, girls use their mobile phones more to cope with anxious moods, overcome boredom or not feel alone, and make a greater number of mobile phone consultations compared to boys (Chóliz & al., 2009). Boys use the mobile phone for commercial reasons, coordination and entertainment tasks (Beranuy & al., 2009), they have a higher degree of “fear of not feeling connected” (Dossey, 2014), and more difficulties to stop using it excessively (De- la-Villa-Moral, & Suárez, 2016).

1.2. Fear of Missing Out (FoMO)

Przybylski and others (2013) conducted the first scientific research to operationalize the FoMO concept, and they designed the first self-report instrument to measure the phenomenon; these authors define the construct as “the generalized perception that others may be experiencing rewarding experiences of which one is absent” (Przybylski, & al., 2013: 1841). FoMO can happen with or without a mobile phone, but it has been associated with the use of mobile phones given the possibilities they provide for an unlimited connection.

FoMO is explained from the theory of self-determination (Ryan, & Deci, 2000); according to this theory it is understood as a self-regulating limbo derived from situational or chronic deficits in the satisfaction of psychological needs such as the need to act effectively in the world, have personal initiative and have relationships with others (Riordan, Flett, Hunter, Scarf, & Conner, 2015). People with unmet psychological needs have a high level of FoMO. This can increase in adolescents since they face significant challenges and obstacles to form their identity and gain their autonomy.

Various investigations link FoMO with the use of the mobile phone. In the study by Alt (2015), a relationship was found between FoMO, the problematic use of social networks on the mobile phone and academic motivation. Adolescents with the greatest need to be popular on social networks experience FoMO more than those who do not have that need (Beyens, Frison, & Eggermont, 2016); FoMO encourages people to connect to social networks and increases the fear in adolescents of not feeling connected or of missing out on experiences in their social environment (Elhai, Levine, Dvrorak, & Hall, 2016).

Oberst, Wegmann, Stodt, Brand, and Chamarro (2017) reported that people with anxiety experience FoMO and improperly use social networks on the mobile phone. This happens because young people expect the use of social networks to increase their positive emotions and eliminate or attenuate their negative emotions. However, the relief of such emotions is momentary, and the feeling of discomfort increases in the long term.

1.3. Communication between parents and children

The family is the first social group where children interact. Through communication, the family knows and negotiates the spaces of daily life, conveys the beliefs, customs and lifestyles of each household (Rodrigo & Palacios, 2014). Family communication is a determining factor in developing attachment between children and their parents or caregivers. Attachment is defined by Armsden and Greenberg (1987) as a meaningful and lasting affective bond with a father, mother or a close peer; it is characterized by good communication, emotional closeness, and trust. Attachment is negatively related to depression and aggression (Lei & Wu, 2007). The development and strength of attachments begin in childhood and depend on physical proximity. As children grow up, physical proximity is less important, and attachment can be sustained through communication tools such as the mobile phone (instant messaging, social networks) (Lepp, Li, & Barkley, 2016). Communication is an essential element in the development of attachment in adolescence.

The incursion of ICT in society generates new dynamics in family communication in a positive and negative way. Carvalho, Francisco, and Relvas (2015) point out how ICT can change family dynamics in a positive way. For example, the possibility of communication in real time and at low cost, despite the geographical distance of the members of the family unit (Subject, verb). Quality communication between adolescents and their parents correlates negatively with the degree of Internet addictions (Liu, Fang, Deng, & Zhang, 2012). According to Davis (2001), ICT can have adverse effects on communication as they affect the quality of family relationships; this negative impact can be defined explicitly in the verbal and non-verbal disconnection that can produce misunderstandings and distancing. Therefore, it is necessary to study the positive and negative impact of ICT on family communication.

2. Method

2.1. Participants

A total of 569 students from three secondary schools in Mallorca (N = 425), Valencia (N = 70) and Tenerife (N = 74) participated in the research. These centers decided to participate in the study for two reasons: a) their interest in raising awareness among their students about the problems generated by the inappropriate use of mobile phones, and b) their desire to promote responsible use of the mobile phone. The centers in Mallorca and Valencia are privately owned but receive state funding, and the one in Tenerife was a state school. The distribution according to sex was 61.1% female and 38.8% male. The age range was from 12 to 19 years of age (Mean=14.6, SD =1.87); 49% were between the ages of 12 and 14, and 51% between 15 and 19 years old. The distribution according to school year was: 33% were in 1st and 2nd year of Compulsory Secondary Education (CSE), 28% 3rd and 4th year of CSE and 38% in 1st and 2nd year of Upper Secondary Education.

2.2. Instruments

A questionnaire was used in the study that collected information about personal characteristics, the problematic use of the mobile phone, FoMO and parent-child communication. The problematic use of mobile phones was analyzed by means of the Mobile Related Experiences Questionnaire (MREQ) designed by Beranuy, Chamarro, Graner, and Carbonell (2009). This questionnaire was developed from the Internet Related Experiences Questionnaire (Gracia, Vigo, Fernández, & Marcó, 2002). The MREQ has 10 items with 4 response alternatives, which range from 1 (almost never) to 4 (almost always). The items are grouped into two factors: the “conflicts” factor has five items, while the other five are grouped into the “communicational and emotional use” factor. Beranuy, Chamarro, Graner, and Carbonell (2009) point out that the internal consistency of the first and second factors, applying the Cronbach ? coefficient, was 0.81 and 0.79, respectively. The internal consistency index of the MREQ was 0.80.

FoMO was analyzed using the Spanish adaptation of the Fear of Missing out questionnaire (FoMO-S) of Przybylski & al. (2013) prepared by Gil & al. (2015). This instrument examines the fears and concerns that the individual may experience when they are out of touch with the experiences of their social environment. The FoMO-S has 10 items with five response alternatives, ranging from 1 (nothing) to 5 (a lot). Gil & al. (2015) point out that the internal consistency index of FoMO-S, applying the Cronbach ? coefficient, was 0.85.

Parent-child communication was analyzed with the Spanish version of the Parent and Peer Attachment Inventory (PPAI) of Gallarin and Alonso-Arbiol (2013). This instrument was designed from the scale of Armsden and Greenberg (1987), and it examines three dimensions: Trust, Communication, and Alienation concerning fathers, mothers, and peers. The study analyzed the second dimension in which the amplitude and quality of the communication that children have with their fathers (PPAI-F) and mothers (PPAI-M) are examined. PPAI-F and IPPAI-M have 9 items, with 5 response alternatives, from 1 (almost never or never) to 5 (almost always or always). Gallarin and Alonso-Arbiol (2013) point out that the internal consistency index of PPAI-F, applying the Cronbach ? coefficient, was 0.88, and the internal consistency index of PPAI-M was 0.87.

2.3. Procedure

The management teams of the centers approved the development of the investigation. The students and the family were informed about the nature of the study to obtain their consent. Meetings were held with the teaching staff of the centers to explain the purpose of the study as well as to specify the dates to do the questionnaires. The three instruments were applied in the classrooms by one of the researchers during school hours.

2.4. Data analysis

The data analysis was performed with the SPSS21 statistical program and included the analysis of the descriptive statistics for each of the variables studied, reliability coefficient, Pearson correlation coefficient, analysis of variance, contrasts of means for independent groups and effect size (Cohen’s d and Eta squared).

3. Results

3.1. Statistics of the analyzed variables

The MREQ, FoMO-S, PPAI-M and PPAI-F statistics are shown in Table 1. The distribution of MREQ and FoMO-S scores has positive asymmetry indexes. Based on the clusters identified by Carbonell & al. (2012) starting from the MREQ scores, our research found that 52% of students “have no problems” with the use of mobile phones, 46% have “occasional problems”, and 2% have “frequent problems”. The distribution of participants’ scores has a negative asymmetry in both the PPAI-M and the PPAI-F. In both cases, the students have high scores in the quality of communication with their parents. A positive correlation was observed between the MREQ and FoMO-E scores (r=0.53, p<.005); students who have a more problematic use of the mobile phone tend to have a higher degree of FoMO. Likewise, a positive correlation was observed (r= 0.55, p<.005) between the PPAI-M and PPAI-F scores; students with a higher quality of communication with their mothers tend to have a higher quality of communication with their fathers.

3.2. Problematic use of the mobile phone

There are significant differences between the mean scores in the MREQ according to age: the group of 15-19-year-olds has a significantly higher mean average score than the group of 12-14-year-olds. In other words, the eldest one is the more problematic is the use of the mobile phone. However, the effect size is low.

The analysis of variance showed significant differences between the mean average scores in the MREQ according to the frequency of use of the mobile phone: the group of students using the mobile phone for more than 4 hours has a significantly higher mean average score than the other two groups. In other words, the greater the number of hours on the mobile phone, the higher the problematic use of it. The effect size is moderate. Finally, the analysis of variance showed significant differences between the mean average scores in the MREQ according to the people whom the students communicate with most by mobile phone: those who communicate more with friends have a significantly higher mean average score than those who communicate more with their parents. In other words, they have more problems with the use of the mobile phone. However, the effect size is low. No significant differences were observed between the mean scores of the QMRE according to sex.

3.3. Fear of missing out

The analysis of variance revealed significant differences between the mean average scores in the FoMO-E as a function of the frequency of use of the mobile phone: the students who use the mobile phone for more than four hours have a significantly higher mean average score than the rest of the students. In other words, they are more afraid of not feeling connected. The effect size is high.

The analysis of variance showed significant differences between the mean average scores in the FoMO-E according to the people whom the students communicate with most by means of the mobile phone: the group of those who communicate more with the friends has a mean average score significantly higher than the group that communicates more with parents.

This means that students who communicate more with friends are more afraid of not feeling connected to them. The effect size is moderate. No significant differences were observed between the mean FoMO-E scores according to sex and age.

3.4. Mothers-children communication

There are significant differences between the mean average PPAI-M scores according to gender: female students have a higher score in the quality of communication with the mother, compared to male students. However, the effect size is low.

The contrast of means showed significant differences in PPAI-M according to age: the group of 12-14-year-olds has a significantly higher mean score than the group of 15-19-year-olds. The older they are, the lower the quality of communication with the mother; however, the effect size low.

The analysis of variance showed significant differences between the mean average PPAI-M scores according to the frequency of mobile phone use: the group of students who use the mobile phone for 0 to 2 hours has a significantly higher mean average score than those in the groups that use it for more time. In other words, the lower the use of the mobile phone the more communication there is with the mother. However, the effect size is low. No significant differences were observed between the mean average scores of the PPAI-M according to the people whom the students communicate with more on the mobile phone.

3.5. Fathers-children communication

The contrast of means for independent groups showed significant differences between the mean average PPAI-F scores according to age: the group of 12-14-year-olds has a significantly higher mean average score than the group of 15-19-year-olds. The older you are, the lower the quality of communication with the father is; however, the effect size is low.

The analysis of variance showed significant differences between the average scores of the PPAIF. According to the frequency of the mobile phone use: the group of students who use the mobile phone for 0 to 2 hours has a significantly higher mean average score than the groups that use it for more time; in other words, the lower the use of the mobile phone the more communication there is with the father. However, the effect size is low. No significant differences were observed between the mean average PPAI-F scores according to the sex and the people whom the students communicated with most by mobile phone.

4. Discussion and conclusions

The aim of our research was to analyze the problematic use of the mobile phone, FoMO, and communication between parents and children in Secondary Education students.

a) Regarding the problematic use of the mobile phone, 46% of students had “occasional problems” and 2% “frequent problems”. The results found do not agree with those of the study by Carbonell et al. (2012), where only 16% of adolescents expressed “occasional problems” and 2% “frequent problems”. Our results also show that the use of the mobile phone is increasing in the age range of 15-19 years of age. This coincides with the results of other studies (de-la-Villa & al., 2016; Cruces, Guil, Sánchez, & Pereira, 2016): the problems with the mobile phone use increase during adolescence compared to its use in preadolescence, and they decrease in young adults. In the adolescence stage, the mobile phone becomes an instrumental and symbolic tool that allows young people to interact with peers, look for autonomy, obtain recognition and externalize their identity (Chóliz & al., 2009). Our research shows that when students use their mobile phone for more than two hours a day, there is a greater chance that there will be a problematic use of it, compared to those who use it for less than two hours. In addition, those who communicated more with their friends tended to use the mobile phone problematically. These results are in line with those obtained by Cruz and others (2016), who reported that the problematic use of mobile phones increases when the number of hours of use per week increases.

b) Regarding the Fear of Missing Out, we observed that the degree of FoMO among students is greater as the frequency of the mobile phone use increases. At the same time, the students with FoMO tend to connect more frequently to the mobile phone because they feel more fear of not being connected, and of missing out on the experiences that this medium offers them; thus, a vicious circle is generated from which it is not easy to escape (Beyens & al., 2016; Elhai & al., 2016). As for the relationship between FoMO and the preference to communicate via mobile phone with friends or family, it was found that students with a higher degree of FoMO tend to communicate more with friends. This could be explained by the stage of the life cycle they are going through: in adolescence, connection with and recognition of peers is sought (Rodrigo & Palacios, 2014); it is a stage in which one feels the need to belong to the group and the desire to be socially connected (Gil & al., 2015). FoMO can lead to an increase in the frequency of peer-to-peer communication, which can lead to more problematic use of the mobile phone.

c) With respect to the communication between parents and children, the results showed significant differences between sexes: girls communicated more with their mothers than boys. These results are consistent with the research of Alvarado-de-Rattia (2013) in preadolescents and Spanish adolescents. According to Sánchez-Queija and Oliva (2003), the type of affective bond established in childhood with parents is related to sex. A bond of secure attachment is more frequent in women. It is characterized by a high degree of affection and communication, both with the father and with the mother. On the other hand, the link between the type of cold control and low level of affection with the mother is more frequent among boys. The students who say that they have a better quality of communication with their mother and father spend less time on their mobile phones. As regards to age differences, it was found that 12-14-year-old students communicated more with their parents. There is a transition from childhood to adolescence in this period, which is why the reference figures of their parents are very important (Lei & Wu, 2007); even minors are aware of the importance of their parents as regulators of Internet content. However, this influence decreases as children grow up in favor of their friends and colleagues (Sánchez-Valle, de-Frutos-Torres, & Vázquez-Barrio, 2017).

Malo-Cerrato, Martín-Perpiña, and Viñas-Poch (2018) point out the contagious effect that families can exercise in the use of new technologies; adolescents who use ICT excessively perceive that their mothers and siblings also use them intensively, which shows the family influence regarding the use of ICT. Older students acquire more skills in the use of interactive media, which generates less dependence on parents; in turn, parents feel less able to regulate the use of such means in their sons and daughters (Bartau-Rojas, Aierbe-Barandiaran, & Oregui-González, 2018).

d) As for the relationship between the problematic use of the mobile phone and the fear of missing out on experiences, a positive and significant relationship was observed between both variables. This result coincides with those reported in the study by Fuster, Chamarro, and Oberst (2017) and Gil & al. (2015). The fear of not feeling connected is caused by the dissatisfaction of psychological needs (Riordan, Flett, Hunter, Scarf, & Conner, 2015), and is a mediating factor in the use of the mobile phone (Carbonell et al., 2012). In the study by Oberst et al. (2017), it was observed, using a structural equation model, that FoMO is the mediating factor between depression, anxiety and the increase in the problematic use of the mobile phone.

e) A positive and significant relationship was also observed in the level of communication between fathers and children and the level of communication between mothers and children. Although students prefer to communicate more with their friends, communication with their parents is still important as it is an essential part of attachment in family dynamics (Armsden, & Greenberg, 1987). In line with what was reported by Lepp, Li, and Barkley (2016) as children grow up, physical proximity is less important for attachment bonds; communication tools such as the mobile phone can help maintain these attachment bonds.

In conclusion, our research shows an increase in the problematic use of mobile phones among secondary school students. The higher the use of the mobile phone, the greater the degree of FoMO; the adolescents’ fear of missing out on their experiences reinforces their desire to use their mobile phones more frequently to feel connected and satisfy unmet psychological needs, which in turn impels them to use mobile phones in a problematic way. In adolescence, parent-child communication is still important. The mobile phone can be a tool to maintain communication and attachment. The regulated use of the mobile phone denotes appropriate parent-children communication. Technological devices such as the mobile phone should be studied as instruments that enhance family relationships.

The training of young people in the proper use of new technologies must be the work of parents, teachers, and counselors. We must count on them to create a common learning space about the problems generated by the misuse of mobile phones and the need to use them responsibly. The Educational and Psycho-pedagogical Guidance Teams in the preschool and primary education stage and the Guidance Departments in the secondary education stage must include specific work units in their Tutorial Action Plans that train the students in the appropriate use of technological artifacts (Santana, 2013; 2015). These units must be connected to the different subjects in the curriculum in order to work on such a relevant topic from an interdisciplinary and experiential approach.

One of the limitations of the study is the small number of participants in the sample. It is necessary to conduct new studies with a larger number of participants from different regions in Spain to confirm the results of the research. In addition, as this is a correlation study, its results are limited to establishing a relationship between variables, though not a causality between them. In future research, it would be necessary to analyze the causes of the problematic use of the mobile phone. In our work, we hypothesize that this problematic use may be mediated by the FoMO syndrome and by the anxiety it causes, as well as by the quality of parent-child communication. It would also be interesting to know whether the type of attachment developed by the children towards their parents and peers is related to the way they use mobile phones since new prevention and intervention guidelines could be given in this field. Likewise, it would be necessary to perform new studies with in-depth interviews that allow us to delve into the worldview of these groups, especially concerning the contents seen on the mobile phone and the social moments/contexts when they are used.

Funding Agency

This research received institutional support from the Vice-Chancellor´s Department for Research at the University of La Laguna (Resolution November 3, 2016).


Draft Content 317334369-71776-en006.jpg


Draft Content 317334369-71776-en007.jpg


Draft Content 317334369-71776-en008.jpg


Draft Content 317334369-71776-en009.jpg


Draft Content 317334369-71776-en010.jpg

References

Alt, D. (2015). College students’ academic motivation, media engagement and fear of missing out. Computers in Human Behavior, 49, 111-119. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2015.02.057

Alvarado-de-Rattia, E. (2013). Percepción de exposición a violencia familiar en adolescentes de población general: Consecuencias para la salud, bajo un enfoque de resiliencia. (Memoria de tesis doctoral inédita). Madrid: Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Departamento de Psicología.

Arab, L.E., & Díaz, G.A. (2015). Impacto de las redes sociales e Internet en la adolescencia: Aspectos positivos y negativos. Revista Médica Clínica Las Condes, 26(1), 7-13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rmclc.2014.12.001

Armsden, G.C., & Greenberg, M.T. (1987). The inventory of parent and peer attachment: Individual differences and their relationship to psychological well-being in adolescence. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 16(5), 427-454. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02202939

Bartau-Rojas, I., Aierbe-Barandiaran, A., & Oregui-González, E. (2018). Parental mediation of the Internet use of Primary students: Beliefs, strategies and difficulties. [Mediación parental del uso de Internet en el alumnado de Primaria: creencias, estrategias y dificultades]. Comunicar, 54, 71-79. https://doi.org/10.3916/C54-2018-07

Beranuy, M., Chamarro, A., Graner, C., & Carbonell, X. (2009). Validación de dos escalas breves para evaluar la adicción a Internet y el abuso de móvil. Psicothema, 21(3), 480-485. https://bit.ly/2PTQJHU

Beranuy, M., Oberst, U., Carbonell, X., & Chamarro, A. (2009). Problematic Internet and mobile phone use and clinical symptoms in college students: The role of emotional intelligence. Computer in Human Behavior, 25, 1182-1187. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2009.03.001

Berríos, L., Buxarrais, M.R., & Garcés, M.S. (2015). Uso de las TIC y mediación parental percibida por niños de Chile. [ICT Use and Parental Mediation Perceived by Chilean Children]. Comunicar, 45, 161-168. https://doi.org/10.3916/C45-2015-17

Beyens, I., Frison, E., & Eggermont, S. (2016). ‘I don’t want to miss a thing’: Adolescents’ fear of missing out and its relationship to adolescents’ social needs, Facebook use, and Facebook related stress. Computers in Human Behavior, 64, 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2016.05.083

Carbonell, X., Chamarro, A., Griffiths, M., Oberst, U., Cladellas, R., & Talarn, A. (2012). Problematic Internet and cell phone use in Spanish teenagers and young students. Anales de Psicología, 28(3), 789-796. https://doi.org/10.6018/analesps.28.3.156061

Carvalho, J., Francisco, R., & Relvas, A.P. (2015). Family functioning and information and communication technologies: How do they relate? A literature review. Computers in Human Behavior, 45, 99-108. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2014.11.037

Chóliz, M., Villanueva, V., & Chóliz, M. C. (2009). Ellos, ellas y su móvil: Uso, abuso (¿y dependencia?) del teléfono móvil en la adolescencia. Revista Española de Drogodependencias, 34(1), 74-88. https://bit.ly/2BZsfct

Cruces-Montes, S.J., Guil-Bozal, R., Sánchez-Torres, N., & Pereira-Núñez, J.A. (2016). Consumo de nuevas tecnologías y factores de personalidad en estudiantes universitarios. Revista de Comunicación y Ciudadanía Digital, 5(2), 203-228. https://doi.org/10.25267/COMMONS.2016.v5.i2.09

Davis, R.A. (2001). A cognitive-behavioral model of pathological Internet use. Computers in Human Behavior, 17(2), 187-195. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0747-5632(00)00041-8

De-la-Villa-Moral, M., & Suárez, C. (2016). Factores de riesgo en el uso problemático de Internet y del teléfono móvil en adolescentes españoles. Revista Iberoamericana de Psicología y Salud, 7(2), 69-78. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rips.2016.03.001

Dossey, L. (2014). FOMO, Digital dementia, and our dangerous experiment. Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing, 10(2), 69-73. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.explore.2013.12.008

Elhai, J.D., Levine, J.C., Dvorak, R.D., & Hall, B.J. (2016). Fear of missing out, need for touch, anxiety and depression arerelated to problematic smartphone use. Computer in Human Behavior, 63, 509-516. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2016.05.079

Fuster, H., Chamarro, A., & Oberst, U. (2017). Fear of missing Out, online social networking and mobile phone addiction: A latent profile approach. Aloma, 35(1), 23-30. https://bit.ly/2LupEKJ

Gallarin, M., & Alonso-Arbiol, I. (2013). Dimensionality of the inventory of parent and peer attachment: evaluation with the spanish version. The Spanish Journal of Psychology, 16(E55), 1-14. https://doi.org/10.1017/sjp.2013.47

García, M.C., & Monferrer, J.M. (2009). Propuesta de análisis teórico sobre el uso del teléfono móvil en adolescentes. [A theoretical analysis proposal on mobile phone use by adolescents]. Comunicar, 33(XVII), 83-92. https://doi.org/10.3916/c33-2009-02-008

Gil, F., Del-Valle, G., Oberst, U., & Chamarro, A. (2015). Nuevas tecnologías. ¿Nuevas patologías? El smartphone y el fear of missing out. Aloma, 33(2), 77-83. https://bit.ly/2Bxhpck

Gracia-Blanco, M., Vigo-Anglada, M., Fernández-Peréz, J., & Marcó-Arbonès, M. (2002). Problemas conductuales relacionados con el uso de Internet: Un estudio exploratorio. Anales de Psicología, 18(2), 273-292. https://bit.ly/2Gy6vbV

Instituto Nacional de Estadística (Ed.) (2016). Encuesta sobre equipamiento y uso de tecnologi?as de informacio?n y comunicacio?n en los hogares, 2016. https://bit.ly/2EkoWih

Instituto Nacional de Estadística (Ed.) (2017). Encuesta sobre equipamiento y uso de tecnologías de información y comunicación en los hogares, 2017. https://bit.ly/2EHPCtF

Lei, L., & Wu, Y. (2007). Adolescents’ paternal attachment and Internet use. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 10(5), 633-639. https://doi.org/10.1089/cpb.2007.9976

Lepp, A., Li, J., & Barkley, J.E. (2016). College students' cell phone use and attachment to parents and peers. Computers in Human Behavior, 64, 401-408. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2016.07.021

Liu, Q.X., Fang, X.Y., Deng, L.Y., & Zhang, J.T. (2012). Parent-adolescent communication, parental Internet use and Internet-specific norms and pathological Internet use among Chinese adolescents. Computers in Human Behavior, 28(4), 1269-1275. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2012.02.010

Malo-Cerrato, S. (2006). The impact of mobile phones in the life of adolescents aged 12-16 years old. [Impacto del teléfono móvil en la vida de los adolescentes entre 12 y 16 años]. Comunicar, 27, 105-112. https://bit.ly/2HOXTsD

Malo-Cerrato, S., Martín-Perpiñá, M. & Viñas-Poch, F. (2018). Excessive use of social networks: Psychosocial profile of Spanish adolescents. [Uso excesivo de redes sociales: Perfil psicosocial de adolescentes españoles]. Comunicar, 56, 101-110. https://doi.org/10.3916/C56-2018-10

Oberst, U., Wegmann, E., Stodt, B., Brand, M., & Chamarro, A. (2017). Negative consequences from heavy social networking in adolescents: The mediating role of fear of missing out. Journal of Adolescence, 55, 51-60. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2016.12.008

Przybylski, A.K., Murayama, K., DeHaan, C.R., & Gladwell, V. (2013). Motivational, emotional, and behavioral correlates of fear of missing out. Computer in Human Behavior, 29(4), 1841-1848. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2013.02.014

Riordan, B.C., Flett, J.A. M., Hunter, J.A., Scarf, D., & Conner, T. (2015). Fear of missing out (FoMO): The relationship between FoMO, alcohol use, and alcohol-related consequences in college students. Annals of Neuroscience and Psychology, 2(7), 1-7. https://doi.org/10.7243/2055-3447-2-9

Roberts, J.A., Pullig, C., & Manolis, C. (2015). I need my smartphone: a hierarchical model of personality and cell-phone addiction. Personality and Individual Differences, 79, 13-19. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2015.01.049

Rodrigo, M.J., & Palacios, J. (coords.). (2014). Familia y desarrollo humano. Madrid: Alianza.

Ryan, R.M., & Deci, E.L. (2000). Self-Determination theory and the facilitation of intrinsic motivation, social development, and well-being. American Psychologist 55(1), 68-78. https://doi.org/10.1037/0003-066x.55.1.68

Sánchez-Queija, I., & Oliva, A. (2003). Vínculos de apego con los padres y relaciones con los iguales durante la adolescencia. Revista de Psicología Social, 18(1), 71-86. https://doi.org/10.1174/02134740360521796

Sánchez-Valle, M., de-Frutos-Torres, B., & Vázquez-Barrio, T. (2017). Parent’s influence on acquiring critical internet skills. [La influencia de los padres en la adquisición de habilidades críticas en Internet]. Comunicar, 53, 103-111. https://doi.org/10.3916/C53-2017-10

Santana, L.E. (2013). Orientación profesional. Madrid: Síntesis.

Santana, L.E. (2015). Orientación educativa e intervención psicopedagógica. Madrid: Pirámide.

Seo, D.G., Park, Y., Kim, M.K., & Park, J. (2016). Mobile phone dependency and its impacts on adolescents’ social and academic behaviours. Computers in Human Behaviors, 63, 282-292. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2016.05.026

Torrecillas-Lacave, T., Va?zquez-Barrio, T., & Monteagudo-Barandalla, L. (2017). Percepción de los padres sobre el empoderamiento digital de las familias en hogares hiperconectados. El Profesional de la Información, 26(1), 97-104. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2017.ene.10

Urosa, R. (2015). Jóvenes y generación 2020. Revista de Estudios de Juventud, 108, 5-219. https://bit.ly/2BAef7q



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Este estudio analiza el uso problemático del móvil, el fenómeno de «Fear of missing out» (FoMO: temor de perderse experiencias) y la comunicación entre padres e hijos/as en el alumnado que cursa educación secundaria en centros públicos y concertados de las Comunidades Autónomas de Canarias, Baleares y Valencia. En la investigación participaron 569 alumnos y alumnas con edades comprendidas entre 12 y 19 años. Los instrumentos utilizados fueron el Cuestionario de experiencias relacionadas con el móvil (CERM), la adaptación española del Cuestionario «Fear of Missing Out» (FoMO-E) y la dimensión de comunicación con padres y madres del «Inventario de apego con padres y rares». Los resultados muestran que: 1) A mayor uso problemático del móvil mayor nivel de FoMO; 2) El alumnado que usa con frecuencia el móvil y se comunica más con sus amigos tiene una puntuación media más alta en el «Cuestionario de experiencias relacionadas con el móvil» y en el «Cuestionario FoMO-E»; 3) El alumnado que usa menos horas el móvil tiene una mayor comunicación parento-filial. En el artículo se discute la relevancia del estudio del FoMO y de la comunicación parento-filial como factores que inciden en el uso problemático del móvil en los jóvenes. Las familias, el profesorado y los equipos de orientación en los centros han de crear un espacio de aprendizaje común para fomentar el uso responsable del móvil.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación (TIC) están creando nuevos entornos de comunicación (Malo-Cerrato, 2006; Arab & Díaz, 2015). En España el uso de las TIC entre menores de 10 a 15 años está muy extendido (92,4%) (INE, 2017). Los jóvenes de la «Generación Z», primera generación nacida en el siglo XXI, se caracterizan por incorporar durante su periodo de aprendizaje/socialización las TIC (Urosa, 2015) y por integrarlas a edades tempranas en su vida cotidiana (García & Monferrer, 2009).

El uso de la tecnología ha tenido un importante crecimiento en los hogares españoles: el 81,9% tenía acceso a la Red en el 2016; este porcentaje se elevó al 83,4% en el 2017 (Instituto Nacional de Estadística, 2016; 2017). El principal tipo de conexión a Internet es el establecido a través del móvil, el 97,4% de los hogares dispone de al menos uno. El uso de artefactos tecnológicos y el lugar que ocupan en el hogar genera nuevas formas de relación entre los miembros de la familia (Torrecillas-Lacave, Va?zquez-Barrio, & Monteagudo-Barandalla, 2017).

El objetivo de nuestro trabajo es analizar el uso problemático del teléfono móvil, el «Fear of missing out» (FoMO) y la comunicación parento-filial en estudiantes entre 12 y 19 años. Concretamente se pretende: a) determinar si existen relaciones estadísticamente significativas entre dichas variables; b) determinar si existen diferencias significativas en esas variables en función del sexo, la edad, la frecuencia de uso del móvil y el tipo de personas con las que el alumnado se comunica más a través del mismo.

1.1. Uso problemático del móvil

El uso del móvil tiene funciones instrumentales y simbólicas para los jóvenes. El móvil es una herramienta multiuso de comunicación, expresión, ocio e información (Chóliz, Villanueva, & Chóliz, 2009); además tiene una dimensión simbólica constituida por la apariencia, el prestigio y la autonomía. El móvil facilita la posibilidad de gestionar adecuadamente las relaciones sociales y los grupos de pertenencia (de iguales, familiares, políticos…) en tiempo real (García & Monferrer, 2009). Por sí mismo no es perjudicial y su uso adecuado puede tener efectos beneficiosos: favorece el desarrollo infantil, ofrece amplias posibilidades de acceso a la información y potencia el aprendizaje; además ofrece la posibilidad de supervisión parental (Bartau-Rojas, Airbe-Barandiaran, & Oregui-González, 2018).

Un indicador emergente de uso problemático del móvil es cuando éste se consulta en exceso; ello genera sensación de inseguridad, irritación, evasión, aislamiento (Beranuy, Oberst, Carbonell, & Chamarro, 2009), estados de ansiedad y depresión, y tendencias obsesivo-compulsivas (Przybylski, Murayama, DeHaan, & Gladwell, 2013; Roberts, Pullig, & Manolis, 2015). Además, puede producir problemas en la escuela y delincuencia juvenil (Lei & Wu, 2007). En definitiva, su mal uso tiene consecuencias psicofisiológicas, afectivas y relacionales, y deteriora las relaciones personales y la comunicación con el entorno próximo (Seo, Park, Kim, & Park, 2016).

Los adolescentes son el colectivo más vulnerable en el uso problemático del móvil (Gil, del-Valle, Oberst, & Chamarro, 2015; Przybylski & al., 2013); desde su más tierna infancia están expuestos a las TIC y las utilizan sin formación específica (Berríos, Buxarrais, & Garcés, 2015). Respecto a las diferencias entre sexos, las chicas usan más el móvil para enfrentarse a estados de ánimo ansiosos, superar el aburrimiento o no sentirse solas, y realizan un mayor número de consultas al móvil en comparación con los chicos (Chóliz & al., 2009). Los chicos utilizan el móvil para uso comercial, tareas de coordinación y entretenimiento (Beranuy & al., 2009), tienen un mayor nivel de «temor a no sentirse conectados» (Dossey, 2014), y más dificultades para dejar de usarlo en exceso (De-la-Villa-Moral, & Suárez, 2016).

1.2. Fear of Missing Out (FoMO) o temor de perderse experiencias

Przybylski y otros (2013) realizaron la primera investigación científica para operacionalizar el concepto de FoMO y diseñaron el primer instrumento de auto-informe para medir el fenómeno; estos autores definen el constructo como «la percepción generalizada de que otros puedan estar viviendo experiencias gratificantes de las cuales uno está ausente» (Przybylski, & al., 2013: 1841). El FoMO puede ocurrir con o sin móvil, pero se ha asociado con el uso del móvil dadas las posibilidades que nos ofrece para estar conectados ilimitadamente.

El FoMO es explicado desde la teoría de la autodeterminación (Ryan, & Deci, 2000); según esta teoría se entiende como un limbo autorregulatorio derivado de déficits situacionales o crónicos en la satisfacción de necesidades psicológicas tales como la necesidad de actuar efectivamente en el mundo, tener iniciativa personal y tener relaciones con otros (Riordan, Flett, Hunter, Scarf, & Conner, 2015). Las personas con necesidades psicológicas insatisfechas tienen un grado alto de FoMO. Esto puede incrementarse en los adolescentes ya que se encuentran ante retos y obstáculos significativos para conseguir su identidad y alcanzar su autonomía.

Diversas investigaciones vinculan el FoMO con el uso del móvil. En el estudio de Alt (2015) se encontró relación entre el FoMO, el uso problemático de las redes sociales en el móvil y la motivación académica. Los adolescentes con mayor necesidad de ser populares en las redes sociales experimentan el FoMO en mayor medida que quienes no tienen esa necesidad (Beyens, Frison, & Eggermont, 2016); el FoMO incita a conectarse a las redes sociales, e incrementa el temor de los adolescentes a no sentirse conectados o a perderse experiencias de su entorno social (Elhai, Levine, Dvrorak, & Hall, 2016).

Oberst, Wegmann, Stodt, Brand y Chamarro (2017) observaron que las personas con ansiedad experimentan FoMO y utilizan de forma inadecuada las redes sociales en el móvil. Esto ocurre porque los jóvenes esperan que el uso de las redes sociales incremente sus emociones positivas y elimine o atenúe sus emociones negativas. Sin embargo, el alivio de tales emociones es momentáneo y a largo plazo la sensación de malestar se incrementa.

1.3. Comunicación entre padres e hijos/as

La familia es el primer grupo social donde niños y niñas interactúan. A través de la comunicación la familia se conoce y negocia los espacios de la vida cotidiana, transmite las creencias, las costumbres y los estilos de vida propios de cada hogar (Rodrigo & Palacios, 2014). La comunicación familiar es un factor determinante para desarrollar el apego entre los niños y niñas con sus padres, madres o cuidadores. El apego es definido por Armsden y Greenberg (1987) como un vínculo afectivo significativo y duradero con un padre, madre o un par cercano; se caracteriza por una buena comunicación, cercanía emocional y confianza. El apego se relaciona negativamente con la depresión y agresividad (Lei & Wu, 2007). El desarrollo y fortaleza de los vínculos de apego comienzan en la infancia y dependen de la proximidad física. A medida que los niños y las niñas crecen, la proximidad física es menos importante y el apego puede sostenerse a través de herramientas de la comunicación como el móvil (mensajes instantáneos, redes sociales) (Lepp, Li, & Barkley, 2016). La comunicación es un elemento imprescindible en el desarrollo del apego en la adolescencia.

La incursión de las TIC en la sociedad genera dinámicas nuevas en la comunicación familiar de forma positiva y negativa. Carvalho, Francisco y Relvas (2015) señalan cómo las TIC pueden cambiar las dinámicas familiares de forma positiva. Por ejemplo, la posibilidad de comunicación en tiempo real y a bajo costo, a pesar de la distancia geográfica de los miembros de la unidad familiar. Una comunicación de calidad de los adolescentes con sus padres correlaciona negativamente con el grado de adicciones a Internet (Liu, Fang, Deng, & Zhang, 2012). Según Davis (2001), las TIC pueden tener efectos negativos en la comunicación ya que impactan en la calidad de las relaciones familiares; este impacto negativo se concreta en la desconexión verbal y no verbal que puede producir malos entendidos y distanciamiento. Por tanto, es necesario el estudio del impacto positivo y negativo de las TIC sobre la comunicación familiar.

2. Método

2.1. Participantes

En la investigación participaron un total de 569 estudiantes de tres centros de enseñanza secundaria de Mallorca (N=425), Valencia (N=70) y Tenerife (N=74). Estos centros decidieron participar en el estudio por dos razones: a) su interés en concienciar a su alumnado sobre los problemas que genera el uso inadecuado del móvil, y b) su deseo de promover el uso responsable del mismo. Los centros de Mallorca y de Valencia eran concertados y el de Tenerife público. Por sexo, el 61,1% eran mujeres y el 38,8% hombres. El rango de edad abarcó de los 12 a los 19 años (Media=14.6, DT=1.87); el 49% tenía edades comprendidas entre los 12 y los 14 años, y el 51% entre los 15 y los 19 años. Por nivel educativo el 33% cursaba 1º y 2º de la ESO, el 28% 3º y 4º y el 38% 1º y 2º Bachillerato.

2.2. Instrumentos

En el estudio se aplicó un cuestionario que recogía información sobre las características personales, el uso problemático del móvil, el FoMO y la comunicación parento-filial. El uso problemático del móvil se analizó mediante el «Cuestionario de experiencias relacionadas con el móvil» (CERM) de Beranuy, Chamarro, Graner y Carbonell (2009). Este cuestionario se desarrolló a partir del «Cuestionario de experiencias relacionadas con Internet» (CERI) (Gracia, Vigo, Fernández, & Marcó, 2002). El CERM está formado por 10 ítems con cuatro alternativas de respuesta, desde 1 (casi nunca) a 4 (casi siempre). Los ítems se agrupan en dos factores: el factor «conflictos» incluye cinco ítems, mientras que los otros cinco se agrupan en el factor «uso comunicacional y emocional». Beranuy, Chamarro, Graner y Carbonell (2009) señalan que el primer factor obtuvo una consistencia interna, mediante la aplicación del coeficiente ? de Cronbach, de 0.81 y el segundo de 0.75. El conjunto de la escala obtuvo un índice de consistencia interna de 0.80.

El FoMO se analizó mediante la adaptación española del «Fear of missing out questionaire» de Przybylski y otros (2013) realizada por Gil y otros (2015). Este instrumento examina los temores y preocupaciones que el individuo puede experimentar cuando está fuera de contacto con las experiencias de su entorno social. El FoMO-E está formado por 10 ítems con cinco alternativas de respuesta, desde 1 (nada) a 5 (mucho). Gil y otros (2015) señalan que la aplicación del coeficiente de Cronbach como índice de consistencia interna obtuvo una fiabilidad de 0.85.

La comunicación parento-filial se analizó mediante la versión española del «Inventario de apego con padres y pares» (IPPA) de Gallarin y Alonso-Arbiol (2013). Este instrumento se diseñó a partir de la escala de Armsden y Greenberg (1987), y examina tres dimensiones: Confianza, comunicación y alienación respecto a los padres, madres y pares. En el estudio se analizó la segunda dimensión en la que se examina la amplitud y la calidad de la comunicación que mantiene los hijos con sus padres (IPPA-P) y madres (IPPA-M). El IPPA-P y el IPPA-M cuentan con nueve ítems, con cinco alternativas de respuesta, desde 1 (casi nunca o nunca) a 5 (casi siempre o siempre). Gallarin y Alonso-Arbiol (2013) señalan que la aplicación del coeficiente ? de Cronbach como índice de consistencia interna obtuvo una fiabilidad de 0.88 para el IPPA-P, y de 0.87 para el IPPA-M.

2.3. Procedimiento

Los equipos directivos de los centros aprobaron la realización de la investigación. Al alumnado y a la familia se les informó sobre la naturaleza del estudio para obtener su consentimiento. Se realizaron reuniones con el profesorado tutor de los centros para explicarles el objetivo del estudio y concretar las fechas para aplicar los cuestionarios. Los tres instrumentos fueron aplicados en las aulas por uno de los investigadores en horario lectivo.

2.4. Análisis de datos

El análisis se llevó a cabo con el programa estadístico SPSS 21 y comprendió el estudio de los estadísticos descriptivos para cada una de las variables estudiadas, coeficiente de fiabilidad, coeficiente de correlación de Pearson, análisis de varianza, contrastes de medias para grupos independientes y tamaño del efecto (d de Cohen y eta cuadrado).

3. Resultados

3.1. Estadísticos de las variables analizadas

Los estadísticos del CERM, FoMO, IPPA-M e IPPA-P se muestran en la Tabla 1. La distribución de las puntuaciones del CERM y del FoMO-E presenta índices de asimetría positivos. En base a los clusters identificados por Carbonell y otros (2012) partiendo de las puntuaciones del CERM, en nuestra investigación se constató que el 52% de estudiantes «no tienen problemas» con el uso del móvil, el 46% tienen «problemas ocasionales» y el 2% tienen «problemas frecuentes». La distribución de las puntaciones de los participantes tiene una asimetría negativa tanto en el IPPA-M como en el IPPA-P. En ambos casos el alumnado presenta altas puntuaciones en la calidad de la comunicación con sus progenitores.

Entre las puntuaciones del CERM y del FoMO-E se observó una correlación positiva (r=0.53, p<.005); el alumnado que hace un mayor uso problemático del móvil tiende a tener un mayor grado de FoMO. Asimismo, se observó una correlación positiva (r=0.55, p<.005) entre las puntuaciones del IPPA-M y del IPPA-P; el alumnado con mayor calidad de comunicación con sus madres tiende a tener mayor calidad de comunicación con sus padres.

3.2. Uso problemático del móvil

Se advierten diferencias significativas entre las puntuaciones medias en el CERM en función de la edad: el grupo de 15-19 años tiene una puntuación media significativamente mayor que el grupo de 12-14 años; esto es, a mayor edad hay un mayor uso problemático del móvil. Sin embargo, el tamaño del efecto es bajo.

El análisis de varianza mostró diferencias significativas entre las puntuaciones medias en el CERM en función de la frecuencia de uso del móvil: el grupo de alumnos/as que usa más de cuatro horas el móvil tiene una puntuación media significativamente mayor que las de los otros dos grupos; esto es, a mayor número de horas en el móvil, hay un mayor uso problemático del mismo. El tamaño del efecto es moderado.

Por último, el análisis de varianza mostró diferencias significativas entre las puntuaciones medias en el CERM en función de las personas con las que el alumnado se comunica más mediante el móvil: quienes se comunican más con los amigos tienen una puntuación media significativamente mayor que quienes se comunican más con sus padres/madres; es decir tienen más problemas con el uso del móvil. Sin embargo, el tamaño del efecto es bajo. No se observaron diferencias significativas entre las puntuaciones medias del CERM en función del sexo.

3.3. Temor de perderse experiencias

El análisis de varianza reveló diferencias significativas entre las puntuaciones medias en el FoMO-E en función de la frecuencia de uso del móvil: el alumnado que usa más de cuatro horas el móvil tiene una puntuación media significativamente mayor que el resto del alumnado; esto es, tiene mayor temor a no sentirse conectados. El tamaño del efecto es alto.

El análisis de varianza mostró diferencias significativas entre las puntuaciones medias en el FoMO-E en función de las personas con las que el alumnado se comunica más mediante el móvil: el grupo de quienes se comunican más con los amigos tiene una puntuación media significativamente mayor que el grupo que se comunica más con padres/madres; esto quiere decir que los estudiantes que se comunican más con los amigos, tienen mayor temor a no sentirse conectados con ellos. El tamaño del efecto es moderado. No se observaron diferencias significativas entre las puntuaciones medias del FoMO-E en función del sexo y de la edad.

3.4. Comunicación entre madres e hijos/as

Se advierten diferencias significativas entre las puntuaciones medias en IPPA-M en función del sexo: las alumnas tienen una mayor puntuación en la calidad de la comunicación con la madre, en comparación con los alumnos. Sin embargo, el tamaño del efecto es bajo.

El contraste de medias mostró diferencias significativas en el IPPA-M en función de la edad: el grupo de 12-14 años tiene una puntuación media significativamente mayor que el de 15-19 años; a mayor edad, hay menor índice de comunicación de calidad con la madre. Sin embargo, el tamaño del efecto es bajo.

El análisis de varianza mostró diferencias significativas entre las puntuaciones medias del IPPA-M en función de la frecuencia de uso del móvil: el grupo de alumnos/as que usa de cero a dos horas el móvil tiene una puntuación media significativamente mayor que las de los grupos que lo usan más horas; esto es, a menor uso del móvil hay mayor comunicación con la madre. Sin embargo, el tamaño del efecto es bajo. No se observaron diferencias significativas entre las puntuaciones medias del IPPA-M en función de las personas con las que el alumnado se comunica más por el móvil.

3.5. Comunicación entre padres e hijos/as

El contraste de medias para grupos independientes mostró diferencias significativas entre las puntuaciones medias del IPPA-P en función de la edad: el grupo de 12-14 años tiene una puntuación media significativamente mayor que el grupo de 15-19 años; a mayor edad, hay menor índice de comunicación de calidad con el padre. Sin embargo, el tamaño del efecto es bajo.

El análisis de varianza mostró diferencias significativas entre las puntuaciones medias del IPPA-P en función de la frecuencia de uso del móvil: el grupo de alumnos/as que usa de 0 a 2 horas el móvil tiene una puntuación media significativamente mayor que las de los grupos que lo usan más horas; esto es, a menor uso del móvil hay mayor comunicación con el padre. Sin embargo, el tamaño del efecto es bajo. No se observaron diferencias significativas entre las puntuaciones medias del IPPA-P en función del sexo y de las personas con las que el alumnado se comunica más por el móvil.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

El objetivo de nuestra investigación era analizar el uso problemático del móvil, el FoMO y la comunicación entre padres e hijos en estudiantes de Educación Secundaria.

a) En cuanto al uso problemático del móvil, el 46% de los estudiantes tenía «problemas ocasionales» y el 2% «problemas frecuentes». Los resultados obtenidos no concuerdan con los del estudio de Carbonell y otros (2012), donde solo el 16% de los adolescentes manifestaba tener «problemas ocasionales» y el 2% «problemas frecuentes». Nuestros resultados ponen de manifiesto además que en el rango de edad de 15-19 años se incrementa el uso del móvil. Esto coincide con los resultados de otros estudios (de-la-Villa & al., 2016; Cruces, Guil, Sánchez, & Pereira, 2016): los problemas con el uso del móvil aumentan durante la adolescencia en comparación con su uso en la preadolescencia, y disminuyen en adultos jóvenes.

En la etapa de la adolescencia el móvil se convierte en una herramienta instrumental y simbólica que permite a los jóvenes interactuar con los pares, buscar autonomía, obtener reconocimiento y exteriorizar su identidad (Chóliz & al., 2009). En nuestra investigación se advierte que cuando el alumnado utiliza su móvil más de dos horas al día tiene mayor posibilidad de hacer un uso problemático del mismo, en comparación con quienes lo utilizan menos de dos horas. Además, se observa que quienes se comunicaban más con sus amigos tendían a hacer un uso problemático del móvil. Dichos resultados se hallan en la línea de los obtenidos por Cruces y otros (2016), quienes advirtieron que el uso problemático del móvil se incrementa cuando aumenta el número de horas de uso a la semana.

b) Respecto al «Fear of Missing Out», observamos que el nivel de FoMO entre el alumnado es mayor a medida que se incrementa la frecuencia de uso del móvil. A su vez, el alumnado con FoMO tiende a conectarse más frecuentemente al móvil al sentir más temor de no estar conectado, y de perderse las experiencias que les ofrezca este medio; así pues, se genera un círculo vicioso del que no es fácil salir (Beyens & al., 2016; Elhai & al., 2016). En cuanto a la relación entre el FoMO y la preferencia a comunicarse a través del móvil con los amigos o la familia, se encontró que los estudiantes con un mayor grado de FoMO tienden a comunicarse más con los amigos. Esto podría explicarse por la etapa del ciclo vital que atraviesan: en la adolescencia se busca la conexión y el reconocimiento de los iguales (Rodrigo & Palacios, 2014); es una etapa en la que se siente la necesidad de pertenencia al grupo y el deseo de estar conectados socialmente (Gil & al., 2015). El FoMO puede llevar a incrementar la frecuencia de la comunicación entre iguales, lo que puede generar un mayor uso problemático del móvil.

c) En cuanto a la comunicación entre madres/padres e hijos/as, los resultados evidenciaron diferencias significativas entre sexos: las chicas se comunicaban más con sus madres que los chicos. Estos resultados son coincidentes con la investigación de Alvarado-de-Rattia (2013) en preadolescentes y adolescentes españoles. Según Sánchez-Queija y Oliva (2003) el tipo de vínculo afectivo establecido en la infancia con los padres guarda relación con el sexo. Con las mujeres es más frecuente un vínculo de apego seguro, caracterizado por un alto afecto y comunicación, tanto con el padre como con la madre; en cambio, entre los chicos es más frecuente el vínculo de tipo control frío o de bajo afecto con la madre. El alumnado que afirma tener una mejor calidad de comunicación con la madre y el padre utiliza menos horas el móvil.

En cuanto a las diferencias en la edad se observó que el alumnado de 12-14 años se comunicaba más con los padres y las madres. En este periodo se produce la transición de niños/niñas a adolescentes, por lo que las figuras de referencia de sus padres son muy importantes (Lei & Wu, 2007); incluso los menores son conscientes de la importancia de sus padres como agentes reguladores de los contenidos de Internet. Sin embargo, esta influencia disminuye a medida que los menores crecen a favor de sus amigos y compañeros (Sánchez-Valle, de-Frutos-Torres, & Vázquez-Barrio, 2017). Malo-Cerrato, Martín-Perpiña y Viñas-Poch (2018) señalan el efecto contagio que las familias pueden ejercer en el uso de las nuevas tecnologías; los adolescentes con un consumo excesivo de las TIC perciben que sus madres y hermanos/as también hacen un uso intensivo de las mismas, lo que evidencia la influencia familiar en su uso. El alumnado de mayor edad va adquiriendo más habilidades en el uso de los medios interactivos, lo que genera menor dependencia de los padres; a su vez los padres se sienten menos capacitados para regular el uso de dichos medios en sus hijos e hijas (Bartau-Rojas, Aierbe-Barandiaran, & Oregui-González, 2018).

d) En cuanto a la relación entre el uso problemático del móvil y el temor de perderse experiencias, se observó una relación positiva y significativa entre ambas variables. Este resultado coincide con los obtenidos en el estudio de Fuster, Chamarro y Oberst (2017) y Gil y otros (2015). El temor a no sentirse conectado se origina por la insatisfacción de necesidades psicológicas (Riordan, Flett, Hunter, Scarf, & Conner, 2015), y es un factor mediador en el uso del móvil (Carbonell y otros, 2012). En el estudio de Oberst y otros (2017), se observó a través de un modelo de ecuación estructural que el FoMO es el factor mediador entre la depresión, la ansiedad y el incremento del uso problemático del móvil.

e) Asimismo se observó una relación positiva y significativa en el nivel de comunicación entre padres e hijos/as y el nivel de comunicación entre madres e hijos/as. Aunque el alumnado prefiere comunicarse en mayor medida con sus amigos, la comunicación con sus padres sigue siendo importante ya que es parte esencial del apego en la dinámica familiar (Armsden, & Greenberg, 1987). En la línea de lo señalado por Lepp, Li y Barkley (2016) a medida que los niños y niñas van creciendo la proximidad física es menos importante para los vínculos de apego; herramientas de la comunicación como el móvil pueden ayudar a mantenerlo.

Para concluir, en nuestra investigación se constata un incremento del uso problemático del móvil entre el alumnado de educación secundaria. Cuanto mayor es el uso del móvil mayor es el grado de FoMO; el temor de los adolescentes de perderse experiencias retroalimenta su deseo de utilizar el móvil con mayor frecuencia para sentirse conectados y satisfacer necesidades psicológicas insatisfechas, esto a su vez les impele a hacer un uso problemático del móvil. En la adolescencia la comunicación parento-filial sigue siendo importante; el móvil puede ser una herramienta para mantener la comunicación y el apego. El uso regulado del móvil indica una adecuada comunicación parento-filial. Los aparatos tecnológicos como el móvil han de ser estudiados como instrumentos potenciadores de las relaciones familiares.

La formación de los jóvenes en el uso adecuado de las nuevas tecnologías ha de ser una labor de padres, profesores y orientadores; se ha de contar con ellos para crear un espacio de aprendizaje común sobre los problemas que genera el mal uso del móvil y la necesidad de emplearlo de manera responsable. Los Equipos de Orientación Educativa y Psicopedagógica (EOEP) en la etapa de educación infantil y primaria y los Departamentos de Orientación en la etapa de educación secundaria han de incorporar en sus Planes de Acción Tutorial unidades de trabajo específicas que forme al alumnado en el uso adecuado de los artefactos tecnológicos (Santana, 2013; 2015); tales unidades han de estar conectadas con las diferentes materias del currículo para poder trabajar un tema tan relevante desde el enfoque interdisciplinar y experiencial.

Una de las limitaciones del estudio es el reducido número de sujetos de la muestra. Es necesario realizar nuevos análisis en los que participen un mayor número de sujetos de diferentes Comunidades Autónomas para poder confirmar los resultados de la investigación. Además, al ser un estudio correlacional sus resultados se limitan a establecer una relación entre variables, pero no una causalidad entre las mismas. En investigaciones futuras sería necesario analizar las causas del uso problemático del móvil.

En nuestro trabajo conjeturamos que dicho uso problemático puede estar mediado por el síndrome FoMO y por la ansiedad que provoca, así como por la calidad de la comunicación parento-filial. También sería interesante conocer si el tipo de apego desarrollado por los hijos/as hacia sus padres/madres y pares está relacionado con la forma de uso del móvil, ya que podrían darse nuevas pautas de prevención e intervención en este campo. Asimismo, habría que realizar nuevos estudios con entrevistas en profundidad que permitan ahondar en la cosmovisión de estos colectivos, especialmente sobre los contenidos visualizados en el móvil y los momentos/contextos sociales de su uso.

Apoyos

Esta investigación recibió apoyo institucional del Vicerrectorado de Investigación de la Universidad de la Laguna (Resolución de 3 de noviembre del 2016).


Draft Content 317334369-71776 ov-es006.jpg


Draft Content 317334369-71776 ov-es007.jpg


Draft Content 317334369-71776 ov-es008.jpg


Draft Content 317334369-71776 ov-es009.jpg


Draft Content 317334369-71776 ov-es010.jpg

Referencias

Alt, D. (2015). College students’ academic motivation, media engagement and fear of missing out. Computers in Human Behavior, 49, 111-119. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2015.02.057

Alvarado-de-Rattia, E. (2013). Percepción de exposición a violencia familiar en adolescentes de población general: Consecuencias para la salud, bajo un enfoque de resiliencia. (Memoria de tesis doctoral inédita). Madrid: Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Departamento de Psicología.

Arab, L.E., & Díaz, G.A. (2015). Impacto de las redes sociales e Internet en la adolescencia: Aspectos positivos y negativos. Revista Médica Clínica Las Condes, 26(1), 7-13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rmclc.2014.12.001

Armsden, G.C., & Greenberg, M.T. (1987). The inventory of parent and peer attachment: Individual differences and their relationship to psychological well-being in adolescence. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 16(5), 427-454. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02202939

Bartau-Rojas, I., Aierbe-Barandiaran, A., & Oregui-González, E. (2018). Parental mediation of the Internet use of Primary students: Beliefs, strategies and difficulties. [Mediación parental del uso de Internet en el alumnado de Primaria: creencias, estrategias y dificultades]. Comunicar, 54, 71-79. https://doi.org/10.3916/C54-2018-07

Beranuy, M., Chamarro, A., Graner, C., & Carbonell, X. (2009). Validación de dos escalas breves para evaluar la adicción a Internet y el abuso de móvil. Psicothema, 21(3), 480-485. https://bit.ly/2PTQJHU

Beranuy, M., Oberst, U., Carbonell, X., & Chamarro, A. (2009). Problematic Internet and mobile phone use and clinical symptoms in college students: The role of emotional intelligence. Computer in Human Behavior, 25, 1182-1187. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2009.03.001

Berríos, L., Buxarrais, M.R., & Garcés, M.S. (2015). Uso de las TIC y mediación parental percibida por niños de Chile. [ICT Use and Parental Mediation Perceived by Chilean Children]. Comunicar, 45, 161-168. https://doi.org/10.3916/C45-2015-17

Beyens, I., Frison, E., & Eggermont, S. (2016). ‘I don’t want to miss a thing’: Adolescents’ fear of missing out and its relationship to adolescents’ social needs, Facebook use, and Facebook related stress. Computers in Human Behavior, 64, 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2016.05.083

Carbonell, X., Chamarro, A., Griffiths, M., Oberst, U., Cladellas, R., & Talarn, A. (2012). Problematic Internet and cell phone use in Spanish teenagers and young students. Anales de Psicología, 28(3), 789-796. https://doi.org/10.6018/analesps.28.3.156061

Carvalho, J., Francisco, R., & Relvas, A.P. (2015). Family functioning and information and communication technologies: How do they relate? A literature review. Computers in Human Behavior, 45, 99-108. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2014.11.037

Chóliz, M., Villanueva, V., & Chóliz, M. C. (2009). Ellos, ellas y su móvil: Uso, abuso (¿y dependencia?) del teléfono móvil en la adolescencia. Revista Española de Drogodependencias, 34(1), 74-88. https://bit.ly/2BZsfct

Cruces-Montes, S.J., Guil-Bozal, R., Sánchez-Torres, N., & Pereira-Núñez, J.A. (2016). Consumo de nuevas tecnologías y factores de personalidad en estudiantes universitarios. Revista de Comunicación y Ciudadanía Digital, 5(2), 203-228. https://doi.org/10.25267/COMMONS.2016.v5.i2.09

Davis, R.A. (2001). A cognitive-behavioral model of pathological Internet use. Computers in Human Behavior, 17(2), 187-195. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0747-5632(00)00041-8

De-la-Villa-Moral, M., & Suárez, C. (2016). Factores de riesgo en el uso problemático de Internet y del teléfono móvil en adolescentes españoles. Revista Iberoamericana de Psicología y Salud, 7(2), 69-78. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rips.2016.03.001

Dossey, L. (2014). FOMO, Digital dementia, and our dangerous experiment. Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing, 10(2), 69-73. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.explore.2013.12.008

Elhai, J.D., Levine, J.C., Dvorak, R.D., & Hall, B.J. (2016). Fear of missing out, need for touch, anxiety and depression arerelated to problematic smartphone use. Computer in Human Behavior, 63, 509-516. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2016.05.079

Fuster, H., Chamarro, A., & Oberst, U. (2017). Fear of missing Out, online social networking and mobile phone addiction: A latent profile approach. Aloma, 35(1), 23-30. https://bit.ly/2LupEKJ

Gallarin, M., & Alonso-Arbiol, I. (2013). Dimensionality of the inventory of parent and peer attachment: evaluation with the spanish version. The Spanish Journal of Psychology, 16(E55), 1-14. https://doi.org/10.1017/sjp.2013.47

García, M.C., & Monferrer, J.M. (2009). Propuesta de análisis teórico sobre el uso del teléfono móvil en adolescentes. [A theoretical analysis proposal on mobile phone use by adolescents]. Comunicar, 33(XVII), 83-92. https://doi.org/10.3916/c33-2009-02-008

Gil, F., Del-Valle, G., Oberst, U., & Chamarro, A. (2015). Nuevas tecnologías. ¿Nuevas patologías? El smartphone y el fear of missing out. Aloma, 33(2), 77-83. https://bit.ly/2Bxhpck

Gracia-Blanco, M., Vigo-Anglada, M., Fernández-Peréz, J., & Marcó-Arbonès, M. (2002). Problemas conductuales relacionados con el uso de Internet: Un estudio exploratorio. Anales de Psicología, 18(2), 273-292. https://bit.ly/2Gy6vbV

Instituto Nacional de Estadística (Ed.) (2016). Encuesta sobre equipamiento y uso de tecnologi?as de informacio?n y comunicacio?n en los hogares, 2016. https://bit.ly/2EkoWih

Instituto Nacional de Estadística (Ed.) (2017). Encuesta sobre equipamiento y uso de tecnologías de información y comunicación en los hogares, 2017. https://bit.ly/2EHPCtF

Lei, L., & Wu, Y. (2007). Adolescents’ paternal attachment and Internet use. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 10(5), 633-639. https://doi.org/10.1089/cpb.2007.9976

Lepp, A., Li, J., & Barkley, J.E. (2016). College students' cell phone use and attachment to parents and peers. Computers in Human Behavior, 64, 401-408. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2016.07.021

Liu, Q.X., Fang, X.Y., Deng, L.Y., & Zhang, J.T. (2012). Parent-adolescent communication, parental Internet use and Internet-specific norms and pathological Internet use among Chinese adolescents. Computers in Human Behavior, 28(4), 1269-1275. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2012.02.010

Malo-Cerrato, S. (2006). The impact of mobile phones in the life of adolescents aged 12-16 years old. [Impacto del teléfono móvil en la vida de los adolescentes entre 12 y 16 años]. Comunicar, 27, 105-112. https://bit.ly/2HOXTsD

Malo-Cerrato, S., Martín-Perpiñá, M. & Viñas-Poch, F. (2018). Excessive use of social networks: Psychosocial profile of Spanish adolescents. [Uso excesivo de redes sociales: Perfil psicosocial de adolescentes españoles]. Comunicar, 56, 101-110. https://doi.org/10.3916/C56-2018-10

Oberst, U., Wegmann, E., Stodt, B., Brand, M., & Chamarro, A. (2017). Negative consequences from heavy social networking in adolescents: The mediating role of fear of missing out. Journal of Adolescence, 55, 51-60. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2016.12.008

Przybylski, A.K., Murayama, K., DeHaan, C.R., & Gladwell, V. (2013). Motivational, emotional, and behavioral correlates of fear of missing out. Computer in Human Behavior, 29(4), 1841-1848. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2013.02.014

Riordan, B.C., Flett, J.A. M., Hunter, J.A., Scarf, D., & Conner, T. (2015). Fear of missing out (FoMO): The relationship between FoMO, alcohol use, and alcohol-related consequences in college students. Annals of Neuroscience and Psychology, 2(7), 1-7. https://doi.org/10.7243/2055-3447-2-9

Roberts, J.A., Pullig, C., & Manolis, C. (2015). I need my smartphone: a hierarchical model of personality and cell-phone addiction. Personality and Individual Differences, 79, 13-19. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2015.01.049

Rodrigo, M.J., & Palacios, J. (coords.). (2014). Familia y desarrollo humano. Madrid: Alianza.

Ryan, R.M., & Deci, E.L. (2000). Self-Determination theory and the facilitation of intrinsic motivation, social development, and well-being. American Psychologist 55(1), 68-78. https://doi.org/10.1037/0003-066x.55.1.68

Sánchez-Queija, I., & Oliva, A. (2003). Vínculos de apego con los padres y relaciones con los iguales durante la adolescencia. Revista de Psicología Social, 18(1), 71-86. https://doi.org/10.1174/02134740360521796

Sánchez-Valle, M., de-Frutos-Torres, B., & Vázquez-Barrio, T. (2017). Parent’s influence on acquiring critical internet skills. [La influencia de los padres en la adquisición de habilidades críticas en Internet]. Comunicar, 53, 103-111. https://doi.org/10.3916/C53-2017-10

Santana, L.E. (2013). Orientación profesional. Madrid: Síntesis.

Santana, L.E. (2015). Orientación educativa e intervención psicopedagógica. Madrid: Pirámide.

Seo, D.G., Park, Y., Kim, M.K., & Park, J. (2016). Mobile phone dependency and its impacts on adolescents’ social and academic behaviours. Computers in Human Behaviors, 63, 282-292. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2016.05.026

Torrecillas-Lacave, T., Va?zquez-Barrio, T., & Monteagudo-Barandalla, L. (2017). Percepción de los padres sobre el empoderamiento digital de las familias en hogares hiperconectados. El Profesional de la Información, 26(1), 97-104. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2017.ene.10

Urosa, R. (2015). Jóvenes y generación 2020. Revista de Estudios de Juventud, 108, 5-219. https://bit.ly/2BAef7q

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/03/19
Accepted on 31/03/19
Submitted on 31/03/19

Volume 27, Issue 1, 2019
DOI: 10.3916/C59-2019-04
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Views 15
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?