Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The accessibility and easeofuse for children of information and communication technologies lead us to suggest that one of the key questions for their potential empowerment is linked to their analytical use by means of the acquisition of critical skills. The family environment is considered an important factor in digital literacy and the education of critical citizens. The present paper analyzes the mediation role of the parents in their children’s education. It shows a predictive model that includes parental education style and their trust in the interactive media for their children’s acquisition of critical cognitive abilities. It also identifies the personal and contextual factors that are related to the parental education style. The model was tested on a representative sample of 765 families from the Madrid Community selected on the educational level, center type, and district income bases. It was found that children’s educational level is the factor of greatest impact on the acquisition of critical abilities. Nevertheless, as parents adopt a less restrictive style regarding the uses of Internet, there is a more positive influence on the acquisition of critical abilities independently of the age effect. The results question the role of parental restrictions on the use of the interactive media to encourage the education of critical citizens.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction and status of the issue

1.1. The new digital divide: empowerment

It is undeniable that Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have become a fundamental tool and that knowing and using them at an advanced level is a priority in order to participate in a complex, globalized society. Leisure is ever more linked to the use of computers, tablets or cell phones, but also to the exercise of rights and active citizenship (Gutiérrez-Rubí, 2015); employability (Núñez-Ladevéze & Núñez-Canal, 2016) or access to permanent education depends on digital competence (Travieso & Planella, 2008). Children show great technological skills, but the same cannot be said for their capacity to critically understand the audiovisual context in which they live.

Ballestero (Fuente-Cobo, 2017) mentions four elements to summarize the digital divide concept: availability of a computer; another electronic device in the home or at work; acquaintance with the basic tools to access and surf the Internet; and the user´s competence to convert the information reached on the web into ‘knowledge’.

The gap regarding access and connectivity has almost disappeared among children and young people in Spain. The use of ICT is occurring at ever younger ages. The study “Minors and Mobile Connectivity in Spain” states that two- and three-year-olds habitually access their parents’ terminals to use children’s applications for games, music, activities, and videos. Considering ownership, the latest survey on “Equipment and Use of Information and Communication Technologies in Homes” run by the Statistics National Institute (Spain) indicates that 25.5% of 10-year-old Spanish children have a cell phone, that this percentage doubles at the age of 11 and that the figure continues to increase until, at the age of 15, it reaches almost 100%. The drop in the starting age for the use of smartphones is not an exclusively Spanish phenomenon, but it does have a high incidence in our country, where the number of minors with smartphones is the highest in Europe and is comparable to the USA. Regarding connectivity, 93.7% of Spanish children connect to the Internet from their homes (INTEF, 2016) and those who have a smartphone are permanently in connection, except when they are asleep (Cánovas, 2014).

Exclusion from digital society is no longer based on accessibility to the web or possession of devices, but rather relies on the ability to behave analytically. The real digital divide nowadays is empowerment as regards digital literacy, defined as “acquisition of the intellectual skills needed to interact both with the existing culture and to recreate it critically and freely, and consequently, as a right and need for citizens of the information society” (Area, Gutiérrez, & Vidal, 2012: 9).

The often reductionist vision that schools have of digital competence (Ferrés & Piscitelli, 2012), focusing on the technical aspects and ignoring the training of the critical spirit, grants central importance to family mediation in the process of gaining the knowledge needed for a creative and safe use of information and communication technologies, which are becoming empowerment technologies (Reig-Hernández, 2012).

On this basis, the proposal of this study does not focus on defining a profile of a mother or a father depending on the use of Internet allowed to their children. The objective is to define how the parental control style and their confidence in the medium enable the empowerment of minors in the use of the Internet. The relationship between the empowerment of minors in the use of Internet and the acquisition of critical skills is clear, as the latter is crucial in the development of an independent and responsible use of the medium.

1.2. Influence of parental styles on digital empowerment

It appears to be proven that parenting styles influence the use that children make of Internet. Valcke, Bonte, Wever, and Rots (2010) distinguished between different parenting styles depending on the control exercised by the parents. They observed that the way in which children approached the technology is related to their parents’ Internet use, their attitude and their experience online, and stated that the parenting style, the parent’ behavior on Internet and their level of education were the variables that best forecast the children’s use of Internet in the home.

Among the components which influenced the educational setting of the children, the parents’ age appears to be decisive. There are studies that show that the older the parents, the less level of experience in their use of the Internet, and the less regulation of their children’s use (Álvarez, Torres, Rodríguez, Padilla, & Rodrigo, 2013; Valcke & al., 2010). Álvarez and others (2013), apart from the age of the parents, add the level of education as a key element in the parents’ attitudes: parents with a lower level of education are those who feel more involved in the regulation of their children’s activities online and show higher-quality motivation based on the promotion of social interaction and learning. Nikken and Schols (2015) point out the influence of the use the parents themselves make of Internet on its use by their children, whereas Rial, Gómez, Braña, and Varela (2014) show that the control exercised by parents over their children is significantly lower when they do not use the Internet.

Padilla, Ortiz, Álvarez, Castaño, Perdomo, and López (2015) have also drawn attention to the influence of the physical space and the attitudinal component of the parents and carers on the frequency and extent of the Internet in the home. They analyzed which variables of the socio-demographic profile of the parents and the family are related to regulating the attitudinal components of the family and the physical setting when children use the Internet, together with the frequency and diversity of its use. These authors concluded that parents with children in primary school have more regulated use of Internet because the children connect in spaces they share with their parents, which allows them to have more control over what their children see (Álvarez & al., 2013; Valcke & al., 2010).

However, the research is not conclusive on which style of parental control is most appropriate. Some studies state that children use the Internet more when their parents adopt a more permissive style and that the opposite occurs in cases of an authoritarian style which, incidentally, is the most predominant (Valcke & al., 2010). The idea that it is recommendable to regulate use as a preventative measure to avoid potential risks is underlying. Connecting this with conflictive situations which may arise online, Melamud and others (2009), in research carried out in Argentina with children between the ages of 4 and 18, concluded that parents have little knowledge of what their children do on the Internet and underestimate its potential risks. Lobe, Segers and Tsaliki (2009) found that in those countries in which the strategies for parental control are weak, children run higher risks in their use of the Internet. Specifically, Spain has one of the lowest levels of risk as a result of less awareness of the risks combined with a more efficient family mediation in the form of conversation with children on their use of the Internet. Nevertheless, these studies are not conclusive as regards what the best parental control strategies are, nor on the influence they have on the acquisition of children’s critical skills.

It does appear to be clear that dysfunctional parenting styles (abuse and indifference) influence Internet addiction (Matalinares & Díaz, 2013) and that intensive use by children is linked with homes where there is no parental control (Fernández, Peñalba, & Irazabal, 2015; Rial, Gómez, Braña, & Varela, 2014). The fact that parents are not Internet users also implies a risk for adolescents as they may make problematic use of the medium (Boubeta, Ferreiro, Salgado, & Couto, 2015).

On the question of how the risks to be found on the Internet should be tackled, the proposals are directed towards increasing preventive programs for responsible and safe use (Berríos, Buxarrais, & Garcés, 2015). The major challenge for the future would be to “maximize the positive effects and minimize the negative effects” of the Internet on children (Fernández-Montalvo, Peñalba, & Irazabal, 2015: 119). Tejedor and Pulido (2012: 70) recommend that the educational curriculum should include the empowerment of children regarding the risks of cyberbullying and grooming, and state that “global education strategies should be designed to consolidate skills related to media literacy”, together with preventive models which include the families. De-Frutos-Torres and Marcos-Santos (2017) propose preventive actions based on the sharing of negative experiences on social networks by teenagers, and acceptable behaviors there.

The relevance of parent mediation seems obvious, and even children are aware of the importance of their parents as regulatory agents of the Internet contents they access. Nevertheless, this influence declines as children get older with a bias towards their friends and companions; this also occurs in more problematical situations (Jiménez-Iglesias, Garmendia, & Casado-del-Río, 2015).

There are many contributions on strategies for parental control, although there is little interest in studying the factors of influence in family mediation and their effectiveness (López-de-Ayala & Ponte, 2016). Torrecillas-Lacave, Vázquez-Barrio, and Monteagudo-Barandalla (2017), in a study focusing on the “hyper-connected homes” in the Community of Madrid, conclude that parents’ opinion is very positive regarding ICT and that there are two different mediation styles: some parents use a more restrictive style which includes strategies for digital control of contents, timetables and time online; while others prefer shared surfing. They also point out that, independently of the mediation style preferred by the families, they all establish support strategies which go from intensifying family communication to awareness of the potential risks associated with publishing images and videos online. Concern about this issue is not merely the fruit of the risks Internet may imply for children, but it is also due to the enormous potential it has as a key platform to promote the autonomous learning and development of children (Kerawalla & Crook, 2002, quoted in Padilla, 2015). For this reason, it is of interest to explore the parent/child relationship in their approach to the Internet for connection and learning, capable of making children more independent and responsible.

2. Material and method

2.1. Study

The first objective of the work is to identify which personal, attitudinal and behavioral variables are associated with the parental style which regulates Internet access. Among the personal factors, we include the age of the parents, their level of education, the number of children in the family unit, the age of the children, the type of home and the parents’ experience of using the Internet for either work or personal reasons. The attitudinal variables gather the parents’ confidence in the interactive medium and their concern regarding the risks which may affect their children. Finally, in the behavioral variables, we include prior authorization for access to the Internet, subsequent control after its use and limitation of the time online.

The second objective of the work focuses on identifying the variables which make a significant contribution to children’s acquisition of critical skills in the use of Internet in the family setting. After reviewing the literature on the subject, we hypothesize that the parental style will affect the acquisition of critical skills, together with the remaining personal, attitudinal and behavioral factors already mentioned.

To explore the factors associated with the parents’ style of control for the use of the Internet, the Chi-squared statistic has been used for the categorical variables and the analysis of variance1 (ANOVA) for the continuous variables. The predictive model has been tested through a linear regression analysis organized hierarchically by blocks using the stepwise method which is appropriate for the identification of the variables that make a significant contribution to the acquisition of critical skills in the use of the Internet. The interpretation of the results is based on the statistical F-test, the proportion of explained variance (standardized R2) and the standardized parameters of the regression equation2.

2.2. Sample

The population is defined by schoolchildren from the municipality of Madrid. The extraction of the sample has followed multistage sampling stratified by clusters using the school as a sample unit. The strata were defined by educational levels (Preschool/Primary, Secondary/ Baccalaureate), the type of school (public or private/semiprivate) and income level of the district (above average, average or below the average for the municipality of the city of Madrid). The schools were selected randomly within each stratus using the school register of the Education Board of the Community of Madrid. The collaboration of the school in the study was requested by telephone. The collaboration of the parents was organized through the school. The questionnaire was completed online. 765 valid questionnaires were gathered. Participation was 57% which indicates a good level of response according to the criteria of Baxter and Babbie (2004). 32% of the responses came from public schools and the remaining 68% from private schools.

2.3. Measurement tools

To collect the data an ad hoc questionnaire was created for this study. The personal data included were: age of parent, gender, the academic level reached, the frequency of use of Internet for work or personal (leisure) reasons and academic year of their child. The parents’ confidence on Internet was measured on a 4-point Likert-type scale with scores which went from skepticism to confidence in the web (Mean =2.46; typical deviation 0.61).

To measure the parents concern with Internet risks, they were asked about the level of concern created by 10 situations in relation to their children: that they might be contacted by strangers, that crimes could be committed against their child, that they might be bullied or harassed by other children, that they might see inappropriate material, that their child might commit a crime, that it takes away opportunities for other activities, that he/she spends a lot of time online, that he/she does not have criteria to assess what he/she may find, that he/she does not control its use, that he/she misses opportunities for real contact with his/her friends. The answers were arranged on 4-point Likert-type scale grading the concern from low to high. The answers present a high degree of internal consistency (Alpha de Cronbach=0.92). For the analyses, a global score was calculated based on the mean sum of the ten situations (mean =3.27; standard deviation 0.66).

Several indicators have been used to evaluate parents’ intervention in their children’s activities on the Internet. A general question regarding whether parents’ permission was required or not to use the Internet at home during non-vacation periods. A question about time limits for Internet use with answers that go from the most restrictive time periods to the least (less than an hour; between one and two hours; between two and three hours; over three hours and unlimited). Thirdly, data was gathered on the authorization for Internet use in eight different situations or scenarios: use of instant messaging, watching videos, surfing, having one’s profile on a social network, downloading music or films, sharing photographs, music or videos with others, online shopping and installing apps from the web. Each response alternative reflects a parent/child relationship style which goes from the possibility of access only with permission, access with permission and supervision, and restricted access. The answers to these situations, which have a high internal consistency (Alpha de Cronbach=0.86) have been added to create a global indicator of the degree of regulation of Internet use which has been used to establish the parental style (mean=24.4 and standard deviation=4.5). Based on response distribution, three groups of approximately the same size have been established: the first has been called “free/somewhat restrictive access style” (scores up to 20 points), the second called “negotiated style” (scores between 21 and 25) and the third called “restrictive style” (scores over 25). Finally, in the parent-child relationship, we asked if the children’s behavior after using the Internet was controlled. The actions included were: reviewing sites the child has visited, the WhatsApp groups, friends who have been added, the contents of his/her profile, the messages received or sent and the files downloaded. The positive answers have been added to obtain a global indicator of control (mean=2.97; standard deviation=2.26).

The acquisition of critical skills on the use of ICT has been used as a model dependent variable. This question reflects the number of critical skills acquired in Internet use the parents’ opinion, disregarding where they were acquired (home or school). The issues included were: the importance of verifying Internet information, that there are good websites and others which are not good, how to use reliable sources when downloading Internet content, where to find information to address homework tasks, encouraging the child to explore and learn things online. The affirmative responses to each of these questions were added and formed a single indicator. The mean for affirmative responses is 3.67, and the standard deviation is 1.65.

3. Results

3.1. Factors associated with parenting style

The gender of the respondent is associated with the parenting style for Internet access. The differences are produced in the free or little-restricted style which appears more frequently in men than women, and in the restrictive style where there is a higher proportion of women (77.9%) than men (22.1%). Taking into account the personal projection in the responses, it could be argued that mothers tend to place more restrictions on their children’s habits. The age factor also shows statistically significant differences. The fathers and mothers who practice a free and negotiated control of Internet are older (49 and 46.3 years old on average, respectively) than the parents of a more restrictive style (mean age= 41.7). The level of education completed shows some significant differences, although there is no clear tendency. In the freestyle relationship, there is a higher proportion of parents with university studies, while in the restrictive-style relationship there is a lower proportion of parents with university studies and a higher proportion of parents with vocational training and baccalaureate. The number of children under 18 and the type of household does not return statistically significant differences. Finally, the children’s level of education is a point that is related with the parenting style. Of interest is the fact that, at the first stages of academic learning (primary), there is a greater proportion of parents who adopt the restrictive style, compared to the period of secondary education and baccalaureate, when there is a higher proportion of negotiated and free access. In addition, the number of children in the household and the type of family (single-parent, spouses and children) is not associated with the style of family relationship.


Sanchez-Valle et al 2017a-62672-en035.jpg

The relationship between the confidence and concern regarding Internet risks and the style of parental control on the Internet is coherent with the original hypothesis. Parents who adopted a free style tend to show a greater degree of confidence in the interactive medium (mean=2.56) compared to those who show a more restrictive style (mean=2.41). The awareness of the risks that children can run online also has a significant relationship with the style of parental control. Those who adopt a freestyle relation tend to show a lower degree of concern regarding the risks their children may run (mean=3.11), compared to those who are more restrictive in their relationship with the medium who show greater concern in this sense (mean=3.36).


Sanchez-Valle et al 2017a-62672-en036.jpg

In the free and negotiated styles, there is a lower proportion of parents who require prior permission before Internet use, compared to 92% of the restrictive-style parents who demand approval before surfing. The regulation of the time connected shows differences in the lower time band where there is a higher proportion of parents with a restrictive style (65.2%). Finally, in the free style, there are fewer subsequent controls than in the negotiated and restrictive ones. On the whole, a coherent scenario appears in which the parents’ confidence leads to the adoption of parent/child relationship styles which are more relaxed and the concern regarding risks results in greater limitations. In this sense, both the freedom granted and the restrictions are coherent in the uses, in the freedom of access, and the time of use and in the subsequent controls.

3.2. The acquisition of critical skills

In the hierarchical regression analysis using the stepwise method, only those variables which make a significant contribution with the dependent variable are included in the model 3. Therefore, the analysis will permit us to identify which variables make a significant contribution to the acquisition of critical skills on the Internet. In the first block, only the children’s academic year enters into the regression model. This variable explains 27.2% of the variance. In the second block, neither the confidence in the interactive medium nor the parent’s concern regarding Internet risks influences the acquisition of the children’s critical skills. Consequently, none of the attitudinal variables play a significant role in the regression despite their relationship with the parenting style. In the final block, the parental style of control of Internet, the control of subsequent activities and the time limit make a significant contribution. Taken as a whole, the model explains 35.6% of the critical skills in the interactive medium.

Regarding the parameters of the regression equation (table 4), it is found that the variable with greater predictive capacity is the academic year. As is to be expected, when the children go on to higher educational levels they acquire greater skills in the use of interactive media. The subsequent control of children’s activities online is the second most influential variable in the acquisition of critical skills. The sense of the relationship is positive, that is to say, the more control parents have, the greater is the skill acquired by the children. The parenting style on the Internet is shown to have a significant effect on the dependent variable but in reverse order. The more the parents adopt a more restrictive style in access to Internet applications, the lower is the level of acquisition of critical skills by the children. Finally, the period allowed for the use of Internet shows a positive relationship with the acquisition of critical skills. The more time, the better acquisition of critical skills, although this variable has the least effect on the regression equation.


Sanchez-Valle et al 2017a-62672-en037.jpg


Sanchez-Valle et al 2017a-62672-en038.jpg

4. Discussion and conclusions

The parental style of control emerges as crucial in the empowering of children in the acquisition of critical skills, which coincides with earlier works which had shown the importance of parental mediation in the adoption of Internet (Valcke & al., 2010; Ihmeideh & Shawareb, 2014; Nikken & Schools, 2015). The wide variety of styles associated with the use of the interactive medium shows the importance of giving children opportunities to grow and acquire skills. The learning opportunities do not necessarily have to be delimited by the children’s age. Although it is true that as the children advance academically they acquire greater skills to apply to the interactive setting, the results of the model lead us to affirm that parents may become the agents of change in the experience, by enabling their children to explore the web and by adopting a nonrestrictive tutelary style that allows the child to surf freely on those sites which are adapted to his/her level of maturity. When parents adopt a restrictive style of relationship, the acquisition of skills deteriorates. At the same time, the subsequent controls by the parents monitor the learning process.

The acquisition of critical skills is not affected, directly at least, by the level of education in the family background, nor by the parents’ age. In accordance with what has been stated by other studies (Álvarez & al., 2013), younger parents tend to adopt more restrictive relationship styles on the interactive medium. Likewise, it is found that confidence in Internet and concern about its risks do not directly affect the acquisition of skills, although they have a mediating role in the parental relationship styles. The parents with greater concern about the risks which are most critical of the interactive medium are less amenable to the idea of online exploration by their children.

At an applied level it would be interesting if, apart from the actions of parental guidance in indicating online risks, there were the insistence on the importance of granting opportunities for access to the children under parents’ control for their empowerment. Along the same lines, Ihmeideh and Shawareb (2014) state the importance of schools and preschools working together with parents so that the Internet can be used appropriately in schools and at home.

Notes

1 Before carrying out the ANOVA, the equality of variances was assessed using Levene’s test.

2 In the linear regression equation, the independence of the residuals was tested by means of the Durbin-Watson test, the quality of variances with Levene’s test and the absence of the co-linearity of the variables. The entrance criteria for the variables in the regression is 0.05.

3 The first block of the equation includes the personal variables: the parents’ ages, an academic level reached, the frequency of Internet use, children’s ages, number of members in the family unit and household type. The second block includes the confidence in the interactive media and the concern about Internet risks. The third block includes the variables relative to parental control activities: parental control style on the Internet, the requisite of authorization for the use of the Internet, limitation of time of use and the number of subsequent controls of the online conduct.

Funding Agency

This article is part of the research project titled School Community 2.0. Family and school are facing the challenge of digital culture. Diagnosis and proposals for action, funded by the Fundación Universitaria San Pablo CEU (Ref. FUSP-BS-PPC 19/2014) and participates in the activities of the Digital Vulnerability Program PROVULDIG (S2015/HUM3434), funded by the Community of Madrid and the European Social Fund (2016-2018).

References

Álvarez, M., Torres, A., Rodríguez, E., Padilla, S., & Rodrigo, M.J. (2013). Attitudes and Parenting

Area, M., Gutiérrez, A., & Vidal, F. (2012). Alfabetización digital y competencias informacionales. Madrid: Fundación Telefónica / Ariel.

Baxter, L.A., & Babbie, E.R. (2003). The Basics of Communication Research. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Thomson Learning.

Berrios, L., Buxarrais, M.R., & Garcés, M.S. (2015). Uso de las TIC y mediación parental percibida por niños de Chile. [ICT Use and Parental Mediation Perceived by Chilean Children]. Comunicar, 45, 161-168. https://doi.org/10.3916/C45-2015-17

Boubeta, A.R., Ferreiro, S.G., Salgado, P.G., & Couto, C.B. (2015). Variables asociadas al uso problemáti-co de Internet entre adolescentes. Health and Addictions / Salud y Drogas, 15(1), 25-38. (https://goo.gl/jXIelE) (2017-03-12).

Cánovas, G. (dir.) (2014). Menores de edad y conectividad Móvil en España. Madrid: Protégeles. (https://goo.gl/SgSSfr) (2017-03-24).

De-Frutos-Torres, B., & Marcos-Santos, M. (2017). Disociación de las experiencias negativas y la percepción de riesgo de las redes sociales en adolescentes. El Profesional de la Información, 25(1), 88-96. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2017.ene.09

Dimensions in Parents’ Regulation of Internet Use by Primary and Secondary School Children. Computers & Education, 67, 69-78. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2013.03.005

Experiences of Risk. In S. Livingston & L. Haddon (Eds), Eu Kids. Opportunities and Risk for Children (pp. 173-186). London: The Policy Press. University of Bristol.

Fernández, J., Peñalva, M.A., & Irazabal, I. (2015). Hábitos de uso y conductas de riesgo en Internet en la preadolescencia. [Internet Use Habits and Risk Behaviours in Preadolescence]. Comunicar, 44, 113-121. https://doi.org/10.3916/C44-2015-12

Ferrés, J., & Piscitelli, A. (2012). La competencia mediática: propuesta articulada de dimensiones e indica-dores. [Media Competence. Articulated Proposal of Dimensions and Indicators]. Comunicar, 38, 75-82. https://doi.org/10.3916/C38-2012-02-08

Fuente-Cobo, C. (2017). Públicos vulnerables y empoderamiento digital: el reto de una sociedad e-inclusiva. El Profesional de la Información, 26(1), 5-12. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2017.ene.01

Gutiérrez-Rubí, A. (2015). La transformación digital y móvil de la comunicación política. Barcelona: Ariel.

Ihmeideh, F.M., & Shawareb, A.A. (2014). The Association between Internet Parenting Styles and Children's Use of the Internet at Home. Journal of Research in Childhood Education, 28(4), 411-425. https://doi.org/10.1080/02568543.2014.944723

INTEF (Ed.) (2016). Indicadores del uso de las TIC en España y en Europa año 2016. Madrid: Instituto Nacional de Tecnologías Educativas y de Formación del Profesorado (https://goo.gl/hfETo4) (2017-02-12).

Jiménez-Iglesias, E., Garmendia-Larrañaga, M., & Casado-del-Río, M.A. (2015). Percepción de los y las menores de la mediación parental respecto a los riesgos en Internet. Revista Latina de Comunicación So-cial, 70, 49-68. https://doi.org/10.4185/RLCS-2015-1034.

Lobe, B., Segers, K., & Tsaliki, L. (2009). The Role of Parental Mediation in Explaining Cross-national

López-de-Ayala, M.C., & Ponte, C. (2016). La mediación parental de las practices online de los menores españoles: una revisión de estudios empíricos. Doxa, 23, 13-46. (https://goo.gl/1V4wmJ) (2017-02-12).

Matalinares, M., & Díaz, G. (2013). Influencia de los estilos parentales en la adicción al Internet en alumnos de secundaria del Perú. Revista de Investigación en Psicología, 16(2), 195-220. (https://goo.gl/YZdyJk) (2017-02-24).

Melamud, A., Nasanovsky, J., Otero, P., Canosa, D., Enríquez, D., Köhler, C., ... & Svetliza, J. (2009). Usos de Internet en hogares con niños de entre 4 y 18 años: control de los padres sobre este uso. Resultados de una encuesta nacional. Archivos Argentinos de Pediatría, 107(1), 30-36. (https://goo.gl/oEY0x9) (2017-02-24).

Nikken, P.J., & Schols, M. (2015). How and Why Parents Guide the Media Use of Young Children. Fam Stud, 24, 3423-3435. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-015-0144-4

Núñez-Ladeveze, L., & Núñez-Canal, M. (2016). Noción de emprendimiento para una formación escolar en competencia emprendedora. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 71, 1069-1089. (https://goo.gl/xVUVpp) (2017-02-14).

Padilla, S., Ortiz, E.R., Álvarez, M., Castaño, A. T., Perdomo, A. S., & López, M.J.R. (2015). La influencia del escenario educativo familiar en el uso de Internet en los niños de primaria y secundaria. Infancia y aprendizaje. Journal for the Study of Education and Development, 38(2), 402-434. https://doi.org/10.1080/02103702.2015.1016749

Reig-Hernández, D. (2012). Disonancia cognitiva y apropiación de las TIC. Telos, 90, 9-10. (https://goo.gl/jdxLG5) (2017-02-24).

Rial, A., Gómez, P., Braña, T., & Varela, J. (2014). Actitudes, percepciones y uso de Internet y las redes sociales entre los adolescentes de la comunidad gallega (España). Anales de Psicología, 30(2), 642-655. (https://goo.gl/CVIjAv) (2017-02-23).

Tejedor, S., & Pulido, C.M. (2012). Retos y riesgos del uso de Internet por parte de los menores. ¿Cómo empoderarlos? [Challenges and Risks of Internet Use by Children. How to Empower Minors?]. Comunicar, 39, 65-72. https://doi.org/10.3916/C39-2012-02-06

Torrecillas-Lacave, T., Vázquez-Barrio, T., & Monteagudo-Barandalla, L. (2017). Percepción de los padres sobre el empoderamiento digital de las familias en hogares hiperconectados. El Profesional de la Información, 26(1), 97-105. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2017.ene.10

Travieso, J.L., & Planella, J. (2008). La alfabetización digital como factor de inclusión social: una mirada crítica. UOC Papers, 6. (https://goo.gl/rqQym7) (2017-02-25).

Valcke, M., Bonte, S., De-Wever, B., & Rots, I. (2010). Internet Parenting Styles and the Impact on Internet Use of Primary School Children. Computers & Education, 55(2), 454-464. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2010.02.009



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

La accesibilidad y facilidad de uso de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación en los menores lleva a plantear que una de las cuestiones clave para su potencial de empoderamiento está vinculada al uso crítico de las mismas a través de la adquisición de habilidades críticas. El entorno familiar se postula como un factor determinante en la alfabetización digital y en la formación de ciudadanos críticos. El presente trabajo analiza el papel mediador de los padres en la educación de sus hijos. Plantea un modelo compresivo que recoge la influencia del estilo parental y la confianza de los progenitores hacia el medio interactivo en la adquisición de habilidades críticas por parte de los menores y se identifican los factores personales y contextuales que influyen sobre el estilo parental. El modelo se pone a prueba con una muestra representativa de 765 familias procedentes de la Comunidad de Madrid seleccionadas en función del nivel de enseñanza, tipología de centro y nivel de renta del distrito. Se comprueba que el nivel educativo de los hijos es el factor más influyente en la adquisición de habilidades críticas. No obstante, cuanto menos restrictivo es el estilo de control parental de Internet, más positivamente influye en la adquisición de habilidades independientemente de la edad. Los resultados cuestionan el papel de las restricciones en el uso del medio interactivo para la formación de ciudadanos críticos.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

1.1. La nueva brecha digital: el empoderamiento

Es indiscutible que las TIC se han convertido en una herramienta fundamental y que conocerlas y utilizarlas de forma avanzada es prioritario para desenvolverse en una sociedad compleja y globalizada. El ocio está cada día más vinculado al uso de ordenadores, tablets o móviles, pero también el ejercicio de derechos y ciudadanía activa (Gutiérrez-Rubí, 2015); la empleabilidad (Núñez-Ladevéze & Núñez-Canal, 2016) o el acceso a la formación permanente dependen de la competencia digital (Travieso & Planella, 2008). Los niños demuestran grandes habilidades tecnológicas, pero no sucede lo mismo con la capacidad de comprender críticamente el contexto audiovisual en el que viven.

Ballestero (Fuente-Cobo, 2017) resume en cuatro elementos las variables que integran el concepto de brecha digital: disponibilidad de ordenador u otro dispositivo electrónico en el hogar que permita conexión a Internet; conectividad a la Red desde el hogar o el trabajo; conocimiento de las herramientas básicas para poder acceder y navegar por la Red; y competencia para poder hacer que la información accesible en la Red pueda ser convertida en ‘conocimiento’ por el usuario.

A juzgar por los datos, la brecha de acceso y conectividad ha disminuido hasta prácticamente desaparecer entre los niños y jóvenes españoles. El uso de Tecnologías de la Información y la Comunicación (TIC) se está produciendo a edades cada vez más tempranas. El estudio Menores de Edad y Conectividad Móvil en España señala que los niños de dos y tres años acceden de forma habitual al terminal de sus padres manejando aplicaciones infantiles de juegos, música, actividades y vídeos. Si en lugar de uso, hablamos de propiedad, la última encuesta del Instituto Nacional de Estadística sobre «Equipamiento y uso de tecnologías de información y comunicación» en los hogares», indica que el 25,5% de los niños españoles de 10 años tiene un móvil, ese porcentaje se duplica a los 11 y esta cifra sigue creciendo hasta que a los 15, llega casi al 100%. El descenso en la edad de inicio del uso de los móviles inteligentes no es un fenómeno exclusivo de España, pero sí tiene una incidencia especial en nuestro país, donde la tasa de menores con smartphones es la mayor de Europa, y equiparable a la de EEUU. En cuanto a la conectividad, sabemos que el 93,7% de los niños españoles se conectan a Internet desde su casa (INTEF, 2016) y que todos los que disponen de móvil inteligente tienen conexión permanente, solo interrumpida durante el sueño (Cánovas, 2014).

Los excluidos de la sociedad digital ya no son aquellos que no tienen los dispositivos ni el acceso a la Red, sino aquellos que no son capaces de actuar críticamente. La verdadera brecha digital hoy en día es el empoderamiento relativo a la alfabetización digital, definida como la «adquisición de las competencias intelectuales necesarias para interactuar tanto con la cultura existente como para recrearla de un modo crítico y emancipador y, en consecuencia, como un derecho y una necesidad de los ciudadanos de la sociedad informacional» (Area, Gutiérrez, & Vidal, 2012: 9).

La visión en muchos casos reduccionista que tiene la escuela de la competencia digital (Ferrés & Piscitelli, 2012), centrada en los aspectos técnicos y desatendiendo la formación del espíritu crítico, implica la centralidad de la mediación familiar en el proceso de adquisición de los conocimientos necesarios para el uso creativo y seguro de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación, que se van convirtiendo en tecnologías del empoderamiento (Reig-Hernández, 2012).

Partiendo de esta base, la propuesta que realiza este estudio va más allá de definir un perfil de padre o madre en función del uso de Internet que permiten realizar a sus hijos. El objetivo es determinar cómo el estilo de control parental ejercido por los progenitores y su confianza en el medio permite empoderar a los menores en el uso de Internet. La relación entre el empoderamiento de los niños en el uso de Internet y la adquisición de habilidades críticas está fuertemente relacionada puesto que estas últimas son cruciales para desarrollar un uso independiente y responsable del medio.

1.2. Influencia de los estilos parentales en el empoderamiento digital

Parece demostrado que el estilo parental influye en el uso que los niños realizan de Internet. Valcket, Bonte, Wever y Rots (2010) distinguieron diferentes estilos parentales en función del control que ejercen los padres. Observaron que el modo en el que los hijos se acercan a la tecnología está relacionado con el uso de Internet que hacen los progenitores, su actitud y su experiencia en la Red y definieron que el estilo parental, el comportamiento de los padres en Internet y su nivel educativo eran las variables que más predecían el uso de Internet de los menores en el hogar.

Entre los componentes que influyen en el escenario educativo de los hijos, la edad de los padres aparece como determinante. Hay estudios que demuestran que, a mayor edad de los padres, menor nivel de experiencia en el uso de Internet y menor regulación del uso que hacen los hijos (Álvarez, Torres, Rodríguez, Padilla, & Rodrigo, 2013; Valcket & al., 2010). Álvarez y otros (2013) añaden a la edad de los progenitores, el nivel educativo como elementos clave en las actitudes de los padres: son los progenitores con menor nivel educativo los que se sienten más implicados en la regulación de las actividades de Internet de sus hijos y muestran motivaciones de mayor calidad basadas en el fomento de la interacción social y del aprendizaje. Nikken y Schols (2015) señalan la influencia del uso propio que realizan los padres de Internet en la utilización por parte de sus hijos, mientras, Rial, Gómez, Braña y Varela (2014) muestran que el control que realizan los padres sobre sus hijos es significativamente inferior cuando ellos no utilizan Internet.

Padilla, Ortiz, Álvarez, Castaño, Perdomo y López (2015) también han puesto de manifiesto la influencia del espacio físico y el componente actitudinal de los padres y cuidadores en la frecuencia y amplitud de uso de Internet en el hogar. Analizaron qué variables del perfil sociodemográfico de los padres y la familia y de los hijos modulan los componentes físicos y actitudinales del escenario familiar, así como su uso frecuente y diverso por parte de los hijos. Estos autores concluyen que los padres con hijos en primaria hacen un uso más regulado de Internet debido a que los niños se conectan en espacios compartidos con ellos, lo que permite mantener el control sobre lo que los hijos ven (Álvarez & al., 2013; Valcket & al., 2010).

Sin embargo, las investigaciones no son concluyentes sobre cuál es el estilo de control parental idóneo. Hay estudios que señalan que los menores utilizan más Internet cuando los padres adoptan un estilo permisivo y ocurre lo contrario en los casos de un estilo autoritario que, por otro lado, es el predominante (Valcket & al., 2010). Subyace la idea de que es conveniente regular el uso como medida preventiva para evitar posibles riesgos. Relacionándolo con las situaciones conflictivas que puedan surgir en la Red, Melamud y otros (2009), en una investigación realizada en Argentina con niños entre 4 y 18 años, concluían que los padres tienen poco conocimiento sobre lo que hacen sus hijos en Internet y subestiman sus riesgos potenciales. Lobe, Segers y Tsaliki (2009) encontraron que en los países en los que las estrategias de control parental son débiles, los niños encuentran riesgos más altos en el uso de Internet. Concretamente, España ostenta uno de los niveles más bajos como resultado de una menor sensibilidad a los riesgos combinada con una mediación familiar más eficiente que adopta la forma de conversar con los hijos sobre el uso de Internet. No obstante, estos estudios no son concluyentes respecto a cuáles son las mejores estrategias de control parental, ni cómo influyen en la adquisición de habilidades críticas de los menores.

Lo que sí parece claro es que los estilos parentales disfuncionales (abuso e indiferencia) influyen en la adicción a Internet (Matalinares & Díaz, 2013) y que el uso intensivo de los menores está relacionado con los hogares en los que no existe control parental (Fernández, Peñalba, & Irazabal, 2015; Rial, Gómez, Braña, & Varela, 2014). El hecho de que los padres no sean usuarios de Internet también supone un riesgo para los adolescentes ya que pueden hacer un uso problemático del medio (Boubeta, Ferreiro, Salgado, & Couto, 2015).

Sobre cómo afrontar los riesgos que entraña la Red, las propuestas van dirigidas a incrementar los programas preventivos para un uso responsable y seguro (Berríos, Buxarrais, & Garcés, 2015). El gran reto para el futuro se encontraría en «maximizar los efectos positivos y minimizar los efectos negativos» de Internet sobre los menores (Fernández-Montalvo, Peñalba, & Irazabal, 2015: 119). Tejedor y Pulido (2012: 70) recomiendan incluir en el currículo educativo el empoderamiento de los menores respecto a los riesgos de ciberacoso y grooming, y señalan que «se deben diseñar estrategias educativas globales para afianzar las competencias relacionadas con la alfabetización mediática», así como se deben diseñar modelos de prevención en los que incluyan a las familias. De-Frutos-Torres y Marcos-Santos (2017) proponen acciones preventivas basadas en la puesta en común de las experiencias negativas en las redes sociales por parte de los adolescentes, y los comportamientos aceptables en ellas.

La relevancia de la mediación de los progenitores parece evidente, e incluso los menores son conscientes de la importancia de sus padres como agentes reguladores de los contenidos a los que acceden a través de Internet. Sin embargo, esta influencia va disminuyendo a medida que los menores crecen a favor de sus amigos y compañeros, también en las situaciones más problemáticas (Jiménez-Iglesias, Garmendia, & Casado-del-Río, 2015).

Sobre las estrategias de control parental son muchas las aportaciones, aunque existe poco interés por estudiar los factores que influyen en la mediación familiar y su efectividad (López-de-Ayala & Ponte, 2016). Torrecillas-Lacave, Vázquez-Barrio y Monteagudo-Barandalla (2017), en un estudio centrado en los «hogares hiperconectados» de la Comunidad de Madrid, concluyen que la opinión de los padres es muy positiva respecto a las TIC y que existen distintos estilos de mediación: hay padres que utilizan un estilo más restrictivo que incluye estrategias de control digital de los contenidos, de los horarios y de los tiempos de uso; mientras que otros prefieren la navegación compartida. También señalan que, independientemente del estilo de mediación preferido por las familias, todas establecen estrategias de refuerzo que van desde la intensificación de la comunicación familiar hasta la concienciación de los posibles riesgos asociados a la publicación de imágenes y vídeos en redes. La preocupación por este tema no es solo fruto de los riesgos que pueda entrañar Internet para los menores, sino que también es debida al enorme potencial que tiene como medio clave para fomentar el aprendizaje autónomo y el desarrollo de los hijos (Kerawalla & Crook, 2002 citados en Padilla, 2015). Por esto es interesante explorar la relación padres e hijos en su acercamiento a Internet como instrumento de relación y aprendizaje capaz de hacer más independientes y responsables a los menores.

2. Material y método

2.1. Estudio

El trabajo tiene como objetivo identificar qué variables personales, actitudinales y comportamentales están asociadas al estilo parental que regula el acceso a Internet. Entre los factores personales se incluye la edad de los padres, el nivel de estudios alcanzado, el número de hijos en la unidad familiar, la edad de los hijos, el tipo de hogar y la experiencia de uso de Internet demostrada por los padres bien sea por razones laborales o personales. Las variables actitudinales recogen la confianza de los progenitores en el medio interactivo y su preocupación por los riesgos que puedan afectar a sus hijos. Finalmente, en los aspectos comportamentales se incluye la autorización previa para el acceso a Internet, el control posterior después del uso y la limitación de tiempo conectados a Internet.

El segundo objetivo del trabajo se centra en identificar las variables que tienen una contribución significativa en la adquisición de habilidades críticas en el uso de Internet de los menores en el entorno familiar. Partiendo de la revisión de la literatura sobre el tema se hipotetiza que el estilo parental tendrá un efecto sobre la adquisición de habilidades críticas, junto al resto de factores personales, actitudinales y comportamentales mencionados.

Para explorar los factores asociados con el estilo de control de los padres en el uso de Internet se ha utilizado el estadístico Chi-cuadrado en las variables categóricas y el análisis de varianza de un factor1 (ANOVA) para las variables continuas. El modelo predictivo se ha puesto a prueba mediante un análisis de regresión lineal jerarquizada por bloques por el método de pasos sucesivos que permite identificar las variables que tienen una contribución significativa en la adquisición de habilidades críticas en el uso de Internet. La interpretación de los resultados del modelo se basa en el estadístico F, la proporción de varianza explicada (R2 estandarizado) y los parámetros estandarizados de la ecuación de regresión2.

2.2. Muestra

El universo de estudio está formado por los escolares del municipio de Madrid. La extracción de la muestra ha seguido un muestreo polietápico estratificado por conglomerados utilizando el colegio como unidad muestral. Los estratos se definieron por niveles de enseñanza (Infantil/Primaria, Secundaria/Bachillerato), tipología de centro educativo (pública o privada/concertada) y nivel de renta del distrito (por encima de la media, en la media o por debajo de la media del municipio de Madrid capital). La selección de centros se hizo de forma aleatoria dentro de cada estrato utilizando el registro de centros de la Consejería de Educación de la Comunidad de Madrid. La colaboración del centro en el estudio se consultó telefónicamente. La colaboración de los padres se gestionó a través de los tutores de los centros. La cumplimentación del cuestionario se realizó online. Se recogieron 765 cuestionarios debidamente cumplimentados. El porcentaje de participación fue del 57% indicativo de una buena tasa de respuesta según el criterio de Baxter y Babbie (2004). El 32% de las respuestas procedían de centros públicos y el 68% restante procedía de centros privados.

2.3. Instrumentos de medida

Para la recogida de los datos se elaboró un cuestionario ad hoc que cubría los propósitos del estudio. Se incluyeron los siguientes datos personales: edad del progenitor, sexo, nivel de estudios alcanzados, frecuencia de uso de Internet por razones laborales y personales (ocio) y curso académico en el que se encuentran sus hijos. La confianza de los padres hacia Internet se midió en una escala tipo Likert de 4 puntos cuyas puntuaciones iban desde el escepticismo a la confianza en la Red (media=2,46; desviación típica 0,61).

Para medir la preocupación de los padres por los riesgos de Internet se preguntó por el grado de preocupación que generan diez situaciones en relación con sus hijos: que sean contactados por extraños, que cometan delitos contra su hijo, que sea maltratado o vejado por otros niños, que vean material inapropiado, que su hijo pueda cometer delitos, que le quite oportunidades de hacer otras actividades, que le dedique mucho tiempo, que no tenga criterios para valorar lo que encuentra, que no tenga control sobre su uso, que pierda oportunidades de contacto real con sus amigos. Las respuestas fueron dispuestas en una escala tipo Likert de 4 puntos gradando la preocupación de menos a más. Las respuestas presentan un alto grado de consistencia interna (Alpha de Cronbach=0,92). Para los análisis se calcula la puntuación global a partir de la suma promediada de las 10 situaciones (media=3,27; desviación típica 0,66).

Para evaluar la intervención de los padres en las actividades de sus hijos en Internet se han utilizado varios indicadores. Una pregunta general sobre si se requería o no autorización de los padres para usar Internet en casa durante los periodos no vacacionales. Una cuestión sobre la limitación de tiempo para utilizar Internet cuyas respuestas van de periodos de tiempo más restrictivos a menos (menos de una hora; entre una y dos horas; entre dos y tres horas; más de tres horas y sin límite). En tercer lugar, se ha recogido la autorización para utilizar Internet en ocho situaciones o escenarios diferentes: utilizar servicio de mensajería instantánea, ver vídeos, navegar, tener perfil propio en una red social, descargarse música o películas, compartir fotos, música o vídeos con otros, comprar por Internet e instalarse aplicaciones de la web. Cada alternativa de respuesta refleja un estilo de relación padres-hijos que va desde la posibilidad de acceder solo con permiso, el acceso con permiso y supervisión y la restricción del acceso. Las respuestas a estas situaciones, que obtienen una elevada consistencia interna (Alpha de Cronbach=0,86), se han sumado para crear un indicador global del grado de regulación del uso de Internet que se ha utilizado para establecer el estilo parental (media=24,4 y desviación típica=4,5). En función de la distribución de las respuestas se han establecido tres grupos aproximadamente del mismo tamaño: el primero se ha denominado «estilo de acceso libre/ poco restrictivo» (puntuaciones hasta 20 puntos), el segundo llamado «estilo negociador» (puntuaciones entre 21 y 25) y el tercero calificado «estilo restrictivo» (puntuaciones mayores de 25). Finalmente, en la relación padres-hijos se preguntó si se hacía un control del comportamiento de sus hijos después de utilizar Internet. Las acciones consultadas fueron: comprobar páginas por las que ha navegado, los grupos de whatsapp, los amigos agregados, los contenidos del perfil, los mensajes recibidos o enviados y los archivos descargados. Las respuestas afirmativas se han agregado para obtener un indicador global de control (media=2,97; desviación típica=2,26).

La adquisición de habilidades críticas sobre el uso de las TIC se ha utilizado como variable dependiente del modelo. Esta cuestión refleja el número de habilidades críticas adquiridas en el uso de Internet a juicio de los padres, al margen de dónde hayan sido adquiridas (familia o escuela). Las cuestiones incluidas fueron las siguientes: la importancia de contrastar la información de Internet, que hay páginas webs buenas y otras que no lo son, cómo utilizar fuentes de confianza al bajar contenidos de Internet, dónde buscar información para afrontar tareas escolares, animarle a explorar y aprender cosas en Internet. Las respuestas afirmativas a cada una de estas cuestiones se han agregado formando un único indicador. La media de respuestas afirmativas es 3,67 y la desviación típica es 1,65.

3. Resultados

3.1. Factores asociados al estilo parental

El sexo del que responde está asociado con el estilo parental de acceso a Internet. Las diferencias se producen en el estilo libre o poco restrictivo que aparece con más frecuencia en los hombres que en las mujeres y en el estilo restrictivo donde se sitúan mayor proporción de mujeres (77,9%) que hombres (22,1%). Teniendo en cuenta la proyección personal en las respuestas se podría afirmar que las madres tienden a poner más restricciones en los hábitos de sus hijos. La edad también muestra diferencias estadísticamente significativas. Los padres que practican un control de Internet de estilo libre y negociador tienen más edad (49 y 46,3 años de media, respectivamente) que los padres de estilo más restrictivo (edad media=41,7 años). El nivel de estudios alcanzado muestra algunas diferencias significativas, si bien no hay una tendencia clara. En el estilo de relación libre hay mayor porcentaje de padres con estudios universitarios, mientras que en el estilo de relación restrictivo hay menor proporción de padres universitarios y mayor proporción de progenitores con estudios de formación profesional, bachillerato y/o estudios superiores. El número de hijos menores en el hogar y el tipo de hogar no arroja diferencias estadísticamente significativas. Finalmente, el nivel académico de los hijos es un aspecto que claramente está relacionado con el estilo de relación parental. Es interesante ver cómo en las primeras etapas de la formación académica (primaria) hay mayor proporción de padres que adoptan el estilo restrictivo, frente al periodo de formación secundaria y bachillerato en el que hay mayor proporción del estilo negociador y libre. Por otra parte, el número de menores del hogar y el tipo de familia (monoparental, cónyuge e hijos) no están asociadas con el estilo de relación familiar.


Sanchez-Valle et al 2017a-62672 ov-es035.jpg

La relación de la confianza y preocupación por los riesgos de Internet y el estilo de control parental en Internet es coherente con el planteamiento inicial. Los padres que adoptan un estilo libre tienden a mostrar mayor grado de confianza en el medio interactivo (media=2,56) frente a los que muestran un estilo más restrictivo que tienden a confiar en menor medida en el medio interactivo (media=2,41). La toma de conciencia de los riesgos que pueden sufrir los hijos en Internet también tiene una relación significativa con el estilo de control parental. Los que adoptan un estilo de relación libre tienden a mostrar menor grado de preocupación por los riesgos de sus hijos (media=3,11), frente a los más restrictivos en su relación con el medio que manifiestan mayor preocupación en este sentido (media=3,36).


Sanchez-Valle et al 2017a-62672 ov-es036.jpg

En los estilos libre y negociador hay menor proporción de padres que requieren su autorización previa antes de utilizar Internet, frente al 92% de los padres del estilo restrictivo que exige su visto bueno antes de iniciar la navegación. La regulación del tiempo de conexión muestra diferencias en la franja de menor tiempo donde se sitúan mayor proporción de padres con estilo restrictivo (65,2%). Por último, en el estilo libre hay menos controles posteriores que en los estilos negociador y restrictivo. En conjunto se dibuja un escenario coherente en el que la confianza de los padres lleva a adoptar estilos de relación padres-hijos más relajados y la preocupación por los riesgos conlleva mayores limitaciones. En este mismo sentido, tanto la libertad como las restricciones son coherentes en los usos, en la libertad de acceso, en el tiempo de uso y en los controles posteriores.

3.2. La adquisición de las habilidades críticas

En el análisis de regresión jerarquizada por el método por pasos solo las variables que tienen una contribución significativa con la variable dependiente son incluidas en el modelo3, por lo tanto, el análisis permitirá identificar qué variables tienen una contribución significativa en la adquisición de habilidades críticas en Internet. En el primer bloque solo el curso académico de los hijos entra en el modelo de regresión. Esta variable explica el 27,2% de la varianza. En el segundo bloque ni la confianza en el medio interactivo, ni la preocupación por los riesgos de Internet de los padres influyen sobre la adquisición de habilidades críticas de los hijos. Consecuentemente, ninguna de las variables actitudinales tiene un papel significativo en la regresión a pesar de su relación con el estilo parental. En el último bloque el estilo de control parental en Internet, el control de actividades posterior y el límite de tiempo tienen una contribución significativa. En conjunto, el modelo explica el 35,6% de las habilidades críticas en el medio interactivo.

Atendiendo a los parámetros de la ecuación de regresión (Tabla 4) se aprecia que la variable con mayor capacidad predictiva es el curso académico. Como cabría esperar, a medida que los hijos están en niveles educativos superiores adquieren mayores habilidades en el uso de los medios interactivos. El control posterior de las actividades de los hijos en Internet es la segunda variable que más influye en la adquisición de las habilidades críticas. El sentido de la relación es positiva, es decir, a medida que hay más control por parte de los padres, mayor es la destreza adquirida por los menores. El estilo parental en Internet muestra un efecto significativo sobre la variable dependiente, pero en sentido inverso. A medida que los padres adoptan un estilo más restrictivo en el acceso a las aplicaciones de Internet, menor es el grado de adquisición de habilidades críticas de los menores. Por último, el periodo de tiempo permitido para utilizar Internet muestra una relación positiva con la adquisición de habilidades críticas. A mayor tiempo de uso, mayor es la adquisición de habilidades críticas, si bien esta variable es la que tiene menos peso en la ecuación de regresión.


Sanchez-Valle et al 2017a-62672 ov-es037.jpg


Sanchez-Valle et al 2017a-62672 ov-es038.jpg

4. Discusión y conclusiones

El estilo de control parental resulta crucial en el empoderamiento de los menores en la adquisición de habilidades críticas coincidiendo con trabajos previos que habían puesto de manifiesto la importancia de la mediación parental en la adopción de Internet (Valcket & al., 2010; Ihmeideh & Shawareb, 2014; Nikken & Schols, 2015). El abanico de estilos asociados al uso del medio interactivo pone de relieve la importancia de dotar de oportunidades a los menores para crecer y adquirir competencias en el medio. Las oportunidades de aprendizaje no necesariamente deben venir acotadas por la edad de los menores. Si bien es cierto que a medida que los menores avanzan académicamente adquieren más capacidades que se aplican al entorno interactivo, los resultados del modelo nos llevan a afirmar que los padres pueden convertirse en catalizadores de la experiencia, posibilitando que sus hijos puedan explorar la Red y adoptando un estilo tutelado no restrictivo que permita que el menor pueda navegar libremente por las webs que estén adaptadas a su nivel madurativo. En la medida que los padres adoptan un estilo de relación restrictivo se resiente la adquisición de habilidades críticas. Al mismo tiempo, el control posterior ejercido por los progenitores monitoriza el proceso de aprendizaje.

La adquisición de habilidades críticas no está influida, al menos directamente, por el nivel educativo del entorno familiar, ni por la edad de los padres. En consonancia con lo apuntado por otros estudios (Álvarez & al., 2013) los padres más jóvenes tienden a adoptar estilos de relación más restrictivos en el medio interactivo. De igual modo se comprueba que la confianza en Internet y la preocupación por sus riesgos no afectan directamente a la adquisición de habilidades, si bien, tienen un papel mediador en los estilos de relación parental. Los padres con mayor preocupación por los riesgos y más críticos con el medio interactivo manifiestan menos disposición a que sus hijos lo exploren.

En un plano aplicado sería interesante que en las acciones de orientación parental además de indicar los riesgos del medio interactivo se insista en la importancia de dotar de oportunidades de acceso a los menores bajo su control para su empoderamiento. En este mismo sentido apuntan Ihmeideh y Shawareb (2014) sobre la importancia de que colegios y guarderías trabajen junto a los padres para que Internet se use en el ámbito escolar y en casa de manera adecuada.

Notas

1 Antes de llevar a cabo el ANOVA se ha comprobado la homogeneidad de las varianzas con el test de Levene.

2 En la ecuación de regresión lineal se ha comprobado la independencia de los residuos mediante la prueba Durbin-Watson, la igualdad de las varianzas con el test de Levene y la ausencia de colinealidad de las variables. El criterio de entrada de las variables en la regresión es 0,05.

3 En el primer bloque de la ecuación se incluyen las variables personales: edad de los padres, nivel educativo alcanzado, frecuencia de uso de Internet, edad de los hijos, nº de miembros de la unidad familiar y tipo de hogar. En el segundo se han incluido la confianza en el medio interactivo y la preocupación por los riesgos de Internet. En el tercer bloque se hallan las variables relativas a las actividades control parental: estilo de control parental en Internet, el requisito de autorización de uso de Internet, la limitación de tiempo de uso y el número de controles posteriores del comportamiento de navegación.

Apoyos

Este artículo es el resultado de una investigación titulada Comunidad escolar 2.0. La familia y la escuela ante los retos de la cultura digital. Diagnóstico y propuestas de actuación financiada por la Fundación Universitaria San Pablo CEU (Ref. FUSP-BS-PPC 19/2014) y forma parte de las actividades del Programa sobre Vulnerabilidad Digital PROVULDIG (S2015/HUM3434), financiado por la Comunidad de Madrid y el Fondo Social Europeo (2016-2018).

Referencias

Álvarez, M., Torres, A., Rodríguez, E., Padilla, S., & Rodrigo, M.J. (2013). Attitudes and Parenting

Area, M., Gutiérrez, A., & Vidal, F. (2012). Alfabetización digital y competencias informacionales. Madrid: Fundación Telefónica / Ariel.

Baxter, L.A., & Babbie, E.R. (2003). The Basics of Communication Research. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Thomson Learning.

Berrios, L., Buxarrais, M.R., & Garcés, M.S. (2015). Uso de las TIC y mediación parental percibida por niños de Chile. [ICT Use and Parental Mediation Perceived by Chilean Children]. Comunicar, 45, 161-168. https://doi.org/10.3916/C45-2015-17

Boubeta, A.R., Ferreiro, S.G., Salgado, P.G., & Couto, C.B. (2015). Variables asociadas al uso problemáti-co de Internet entre adolescentes. Health and Addictions / Salud y Drogas, 15(1), 25-38. (https://goo.gl/jXIelE) (2017-03-12).

Cánovas, G. (dir.) (2014). Menores de edad y conectividad Móvil en España. Madrid: Protégeles. (https://goo.gl/SgSSfr) (2017-03-24).

De-Frutos-Torres, B., & Marcos-Santos, M. (2017). Disociación de las experiencias negativas y la percepción de riesgo de las redes sociales en adolescentes. El Profesional de la Información, 25(1), 88-96. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2017.ene.09

Dimensions in Parents’ Regulation of Internet Use by Primary and Secondary School Children. Computers & Education, 67, 69-78. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2013.03.005

Experiences of Risk. In S. Livingston & L. Haddon (Eds), Eu Kids. Opportunities and Risk for Children (pp. 173-186). London: The Policy Press. University of Bristol.

Fernández, J., Peñalva, M.A., & Irazabal, I. (2015). Hábitos de uso y conductas de riesgo en Internet en la preadolescencia. [Internet Use Habits and Risk Behaviours in Preadolescence]. Comunicar, 44, 113-121. https://doi.org/10.3916/C44-2015-12

Ferrés, J., & Piscitelli, A. (2012). La competencia mediática: propuesta articulada de dimensiones e indica-dores. [Media Competence. Articulated Proposal of Dimensions and Indicators]. Comunicar, 38, 75-82. https://doi.org/10.3916/C38-2012-02-08

Fuente-Cobo, C. (2017). Públicos vulnerables y empoderamiento digital: el reto de una sociedad e-inclusiva. El Profesional de la Información, 26(1), 5-12. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2017.ene.01

Gutiérrez-Rubí, A. (2015). La transformación digital y móvil de la comunicación política. Barcelona: Ariel.

Ihmeideh, F.M., & Shawareb, A.A. (2014). The Association between Internet Parenting Styles and Children's Use of the Internet at Home. Journal of Research in Childhood Education, 28(4), 411-425. https://doi.org/10.1080/02568543.2014.944723

INTEF (Ed.) (2016). Indicadores del uso de las TIC en España y en Europa año 2016. Madrid: Instituto Nacional de Tecnologías Educativas y de Formación del Profesorado (https://goo.gl/hfETo4) (2017-02-12).

Jiménez-Iglesias, E., Garmendia-Larrañaga, M., & Casado-del-Río, M.A. (2015). Percepción de los y las menores de la mediación parental respecto a los riesgos en Internet. Revista Latina de Comunicación So-cial, 70, 49-68. https://doi.org/10.4185/RLCS-2015-1034.

Lobe, B., Segers, K., & Tsaliki, L. (2009). The Role of Parental Mediation in Explaining Cross-national

López-de-Ayala, M.C., & Ponte, C. (2016). La mediación parental de las practices online de los menores españoles: una revisión de estudios empíricos. Doxa, 23, 13-46. (https://goo.gl/1V4wmJ) (2017-02-12).

Matalinares, M., & Díaz, G. (2013). Influencia de los estilos parentales en la adicción al Internet en alumnos de secundaria del Perú. Revista de Investigación en Psicología, 16(2), 195-220. (https://goo.gl/YZdyJk) (2017-02-24).

Melamud, A., Nasanovsky, J., Otero, P., Canosa, D., Enríquez, D., Köhler, C., ... & Svetliza, J. (2009). Usos de Internet en hogares con niños de entre 4 y 18 años: control de los padres sobre este uso. Resultados de una encuesta nacional. Archivos Argentinos de Pediatría, 107(1), 30-36. (https://goo.gl/oEY0x9) (2017-02-24).

Nikken, P.J., & Schols, M. (2015). How and Why Parents Guide the Media Use of Young Children. Fam Stud, 24, 3423-3435. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-015-0144-4

Núñez-Ladeveze, L., & Núñez-Canal, M. (2016). Noción de emprendimiento para una formación escolar en competencia emprendedora. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 71, 1069-1089. (https://goo.gl/xVUVpp) (2017-02-14).

Padilla, S., Ortiz, E.R., Álvarez, M., Castaño, A. T., Perdomo, A. S., & López, M.J.R. (2015). La influencia del escenario educativo familiar en el uso de Internet en los niños de primaria y secundaria. Infancia y aprendizaje. Journal for the Study of Education and Development, 38(2), 402-434. https://doi.org/10.1080/02103702.2015.1016749

Reig-Hernández, D. (2012). Disonancia cognitiva y apropiación de las TIC. Telos, 90, 9-10. (https://goo.gl/jdxLG5) (2017-02-24).

Rial, A., Gómez, P., Braña, T., & Varela, J. (2014). Actitudes, percepciones y uso de Internet y las redes sociales entre los adolescentes de la comunidad gallega (España). Anales de Psicología, 30(2), 642-655. (https://goo.gl/CVIjAv) (2017-02-23).

Tejedor, S., & Pulido, C.M. (2012). Retos y riesgos del uso de Internet por parte de los menores. ¿Cómo empoderarlos? [Challenges and Risks of Internet Use by Children. How to Empower Minors?]. Comunicar, 39, 65-72. https://doi.org/10.3916/C39-2012-02-06

Torrecillas-Lacave, T., Vázquez-Barrio, T., & Monteagudo-Barandalla, L. (2017). Percepción de los padres sobre el empoderamiento digital de las familias en hogares hiperconectados. El Profesional de la Información, 26(1), 97-105. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2017.ene.10

Travieso, J.L., & Planella, J. (2008). La alfabetización digital como factor de inclusión social: una mirada crítica. UOC Papers, 6. (https://goo.gl/rqQym7) (2017-02-25).

Valcke, M., Bonte, S., De-Wever, B., & Rots, I. (2010). Internet Parenting Styles and the Impact on Internet Use of Primary School Children. Computers & Education, 55(2), 454-464. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2010.02.009

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/09/17
Accepted on 30/09/17
Submitted on 30/09/17

Volume 25, Issue 2, 2017
DOI: 10.3916/C53-2017-10
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 3
Views 6
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?