Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The construction, visualization, and stabilization of public problems require the mobilization of civil society groups concerned about these issues to actively engage in the demand for actions and policies. This paper explores the institutional campaigns against human trafficking and sexual exploitation in Spain between 2008 and 2017 and their role in helping to shape this issue as a matter of public concern. Our aim is to identify the ideological basis of these campaigns through their representations of predominant actors, which have been systematized to identify possible mistakes and to help determine more effective actions with a greater capacity for mobilization. We applied a mixed content analysis combined with a semiotic model to evaluate the presence or absence of the different actors and their relevance in each case. Several lines of discourse have been reiterated across the 50 campaigns analysed: Curbing the demand for prostitution as a priority objective; the centrality of victims in the representations; the role of the consumer of paid sex as an accomplice to the crime; and the correlation between prostitution and human trafficking. We will also examine how these issues relate to the broader dispute on the status of prostitution in Spain. This will require a conceptual shift away from educational and social-oriented communication towards the structural causes, collective responsibility and transformative justice frameworks.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

In the last decade, trafficking in women and girls for sexual exploitation has become symbolically institutionalised in Spain as a phenomenon that exemplifies the global gender inequalities and requires greater social attention. This issue is recognised today as a public problem (Gusfield, 2003) that reflects shared social unrest that requires institutional intervention: legislative changes, specific public policies and communication actions to raise public awareness, among others (Cefaï, 2012; Schillagi, 2011; Dewey, 2004).

In order for sexual exploitation to become a problem of this nature, certain conditions had to be met: the existence of associated collective discontent and suffering, consensus on its importance, the work of specialists in the issue, appeals to the state to address the problem, and the existence of convincing indicators and categories that set the issue as a concern in different public arenas (Kessler, 2015).

The particularity of the issue as an (inter)national problem lies upon its connection to the -still open- controversy on the legal status of prostitution (Gimeno, 2012; Saiz-Echezarreta, 2015; Andrijasevic & Mai, 2016). In the different spaces in which the issue is mentioned and discussed, participants tend to question the stories that point to the consensus and highlight the dichotomous confrontation that characterises this discussion, largely polarised between those that advocate for its abolition and those who defend sex work (Gimeno, 2012; Pajnic, 2013).

Social movements, organisations, and institutions of different governmental levels have increased their discursive efforts to influence current and future policies (Second National Plan against Sexual Exploitation, 2015-2018, and Anti-trafficking Law, respectively) and raise public awareness of this crime. This has led to a scenario where public action initiatives that aim to make trafficking an issue of top priority in the public agenda have incremented exponentially, without solving the disagreement.

As part of a wider research project on the construction of public problems in the mediated sphere, this article analyses how effective institutional advertising is to spread awareness about the phenomenon of sexual exploitation and to enforce a perspective on it through the use of the basic persuasive mechanisms of social advertising: raising of public awareness, symbolic condensation, and emotional intensity. In essence, the article examines how the campaigns carried out by Spanish public administrations between 2008 and 2017 mobilise discourses based on consensus and orient narratively the controversy, proposing a hegemonic narrative (Terzi & Bovet, 2005; Peñamarín, 2014; Arquembourg, 2011).

Social advertising, linked to educommunication and communication for social change, has a positive influence when it is developed in a strategic, systematic and responsible way; when it prioritises the purposes and efficiency beyond the objectives and efficacy; and when it refers to a scrupulous ethical framework (Alvarado, De-Andrés, & Collado, 2017). In the institutional case, a specific regulation prohibits those communications that “aim to eulogise the government’s work” to ensure they serve the citizenry “and not those who promote them” (Statement of Intent, Law 29/2005 on Advertising and Institutional Communication).

The progressive increase in campaigns indicates that sexual exploitation has become a critical issue of advocacy at the global and hyper-local levels. Thus, it seems imperative to impose here what Gozálvez and Contreras (2014: 130) call “the civic duty” of educommunication, its “ethical, social and democratic undertone related to the need for citizen empowerment in mediated issues”.

These campaigns are the continuation of the strategy initiated for the prevention of gender violence at the state level in 1998, which has persisted despite the budgetary constraints derived from the crisis. The Second Comprehensive Plan Against Trafficking contemplates campaigns as preventive measures to prevent irregular immigration in the countries of origin (Nieuwenhuys & Pécoud, 2007) (measure 21), as well as other actions aimed at discouraging demand for sexual services, especially among young people (measures 6 and 7).

Campaigns to raise public awareness of trafficking are currently being carried out from above: non-mobilised citizens are informed by media products and institutional materials. This institutionalised action seems to be a drift of the awareness-raising work and the success of the advocacy of (inter)national lobbies for the abolition of violence against women in the domestic field, a common strategy in European countries (Devillar & Le-Saulnier, 2015).

Interesting perspectives on this phenomenon examine whether these campaigns are promoting a consensual hegemonic view of the problem, or whether there is room for dissent; and whether the provided information and viewpoints allow for better understanding of the problem or, on the contrary, reinforce stereotypes and unquestioned common places, despite their lack of explanatory capacity and relevance, as it was the case with previous campaigns (Fernández-Romero, 2008; Núñez-Puente & Fernández-Romero, 2015).

The representation against sexual exploitation exceeds this problem since its discourses affect the social-sexual order and the (de)legitimation of certain subjects, practices, desires and models of public and political action (Von-Lurzer, 2014; Sabsay, 2009). The discourses on sexuality, as well as its traditions, dispositions, habits and uses», in the words of Sabsay (2009: 10), “are not limited to reproducing an already given hierarchy of social and sexual identities. On the contrary, this ‘representation’ space elaborates and produces ‘performatively’ its social modeling effects”.

Media representations are spaces where categorisations, power relations, and practices are put into play. The scenarios in which they are disseminated, tend to be intertwined; and each type of genre (informative, advertising, fictional) that promotes them acquires meaning and makes sense in its bonds with the others. This inter-discursive space, as an interpretation framework, is especially relevant for advertising given its extreme symbolic condensation. The slogans, mottos, and images that appear in an ad can be read because the public use common encyclopedias to fill in the spaces and make the necessary connections to understand the texts and insert them into a coherent narrative about certain realities (Peñamarín, 2014; 2015).

After a decade, it seems necessary to review the work that has been done regarding institutional advertising in Spain, to set the agenda, inform, raise awareness and prevent trafficking, establishing a first diagnosis that reveals the successes and errors of a discourse that needs to be further developed. It is a pending review that has been already carried out in the Anglo-Saxon world (Andrijasevic & Anderson, 2009; O’Brien, 2013; 2015).

2. Materials and methods

The methodological proposal guiding this general research project is a combination of ethnographic techniques and socio-semiotic discourse analysis, which has demonstrated to be effective to “follow conflicts” (Marcus, 2001; Terz & Bovet, 2005) and to analyse controversies about public problems (Venturini, 2010). The “follow the conflict” strategy (Marcus, 2001: 120) consists in tracking the location of the different groups or parties involved in a conflict, “examining the circulation of cultural meanings, objects, and identities in a diffuse time-space” (Marcus, 2001: 111) where their discussion takes place, and usually at the same time in areas of daily life, legal institutions, and the media.

As part of the strategy to follow the dispute over trafficking for sexual exploitation, ninety advertising campaigns launched between 2004 and 2017 (September) were analysed. Of these campaigns, fifty that were mainly produced by a public institution1 were selected. The analysis of the campaigns focused on their graphic and audiovisual advertising messages, because: 1) they are the most widespread and accessible elements in comparison to other complementary actions (roundtables, theatre plays, etc.); 2) because they directly inform and raise awareness on a mass scale about causes, problems, protagonists, and solutions, extending the concern to the general public.

The sample was subjected to a mixed content analysis, guided by a purpose-created coding table that incorporates quantitative data related to the number of campaigns and the identification and description of structural elements of their production-reception system (year of production and circulation, elements, issuing organisations, target audience, frequency of terms). Also, the semiotic analysis was performed to explore the objectives and strategies of representation and the characterisation of actors, through the study of the slogans and images as well as assumptions and expository models (Peñamarín, 2015).

The purpose is to reveal the centres of attention that prevail in the representations of this reality, as a way of a first diagnosis that allows us to evaluate the ideological and moral orientation of the institutional proposals, and to identify key aspects to orient future actions. Given that a single piece may contain several actors or characters, the results derived from considering, first, their presence or absence and, later, their greater or lesser prominence in each campaign (relevance and intensity in the encodings).

3. Analysis and results

3.1. Issuing organisations

The organisations that most frequently launch these campaigns are the autonomous communities (22) and the local governments (18) of Spain. The next most common type of organisation is, to a much lesser extent, the Government of Spain (Ministry of Health, Social Affairs, and Equality); the National Police and the provincial governments (3); and the Basque Women’s Institute (Emakunde) (1) (Table 1).


Saiz-Echezarreta et al 2018a-66317-en007.jpg

The most systematic institutions in the use of advertising are the Council of Sevilla (9 campaigns since 2008) and the Xunta of Galicia (7 since 2010). The increase in campaigns has been gradual and irregular (Figure 1), but enough to show that sexual exploitation is a public problem incorporated into the institutional political agenda as a priority awareness area.

The launching of campaigns often coincides with commemorations such as the “World day against trafficking in persons” (30 July), the “International day against sexual exploitation” (23 September) and the “European anti-trafficking day” (18 October). This fact increases the media coverage and probably the visibility, but it can also make the matter invisible for the rest of the year (hence Figure 1 does not consider 2017, despite the fact that its relevance is part of the sample of the campaign launched by the National Police/Mediaset Group).

The most disseminated campaigns are those launched by the Government of Spain (Ministry of Health, Social Affairs, and Equality) since its campaign materials are also used by the local and regional institutions. Of these campaigns, the 2010 campaign stands out due to its international character –adherence to the global Blue Heart Campaign against Human Trafficking–, its dissemination by multiple local councils and entities, and because it has had the widest dissemination so far: “Take a stand against trafficking in women”, of which more than 3,700 posters were circulated in 21 Spanish cities in 2015.

Another relevant case is the campaign of the National Police, which stands out due to the novelty of the campaigner –with no distinguished presence in other topics– and the argument of authority and credibility that its intervention represents in the public space (lately with greater impact thanks to the support of the Mediaset Group).

Other agents with notoriety are the city councils of Seville and Madrid, whose markedly abolitionist proposals have been pioneering and have been accompanied by controversy in the news media. In Seville, the effect of their campaigns was accentuated by their strategy, close to “shock-advertising”, which is recurrent but not always effective in social advertising for prevention in health and social welfare. Although Madrid has only launched three campaigns, their impact and efficiency have multiplied as they have been shared with other municipalities like Valencia.


Saiz-Echezarreta et al 2018a-66317-en008.jpg

3.2. Campaign objectives

The campaigns meet various purposes: raise public awareness, provide data and contexts, generate empathy with the victims and contain the demand, which is the main purpose.

Of the content, the first thing that stands out is that campaigns offer very little information about trafficking and trafficking in persons; the point of view they use to present the subject is more axiological and affective than informative. Virtually none of the ads mention that sexual slavery is a process that may or may not include the crime of trafficking, which depends on international networks and responds to some structural causes that make it an endemic phenomenon in some countries. Only one ad launched by the National Police (2013) reconstructs sexual slavery as a process, resorting to the frequent merchandise metaphor. The stages that are mentioned are selection and extraction of the best raw material, transport, handling, quality control, distribution, promotion, and sale.

To report on this topic and its context, the ad resorts to the use of figures, but not explanations: “While you are reading this message, 45,000 women and girls are sexually exploited in Spain” (Government of Aragon, 2016); “80% of women working in prostitution are forced to do so”, “95% of sex slaves are women and girls” (National Police, 2016).

The ad does not mention the conditions in which the crime is committed, the system that protects it, nor the criminal actions that compose it. The only indication is presented through the body of women, through the hypervisibility of the violence that affects them, which shows victims of attacks in the domestic realm. In this case, women’s bodies are the support of the narrative: they are recognised through the pain and marks of humiliation. This explains the metaphorical reiteration of the figure of the slave, the chains, the barcode tattoos and even their representation as corpses.

The majority explicit objective of these initiatives is to reduce demand for prostitution. Other less common objectives are to (in)form about the crime, open up the debate on the statute of the prostitution, encourage denunciation and deter against criminal conducts. More than reporting –what is reasonable in an initial phase– the objective is to shock the receiver through the denunciation of extreme cases, which are always excessive. This strategy of high visibility involves risks, since prioritising a rhetoric of fascination with violence, always exercised against other women who are perceived as different and far from “us” (the non-prostitutes and non-traded), in the mid and long-term, can bring into play the objective of understanding sexual slavery as a systemic phenomenon and its visibility and importance as a form of violence against women.

3.3. Characterisation3.3.1. Female characters: victims

Of the characters represented, victims and clients are the most abundant (Table 2). Procurers and society are minorities. Victims appear in 40 of the 50 campaigns analysed, and in 24 they are given a relevant role, occupying most of the visual and/or verbal space. The forms of this representation are diverse: as a subject victim of violence or, through a metaphorical configuration: as merchandise (an object of food consumption, packaged, and priced), as a slave, through reference to chains and handcuffs, or transformed in dolls, and in some cases, these images are characterised by a high degree of sexualisation.

Practically absent is the image of the empowered, surviving woman, which managed to appear in campaigns against gender violence. This type of woman is only included in one ad (Council of Almeria, 2014), whose slogan reads “I’m not going to be a victim of sexual exploitation because I have other opportunities”. It is significant that in only other three campaigns the victim speaks in the first person: the Xunta of Galicia, 2014: “Non Trate/as conmigo”; the National Police, 2015: “Help me show my face”, and the Government of Cantabria, 2012: “They’re stealing my life”.


Saiz-Echezarreta et al 2018a-66317-en009.jpg

The re-victimisation, criminalisation and exoticisation of women is obvious, as in the 2013 ad of the National Police, which represents the potential victims with an image characteristic of the news about raids. It shows the police and women from a club with their back turned, which suggests their relation to the deviation, either criminal or non-criminal. Their condition of irregular immigrants is connoted negatively, linked more to criminality than to their condition as subjects in need of support. This occurs despite the insistence on the harmful implications that these kinds of representations generate by configuring the image of the ideal victim, which can have multiple consequences among the victims whose case or situation do not fit that pattern, which hinders their access to public services (O’Brien, 2013; Andrijasevic & Mai, 2016; Núñez-Puente, 2015).

3.3.2. Male characters: customers and pimps

Customers appear on 34 occasions, represented by an image or allusion to a “you”. They are present as unique protagonists in 14 campaigns, while in the remaining they share space with victims or are verbally alluded to. With regards to the men who represent, the most common is a young or middle-aged man, in a jacket or casual attire. The campaigns launched by the Ministry, through coasters (2009), and the Council of Seville (2016), “Your fun has another face”, show a group of young people; the others present a consumer in solitude.

In contrast to the victims, the male figures are not usually sharp; their representation involves drawings, cartons, blurred photographs, images of men turned around or hiding their face. Only the campaign launched by the Council of Madrid in 2015 uses photographs with close-ups, although it applies filters to modify colour. Conversely, the hegemonic representation pattern of women favours their presence using clear and close-up photographs offering testimony. The 2016 campaign of the National Police is exceptional: in it, the consumer of sexual services looks directly at the camera, placing the spectator in the victim’s place.

One of the limitations perceived in this approach is the direct identification made between the consumer of prostitution and the offender, through the category of an accomplice (O’Brien, 2015: 28; López-Riopedre, 2011). The legitimacy and effectiveness of this resource of criminalisation can be questioned, as it may not be an effective persuasive strategy to criminalise the consumer whose conduct wants to be inhibited, much less if we consider that, in a situation of consent, the demand for sexual services in exchange for money is not penalised by law.

Paid consumption is judged here in different degrees: from being an undesirable act that morally degrades the perpetrator, to becoming a directly violent (and, therefore, illicit) action. Thus, the demand for sex appears as a socially marginalised and condemned behavior; however, its relevance in terms of consumption.

Likewise, this ad does not elaborate on the complex relationship existing between the consumer of a service and the conditions of exploitation. This absence could be at the service of an abolitionist argument that wants to operate on the hierarchy of certain moral values, a certain common sense and certain political proposals, which avoid setting out clearly the context or the systemic repercussions of this approach. It would appear as frankly disruptive if these same arguments that allude to complicity were used by public institutions to alert on the purchase of goods and services produced under conditions of exploitation in the impoverished areas of the planet, where labour rights are violated, and people often work under conditions of exploitation (O’Brien, 2015).

Finally, the representation of the pimp emerges in a minority of cases. The pimp is represented marginally (in 2 campaigns) and always in a condemnatory way. In one ad, the pimp appears as part of the trafficking process, turned into a character, a children’s nightmare monster (National Police, 2013); and, in the other, the pimp reveals the means and effects of his activity, through the slogan “Pimps, their business is violence” (Council of Seville, 2009). All this is presented over a big X filled up with insults such as “chulo”, “gavión”, “alcahuete”, etc.

It is interesting to note that the group of campaigns does not illustrate criminals (traffickers, pimps, abusers...) nor shows the way they act. These figures are always presupposed, abstract and dependent on the victims’ testimony. Still, we imagine them either as subjects that are unknown to women, within the mafia or the network; or as subjects that easily deceive women (“lover boy” model). The only human representation of the criminals who mediate in the process is, curiously, that of a woman who retains the passport of an alleged victim in the 2013 campaign of the National Police.

3.3.3. Collective characters: citizens

The citizenry or society, in general, is more mentioned verbally (in four campaigns) than represented at the physical level (in only two campaigns), as the subject recipient of the campaigns and indirectly responsible for the situation due to its presumed indifference and inaction. Here the proposals try to mobilise citizens by questioning them as witness, as people who see what happens, read the papers or the internet ads, and must wake up and act, taking charge of the situation in some way.

3.4. Arguments

Concerning the arguments put into play, the campaign slogans were analysed, understood as bearers of their essential concept in terms of their communicational objective. The most repeated argument is that of the complicity of prostitution users (20 campaigns), which emerges as a violent action in the proposals aimed to inform users of their complicity, redirect their attitude and prevent their conduct. This argument is put forward in slogans that read “Prostitution exists because you pay. Your money hurts a lot”, and “Do not consume prostitution. Without customers... there is no prostitution”.

The second most recognisable argument aims to avoid the conversion of women into commodities. This relies on the denial of the isotopy formed by such concepts as price, purchase, merchandise, which are present in eleven campaigns: “People are not for sale, make a pact with your heart”, “She it is not another object of consumption”. The limitation of this strategy is in the reiteration in the visual representation of the conceptual idea that it aims to avoid, which reinforces instead of widening the imaginary associated with the problem.

On the other hand, eight campaigns highlight the need to acknowledge the problem. The proposal refers to a generic opposition to trafficking, for specific reasons: “Take a stand against trafficking in women” and, the easiest, “Say no to sexual exploitation”. In this case, the campaigns encourage people to be critical in an unspecific way, assuming certain shared ideas, such as the need to not normalise prostitution and consider that the contexts of prostitution include trafficking.

Finally, it is striking that the representation of the clients of prostitutes and their complicit role is not accompanied by direct appeals to denunciation, which are made only three times with such phrases as “Against trafficking, there is no deal. Report it”. It is observed that the mostly abolitionist ideological line here is more focused on blaming the client to avoid consumption than on actively involving clients in the solution.

4. Discussion and conclusions

The analysis reveals the institutional perspectives that have been shown to or hidden from the public in relation to trafficking in women for sexual exploitation, which allows the identification of the possible areas of improvement in future campaigns.

It has been observed that the campaigns have prioritised points of view such as blaming consumption or the narrative centred on the vulnerability of the victims, over other aspects of the crime and the system of trafficking that remain invisible or marginal. This rhetoric is based on the agreed meaning of solidarity, which is defined by Agustín (2009) as the “rescue industry”. This builds a univocal narrative, in which the conflict between good and bad actors is simplified (to the detriment of greater nuances and structural factors), which favours the widespread rejection towards solicitors of prostitution and an empathic attitude towards the victims.

In the absence of the permanent accusation of the responsible agents, the argument moves towards the receiver, who is challenged by the representation of the suffering of the victims and is encouraged to feel compassion and unspecific indignation towards them, portrayed as innocent and mostly “disempowered” (the idealised profile). These victims, characterised in this way, are distanced from the irregular immigrants, since the latter is associated with action and decision, and the former is portrayed as incapable of making decisions and consent to what they do (O’Brien, 2015; Saiz-Echezarreta, Alvarado, & Fernández-Romero, 2017; Kempadoo, 2005).

Public institutions, by democratic delegation, are presented as compassionate, efficient and capable of preventing crime. Moreover, they assume an identity as agents capable of liberating and saving women, thanks to the transfer of resources to other entities (city councils) or the state security forces and bodies. This representation absolves citizens of responsibility over the conditions of vulnerability, inequality, and violence that are at the origin of the trafficking system, in a logic that is similar to that used for several decades in the campaigns of NGOs for development (Saiz-Echezarreta, Alvarado, & Fernández-Romero, 2017; Haynes, 2014). It will be necessary to investigate the implications of presenting citizens only as part of the solution and not the potential causes that favour the expansion of the crime (O’Brien, 2015).

Excluded from representation are the public policies of the institutional actors, who use these resources to legitimise their proposals at the local level with ordinances that can produce situations of greater exclusion and vulnerability in victims, and at the (inter)national level to normalise restrictive migratory policies, which are questioned from the perspective of the human rights of migrants (Kempadoo, 2005; Andrijasevic & Mai, 2016; Kapur, 2002; Nieuwenhuys & Pécoud, 2007).

Institutions operate through advertising from an abolitionist position, which facilitates in the public sphere the narrative orientation of the controversy in favour of this position, at a time when institutional scenarios get intertwined with other territories and remit to the reproduction of certain hegemonic socio-sexual and colonialist orders (Kapur, 2002; Kempadoo, 2016). Therefore, it would be important for these campaigns not to avoid the context of controversy, in particular when they maintain a perspective focused on moral judgment and emotional intensity, which is useful to the moral panic strategy (Weitzer, 2007; Irvine, 2007) which in turn affects the construction of trafficking as a public problem.

With regards to the demand, while the campaigns do not deny its impact on trafficking, there are limitations in its overrepresentation. The one-way relation that the campaigns suggest that exist between demand for sexual services and trafficking may not be so obvious. If so, there would be no doubt of the need to prohibit prostitution, and the truth is that its legal status is the subject of academic, political and social debate. The question is, for example, whether it is reasonable for public institutions to communicate that paying for sex is something negative and even illegal when the situation in Spain is of lack of legislative definition.

By eluding the causes and structural conditions of trafficking and sexual exploitation and mostly pointing out a wrong and immoral desire to get access to sex for pay, these campaigns open a space to apply the narratives and common places inserted in news stories: raids, disarticulation of networks and pimps condemned in trials, among others. This has an impact on the extreme model of the good, institutional, actors and the bad actors, who are not defined under little convincing metaphors like that of the mafias (López-Riopedre, 2011).

Representations (even more in advertising) imply a process of simplification, of translation of the unknown into familiar terms. According to their ways to operate in the public space, they can be useful to widen the social and open spaces of participation and responsibility. From this perspective, the design of future campaigns should start with the discussion and acute review of the strategies and discourses that have been used, and the assessment of their impact, which would require the necessary planning of its integral measurement.

In pursuit of the effectiveness of these interventions, it would be desirable to increase professionalisation in the area of research and to set specific routines oriented to the search for synergies, taking advantage of strategies and campaigns that have been already carried out, and to ending operations in a seasonal basis. This would allow us to unite and streamline efforts, and to keep this issue in the public sphere more continuously.

Following the search for this efficacy, it would also be convenient to review their rules, intervention guidelines and theoretical conceptualisation, since the dissemination of shared knowledge requires addressing the questions made about the definition of the problem of trafficking, which has been recommended in “Cadernos Pagu”, 47, especially Piscitelli’s contribution (2016).

Concerning the strategy of moral, sexual and affective panic followed by the campaigns, it seems necessary to review and implement efforts to connect sexual exploitation with other issues, like other types of exploitation and trafficking, migration policies and violence against women. The lessons learned must be collected, and the campaigns must incorporate an approach focused on the attackers, the structural causes, and women and their families as survivors and not only as victims.

If, as O’Brien points out, it is the focus on the singular demand for sex for pay what makes it difficult to address the collective and individual responsibility in relation to a chain of structural injustices and inequalities, it is advisable that the campaigns are broader and more focused on making the phenomenon known, in order to enable citizens to identify the crime and favour actions in this respect (containment of demand, promotion of denunciation, reduction of stigmatisation of victims). Finally, considering the participation of these campaigns in the controversy, it would be necessary to contemplate the distinction between sexual work and sexual exploitation, and to incorporate other voices and approaches, such as those of sexual workers (Kempadoo, 2005: 149-158).

Cultural and social efficiency must be addressed, and maybe bet, as in other cases, because the construction of a transformative image in the context of controversy can defuse scepticism and the arguments that maintain the status quo and encourage denunciation and the search for a collective solution (De-Andrés, Nos-Aldás & García, 2016: 35).

Notes

1 Catalogue available at: https://figshare.com/s/8fcf63f843a43e64a68e.

Funding agency

R&D Project “The construction of public affairs in the mediated public sphere” (CSO2013-45726-R) and R+D+I Project “Citizens’ skills in emerging digital media in the professional field of communication” (EDU2015-64015-C3-3-R MINECO/FEDER).

References

Agustín, L. (2009). Sexo y marginalidad. Emigración, mercado de trabajo e industria de rescate. Madrid: Popular.

Alvarado, M., De-Andrés, S., & Collado, R. (2017). La exclusión social en el marco de la comunicación para el desarrollo y el cambio social. Un análisis del tratamiento de la inclusión social en campañas de servicio público sin ánimo de lucro. Disertaciones, 10(1), 108-124. (https://goo.gl/3cRFf6).

Andrijasevic, R., & Anderson, B. (2009). Anti-trafficking campaigns: decent? Honest? Truthful? Feminist Review, 92(1), 151-155. (https://goo.gl/tez7bE).

Andrijasevic, R., & Mai, N. (2016). Trafficking (in) representations: Understanding the recurring appeal of victimhood and slavery in neoliberal times. Anti-trafficking Review 7, 1-10. https://doi.org/10.14197/atr.20121771

Arquembourg, J. (2011). Enjeux politiques des récits d’information: D’un objet introuvable à l’institution d’un monde commun. Quaderni, 74, 37-45. (https://goo.gl/oxGjxU).

Cefaï, D. (2012). ¿Qué es una arena pública? Algunas pautas para un acercamiento pragmático. In D. Cefaï, & I. Joseph (Coords.), L’heritage du pragmatisme. Conflits d’urbanité et épreuves de civisme (pp. 51-81). La Tour d’Aigues: Éditions de l’Aube. (https://goo.gl/8wSFUP).

De Andrés, S., Nos-Aldás, E., & García, A. (2016). The transformative image. The power of a photograph for social change: The death of Aylan. [La imagen transformadora. El poder de cambio social de una fotografía: la muerte de Aylan]. Comunicar, 47, 29-37. https://doi.org/10.3916/C47-2016-03

Devillar, V., & Le Saulnier, G. (2015). Le problème publique de la prostitution aux marges des arènes publiques numériques. Journal des Antropologhes, 142-143, 203-226. (https://goo.gl/n66yzS).

Dewey, J. (2004). La opinión pública y sus problemas. Madrid: Morata.

Fernández-Romero, D. (2008). Gramáticas de la publicidad sobre violencia: la ausencia del empoderamiento tras el ojo morado y la sonrisa serena. Feminismo/s, 11, 15-39. (https://goo.gl/C6PbX5).

Gimeno, B. (2012). Aportaciones para un debate abierto. Barcelona: Bellaterra.

Gozálvez, V., & Contreras, P. (2014). Empowering media citizenship through educommunication. [Empoderar a la ciudadanía mediática desde la educomunicación]. Comunicar, 42, 129-136. https://doi.org/10.3916/C42-2014-12

Gusfield, J. (2003). Action collective et problèmes publics. Entretien avec Daniel Cefaï et Danny Trom. In Haynes, D. (2014), The celebritization of human traffcking. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 635(1), 25-45. https://doi.org/10.1177/0002716213515837

Irvine, J.M. (2007). Transient feelings: Sex panics and the politics of emotions. GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, 14(1), 1-40. (https://goo.gl/SBqrFs).

Kapur, R. (2002). The tragedy of victimization rhetoric: resurrecting the ‘native’ subject in international/ postcolonial feminist legal politics. Harvard Human Rights Journal, 15(1), 1-38. (https://goo.gl/wJfqux).

Kempadoo, K. (2005). Sex workers’ rights organizations and anti-trafficking campaigns. In K. Kempadoo (Eds.), Trafficking and prostitution reconsidered: News perspectives on migration, sex work and human rights (pp. 149-158). London: Paradigm Publishers.

Kempadoo, K. (2016). Sexual economies and human trafficking. Revitalizing imperialism. Contemporary campaigns against sex trafficking and modern slavery. Cadernos Pagu, 47. https://doi.org/10.1590/18094449201600470008

Kessler, G. (2015). Controversias sobre la desigualdad: Argentina, 2003-2013. Buenos Aires: Fondo de Cultura Económica.

López-Riopedre, J. (2011). La criminalización de la industria del sexo, una puesta políticamente correcta. Gaceta de Antropología, 27(2). (https://goo.gl/2DnVxK).

Marcus, G. (2001). Etnografía en/del sistema mundo. El surgimiento de la etnografía multilocal. Alteridades, 11(22), 111-127. (https://goo.gl/mcMkbJ).

Nieuwenhuys, C., & Pécoud, A. (2007). Human trafficking, information campaigns, and strategies of migration control. The American Behavioral Scientist, 50(12), 1674-1695. https://doi.org/10.1177/0002764207302474

Núñez-Puente, S., & Romero, D. (2015). Construcción identitaria del sujeto víctima de violencia de género: fetichismo, estetización e identidad pública. Teknokultura, 12(2), 267-284. (https://goo.gl/FkKntp).

O´Brien, E. (2013). Ideal victims in trafficking awareness campaigns. In K. Carrington, M. Ball, E. O´Brien, & J.M. Tauri (Eds.), Crime, justice and social democracy. Critical criminological perspectives. London: Palgrave Macmillan. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137008695_21

O´Brien, E. (2015). Human trafficking heroes and villains: Representing the problem in anti-trafficking awareness campúigns. Social and Legal Studies, 25(2), 205-224. https://doi.org/10.1177/096466391559341

Pajnic, M. (2013). Reconciling paradigms of prostitution through narration. Drustvena Istrazivanja, 22(2). https://doi.org/10.5559/di.22.2.03

Peñamarín, C. (2014). Esfera pública y construcción del mundo común. El relato dislocado. Cuadernos de Información y Comunicación, 19, 103-124. (https://goo.gl/e97oa6).

Peñamarín, C. (2015). Creatività e trasformazione culturale. Il dinamismo dei sistemi di significazione. Versus, 121, 53-69. (https://goo.gl/fV9WXq).

Piscitelli, A. (2016). Economias sexuais, amor e tráfico de pessoas – novas questões conceituais. Cadernos Pagu, 47. https://doi.org/10.1590/18094449201600470005

Sabsay, L. (2009). El sujeto de la performatividad: narrativas, cuerpos y políticas en los límites del género. Valencia: Universitat de Valencia, Servei de Publicacions. (https://goo.gl/7Vhj1q).

Saiz-Echezarreta, V. (2015). Emociones y controversia pública en torno al ‘issue’ prostitución y trata de personas con fines de explotación sexual. De Signis, 24, 109-131. (https://goo.gl/vFcA8W).

Saiz-Echezarreta, V., & Alvarado, M.C. (2017). Prostituciones en Red: Análisis de los espacios publicitarios digitales. Labrys, 30. (https://goo.gl/Z7XZ7K).

Saiz-Echezarreta, V., Alvarado, M.C., & Fernández-Romero, D. (2017). La víctima de trata con fines de explotación sexual como sitio de persuasión: Estrategias de representación postcolonial en las campañas institucionales. In L. Nuño-Gómez, & A. De-Miguel, (Dirs.), Elementos para una teoría crítica del sistema prostitucional (pp. 123-133). Madrid: Comares.

Schillagi, C. (2011). Problemas públicos, casos resonantes y escándalos. Algunos elementos para una discusión teórica. Polis, 30, 1-19. (https://goo.gl/a93sth).

Terzi, C., & Bovet, A. (2005). La composante narrative des controverses politiques et médiatiques. Pour une analyse praxéologique des actions et des mobilisations collectives. Réseaux, 132(4), 111-132. https://doi.org/10.3917/res.132.0111

Venturini, T. (2010). Driving in magma: how to explore controversies with actor-network theory. Public Understanding of Science, 19(3), 258-273. (https://goo.gl/NrW3Re).

Von-Lurzer, C. (2014). Sexualidades en foco. Representaciones televisivas de la prostitución en Argentina. Sexualidades. Serie monográfica sobre sexualidades latinoamericanas y caribeñas, 11, 1-57. (https://goo.gl/bPLHcx).

Weitzer, R. (2007). The social construction of sex trafficking: Ideology and institutionalization of a moral crusade. Politics & Society, 35(3), 447-475. https://doi.org/10.1177/0032329207304319



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

La construcción, visibilización y estabilización de un problema público requiere de la movilización de colectivos ciudadanos interesados en el asunto, que actúen como un ente activo en la reclamación de acciones y políticas. Este artículo analiza las campañas contra la trata de personas con fines de explotación sexual en España (2008-2017) desde su contribución a la conformación de esta cuestión como un problema de carácter público. El objetivo es identificar los ejes ideológicos desde los que han operado estas campañas, a través de las representaciones que se han sistematizado de sus protagonistas para identificar posibles errores y orientar acciones de mayor eficiencia y capacidad movilizadora. Se ha aplicado un análisis de contenido mixto complementado con un análisis semiótico, considerando la presencia o ausencia de los distintos actores y su mayor o menor protagonismo en cada caso. En las cincuenta campañas analizadas se constata la reiteración de varias líneas discursivas: la prioridad en desincentivar la demanda de prostitución, la centralidad de las víctimas en la representación, la figura del demandante de sexo de pago como cómplice del delito y la equiparación de prostitución y trata. Son discursos que intervienen en una controversia más amplia sobre el estatuto de la prostitución en el país y que necesitan reorientarse, desde la educomunicación y la comunicación con fines sociales, hacia las causas estructurales, la responsabilidad colectiva y la denuncia transformadoras.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

En la última década, en España el tráfico y la trata de mujeres y niñas con fines de explotación sexual se ha institucionalizado simbólicamente como un fenómeno que ejemplifica las desigualdades globales de género y que requiere mayor atención social. Este tópico constituye hoy un problema público reconocible (Gusfield, 2003), a través del cual se da voz a un malestar social compartido, sobre el que se reclama la intervención institucional: cambios legislativos, políticas públicas específicas y acciones de sensibilización comunicativa, entre otros (Cefaï, 2012; Schillagi, 2011; Dewey, 2004).

Para que la explotación sexual haya devenido en un problema de esta naturaleza han tenido que cumplirse ciertas condiciones: darse una experiencia de descontento y sufrimiento colectivo asociado, haber consenso sobre su importancia, concurrir un trabajo de especialistas en la cuestión, apelar al Estado para dar respuestas y existir indicadores y categorías convincentes que estabilicen el tema como preocupación en diferentes arenas públicas (Kessler, 2015).

La particularidad del tema como problema (inter)nacional radica en su ligazón a la controversia -aún abierta- sobre el estatuto de la prostitución (Gimeno, 2012; Saiz-Echezarreta, 2015; Andrijasevic & Mai, 2016). En los diferentes espacios en que se interviene y debate el asunto se tienden a cuestionar los relatos que apuntan al consenso, y se resalta la confrontación dicotómica que caracteriza esta discusión, polarizada en gran medida entre las posiciones abolicionistas y las de defensa del trabajo sexual (Gimeno, 2012; Pajnic, 2013).

Movimientos sociales, organizaciones e instituciones de los distintos niveles de la Administración han aumentado sus esfuerzos discursivos para incidir en las políticas vigentes (II Plan Nacional contra la explotación sexual 2015-2018) y futuras (Ley anti-trata), y para concienciar a la población sobre este delito. Esto ha derivado en un escenario donde, sin llegar a solventarse el disenso, se han incrementado exponencialmente las iniciativas de acción pública orientadas a que la trata sea un asunto prioritario en la agenda pública.

Dentro de una investigación más amplia relativa a la construcción de los problemas públicos en la esfera mediatizada, se analiza aquí cómo la publicidad institucional constituye una herramienta eficaz para visibilizar el fenómeno de la trata y hacer valer una perspectiva sobre el mismo, a partir del uso de los mecanismos persuasivos básicos de la publicidad social: búsqueda de notoriedad, condensación simbólica e intensidad emocional. En lo esencial, se indaga cómo las campañas realizadas por administraciones públicas españolas entre 2008 y 2017 movilizan discursos desde el consenso y orientan narrativamente la controversia, proponiendo un relato hegemónico (Terzi & Bovet, 2005; Peñamarín, 2014; Arquembourg, 2011).

La publicidad social, ligada a la educomunicación y a la comunicación con fines sociales, alcanza una influencia positiva cuando se realiza de modo estratégico, sistemático y responsable; prioriza los fines y la eficiencia más allá de los objetivos y la eficacia; y refiere a un escrupuloso marco ético (Alvarado, De-Andrés, & Collado, 2017). En el caso institucional, una regulación específica prohíbe además aquellas que «tengan como finalidad ensalzar la labor del Gobierno» a fin de garantizar que sirvan a los ciudadanos «y no a quien las promueve» (Exposición de Motivos, Ley 29/2005 de Publicidad y Comunicación Institucional).

El aumento progresivo de campañas es un indicador de que la trata ha derivado en un tema de incidencia política de primer orden a nivel global e hiper-local. Por lo que parece imprescindible que deba imponerse aquí lo que Gozálvez & Contreras (2014: 130) llaman «finalidad cívica» de la educomunicación, su «trasfondo ético, social y democrático relacionado con la necesidad de empoderamiento de la ciudadanía en cuestiones mediáticas».

Estas campañas son continuación de la estrategia iniciada para la prevención de la violencia de género a nivel estatal en 1998, que ha persistido a pesar de las restricciones presupuestarias derivadas de la crisis. El II Plan Integral contra la trata recoge la realización de campañas que existían como medida preventiva de contención de la inmigración irregular en los países de origen (Nieuwenhuys & Pécoud, 2007) (medida 21), así como otras acciones orientadas a desincentivar la demanda por servicios sexuales, en especial entre los jóvenes (medidas 6 y 7 del Plan).

La concienciación contra la trata es actualmente una acción desde arriba; la ciudadanía no movilizada se informa a través de productos mediáticos y materiales institucionales. Esta acción institucionalizada parece una deriva de la labor de concienciación y del éxito de la incidencia política de los «lobbies» (inter)nacionales en la abolición de la violencia contra la mujer en el ámbito de la pareja, una estrategia común a países del entorno europeo (Devillar & Le-Saulnier, 2015).

Perspectivas interesantes de analizar incluyen preguntas como si desde estas campañas se está favoreciendo una mirada hegemónica consensual sobre el problema o si hay cabida para el disenso; y si se están aportando informaciones y puntos de vista que permitan comprender mejor el problema o, por el contrario, se refuerzan estereotipos y lugares comunes incuestionados, pese a su falta de capacidad explicativa y pertinencia, como sucedió con campañas anteriores (Fernández-Romero, 2008; Núñez-Puente & Fernández-Romero, 2015).

La representación contra la explotación sexual excede este problema, pues sus discursos inciden en el orden socio-sexual y en la (des)legitimación de ciertos sujetos, prácticas, deseos y modelos de acción pública y política (Von-Lurzer, 2014; Sabsay, 2009). Los discursos sobre sexualidad, así como sus «costumbres, disposiciones, hábitos y usos», en palabras de Sabsay (2009: 10), «no se limitan a reproducir una jerarquía de identidades sociales y sexuales ya dada. Al contrario, este espacio de ‘representación’ en realidad elabora y produce «performativamente» sus propios efectos de modelización social».

Las representaciones mediáticas son espacios donde se ponen en juego categorizaciones, relaciones de poder y prácticas. Los escenarios en que se difunden, suelen entrecruzarse; y cada tipo de género (informativo, publicitario, ficcional) que las promueve adquiere sentido y se ilumina en sus vínculos con los demás. Este espacio interdiscursivo, como marco de interpretación, es especialmente relevante para la publicidad dada su extrema condensación simbólica. Las consignas, lemas e imágenes que aparecen en un anuncio pueden ser leídos porque los públicos utilizan las enciclopedias comunes para rellenar los espacios y realizar las conexiones necesarias para comprender los textos e insertarlos en un relato coherente sobre determinadas realidades (Peñamarín, 2014; 2015).

Transcurrida una década, parece bueno revisar lo realizado desde la publicidad institucional en España, a fin de poner en agenda, informar, sensibilizar y/o prevenir en materia de trata, estableciendo un primer diagnóstico que devele aciertos y errores de un discurso que habrá que seguir construyendo. Es una revisión en deuda, ya acometida en el ámbito anglosajón (Andrijasevic & Anderson, 2009; O´Brien, 2013; 2015).

2. Material y métodos

La propuesta metodológica que guía el proyecto de investigación general es una combinación de técnicas etnográficas y análisis socio-semiótico del discurso, que ha demostrado ser eficaz a la hora de «seguir los conflictos» (Marcus, 2001; Terz & Bovet, 2005) y analizar las controversias sobre problemas públicos (Venturini, 2010). La estrategia «follow the conflict» (Marcus, 2001: 120) consiste en rastrear el lugar de los diferentes grupos o partes de un conflicto, «examinar la circulación de significados, objetos e identidades culturales en un tiempo-espacio difuso» (Marcus, 2001: 111), donde tiene lugar su discusión, y habitualmente de forma simultánea en esferas de la vida cotidiana, instituciones legales y medios de comunicación.

Como parte del seguimiento de la controversia sobre la trata con fines de explotación sexual registramos noventa campañas de publicidad entre 2004 y 2017 (septiembre), de las que seleccionamos las cincuenta con una institución pública como emisor principal1. Su análisis estuvo centrado en los mensajes publicitarios gráficos y audiovisuales, por: 1) ser los más difundidos y accesibles frente a otras acciones complementarias (mesas redondas, representaciones teatrales, etc.); y 2) porque son los que de manera directa dan a conocer y visibilizan a nivel masivo las causas, problemas, protagonistas y soluciones que se plantean, extendiendo su preocupación a la sociedad.

Al corpus se aplicó un análisis de contenido mixto, con una retícula diseñada ad hoc, que incorpora datos cuantitativos relativos al número de campañas y a la identificación y descripción de elementos estructurales de su sistema de producción-recepción (año de realización y difusión, piezas, tipos de emisores, público objetivo, frecuencia de términos). Unido a ello se realizó un análisis semiótico orientado a explorar los objetivos y estrategias de representación y figurativizaciones efectuadas de los actores, a través del estudio de los eslóganes e imágenes, y de las presuposiciones y modelos enunciativos movilizados (Peñamarín, 2015).

El propósito es evidenciar los focos de atención que prevalecen en las representaciones de esta realidad, a modo de un primer diagnóstico que permita evaluar la orientación ideológica y moral de las propuestas institucionales, e identificar claves para orientar acciones futuras. Dado que en una sola pieza pueden aparecer varias figuras, los resultados se derivan de considerar primero su presencia o ausencia y, después, su mayor o menor protagonismo en cada campaña (relevancia e intensidad en las codificaciones).

3. Análisis y resultados

3.1. Emisores

Los emisores más frecuentes de las campañas son las Comunidades Autónomas (22) y los Ayuntamientos (18). Muy lejos le siguen el Gobierno de España (Ministerio de Sanidad, Asuntos Sociales e Igualdad) (3); la Policía Nacional (3) y las Diputaciones provinciales (3); y el Instituto Vasco de la Mujer (Emakunde) (1) (Tabla 1).


Saiz-Echezarreta et al 2018a-66317 ov-es007.jpg

Las instituciones con mayor sistematicidad en el uso de la publicidad son el Ayuntamiento de Sevilla (9 campañas desde 2008) y la Xunta de Galicia (7 desde 2010). El incremento de campañas ha sido paulatino pero irregular (Gráfico 1), pero suficiente para demostrar que la explotación sexual es un problema público incorporado a la agenda política institucional como área de sensibilización prioritaria.

Los lanzamientos de las campañas suelen coincidir con conmemoraciones como el Día Mundial contra la Trata de Personas (30 julio), el Día Internacional contra la Explotación Sexual (23 septiembre) y el Día Europeo contra la Trata (18 de octubre), hecho que si bien aumenta la cobertura mediática y probablemente su notoriedad, puede a la vez invisibilizar el asunto el resto del año. (De ahí que en el Gráfico 1 no se considere 2017, a pesar de que por su relevancia forma parte de la muestra la campaña de la Policía Nacional/Mediaset).

Las campañas con mayor difusión son las del Gobierno de España (Ministerio de Sanidad, Asuntos Sociales e Igualdad), puesto que otras instituciones locales y regionales utilizan también sus materiales. De estas campañas destacan la de 2010 –adhesión a la campaña mundial Corazón Azul–, de carácter internacional y que han difundido múltiples ayuntamientos y entidades locales, y la que tiene mayor divulgación hasta el momento: «Contra la trata de mujeres toma conciencia», de la que circularon más de 3.700 carteles en 21 ciudades españolas en 2015.

Caso relevante es también el de la Policía Nacional, que sobresale tanto por la novedad del anunciante –sin presencia distinguida en otros temas– como por el argumento de autoridad y credibilidad que supone su intervención en el espacio público (últimamente con mayor impacto con el apoyo del Grupo Mediaset).

Otros agentes con notoriedad son los ayuntamientos de Sevilla y Madrid, cuyas propuestas de marcado carácter abolicionista han sido pioneras y acompañadas de polémica en los medios informativos. En Sevilla, su efecto se acentuó por la estrategia empleada, próxima al «shock-advertising», recurrente pero no siempre efectivo en la publicidad social para la prevención en salud y bienestar social. Aunque Madrid solo ha realizado tres campañas, su impacto y eficiencia se han multiplicado al compartirse con otros ayuntamientos como el valenciano.


Saiz-Echezarreta et al 2018a-66317 ov-es008.jpg

3.2. Objetivos de las campañas

Las campañas cumplen diversos propósitos: dar a conocer, ofrecer datos y contextos, generar empatía con las víctimas, contener la demanda. De todos ellos, este último prima.

Del contenido, lo primero que destaca es que las campañas ofrecen muy poca información sobre la trata y el tráfico de personas; escogen un punto de vista más axiológico y afectivo que informativo para presentar el tema. Prácticamente ninguno de los anuncios se ocupa de mencionar que la trata es un proceso que puede o no incluir el delito de tráfico, que depende de redes internacionales y responde a una serie de causas estructurales que lo convierten en un fenómeno endémico en algunos países. Tan solo un anuncio de la Policía Nacional (2013) reconstruye la trata como proceso, recurriendo a la metáfora frecuente de la mercancía. Los estadios mencionados son selección y extracción de la mejor materia prima, transporte, proceso de manipulado, control de calidad, distribución, promoción y venta.

Para informar sobre este tópico y su contexto se recurre a cifras, pero no a explicaciones: «Mientras estás leyendo este mensaje 45.000 mujeres y niñas son explotadas sexualmente en España» (Gobierno de Aragón, 2016); «El 80% de las mujeres que ejerce la prostitución lo hace obligada», «El 95% de las esclavas sexuales son mujeres y niñas» (Policía Nacional, 2016).

No se mencionan las condiciones de comisión del delito, el sistema que lo ampara ni las acciones delictivas que lo componen. El único indicio que se presenta lo hace a través del cuerpo de las mujeres, mediante la hipervisibilidad de la violencia que las afecta, hecho que recuerda a las víctimas de agresiones en la pareja. En este caso, los cuerpos de las mujeres son el soporte de la narrativa: se las reconoce a través del dolor y las huellas de la humillación. Eso explica la reiteración metafórica de la figura de la esclava, las cadenas, los códigos de barras tatuados e incluso su representación como cadáver.

El objetivo explícito mayoritario de estas iniciativas es la reducción de la demanda por prostitución. Otros de menor registro son los de (in)formar sobre el delito, plantear el debate sobre el estatuto de la prostitución, incentivar la denuncia y disuadir frente a conductas delictivas. Más que informar –lo razonable en una fase inicial– se busca aquí impactar al receptor mediante la denuncia de casos extremos, siempre excesivos. Esta estrategia de alta notoriedad conlleva riesgos, pues de priorizarse una retórica de fascinación por la violencia, ejercida siempre sobre otras mujeres que se perciben como diferentes y alejadas del «nosotras» (las no prostitutas y no tratadas), en el mediano y largo plazo puede ponerse en juego el objetivo de comprensión de la trata como fenómeno sistémico y su sensibilización e importancia como forma de violencia contra las mujeres.

3.3. Figurativización3.3.1. Figuras femeninas: víctimas

Entre las figuras representadas abundan víctimas y clientes (Tabla 2). Proxenetas y la sociedad son minoritarios. Las víctimas aparecen en 40 de las 50 campañas analizadas, y en 24 lo hacen de manera relevante, ocupando la mayor parte del espacio visual y/o verbal. Las formas de esta representación son diversas: como sujeto víctima de violencia o, a través de una configuración metafórica, como mercancía (objeto de consumo alimentario, empaquetado, valorado con un precio); también como esclava, mediante la referencia a cadenas y esposas, o transformadas en muñecas, imágenes en algunos casos caracterizadas por un alto grado de sexualización.

Por contra, está prácticamente ausente la figura de la mujer empoderada, superviviente, cuya representación logró abrirse paso en las campañas contra la violencia de género. De ella tan solo encontramos aquí un anuncio (Ayuntamiento de Almería, 2014), cuyo eslogan reza «No voy a ser víctima de explotación sexual porque tengo otras oportunidades». Es significativo que solo haya otras tres campañas en que las víctimas hablen en primera persona: Xunta de Galicia, 2014: «Non Trate/as conmigo»; Policía Nacional, 2015: «Ayúdame a dar la cara», y Gobierno de Cantabria, 2012: «Me están robando la vida».


Saiz-Echezarreta et al 2018a-66317 ov-es009.jpg

La revictimización, criminalización y exotización de las mujeres es algo evidente, como en el anuncio de la Policía Nacional, 2013, que muestra a las potenciales víctimas con una imagen propia de las noticias sobre redadas. Aparece la policía y las mujeres de un club de espaldas, hecho que induce a pensar en su relación con la desviación, sea o no delictiva. Su condición de inmigrantes irregulares se connota negativamente, vinculada a la criminalidad que no a una condición de sujetos requeridos de apoyo. Ello, a pesar de las insistencias en las implicaciones perjudiciales que este tipo de representaciones genera al configurarse la imagen de una víctima ideal, imagen que puede alcanzar múltiples consecuencias entre las víctimas al no calzar su caso o situación con ese patrón, lo que obstaculiza su acceso a los servicios públicos (O´Brien, 2013; Andrijasevic & Mai, 2016; Núñez-Puente, 2015).

3.3.2. Figuras masculinas: clientes y proxenetas

Los clientes aparecen en 34 ocasiones, representados mediante una imagen o la alusión a un «tú». Presencialmente figuran como protagonistas únicos en 14 campañas; en las restantes, bien comparten espacio con las víctimas o son verbalmente aludidos. Sobre los tipos masculinos que los encarnan, suele primar la representación de un hombre joven o de mediana edad, con traje de chaqueta o vestimenta informal. La campaña que el Ministerio realizó a través de posavasos (2009) y la del Ayuntamiento de Sevilla 2009, «Tu diversión tiene otra cara», muestran un colectivo de jóvenes; las demás ilustran un consumidor en soledad.

Contrario a las víctimas, las figuras masculinas no suelen ser nítidas; para representarlas se utilizan dibujos, caricaturas, fotografías difuminadas, imágenes de espaldas o evitando el rostro. Solo la campaña del Ayuntamiento de Madrid 2015 opta por fotografías de primer plano, aunque aplica filtros para modificar el color. A la inversa, el patrón hegemónico de representación de las mujeres favorece su presencia mediante fotografías claras y primeros planos ofreciendo testimonio. Excepcional es la campaña de la Policía Nacional 2016, donde el demandante de servicios sexuales mira directamente a la cámara, situando al espectador en el lugar de la víctima.

Una de las limitaciones que percibimos en este enfoque es la identificación directa entre el demandante de prostitución y el delincuente, a través de la categoría de cómplice (O´Brien, 2015: 28; López-Riopedre, 2011). Cabe cuestionar la legitimidad y eficacia de este recurso de criminalización, pues puede no ser una estrategia persuasiva eficaz criminalizar al receptor cuya conducta se trata de inhibir. Menos si se considera que, en una situación de consentimiento, la demanda por servicios sexuales a cambio de dinero no está penada por ley.

El consumo de pago se enjuicia aquí en distintos grados: desde ser un acto incorrecto (poco deseable) que degrada moralmente a quien lo efectúa, hasta convertirse en una acción directamente violenta (y, por tanto, ilícita). La demanda aparece así como una conducta socialmente marginada y condenada, no obstante su relevancia en términos de consumo.

Asimismo, en esta publicidad se aprecia una falta de elaboración de la compleja relación existente entre el consumidor de un servicio y las condiciones de explotación. Es una ausencia que podría estar al servicio de un argumento abolicionista, que desea operar sobre la jerarquización de ciertos valores morales, un cierto sentido común y determinadas propuestas políticas, que inducen a no explicitar el contexto ni las repercusiones sistémicas de este planteamiento. Aparecería como francamente disruptivo si estos mismos argumentos que aluden a la complicidad, se utilizaran desde las instituciones públicas para alertar sobre la compra de bienes y servicios producidos en condiciones de explotación en las zonas empobrecidas del planeta, donde se vulneran los derechos laborales, trabajando en muchos casos en condiciones de explotación laboral (O´Brien, 2015).

Por último, emerge de forma minoritaria la figura del proxeneta. Este es representado de manera marginal (2 campañas) y siempre condenatoria. En una publicidad aparece como parte del proceso de la trata, convertido en un personaje-monstruo de pesadillas infantiles (Policía Nacional, 2013); y, en la otra, sacando a relucir medios y efectos de su actividad, mediante el eslogan «Proxenetas, su negocio es la violencia» (Ayuntamiento de Sevilla, 2009). Todo, sobre una gran X rellena de insultos como chulo, gavión, alcahuete, etc.

Es interesante observar que el conjunto de campañas no ilustra a los delincuentes (traficantes, proxenetas, abusadores…) ni informa cómo actúan. Estas figuras siempre son presupuestas, abstractas y dependientes del testimonio de las víctimas. Aun así, las imaginamos, bien como sujetos desconocidos para ellas, dentro de la mafia o la red, bien como sujetos que las engañan fácilmente (modelo «lover boy»). La única representación humana de los delincuentes que median en el proceso es, curiosamente, la de una mujer que retiene el pasaporte a una supuesta víctima en la campaña 2013 de la Policía Nacional.

3.3.3. Figuras colectivas: la ciudadanía

Más mencionada verbalmente (4 campañas) que representada a nivel físico (solo en 2), está la ciudadanía o sociedad en general, en cuanto sujeto receptor de las campañas y responsable indirecto de la situación, por una indiferencia o inacción que se le presupone y asigna. Aquí las propuestas se orientan a movilizar a los ciudadanos interpelándoles mediante la figura del testigo, es decir, quien ve lo que sucede, lee los anuncios de prensa o Internet y debe tomar conciencia y actuar, haciéndose cargo de la situación de algún modo.

3.4. Argumentos

Respecto de los argumentos puestos en juego, se analizaron los eslóganes o lemas del corpus, entendiendo que estos soportan el concepto esencial de las campañas en cuanto a su objetivo comunicacional. El argumento más repetido es el de la complicidad de los clientes de la prostitución (20 campañas), complicidad que emerge como una acción violenta en las propuestas encaminadas a informar a los demandantes de su complicidad, reconducir su actitud y evitar su conducta. Este argumento se expone en lemas como «Porque tú pagas existe la prostitución. Tu dinero hace mucho daño» o «No consumas prostitución. Sin clientes… no hay trata».

El segundo argumento más reconocible se orienta a evitar la conversión de las mujeres en objetos de consumo. Este se sostiene en la negación de la isotopía formada por conceptos como precio, compra, mercancía, presentes en 11 campañas: «Las personas no están en venta, pacta con el corazón», «Ella no es un objeto más de consumo». La limitación de esta estrategia está en la reiteración en la representación visual de la idea conceptual que pretende evitar, hecho que refuerza en vez de ampliar los imaginarios asociados a la problemática.

En ocho campañas, por su parte, se apunta a la necesidad de tomar conciencia. La propuesta refiere a una oposición genérica a la trata, a razones específicas: «Contra la trata de mujeres toma conciencia» o, la más sencilla, «No a la explotación sexual». En este caso se apela a ser críticos de un modo inespecífico, suponiendo ciertos presupuestos compartidos, como la necesidad de no normalizar la prostitución y de considerar que los contextos de prostitución incluyen la trata.

Por último, llama la atención que la representación de los demandantes de prostitución y de su papel cómplice no vaya unida a apelaciones directas a denunciar, que se efectúan solo tres veces con frases como «Contra la trata no hay trato. Denúncialo». Aquí se observa que la línea ideológica mayoritariamente abolicionista está más centrada en culpabilizar al cliente para evitar el consumo que en implicarle de manera activa en la solución.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

El análisis efectuado pone en evidencia las perspectivas que institucionalmente se han optado por mostrar o silenciar frente a la ciudadanía respecto de la trata de mujeres con fines de explotación sexual, hecho que permite identificar posibles espacios de mejora para una comunicación futura.

Se observa que se han priorizado puntos de vista como la culpabilización del consumo o el relato centrado en la vulnerabilidad de las víctimas, frente a otros aspectos del delito y del sistema de la trata que se mantienen invisibles o resultan marginales. Esta retórica se moviliza desde un sentido consensuado de la solidaridad, identificado por Agustín (2009) como «industria del rescate». Así se construye una narrativa unívoca, en la que el conflicto entre actores buenos y malos se simplifica (en detrimento de mayores matices y factores estructurales), lo que favorece el rechazo generalizado hacia los demandantes de prostitución y la aproximación empática a las víctimas.

Ante la ausencia de un señalamiento permanente de agentes responsables, la argumentación se desplaza hacia el receptor -interpelado por la representación del sufrimiento de las víctimas-, al que se anima a sentir compasión y una indignación inespecífica hacia ellas, retratadas como inocentes y mayoritariamente «desempoderadas» (perfil idealizado). Unas víctimas que, así figurativizadas, se distancian de los inmigrantes irregulares, pues mientras a unos se les presupone acción y decisión, a ellas se les niega la capacidad de tomar decisiones y consentir (O´Brien, 2015; Saiz-Echezarreta, Alvarado, & Fernández-Romero, 2017; Kempadoo, 2005).

Las instituciones públicas, por delegación democrática, se presentan compasivas, eficientes y capaces de prevenir el delito; asimismo se arrogan una identidad como agentes capaces de liberar y salvar a mujeres, gracias a la transferencia de recursos a otras entidades (ayuntamientos) o a las fuerzas y cuerpos de seguridad del Estado. Esta representación absuelve a los ciudadanos de responsabilidad frente a las condiciones de vulnerabilidad, desigualdad y violencia que están en el origen del sistema de la trata, en una lógica similar a la utilizada en las campañas realizadas durante décadas por las ONG para el desarrollo (Saiz-Echezarreta, Alvarado, & Fernández-Romero, 2017; Haynes, 2014). Será necesario indagar en cuáles son las implicaciones de presentar a la ciudadanía solo como parte de la solución y no de las causas potenciales que favorecen la extensión del delito (O´Brien, 2015).

Fuera de la representación quedan las políticas públicas de los actores institucionales, que utilizan estos recursos para legitimar sus propuestas a nivel local con ordenanzas que pueden producir situaciones de mayor exclusión y vulnerabilidad en las víctimas, y a nivel (inter)nacional para normalizar políticas migratorias restrictivas, cuestionadas desde la perspectiva de los derechos humanos de las personas migrantes (Kempadoo, 2005; Andrijasevic & Mai, 2016; Kapur, 2002; Nieuwenhuys & Pécoud, 2007).

Las instituciones están operando a través de la publicidad desde una posición abolicionista, lo que facilita en la esfera pública una orientación narrativa de la controversia a favor de esta postura, en un momento en que los escenarios institucionales se entrecruzan con otros territorios y remiten a la reproducción de ciertos órdenes socio-sexuales y coloniales hegemónicos (Kapur, 2002; Kempadoo, 2016). Por ello, sería importante no eludir en estas comunicaciones el contexto de la controversia, en particular cuando se mantiene una perspectiva centrada en el juicio moral y la intensidad emotiva, útil a la estrategia de pánico moral (Weitzer, 2007; Irvine, 2007) que afecta a la construcción de la trata como problema público.

Sobre la demanda, si bien no se niega su impacto sobre la trata, se visualizan limitaciones en su sobrerrepresentación. Quizá no sea tan evidente la relación unidireccional que se plantea entre demanda por servicios sexuales y trata. Si así fuera, no cabría duda de la necesidad de prohibir la prostitución y lo cierto es que su estatuto es objeto de debate académico, político y social. Cabe preguntarse, por ejemplo, si es razonable que las instituciones públicas comuniquen que participar en un intercambio de sexo de pago es algo negativo e incluso ilegal, cuando la situación en España es de indefinición legislativa.

Al eludirse las causas y las condiciones estructurales del tráfico y la trata, y apuntar mayoritariamente a un deseo erróneo e inmoral de querer acceder a sexo de pago, en estas campañas se abre un espacio para aplicar las narrativas y los lugares comunes inscritos en los relatos noticiosos: redadas, desarticulación de redes y juicios a proxenetas, entre otros. Esto incide en el modelo extremo de buenos actores, institucionales, y malos actores, indefinidos bajo metáforas poco convincentes como la de las mafias (López-Riopedre, 2011).

Las representaciones (más aún las publicitarias) implican un proceso de simplificación, de traducción de lo desconocido en términos de familiaridad. Según sus modos de operar en el espacio público pueden ser útiles para ensanchar lo social y abrir espacios de participación y responsabilidad. Visto desde allí, el diseño de futuras campañas debería partir de la discusión y revisión aguda de las estrategias y discursos utilizados, valorando su impacto, lo que exigiría una necesaria planificación de su medición integral.

En pos de la eficacia de estas intervenciones, convendría una mayor profesionalización de la investigación y el establecimiento de rutinas específicas que se orienten a la búsqueda de sinergias, al aprovechamiento de estrategias y campañas ya realizadas, y a su eventual desestacionalización. Esto permitiría aunar y amortizar esfuerzos, y mantener de manera más continuada la temática en la esfera pública.

Pensado en esta eficacia, sería asimismo conveniente una revisión de la normativa, de las pautas de intervención y de su conceptualización teórica, pues desde la divulgación del conocimiento compartido es necesario atender los cuestionamientos realizados a la definición del problema de la trata, recomendados en «Cadernos Pagu», nº 47, en especial la aportación de Piscitelli (2016).

Respecto de la estrategia de pánico moral, sexual y afectivo seguida, pareciera necesario revisarla e implementar esfuerzos tendientes a conectar la explotación sexual con otros asuntos, como otros tipos de trata, el tráfico, las políticas migratorias o las violencias contra la mujer. Se deben recoger las lecciones aprendidas e incorporar un enfoque centrado en los agresores, las causas estructurales y las mujeres y sus familias como supervivientes y no solo víctimas.

Si como señala O´Brien, es la focalización sobre el acto singular de la demanda de sexo de pago lo que dificulta abordar la responsabilidad colectiva e individual en relación a una cadena de injusticias y desigualdades estructuradas, resulta recomendable que las campañas sean más amplias y estén más orientadas a dar a conocer el fenómeno, a fin de permitir a la ciudadanía identificar el delito y favorecer pautas de acción al respecto (contención de la demanda, promoción de la denuncia, reducción de la estigmatización de las víctimas). Por último, teniendo en cuenta la participación de estas campañas en la controversia, habría que contemplar la distinción entre trabajo sexual y trata, e incorporar otras voces y planteamientos, como los de las trabajadoras sexuales (Kempadoo, 2005: 149-158).

Se tiene que atender a la eficacia cultural y social, y quizá apostar, como en otros casos, porque la construcción de una imagen transformadora en el contexto de la controversia pueda desactivar el escepticismo y los argumentos que sostienen el statu quo y propiciar la denuncia y la búsqueda colectiva de soluciones (De-Andrés, Nos-Aldás, & García, 2016: 35).

Notas

1 Catálogo en: https://figshare.com/s/8fcf63f843a43e64a68e.

Apoyos

Proyecto I+D «La construcción de los asuntos públicos en la esfera pública mediatizada» (CSO2013-45726-R) y Proyecto I+D+i «Competencias mediáticas de la ciudadanía en medios digitales emergentes en el ámbito profesional de la comunicación» (EDU2015-64015-C3-3-R MINECO/FEDER).

Referencias

Agustín, L. (2009). Sexo y marginalidad. Emigración, mercado de trabajo e industria de rescate. Madrid: Popular.

Alvarado, M., De-Andrés, S., & Collado, R. (2017). La exclusión social en el marco de la comunicación para el desarrollo y el cambio social. Un análisis del tratamiento de la inclusión social en campañas de servicio público sin ánimo de lucro. Disertaciones, 10(1), 108-124. (https://goo.gl/3cRFf6).

Andrijasevic, R., & Anderson, B. (2009). Anti-trafficking campaigns: decent? Honest? Truthful? Feminist Review, 92(1), 151-155. (https://goo.gl/tez7bE).

Andrijasevic, R., & Mai, N. (2016). Trafficking (in) representations: Understanding the recurring appeal of victimhood and slavery in neoliberal times. Anti-trafficking Review 7, 1-10. https://doi.org/10.14197/atr.20121771

Arquembourg, J. (2011). Enjeux politiques des récits d’information: D’un objet introuvable à l’institution d’un monde commun. Quaderni, 74, 37-45. (https://goo.gl/oxGjxU).

Cefaï, D. (2012). ¿Qué es una arena pública? Algunas pautas para un acercamiento pragmático. In D. Cefaï, & I. Joseph (Coords.), L’heritage du pragmatisme. Conflits d’urbanité et épreuves de civisme (pp. 51-81). La Tour d’Aigues: Éditions de l’Aube. (https://goo.gl/8wSFUP).

De Andrés, S., Nos-Aldás, E., & García, A. (2016). The transformative image. The power of a photograph for social change: The death of Aylan. [La imagen transformadora. El poder de cambio social de una fotografía: la muerte de Aylan]. Comunicar, 47, 29-37. https://doi.org/10.3916/C47-2016-03

Devillar, V., & Le Saulnier, G. (2015). Le problème publique de la prostitution aux marges des arènes publiques numériques. Journal des Antropologhes, 142-143, 203-226. (https://goo.gl/n66yzS).

Dewey, J. (2004). La opinión pública y sus problemas. Madrid: Morata.

Fernández-Romero, D. (2008). Gramáticas de la publicidad sobre violencia: la ausencia del empoderamiento tras el ojo morado y la sonrisa serena. Feminismo/s, 11, 15-39. (https://goo.gl/C6PbX5).

Gimeno, B. (2012). Aportaciones para un debate abierto. Barcelona: Bellaterra.

Gozálvez, V., & Contreras, P. (2014). Empowering media citizenship through educommunication. [Empoderar a la ciudadanía mediática desde la educomunicación]. Comunicar, 42, 129-136. https://doi.org/10.3916/C42-2014-12

Gusfield, J. (2003). Action collective et problèmes publics. Entretien avec Daniel Cefaï et Danny Trom. In Haynes, D. (2014), The celebritization of human traffcking. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 635(1), 25-45. https://doi.org/10.1177/0002716213515837

Irvine, J.M. (2007). Transient feelings: Sex panics and the politics of emotions. GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, 14(1), 1-40. (https://goo.gl/SBqrFs).

Kapur, R. (2002). The tragedy of victimization rhetoric: resurrecting the ‘native’ subject in international/ postcolonial feminist legal politics. Harvard Human Rights Journal, 15(1), 1-38. (https://goo.gl/wJfqux).

Kempadoo, K. (2005). Sex workers’ rights organizations and anti-trafficking campaigns. In K. Kempadoo (Eds.), Trafficking and prostitution reconsidered: News perspectives on migration, sex work and human rights (pp. 149-158). London: Paradigm Publishers.

Kempadoo, K. (2016). Sexual economies and human trafficking. Revitalizing imperialism. Contemporary campaigns against sex trafficking and modern slavery. Cadernos Pagu, 47. https://doi.org/10.1590/18094449201600470008

Kessler, G. (2015). Controversias sobre la desigualdad: Argentina, 2003-2013. Buenos Aires: Fondo de Cultura Económica.

López-Riopedre, J. (2011). La criminalización de la industria del sexo, una puesta políticamente correcta. Gaceta de Antropología, 27(2). (https://goo.gl/2DnVxK).

Marcus, G. (2001). Etnografía en/del sistema mundo. El surgimiento de la etnografía multilocal. Alteridades, 11(22), 111-127. (https://goo.gl/mcMkbJ).

Nieuwenhuys, C., & Pécoud, A. (2007). Human trafficking, information campaigns, and strategies of migration control. The American Behavioral Scientist, 50(12), 1674-1695. https://doi.org/10.1177/0002764207302474

Núñez-Puente, S., & Romero, D. (2015). Construcción identitaria del sujeto víctima de violencia de género: fetichismo, estetización e identidad pública. Teknokultura, 12(2), 267-284. (https://goo.gl/FkKntp).

O´Brien, E. (2013). Ideal victims in trafficking awareness campaigns. In K. Carrington, M. Ball, E. O´Brien, & J.M. Tauri (Eds.), Crime, justice and social democracy. Critical criminological perspectives. London: Palgrave Macmillan. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137008695_21

O´Brien, E. (2015). Human trafficking heroes and villains: Representing the problem in anti-trafficking awareness campúigns. Social and Legal Studies, 25(2), 205-224. https://doi.org/10.1177/096466391559341

Pajnic, M. (2013). Reconciling paradigms of prostitution through narration. Drustvena Istrazivanja, 22(2). https://doi.org/10.5559/di.22.2.03

Peñamarín, C. (2014). Esfera pública y construcción del mundo común. El relato dislocado. Cuadernos de Información y Comunicación, 19, 103-124. (https://goo.gl/e97oa6).

Peñamarín, C. (2015). Creatività e trasformazione culturale. Il dinamismo dei sistemi di significazione. Versus, 121, 53-69. (https://goo.gl/fV9WXq).

Piscitelli, A. (2016). Economias sexuais, amor e tráfico de pessoas – novas questões conceituais. Cadernos Pagu, 47. https://doi.org/10.1590/18094449201600470005

Sabsay, L. (2009). El sujeto de la performatividad: narrativas, cuerpos y políticas en los límites del género. Valencia: Universitat de Valencia, Servei de Publicacions. (https://goo.gl/7Vhj1q).

Saiz-Echezarreta, V. (2015). Emociones y controversia pública en torno al ‘issue’ prostitución y trata de personas con fines de explotación sexual. De Signis, 24, 109-131. (https://goo.gl/vFcA8W).

Saiz-Echezarreta, V., & Alvarado, M.C. (2017). Prostituciones en Red: Análisis de los espacios publicitarios digitales. Labrys, 30. (https://goo.gl/Z7XZ7K).

Saiz-Echezarreta, V., Alvarado, M.C., & Fernández-Romero, D. (2017). La víctima de trata con fines de explotación sexual como sitio de persuasión: Estrategias de representación postcolonial en las campañas institucionales. In L. Nuño-Gómez, & A. De-Miguel, (Dirs.), Elementos para una teoría crítica del sistema prostitucional (pp. 123-133). Madrid: Comares.

Schillagi, C. (2011). Problemas públicos, casos resonantes y escándalos. Algunos elementos para una discusión teórica. Polis, 30, 1-19. (https://goo.gl/a93sth).

Terzi, C., & Bovet, A. (2005). La composante narrative des controverses politiques et médiatiques. Pour une analyse praxéologique des actions et des mobilisations collectives. Réseaux, 132(4), 111-132. https://doi.org/10.3917/res.132.0111

Venturini, T. (2010). Driving in magma: how to explore controversies with actor-network theory. Public Understanding of Science, 19(3), 258-273. (https://goo.gl/NrW3Re).

Von-Lurzer, C. (2014). Sexualidades en foco. Representaciones televisivas de la prostitución en Argentina. Sexualidades. Serie monográfica sobre sexualidades latinoamericanas y caribeñas, 11, 1-57. (https://goo.gl/bPLHcx).

Weitzer, R. (2007). The social construction of sex trafficking: Ideology and institutionalization of a moral crusade. Politics & Society, 35(3), 447-475. https://doi.org/10.1177/0032329207304319

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/03/18
Accepted on 31/03/18
Submitted on 31/03/18

Volume 26, Issue 1, 2018
DOI: 10.3916/C55-2018-03
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 1
Views 2
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?