Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Download the PDF version

Resumen

Augmented reality (AR) immersion enables virtual objects and real environments to coexist and encourage experimentation with phenomena that are not possible in the real world. Augmented reality is generating new opportunities for the development of ubiquity within educational environments. The objective of this study was to analyze the impact that the integration of ubiquitous game approaches with augmented reality has on learning. A quasi-experimental study was carried out with 91 sixth-grade primary school students; the learning scenario was designed and the augmented reality application “WallaMe” was selected for use in five sessions of a didactic unit in Art Education. Through pretest and postest procedures, academic performance and information search skills were evaluated, and, a Likert scale analyzed the motivation and collaboration variables among the students. The results showed that the experimental group obtained statistically significant improvements in the academic performance of the subject, motivation, in the search for, and analysis of, information, level of fun and collaboration. The conclusion is that the dynamic activities managed in the intervention, which made use of augmented reality and localization, benefit teaching-learning processes, and encourage innovation and improvement through educational technology.

Resumen

La inmersión de la realidad aumentada (RA) propicia la coexistencia de objetos virtuales y entornos reales que permiten la experimentación con fenómenos que no son posibles en el mundo real. La realidad aumentada está generando una nueva oportunidad de crecimiento de la ubicuidad en los entornos educativos. El objetivo de este estudio es analizar el impacto que tiene sobre el aprendizaje la integración educativa de los enfoques de juego ubicuo con realidad aumentada. Se realizó un estudio cuasi experimental con 91 alumnos de sexto curso de Educación Primaria, se diseñó el escenario de aprendizaje y se seleccionó la aplicación de realidad aumentada «WallaMe», que fue utilizada en cinco sesiones de una unidad didáctica del área de Educación Artística. Mediante el procedimiento de pretest y postest se evaluaron el rendimiento académico y las habilidades de búsqueda de información, y una escala Likert analizó las variables motivación y colaboración entre los estudiantes. Los resultados mostraron que el grupo experimental obtiene mejoras estadísticamente significativas en la motivación hacia el aprendizaje, el rendimiento académico de la materia y en la competencia digital. En definitiva, se concluye que las actividades dinámicas manejadas en la intervención, que hacen uso de realidad aumentada y localización, aportan beneficios en los procesos de enseñanza aprendizaje, y propician una innovación y mejora educativa con el uso de la tecnología educativa.

Keywords

Mobile learning, classroom, basic education, search strategies, learning processes, education, educational technology, educational trends

Keywords

Aprendizaje móvil, aula, educación básica, estrategias de búsqueda, procesos de aprendizaje, enseñanza, tecnología educativa, tendencia educacional

Introduction

The use of game-based learning (Squire, Giovanetto, Devane, & Durga, 2005) as an educational enhancer has grown in recent years, and numerous studies have demonstrated the success of these practices in fomenting the capacity to reason (Bottino, Ferlino, Ott, & Tavella, 2007), leadership skills, collaboration (Zhao & Linaza, 2015) and motivation to learn in primary education. However, the results from using the game-based augmented reality (AR) application in classroom contexts has not been researched as widely, even though the link between AR and the classroom is a hot topic in educational science literature. There are few theoretical or conceptual works that explain the complex relation between the characteristics of rapid technological, and occasionally, revolutionary evolution, its potential for education and learning, and its integration in teaching activities (Cabero & Marín, 2018). We believe the research presented here is a novel and singular contribution. In line with Knaus (2017:64), teachers need to understand the potential of digital media, software and algorithms in order to use them in a rational, didactic way, seeing them as resources and not merely ends in themselves. Some researchers and teaching professionals (Cantillo, Roura, & Sánchez, 2012; Brazuelo, Gallego, & Cacheiro, 2017) have questioned the use of virtual games in the concept and practice of education through mobile and ubiquitous devices. All the studies consulted here state that the use of games and AR can only be justified if their application is didactic, and if it promotes creativity, collaboration and reflection. Creativity is the key dimension highlighted for years by researchers such as Perez-Rodriguez, & Delgado-Ponce (2012: 33). Other researchers (Koring, 2016) conclude that children learn a lot from playing games with other children, thus ideally, digital media should be used by children to play in groups, so that they can engage in, and reflect on, the play they generate.

From this educational perspective, AR-based apps can be used to initiate didactic interactions in towns and cities, and in settings such as museums and places of cultural interest for situated educational activities that motivate users. These developments drive the relocation of teaching away from the school center and move the student away from reality towards immersive scenarios (Dunleavy, Dede, & Mitchell, 2009; Bronack, 2011).

Game-based Digital Learning

Klopfer, Osterweil, & Salen (2009: 21) define digital learning games as those aimed at acquiring knowledge and fostering mental habits and understanding that can be useful in the academic context. The mechanics of these games are essential for their effectiveness as bearers of intrinsic motivation and fun (Perrotta, Featherstone, Aston, & Houghton, 2013). The use of GPS-based games is evidently interesting because they change the players’ paradigm: users must step outside to achieve their goals and walk around to reach objects and fulfil the objectives that allow them to progress in the game. This is also a good way to combat the sedentary habits that are so prevalent among gamers. Games can promote a higher level of thought, and, positive proof in various studies (Dondlinger, 2007; Steinkuehler, & Duncan, 2008) urges designers of educational games to focus on player/student participation in an environment in which they can experiment with the relations between all objects, resolve a set of problems, actively learn a new literacy and develop critical learning (Gee, 2004).

Several studies insist on the advantages of game-based learning as an environment that stimulates motivation and commitment in students (Blunt, 2007; Greenfield, 2010; Slovaček, Zovkić, & Ceković, 2014), and our research is based on verifying this notion. These practices mean that motivation is an integral part of the pedagogical processes (Aguaded, 2012; Eseryel, Law, Ifenthaler, Ge, & Miller, 2014; Katja, 2012; Liao, 2015). The findings in educational research help determine whether to adopt certain objectives and encourage learning activities that are significant and motivational for the students.

Exploring augmented reality

Klopfer & Squire (2008: 205) broadly define AR as a situation in which a coherent localization or virtual information is superimposed dynamically on a real-world situation. Cabero & Barroso (2016, 44) describe AR as the combination in real time of digital and physical information using a range of technological devices. The integration of the real and virtual worlds through AR creates an enriching scenario (Bronack, 2011; Cabero & García, 2016; Fombona, Pascual, & Madeira, 2012; Fombona, 2013 Rico & Agudo, 2016; Squire & Klopfer, 2007). Cabero & Barroso (2016) emphasize that any physical space can become a stimulating educational scenario, and that AR reinforces ubiquitous learning through an inspiring learning environment in which the student interacts with objects and manages information.

Some successful experiences in which students have to use portable devices to carry out research, interpret unique location data and provide solutions within an AR-based game environment are: “Environmental Detectives” (Squire & Klopfer, 2007), a game in which students assume the role of environmental engineers and have to solve problems in a real setting. A similar experience is “Mad City Mystery” (Squire & Jan, 2007), in which players have to solve a crime by searching for information in their environment; another is “Frequency 1550”, developed by The Waag Society to help students discover medieval Amsterdam (Akkerman, Admiraal, & Huizenga, 2009).

Ubiquitous learning implies the break between formal and informal learning and facilitates a more social way of learning; it presumes that learning “based on the curriculum” gives way to learning “based on problem-solving”, now with the student as framework of reference.

The advantages of AR enable detection of locations, monitoring of student status and issuing of task reminders. This dynamic offers alternatives for refocusing student attention. AR technology is easy to incorporate into education as it allows students to use their own devices without the need for extra technologies. Fombona & Vázquez (2017: 335) state that primary school students already own devices that can be used for AR-based activities, since 80% of devices nowadays use the Android operating system and 60% have GPS, which lets students perform geolocation tasks. Barroso & Cabero (2016:165) carried out a detailed study that concluded that AR objects aroused considerable interest in students, technically and aesthetically, as well as for ease of use. This system allows users to work in real time by exchanging comments and provides information that heightens participants’ sensation of immediacy. All the AR-related media mentioned so far enable the user to experience interactions with a sense of immersion, which is “the subjective impression that you are involved in a global and realistic experience” (Dede, 2009: 66). All this occurs within a ubiquitous learning scenario expanded by digital mobile media that allow the user to construct and exchange knowledge between the virtual and the physical (Díez & Díaz, 2018). Ubiquitous learning implies the break between formal and informal learning and facilitates a more social way of learning; it presumes that learning “based on the curriculum” gives way to learning “based on problem-solving”, now with the student as framework of reference (Burbules, 2014). The various subsets of AR including mobile AR, gameable AR, and multiplayer AR, offer a range of possibilities to support the implementation of these perspectives. Considering the most important characteristics of these AR types, we can classify the educational approach in three categories: Approaches that emphasize student participation via “roles”, student interactions with physical locations (ubiquity, collaboration, situated learning, informal learning) and the design of learning tasks (learning in 3D, visualizing the invisible). This study focuses on an intervention that emphasizes learning tasks, ubiquity, collaboration and situated learning, with the use of location and programs such as “WallaMe”.

Method

Research design

We based our study on a quasi-experimental design on both a control and an experimental group, including a pretest and postest. The main objective was to analyze the impact on learning of ubiquitous AR game approaches in education; the variables analyzed were: academic performance, student skills in searching for, and analyzing, information, level of fun and collaboration established among the students. The hypotheses were: The use of AR in ubiquitous settings improves academic performance (H1); the use of AR improves searching and information analysis skills (H2); the use of AR increases motivation and level of fun (H3); the use of AR and ubiquity fosters collaboration (H4). The research was structured around the following dimensions, with the indicators and instruments described for each dimension (Table 1).


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/32dd1783-eef6-4654-aa6e-f5fe53a3e8b3/image/774ff825-9d03-4cc4-a05d-8eff60eb96f4-ueng-06-01.png


Participants

This research was developed in a public Primary Education school in the Autonomous Community of Madrid, and it was applied to all the students in sixth grade (91 students) who attended Art Education classes. The experimental group consisted of 69 students, who searched for information using technological devices (Dimension 1) with the “WallaMe” app during five sessions that were part of a didactic unit on “Art in Europe” (Dimension 2).


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/32dd1783-eef6-4654-aa6e-f5fe53a3e8b3/image/e0bfc564-f2ae-432a-aa79-e68a76eacb92-ueng-06-02.png


The control group was formed of 22 students in a class that studied the same unit but using a textbook and “traditional” forms of teaching, with an expositional approach and teacher-centered focus. The sampling was non-probabilistic and intentional. The experimental group had 34 girls and 35 boys; the control group had 13 girls and 9 boys. The pretest control for knowledge of “Art in Europe” in the two groups showed that both sets of students had the same level of knowledge.

Intervention process

Based on the conceptual definition described in the theoretical section of this article (Mathews, 2010; Rosenbaum, Klopfer, & Perry, 2007; Squire & Jan, 2007; Squire & Klopfer, 2007), the analysis of the tools and intervention centered on the application of game- and situation-based learning. The categories that framed the analysis and application were:

  • Approaches that emphasize student interactions with physical locations.
  • Approaches that emphasize the design of learning tasks.

In dimension 1, the analysis centered on the students’ ability to search for, select and analyze information using their mobile phones, thus, ubiquitous learning. The 5 sessions in Art Education were aimed at learning about works of art in Europe. The students were organized individually and later in groups, to carry out searches for information relating to the paintings in different countries, analyzing artistic styles, historical context, the artists, and social and cultural repercussions (Figure 1). Dimension 2 consisted of an intervention in the 5 sessions of the “Art in Europe” unit. Here the students had to download the free “WallaMe” app to their phones (Figure 2).


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/32dd1783-eef6-4654-aa6e-f5fe53a3e8b3/image/e31de743-e5a7-4440-a6b0-852c781849a9-ueng-06-03.png


Then, in groups, they went to the school playground to locate images of some of the most important paintings in European art history. Once they had captured the images, the students had to work in groups to find the following data: title of each painting, name of the artist, country of origin, historical and social context, style of painting used, description of the style and interpretation of the work. Instructions and materials were provided to help students structure their work and carry out the tasks on computers with an Internet connection in the classroom. Once completed, the final session consisted of a discussion to check the answers (name of painting, artist, style). We worked with interesting historical and artistic concepts while also learning about the geography of Europe, and we developed digital competences in a task that required continuous information searching.

When both groups had concluded the 5 sessions, a postest was carried out to evaluate academic performance in relation to the content imparted in the didactic unit. A questionnaire was also distributed to both groups, with a 1-5 Likert scale, to analyze the variables of motivation, commitment, level of fun and collaboration.

In both dimensions, the students searched for, and analyzed, information relating to the artistic content in the unit. The curricular structure complied with current education legislation: Content, assessment criteria and learning standards. Content is designed to foment the creative process: purpose of the painting, search for information (bibliographical and internet). Planning, work to be developed by analyzing works of art from various countries. The assessment criteria included: 1) Being able to distinguish the fundamental differences between fixed images and images in motion, classifying them according to the patterns learnt; 2) Ability to approach reading, analysis and interpretation of art and images that are fixed and in motion, in their historical and cultural contexts, understanding their meaning and social function in a critical way, and being able to produce new visual compositions based on the knowledge acquired; 3) Responsible use of information and communication technologies to search for, create and disseminate images that are fixed and in motion.

The following learning standards were established: Classification of fixed and moving images according to a range of criteria; Critical assessment of messages transmitted by the images; Development of good habits for ordering, correct usage and careful maintenance of the material and instruments used in their artistic creations; Demonstration of creativity and initiative in their artistic productions; Active participation in group tasks; Assessment of the compositions produced; Handling simple computing programs for sound and treatment of digital images (size, brightness, color, contrast…) that contribute to the development of the creative process.

Analysis and results

3.1. Dimension 1: Search for, and analysis of, information and works of art

A comparison of the data for the control and experimental groups yielded the results for the students who carried out searches for information using a conventional approach based on the textbook, and for those who used electronic devices and mobile phones with AR.

Pretest and postest. Wilcoxon test and sign test

Given that both sets of students had the same initial level of competence in the subject, the analysis of the postest is of particular interest as it presents a significant difference in the scores according to the treatment used. The results from the Wilcoxon test and the sign test, with a significance of 0.01, indicate a statistically significant improvement in various factors, thus, the research hypothesis regarding better academic performance, improved information search and analysis skills, level of fun and collaboration, is proven correct (Table 2).


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/32dd1783-eef6-4654-aa6e-f5fe53a3e8b3/image/67becd61-9e45-4e9e-9cdf-18e53f661035-ueng-06-04.png


Control group and experimental group

The scores showed a statistically significant improvement in the experimental group over the control group following treatment assignment. The students who performed the activity using electronic devices and ubiquitous learning scored higher in the variables analyzed than the control group that worked with the textbook (Table 3).


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/32dd1783-eef6-4654-aa6e-f5fe53a3e8b3/image/f759889c-5be6-48ad-9bb3-8764c38cf09e-ueng-06-05.png


Dimension 2: Using “WallaMe” in an educational context: a case in primary education

In this dimension, we analyzed the intervention with the “WallaMe” app in Art Education. A quasi-experimental design was constructed since it was impossible to work with a random sample due to ethical or logistical considerations. A pretest was carried with the experimental group (O1), a program (X) and a postest (O2). The control group had a pretest (O1) and a postest (O2).

This design ensures control over the majority of sources and is more accessible in educational settings. In short, a pretest and postest were carried out, and there was also a control group, so, various non-parametric tests were run due to this being a cautious research proposal. The experimental group consisted of 69 students at three centers that had uploaded “WallaBe” to their mobile phones for 5 sessions of a didactic unit called “Art in Europe”. There was also a control group of 22 students who studied the same unit but used a textbook and a “traditional” form of teaching. The sampling was non-probabilistic and intentional, hence the quasi-experimental design. Although it was assumed that the number of students in the experimental group was sufficient to render it normal, a conservative approach was favored, with the running of non-parametric tests (Wilcoxon test and Mann-Whitney U test), with a significance level (α) of 0.01.

Pretest and postest: Wilcoxon test and sign test

An exploratory analysis of the data was performed; the low values in the preliminary test suggested that the students in both groups had the same initial levels. It was in the postest that scores varied, to indicate significant differences in the values according to the treatment applied. The Wilcoxon and sign tests values, with a significance of 0.01, indicate a statistically significant improvement, thus the research hypothesis is proven in terms of better academic results, greater motivation, level of fun, stronger information search skills and collaboration (Table 4).


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/32dd1783-eef6-4654-aa6e-f5fe53a3e8b3/image/9300d47b-683f-48c7-a8c4-eb0def493f3e-ueng-06-06.png


Control group and experimental group

As well as the data that established that there was a variation, with an increase in student scores following application of the treatments assigned, the experimental groups showed a statistically significant improvement in relation to the control group.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/32dd1783-eef6-4654-aa6e-f5fe53a3e8b3/image/8a90d3fa-2066-4269-af5a-cddc5b377267-ueng-06-07.png



The students who carried out the activity with “WallaMe” got better results for the variables analyzed than the control group that worked with textbook and via direct teacher instruction (Table 5).

There was a statistically significant improvement in the dependent variables analyzed, with greater incidence of motivation and level of fun, which emphasizes the active nature of the intervention applied (Figure 3).

The improvement in academic performance indicated in the test of the didactic unit on Art Education is appreciated in the control group values of 3.32 in the pretest and 3.59 in the postest, against 3.39 in the experimental group’s pretest (similar to the GC) and 4.01 in the postest (an improvement on the GC postest score). Both groups begin with similar scores in the pretest, but the learning processes lead to an improvement in the postest score for the experimental group, which exceeds 4 points. Based on the data from this statistical analysis, the trend and improvement are statistically significant when the intervention that is the object of this study was applied.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/32dd1783-eef6-4654-aa6e-f5fe53a3e8b3/image/5223c3a7-f6bc-4f89-96e9-02624949b3bb-ueng-06-08.png


Discussion

The results analysis enables us to compare our data with those of other authors, in relation to the impact of the approach proposed in our study regarding location and AR in educational settings. These resources can involve the students much more and can support learning in specific contexts. In line with the results of this research, other studies state that learning with localization and AR offers benefits for, and improvements in, learning processes (Bronack, 2011; Mathews, 2010; Rosenbaum, Klopfer, & Perry, 2007; Squire & Jan, 2007; Squire & Klopfer, 2007), and fosters student motivation (Bressler & Bodzin 2013; Cózar-de-Moya, Hernández, & Hernández, 2015; Han, Jo, Hyun, & So, 2015). A range of studies have evaluated ubiquity together with technological elements and AR within different contexts and areas (Huang, Sun, & Li, 2016; Kim & Han, 2014: Pendit, Zaibon, & Abubakar, 2015), and they emphasize the advantages they provide for interaction and motivation, which reflects the results in our study.

Other experiences in primary education highlight interaction, the creation of local, significant materials for students (Diego-Obregon, 2014), with curricular content and collaborative work (Ramirez & Cassinerio, 2014), and with works and projects centered on an environment-focused education (Kamarainen, Metcalf, Grotzer, Browne, Mazzuca, Tutwiler, & Dede, 2013). These studies and experiences from other countries present significant evidence that the use of AR and ubiquity in educational settings yields substantial improvements, as do the findings of our research.

This study is in line with other authors, in that AR-related learning activities often lead to innovative approaches that involve participative simulations (Wu, Lee, Chang, & Liang, 2013). Our study shows that the nature of these educational approaches differs considerably from the teacher-centered approach (Kerawalla, Luckin, Seljeflot, & Woolard, 2006; Squire & Jan, 2007). This study corroborates the coherence of the approach proposed by Klopfer & Squire (2008: 203-228) that emphasizes the need to balance competitive impulses and facilitate the decentralized flow of information in educational activities. The results in our study demonstrate the advantages of collaboration and the importance of technology and information management as essential skills (Kerawalla & al., 2006; Klopfer & Squire, 2008; Squire & Jan, 2007).

Conclusions

Although there are numerous theoretical studies on the potential for, and design of, AR apps, there is less research on the effects of AR-based game scenario design on improvements in learning, in other words, how this can be used in everyday classroom contexts.

Overall, it is considered that the resources and approaches analyzed are beneficial for pedagogical practice, and there are enough suitable projects and media available to design and develop educational activities. By triangulation of the data (Cohen, Manion, & Morrison, 2000) and the results in the two dimensions analyzed, we can conclude that:

1) The use of mobile devices and ubiquity in the search for information relevant to Art Education improved academic achievement and competence in information search and analysis (Dimension 1, Table 2, Table 3).

2) The approaches based on ubiquitous learning, AR and information search contributed to an increase in the level of fun and the potential for collaboration between students (Dimension 1, Table 2; Table 3).

3) There are statistically significant improvements in academic performance when activities are applied in the school setting, as in the case detailed in dimension 2 (Table 4, Table 5; Figure 3).

4) There are statistically significant improvements in motivation, level of fun, information search skills and collaboration. The pedagogical use of ubiquitous AR in a project on European painting was successful as a case study, and the results present numerous advantages (Table 4; Table 5).

It is evident that an incorporation of this type requires resources, infrastructure and good internet connection, and adequately trained teachers for this pedagogical design to be integrated. However, as this study shows, when these are all in place, the evidence and advantages are clear. The apps currently on the market that use location and AR are clearly designed for gaming and entertainment, yet with some exceptions, and by well-planned design, they can be used to develop activities and projects that offer considerable advantages, as various studies have described and which our own study verifies.

In the case explored here, we emphasize the values that show statistically significant improvements in educational performance, motivation, level of fun, information search skills and student collaboration. This case has shown that game-based, dynamic activities that use localization and AR offer pedagogical benefits and represent an opportunity for success in enabling innovation in education through the application of emerging technologies.

References

  1. AguadedI., . 2012.proficiency, an educational initiative that cannot wait. [La competencia mediática, una acción educativa inaplazable&author=Aguaded&publication_year= Media proficiency, an educational initiative that cannot wait. [La competencia mediática, una acción educativa inaplazable]]Comunicar 39:07-08
  2. AkkermanS., AdmiraalW., HuizengaJ., . 2009.in history education: A mobile game in and about medieval&author=Akkerman&publication_year= Storification in history education: A mobile game in and about medieval.Computers & Education 52(2):449-459
  3. BarrosoJ., CaberoJ., . 2016.de objetos de aprendizaje en realidad aumentada: Estudio piloto en el Grado de Medicina&author=Barroso&publication_year= Evaluación de objetos de aprendizaje en realidad aumentada: Estudio piloto en el Grado de Medicina.Enseñanza & Teaching 34(2):149-167
  4. BluntR., . 2007.game-based learning work? Results from three recent studies&author=Blunt&publication_year= Does game-based learning work? Results from three recent studies. In: , ed. Training, Simulation & Education Conference (I/ITSEC)&author=&publication_year= Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation & Education Conference (I/ITSEC). Florida, USA: NTSA. 1-11
  5. BottinoR.M., FerlinoL., OttM., TavellaM., . 2007.Developing strategic and reasoning abilities with computer games at primary school level.Computers & Education 49(4):1272-1286
  6. BrazueloF., GallegoD., CacheiroM.L., . 2017.docentes ante la integración educativa del teléfono móvil en el aula&author=Brazuelo&publication_year= Los docentes ante la integración educativa del teléfono móvil en el aula.Revista de Educación a Distancia 52:1-22
  7. BresslerD.M., BodzinA.M., . 2013.mixed methods assessment of students’ flow experiences during mobile augmented reality science game&author=Bressler&publication_year= A mixed methods assessment of students’ flow experiences during mobile augmented reality science game.Journal of Computer Assisted Learning 29(6):505-517
  8. BronackS.C., . 2011.role of immersive media in online education&author=Bronack&publication_year= The role of immersive media in online education.Journal of Continuing Higher Education 59(2):113-117
  9. BurbulesN., . 2014.El aprendizaje ubicuo: Nuevos contextos, nuevos procesos.Entramados 1:131-133
  10. CaberoJ., BarrosoJ., . 2016.educational possibilities of augmented reality&author=Cabero&publication_year= The educational possibilities of augmented reality.Journal of New Approaches in Educational Research 5(1):44-50
  11. CaberoJ., GarcíaF., . 2016. , ed. aumentada&author=&publication_year= Realidad aumentada. Madrid: Síntesis.
  12. CaberoJ., MarínV., . 2018.Blended learning y realidad aumentada: Experiencias de diseño docente.RIED 21(1):57-74
  13. CantilloC., RouraM., SánchezA., . 2012.Tendencias actuales en el uso de dispositivos móviles en educación.La Educ@ción Digital Magazine 147:1-21
  14. CohenL., ManionL., MorrisonK., . 2000. , ed. methods in education&author=&publication_year= Research methods in education. New York: Routledge.
  15. CózarR., De-MoyaM., HernándezJ., HernándezJ., . 2015.Tecnologías emergentes para la enseñanza de las ciencias sociales. Una experiencia con el uso de realidad aumentada en la formación inicial de maestros.Digital Education Review 27:138-153
  16. DedeC., . 2009.interfaces for engagement and learning&author=Dede&publication_year= Immersive interfaces for engagement and learning.Science 323(5910):66-69
  17. Diego-ObregonR., . 2014.Realidad aumentada en documentos e imágenes.Aula de Innovación Educativa 230:65-66
  18. DíezE., DíazJ.M., . 2018.learning ecologies for a critical cyber-citizenship. [Ecologías de aprendizaje ubicuo para la ciberciudadanía crítica&author=Díez&publication_year= Ubiquitous learning ecologies for a critical cyber-citizenship. [Ecologías de aprendizaje ubicuo para la ciberciudadanía crítica]]Comunicar 54:93-103
  19. DondlingerM.J., . 2007.Educational video games design: A review of the literature.Journal of Applied Educational Technology 4(1):21-31
  20. DunleavyM., DedeC., MitchellR., . 2009.and limitations of immersive participatory augmented reality simulations for teaching and learning&author=Dunleavy&publication_year= Affordances and limitations of immersive participatory augmented reality simulations for teaching and learning.Journal of Science Education and Technology 18(1):7-22
  21. EseryelD., LawV., IfenthalerD., GeX., MillerR., . 2014.An investigation of the interrelationships between motivation, engagement, and complex problem solving in game-based learning.Educational Technology & Society 17(1):42-53
  22. FombonaJ., . 2013.interactividad de los dispositivos móviles geolocalizados, una nueva relación entre personas y cosas&author=Fombona&publication_year= La interactividad de los dispositivos móviles geolocalizados, una nueva relación entre personas y cosas.Revista Historia y Comunicación Social 18:777-788
  23. FombonaJ., Vázquez-CanoE., . 2017.de utilización de la geolocalización y realidad aumentada en el ámbito educativo&author=Fombona&publication_year= Posibilidades de utilización de la geolocalización y realidad aumentada en el ámbito educativo.Educación 1(20):319-342
  24. FombonaJ., PascualM.J., MadeiraM.F., . 2012.Realidad aumentada, una evolución de las aplicaciones de los dispositivos móviles.Píxel-Bit 41:197-210
  25. GeeJ.P., . 2004. , ed. que nos enseñan los videojuegos sobre el aprendizaje y el alfabetismo&author=&publication_year= Lo que nos enseñan los videojuegos sobre el aprendizaje y el alfabetismo. Málaga: Aljibe.
  26. GreenfieldP.M., . 2010.games revisited&author=Greenfield&publication_year= Video games revisited. In: Van-EckR., ed. and cognition: Theories and practice from the learning sciences&author=Van-Eck&publication_year= Gaming and cognition: Theories and practice from the learning sciences. Hershey, PA: IGI Global. 1-21
  27. HanJ., JoM., HyunE., SoH.J., . 2015.young children's perception toward augmented reality-infused dramatic play&author=Han&publication_year= Examining young children's perception toward augmented reality-infused dramatic play.Educational Technology Research and Development 63(3):455-474
  28. HuangC.S.J., YangS.J.H., ChiangT.H.C., SuA.Y.S., . 2016.Effects of situated mobile learning approach on learning motivation and performance of EFL students.Journal of Educational Technology & Society 19(1):263-276
  29. KamarainenA.M., MetcalfS., GrotzerT., BrowneA., MazzucaD., TutwilerM.S., DedeC., . 2013.Integrating augmented reality and probeware with environmental education field trips&author=Kamarainen&publication_year= EcoMOBILE: Integrating augmented reality and probeware with environmental education field trips.Computers & Education 68:545-556
  30. KatjaF., . 2012.Lernen in der Schule&author=Katja&publication_year= Mobiles Lernen in der Schule. In: Laufer.J., RölleckeR., eds. digitaler Medien für Kinder und Jugenlichen&author=Laufer.&publication_year= Chancen digitaler Medien für Kinder und Jugenlichen. München: Koepadverlag. 53-59
  31. KerawallaL., LuckinR., SeljeflotS., WoolardA., . 2006.it real’: Exploring the potential of augmented reality for teaching primary school science&author=Kerawalla&publication_year= ‘Making it real’: Exploring the potential of augmented reality for teaching primary school science.Virtual Reality 10(3):16-174
  32. KimH., HanS., . 2014.A framework for the automatic 3D city modeling using the panoramic image from mobile mapping system and digital maps. 2014 ieee virtual reality (vr)
  33. KlopferE., SquireK., . 2008.detectives: The development of an augmented reality platform for environmental simulations&author=Klopfer&publication_year= Environmental detectives: The development of an augmented reality platform for environmental simulations.Educational Technology Research and Development 56(2):203-228
  34. KlopferE., OsterweilS., SalenK., . 2009.Moving learning games forward. Cambridge, MA: The Education Arcade.
  35. KnausT., . 2017.Pädagogik des digitale: Phänomene, Potentiale, Perspektiven. In: EderS., MikatC., TillmannA., eds. takes command&author=Eder&publication_year= Software takes command. München: Kopaed. 40-68
  36. LiaoT., . 2015.or admented reality? The influence of marketing on augmented reality tecnologies&author=Liao&publication_year= Augmented or admented reality? The influence of marketing on augmented reality tecnologies.Information Communication & Society 18(3):310-326
  37. MathewsJ.M., . 2010.Using a studio-based pedagogy to engage students in the design of mobile-based media.English eaching: Practice and Critique 9(1):87-102
  38. PenditU.C., ZaibonS.B., AbubakarJ.A., . 2015.interpretive media usage in cultural heritage sites at yogyakarta&author=Pendit&publication_year= Digital interpretive media usage in cultural heritage sites at yogyakarta.Jurnal Teknologi 75(4):71-77
  39. Pérez-RodríguezM.A., Delgado-PonceA., . 2012.digital and audiovisual competence to media competence: Dimensions and indicators. [De la competencia digital y audiovisual a la competencia mediática: Dimensiones e indicadores&author=Pérez-Rodríguez&publication_year= From digital and audiovisual competence to media competence: Dimensions and indicators. [De la competencia digital y audiovisual a la competencia mediática: Dimensiones e indicadores]]Comunicar 39:25-35
  40. PerrotaC., FeatherstoneG., AstonH., HoughtonE., . 2013.Game-based learning: Latest evidence and future directions.
  41. RamírezV., CassinerioS., . 2014.Realidad aumentada-trabajo cooperativo; nivel inicial. In: Iberoamericano de Ciencia, Tecnología&author=&publication_year= Congreso Iberoamericano de Ciencia, Tecnología. Buenos Aires: Innovación y Educación. 1-21
  42. RicoM.M., AgudoJ.E., . 2016.móvil de inglés mediante juegos de espías en Educación Secundaria&author=Rico&publication_year= Aprendizaje móvil de inglés mediante juegos de espías en Educación Secundaria.RIED 19(1):121-139
  43. RodewaldE.M., . 2017.Profilklasse, ‘Smart Gaming’. In: GrossF., RölleckeR., eds. der Vielfalt- Integration und Inklusion&author=Gross&publication_year= MedienPädagogik der Vielfalt- Integration und Inklusion. München: Kopaed.
  44. RosenbaumE., KlopferE., PerryJ., . 2007.location learning: Authentic applied science with networked augmented realities&author=Rosenbaum&publication_year= On location learning: Authentic applied science with networked augmented realities.Journal of Science Education and Technology 16(1):31-45
  45. SlovacekK.A., ZovkićN., CekovićA., . 2014.A Language games in early school age as a precondition for the development of good communicative skills.Croatian Journal of Education 16(1):11-23
  46. SquireK., JanM., . 2007.city mystery: Developing scientific argumentation skills with a place-based augmented reality game on handheld computers&author=Squire&publication_year= Mad city mystery: Developing scientific argumentation skills with a place-based augmented reality game on handheld computers.Journal of Science Education and Technology 16(1):5-29
  47. SquireK., KlopferE., . 2007.reality simulations on handheld computers&author=Squire&publication_year= Augmented reality simulations on handheld computers.Journal of the Learning Sciences 16(3):371-413
  48. SquireK., GiovanettoL., DevaneB., DurgaS., . 2005.users to designers: Building a self-organizing game-basedlearning environment&author=Squire&publication_year= From users to designers: Building a self-organizing game-basedlearning environment.TechTrends 49(5):34-42
  49. SteinkuehlerC., DuncanS., . 2008.habits of mind in virtual worlds&author=Steinkuehler&publication_year= Scientific habits of mind in virtual worlds.Journal of Science Education and Technology 17:530-543
  50. WuH.K., LeeS.W.Y., ChangH.Y., LiangJ.C., . 2013.status, opportunities and challenges of augmented reality in education&author=Wu&publication_year= Current status, opportunities and challenges of augmented reality in education.Computers & Education 62:41-49
  51. Zamora-ManzanoJ.L., Bello-RodríguezS., . 2017.móviles como herramienta de aprendizaje en el mundo del Derecho&author=Zamora-Manzano&publication_year= Dispositivos móviles como herramienta de aprendizaje en el mundo del Derecho. In: Pérez-FeraM., Rodríguez-PulidoJ., eds. prácticas docentes del profesorado universitario&author=Pérez-Fera&publication_year= Buenas prácticas docentes del profesorado universitario. Barcelona: Octaedro. 139-152
  52. ZhaoZ., LinazaJ.L., . 2015.importancia de los videojuegos en el aprendizaje y el desarrollo de niños de temprana edad&author=Zhao&publication_year= La importancia de los videojuegos en el aprendizaje y el desarrollo de niños de temprana edad.Electronic Journal of Research in Educational Psychology 13(2):301-318



Click to see the English version (EN)

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

Resumen

La inmersión de la realidad aumentada (RA) propicia la coexistencia de objetos virtuales y entornos reales que permiten la experimentación con fenómenos que no son posibles en el mundo real. La realidad aumentada está generando una nueva oportunidad de crecimiento de la ubicuidad en los entornos educativos. El objetivo de este estudio es analizar el impacto que tiene sobre el aprendizaje la integración educativa de los enfoques de juego ubicuo con realidad aumentada. Se realizó un estudio cuasi experimental con 91 alumnos de sexto curso de Educación Primaria, se diseñó el escenario de aprendizaje y se seleccionó la aplicación de realidad aumentada «WallaMe», que fue utilizada en cinco sesiones de una unidad didáctica del área de Educación Artística. Mediante el procedimiento de pretest y postest se evaluaron el rendimiento académico y las habilidades de búsqueda de información, y una escala Likert analizó las variables motivación y colaboración entre los estudiantes. Los resultados mostraron que el grupo experimental obtiene mejoras estadísticamente significativas en la motivación hacia el aprendizaje, el rendimiento académico de la materia y en la competencia digital. En definitiva, se concluye que las actividades dinámicas manejadas en la intervención, que hacen uso de realidad aumentada y localización, aportan beneficios en los procesos de enseñanza aprendizaje, y propician una innovación y mejora educativa con el uso de la tecnología educativa.

ABSTRACT

Augmented reality (AR) immersion enables virtual objects and real environments to coexist and encourage experimentation with phenomena that are not possible in the real world. Augmented reality is generating new opportunities for the development of ubiquity within educational environments. The objective of this study was to analyze the impact that the integration of ubiquitous game approaches with augmented reality has on learning. A quasi-experimental study was carried out with 91 sixth-grade primary school students; the learning scenario was designed and the augmented reality application “WallaMe” was selected for use in five sessions of a didactic unit in Art Education. Through pretest and posttest procedures, academic performance and information search skills were evaluated, and, a Likert scale analyzed the motivation and collaboration variables among the students. The results showed that the experimental group obtained statistically significant improvements in the academic performance of the subject, motivation, in the search for, and analysis of, information, level of fun and collaboration. The conclusion is that the dynamic activities managed in the intervention, which made use of augmented reality and localization, benefit teaching-learning processes, and encourage innovation and improvement through educational technology.

Keywords

Aprendizaje móvil, aula, educación básica, estrategias de búsqueda, procesos de aprendizaje, enseñanza, tecnología educativa, tendencia educacional

Keywords

Mobile learning, classroom, basic education, search strategies, learning processes, education, educational technology, educational trends

Introducción

La utilización de entornos de aprendizaje basado en juegos –o en inglés, «game-based learning» (GBL) (Squire, Giovanetto, Devane, & Durga, 2005)– como potenciadores de aprendizajes se ha extendido en los últimos años y numerosas investigaciones demuestran el éxito de estas prácticas sobre la capacidad de razonamiento (Bottino, Ferlino, Ott, & Tavella, 2007), de liderazgo, colaboración (Zhao & Linaza, 2015) y motivación hacia el aprendizaje en Educación Primaria. Sin embargo, los resultados de la aplicación «Realidad aumentada» en contextos de aula basados en juego ha sido menos investigada, si bien la interrelación de ambas dimensiones es objeto actual de estudio en la literatura científica educativa. Existe todavía poco trabajo teórico y conceptual con el que explicar la compleja relación entre las características de la evolución tecnológica rápida y, a veces revolucionaria, su potencial de educación y aprendizaje, así como su integración complementaria en la actividad docente (Cabero & Marín, 2018).

Esta investigación se contempla como una aportación novedosa y singular. Siguiendo a Knaus (2017), los docentes deben conocer la potencialidad de los medios digitales, software y algoritmos para integrar su uso de forma didáctica racional cuando sea posible, viendo que son recursos, nunca fines. Existen investigadores y profesionales (Cantillo, Roura, & Sánchez, 2012; Brazuelo, Gallego, & Cacheiro, 2017) de la enseñanza que se han cuestionado la conveniencia o no de integrar juegos virtuales en el concepto y la práctica educativa mediante dispositivos móviles y ubicuos. Los estudios consultados coinciden en señalar que en la integración de juegos y realidad aumentada (en adelante RA) es necesaria una aplicación didáctica, cuidando las dimensiones de creatividad, colaboración y reflexión. La dimensión de creatividad ha sido subrayada hace años por las investigadoras Pérez-Rodríguez y Delgado-Ponce (2012). Por otra parte, otras investigaciones (Koring, 2016) concluyen que los niños aprenden mucho de los juegos con otros niños. En consecuencia, el ideal es que, con los medios digitales se juegue en grupo y se reflexione también sobre el juego.

Desde la perspectiva educativa, se considera que las aplicaciones basadas en RA podrían ser el comienzo de una interacción didáctica en ciudades, museos y lugares de interés cultural, posibilitando actividades educativas dirigidas a motivar a los usuarios. Estos desarrollos impulsan la desubicación de la enseñanza fuera del centro educativo y también trasladan al estudiante fuera de la realidad, surgiendo así los escenarios inmersivos (Dunleavy, Dede, & Mitchell, 2009; Bronack, 2011).

Aprendizaje digital Basado en Juego

Klopfer, Osterweil y Salen (2009) definen los juegos de aprendizaje digital como aquellos dirigidos a la adquisición de conocimiento, fomentando hábitos mentales y de comprensión que generalmente son útiles dentro de un contexto académico. Además, poseen los mecanismos determinantes para su efectividad pues son portadores de motivación intrínseca y disfrute (Perrotta, Feathersotone, Aston, & Houghton, 2013). Está claro que es interesante el uso de juegos que usan sistemas de posicionamiento global (GPS) porque cambian el paradigma de los jugadores: deben salir a la calle para lograr sus metas y deben caminar para obtener objetos y alcanzar objetivos que les permitan avanzar en el juego. Esto puede combatir los hábitos sedentarios que prevalecen en los jugadores.

Los juegos son capaces de promover el pensamiento de orden superior. La evidencia positiva en varios estudios (Dondlinger, 2007; Steinkuehler & Duncan, 2008) indica que el diseño de juegos con fines educativos debe recomendarse, pues el jugador/estudiante participa en un ambiente en el que puede experimentar con las relaciones entre todos los objetos, resolver un conjunto de problemas, aprender un nuevo alfabetismo de forma activa y facilitar un aprendizaje crítico (Gee, 2004).

Varias investigaciones destacan las ventajas del Aprendizaje Basado en Juego como entorno que promueve la motivación y el compromiso del estudiante (Blunt, 2007; Greenfield, 2010; Slovaček, Zovkić, & Ceković, 2014), lo que nos ha impulsado a su verificación mediante la investigación educativa. A través de estas prácticas, la motivación está presente en los procesos pedagógicos (Aguaded, 2012; Eseryel, Law, Ifenthaler, Ge, & Miller, 2014; Katja, 2012; Liao, 2015). La investigación educativa proporciona hallazgos que ayudan a determinar si es aconsejable adoptar objetivos y fomentar actividades de aprendizaje que sean significativas y motivadoras para los estudiantes.

Explorando la realidad aumentada

Klopfer y Squire (2008) definen ampliamente la RA como una situación en la cual un contexto del mundo real se superpone dinámicamente con una localización coherente o información virtual sensible al contexto. Cabero y Barroso (2016) describen la RA como la combinación en tiempo real de información digital y física a través de diferentes dispositivos tecnológicos. La integración de mundos virtuales y reales a través de la RA crea un escenario enriquecido (Bronack, 2011; Cabero & García, 2016; Fombona, Pascual, & Madeira, 2012; Fombona, 2013 Rico & Agudo, 2016; Squire & Klopfer, 2007). Cabero y Barroso (2016) destacan que cualquier espacio físico puede ser un escenario académico estimulante, y que la RA favorece el aprendizaje ubicuo a través de un ambiente de aprendizaje rico, en el que el estudiante interactúa con objetos y maneja información.

El aprendizaje ubicuo supone la ruptura entre aprendizaje formal e informal, permite un modo más social de aprender, supone el paso del aprendizaje «basado en el currículum» al aprendizaje «basado en problemas» y el marco de referencia es el estudiante.

Algunas experiencias de éxito en las que los alumnos tienen que usar dispositivos portátiles para realizar investigaciones, interpretar datos de ubicación únicos y dar soluciones en un entorno lúdico con RA son: «Environmental Detectives» (Squire & Klopfer, 2007), que es un juego en el que los estudiantes asumen el papel de ingenieros ambientales y tienen que resolver varios problemas en el entorno real. Otra experiencia con la misma dinámica es «Mad City Mystery» (Squire & Jan, 2007), en el que los jugadores tienen que resolver un crimen obteniendo información de su entorno; o el juego «Frequency 1550» desarrollado por The Waag Society para ayudar a los alumnos a conocer la Amsterdam medieval (Akkerman, Admiraal, & Huizenga, 2009). Las ventajas de la RA permiten detectar ubicaciones, el estado de los estudiantes y los recordatorios de tareas. Esta dinámica ofrece alternativas para reenfocar la atención de los estudiantes. La tecnología de la RA es fácil de incorporar a la enseñanza, ya que permite incorporar dispositivos propios de los estudiantes sin necesidad de tecnologías adicionales. Fombona y Vázquez (2017) afirman que los estudiantes ya en la etapa de primaria disponen de equipos susceptibles de realizar tareas apoyadas en los desarrollos de RA, pues el 80% de sus equipos cuentan con el sistema operativo Android y en el 60% de ellos tienen el sistema GPS integrado, lo que les posibilita realizar tareas de geolocalización. Barroso y Cabero (2016) tras una minuciosa investigación concluyen que los objetos de realidad aumentada despiertan gran interés entre los estudiantes, tanto desde el punto de vista técnico y estético, como de su facilidad de utilización.

Este sistema permite trabajar en tiempo real con comentarios y proporciona información para fomentar la sensación de inmediatez de los participantes. Los medios mencionados relativos a la RA proporcionan interacciones con un sentido de inmersión, que es «la impresión subjetiva de que uno se está involucrando en una experiencia global y realista» (Dede, 2009: 66). Y todo ello desde un aprendizaje ubicuo, expandido a través de medios digitales móviles que permiten la construcción e intercambio de conocimiento entre lo virtual y lo presencial (Díez & Díaz, 2018). El aprendizaje ubicuo supone la ruptura entre aprendizaje formal e informal, permite un modo más social de aprender, supone el paso del aprendizaje «basado en el currículum» al aprendizaje «basado en problemas» y el marco de referencia es el estudiante (Burbules, 2014).

Destacamos diferentes subconjuntos de RA, la RA móvil, la RA basada en jugabilidad y la RA multijugador, que ofrecen diferentes posibilidades para apoyar la implementación de estas perspectivas. Con base en las características más sobresalientes de estos planteamientos, clasificamos los enfoques de instrucción en tres categorías principales: enfoques que enfatizan la participación de los estudiantes en «roles», las interacciones de los estudiantes con ubicaciones físicas (ubicuidad, colaboración, aprendizaje situado, aprendizaje informal) y el diseño de tareas de aprendizaje (aprendizaje en perspectivas 3D, visualización de lo invisible). El presente estudio se centra en una intervención que enfatiza tareas de aprendizaje, ubicuidad, colaboración y aprendizaje situado, con el uso de localización y con programas como «WallaMe».

Método

Diseño de la investigación

Partimos de un diseño cuasi experimental con grupo experimental y grupo control y con pretest y postest. A partir de este enfoque, el objetivo principal es analizar el impacto que tiene sobre el aprendizaje la integración educativa de los enfoques de juego ubicuo con RA. Para ello, las variables a analizar son: el rendimiento académico, las habilidades de búsqueda y análisis de información, el grado de diversión y la colaboración establecida entre los alumnos. Las hipótesis formuladas son: el uso ubicuo de la RA mejora el rendimiento académico (H1); la utilización de la RA mejora la búsqueda y análisis de información (H2); la integración de la RA mejora la motivación y diversión (H3); la utilización de la RA y ubicuidad propicia la colaboración(H4). La investigación está estructurada en las siguientes dimensiones, con indicadores e instrumentos en cada una de ellas (Tabla 1).


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/ff5e058c-e727-4d95-b91b-d8780c42a4ea/image/ff70103a-e860-47c0-961a-70052a1e215b-u08-01.png


Participantes

El estudio se ha llevado a cabo en un centro público de Educación Primaria de la Comunidad de Madrid y se ha aplicado a la totalidad de alumnos de sexto curso (91 estudiantes), en el área de Educación Artística. El grupo experimental está conformado por 69 estudiantes que han realizado búsquedas de información con medios tecnológicos (Dimensión 1) y han integrado la aplicación «WallaMe» en cinco sesiones de la unidad didáctica «Arte en Europa» (Dimensión 2). El grupo de control está constituido por los 22 alumnos de una clase que desarrollan la misma unidad didáctica con un libro de texto y de una manera «tradicional» con enfoques expositivos y una metodología centrada en el profesor. La muestra es no probabilística e intencional. En cuanto a las características de la muestra, el grupo experimental cuenta con 34 niñas y 35 niños. Y el grupo control con 13 niñas y 9 niños. El control de pretest en conocimientos de «Arte en Europa» en ambos grupos nos permite afirmar que tienen el mismo nivel de conocimientos.

Proceso de intervención

Con base en la delimitación conceptual detallada en la sección teórica anteriormente expuesta (Mathews, 2010; Rosenbaum, Klopfer, & Perry, 2007; Squire & Jan, 2007; Squire & Klopfer, 2007), el análisis de las herramientas y la intervención se centra en una aplicación de aprendizaje basada en juegos, y aprendizaje basado en el lugar. Las categorías en las que se enmarcan el análisis y la aplicación son:

  • Enfoques que enfatizan las interacciones de los estudiantes con ubicaciones físicas.
  • Enfoques que enfatizan el diseño de tareas de aprendizaje.

En la Dimensión 1 se analizan la posibilidad de búsqueda, selección y análisis de información por parte de los estudiantes con el teléfono móvil. Por tanto, con un aprendizaje ubicuo. Las 5 sesiones en Educación Artística están orientadas al aprendizaje del arte, en concreto obras pictóricas en Europa. Se organizan los estudiantes individualmente y después en grupo para realizar búsquedas de información de las obras de los distintos países, analizando los estilos artísticos, el contexto histórico, los autores y la repercusión social y cultural (Figura 1).


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/ff5e058c-e727-4d95-b91b-d8780c42a4ea/image/2361c3da-80ce-49d8-bfc1-acdb80cfde55-u08-02.png


En la Dimensión 2, se aplica una intervención en cinco sesiones de la unidad didáctica «Arte en Europa». En la intervención, los estudiantes deben conectarse a su dispositivo móvil a través de la aplicación gratuita «WallaMe» (Figura 2). Los estudiantes en grupos van a buscar en el patio del centro educativo imágenes de algunas de las obras pictóricas más importantes de Europa.

Una vez se han obtenido las imágenes, deben trabajar en grupos para descubrir los siguientes datos: título de cada obra pictórica, autor, país, contexto histórico, contexto social de la época, estilo pictórico, descripción del estilo e interpretación de la obra artística. Se proporcionan diferentes indicaciones y materiales para ayudar a los estudiantes a estructurar su tarea y trabajar con ordenadores con conexión a Internet en el aula. Una vez que han terminado, en la última sesión se realiza una puesta en común para evaluar la exactitud de las preguntas (trabajo, autor, estilo) y para recopilar las contribuciones de los estudiantes con respecto a la interpretación de las diferentes obras. Trabajamos con conceptos históricos y artísticos de gran interés, mientras aprendemos la geografía de Europa y desarrollamos la competencia digital en una tarea de búsqueda continua de información.

Una vez que los dos grupos han recibido las cinco sesiones, se somete a ambos al postest que permitirá evaluar el rendimiento académico del alumnado en relación a los contenidos impartidos de la unidad didáctica. Además, se aplica un cuestionario de escala Likert de uno a cinco para analizar las variables de motivación, compromiso, diversión y colaboración en ambos grupos.

En ambas dimensiones se analiza y busca información relativa a los contenidos artísticos trabajados. La estructura curricular es coherente con la legislación vigente: contenidos, criterios de evaluación y estándares de aprendizaje. Como contenidos se destaca el proceso creativo: Propósito de la obra, búsqueda de información (bibliográfica e Internet), planificación, trabajo a desarrollar analizando obras artísticas de diversos países.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/ff5e058c-e727-4d95-b91b-d8780c42a4ea/image/146b887e-4cc1-4b89-830c-7bf3a5dad2eb-u08-03.png


Como criterios de evaluación se destacan: 1) Distinguir las diferencias fundamentales entre las imágenes fijas y en movimiento clasificándolas siguiendo patrones aprendidos; 2) Aproximarse a la lectura, análisis e interpretación del arte y las imágenes fijas y en movimiento en sus contextos culturales e históricos comprendiendo de manera crítica su significado y función social, siendo capaz de elaborar composiciones visuales nuevas a partir de los conocimientos adquiridos; 3) Utilizar las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación de manera responsable para la búsqueda, creación y difusión de imágenes fijas y en movimiento.

Como estándares de aprendizaje se establecieron los siguientes: clasifica imágenes fijas y en movimiento atendiendo a diversos criterios; Valora críticamente los mensajes que trasmiten las imágenes; desarrolla hábitos de orden, uso correcto, y adecuado mantenimiento de los materiales e instrumentos utilizados en sus creaciones artísticas; muestra creatividad e iniciativa en sus producciones artísticas; participa activamente en tareas de grupo; valora con respeto las composiciones realizadas; maneja programas informáticos sencillos de sonido y tratamiento de imágenes digitales (tamaño, brillo, color, contraste…) que le sirva para el desarrollo del proceso creativo.

Análisis y resultados

Dimensión 1: Búsqueda y análisis de información y obras artísticas

Una vez que comparamos los datos del grupo control y grupo experimental, se detallan los resultados de los estudiantes que buscan información desde un planteamiento convencional con el libro de texto, y estudiantes que usan los recursos electrónicos y recursos con el teléfono móvil y la RA.

Pretest y postest. Prueba de Wilcoxon y prueba de los signos

Partiendo de que los estudiantes en ambos grupos tienen los mismos niveles iniciales, es esencial analizar la prueba posterior (postest) donde un aumento en las puntuaciones puso de relieve diferencias significativas en los valores obtenidos de acuerdo con el tratamiento utilizado. Se destaca que, según los resultados alcanzados en la prueba de Wilcoxon y en la prueba de signos con una significación de 0,01, existe una mejoría estadísticamente significativa en varios factores, por lo que aceptamos la hipótesis de investigación sobre un incremento en el rendimiento académico, búsqueda de información, análisis de información, diversión y colaboración (Tabla 2).


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/ff5e058c-e727-4d95-b91b-d8780c42a4ea/image/c105f209-c807-4848-b9db-fa691ba2e806-u08-04.png


Grupo de control y grupo experimental

Por otra parte, se detalla un aumento en los puntajes de los estudiantes después de aplicar los tratamientos asignados, con una mejora estadísticamente significativa del grupo experimental en relación con el grupo de control. Los estudiantes que realizaron la actividad a través de recursos electrónicos y aprendizaje ubicuo obtuvieron mejores resultados en las variables analizadas que el grupo de control que trabajó con el libro de texto (Tabla 3).


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/ff5e058c-e727-4d95-b91b-d8780c42a4ea/image/0696ed18-3540-48a3-ac61-fad201a1befe-u08-05.png


Dimensión 2: Integración educativa de «WallaMe»: un caso en la Educación Primaria

En esta dimensión, analizamos la intervención llevada a cabo con la aplicación «WallaMe» en el área de Educación Artística. Se lleva a cabo un diseño cuasi experimental, ya que no es posible trabajar con una muestra aleatoria debido a la ética y a la logística. Se aplica en el grupo experimental un pretest (O1), un programa (X) y un postest (O2). En el grupo de control se aplica el pretest (O1) y el postest (O2). Este diseño garantiza el control de la mayoría de las fuentes y es más accesible en entornos educativos. En resumen, se realizan una prueba previa (pretest) y una prueba posterior (posest), y también hay un grupo de control, por lo que se realizan varias pruebas no paramétricas, debido a una propuesta de investigación cautelosa.

Se dispone de un grupo experimental de 69 estudiantes de tres centros que han integrado la aplicación «WallaMe» en cinco sesiones de la unidad didáctica «Arte en Europa». También hay un grupo de control con 22 estudiantes que desarrollan la misma unidad didáctica con un libro de texto y de una manera «tradicional». La muestra no es probabilística e intencional, por lo que se trata de un diseño cuasi experimental. Aunque se supone que el número de estudiantes en el grupo experimental es suficiente para asumir normalidad, se adopta una posición conservadora y se aplican pruebas no paramétricas (prueba de Wilcoxon y prueba U de Mann-Whitney) con un nivel de significación (α) de 0,01.

Pretest y postest: Prueba de Wilcoxon y prueba de los signos

Se realizó un análisis exploratorio de los datos. Los valores inferiores en la prueba preliminar sugieren que los estudiantes en ambos grupos tienen los mismos niveles iniciales. Fue en la prueba posterior (postest) donde un aumento en las puntuaciones indica diferencias significativas en los valores obtenidos de acuerdo con el tratamiento utilizado. Se destaca que, según los valores obtenidos en la prueba de Wilcoxon y en la prueba de signos con una significación de 0.01, existe una mejoría estadísticamente significativa, por lo que aceptamos la hipótesis de investigación sobre un incremento en los resultados académicos, motivación, diversión, búsqueda de información y colaboración (Tabla 4).


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/ff5e058c-e727-4d95-b91b-d8780c42a4ea/image/3c800784-02c1-4e90-87a3-0a0e134638f6-u08-06.png


Grupo de control y grupo experimental

Además de los datos que establecen que existe una variación con un aumento en los puntajes de los estudiantes después de aplicar los tratamientos asignados, también se detalla una mejora estadísticamente significativa del grupo experimental en relación con el grupo de control.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/ff5e058c-e727-4d95-b91b-d8780c42a4ea/image/91beed73-122e-4b65-b5cf-765f52a53310-u08-07.png


Los estudiantes que realizaron la actividad con la aplicación «WallaMe» obtuvieron mejores resultados en las variables analizadas que el grupo de control, que trabajó con el libro de texto y a través de instrucción directa (Tabla 5).


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/ff5e058c-e727-4d95-b91b-d8780c42a4ea/image/618ca15f-8159-4ac2-bad1-24d07c006c16-u08-08.png


Se observa una mejoría estadísticamente significativa en las variables dependientes analizadas, con una mayor incidencia en motivación y diversión que destaca la naturaleza activa de la intervención aplicada (Figura 3). La mejora en el rendimiento académico obtenida en la prueba de la unidad didáctica en el área de Educación Artística, se aprecia con los valores del grupo de control de 3,32 en el pretest y 3,59 en el postest, mientras que en el grupo experimental se obtiene 3,39 en el pretest (similar al grupo GC) y 4,01 en el postest (una mejora respecto al GC). En definitiva, se comienza con valores similares en el pretest, pero en el postest hay una mejora debido a los procesos de aprendizaje, con una eficiencia especial en la calificación del grupo experimental, que supera el valor de 4. A partir de los datos del análisis, la tendencia y la mejora son estadísticamente significativas al aplicar la intervención objeto de estudio.

Discusión

Una vez que se presentan los resultados analizados, es posible comparar varios datos de otros autores relacionados con el impacto del enfoque propuesto con respecto a la ubicación y la RA en entornos educativos. Estos recursos pueden involucrar a los estudiantes y apoyar el aprendizaje en ciertos contextos. De acuerdo con los resultados de la presente investigación, algunos estudios aseguran que el aprendizaje con localización y RA permite mejoras y beneficios en los procesos de aprendizaje (Bronack, 2011; Mathews, 2010; Rosenbaum, Klopfer, & Perry, 2007; Squire & Jan, 2007; Squire & Klopfer, 2007) con ventajas en la motivación del alumnado (Bressler & Bodzin 2013; Cózar-de-Moya, Hernández, & Hernández, 2015; Han, Jo, Hyun, & So, 2015). Hay una variedad de estudios que han valorado la ubicuidad con elementos tecnológicos y RA en distintos contextos y áreas (Huang, Sun, & Li, 2016; Kim & Han, 2014; Pendit, Zaibon, & Abubakar, 2015) resaltando ventajas interactivas y motivadoras coherentemente con los resultados de la presente investigación.

Otras experiencias en la enseñanza elemental destacan interacciones, creando materiales locales y significativos para los estudiantes (Diego-Obregon, 2014), con contenidos curriculares y trabajo cooperativo (Ramírez & Cassinerio, 2014) y con trabajos y proyectos centrados en una educación medioambiental (Kamarainen & al., 2013). Estos antecedentes y experiencias llevadas a cabo en otras partes del mundo detallan pruebas significativas del uso de la RA y la ubicuidad en entornos educativos con mejoras sustanciales y coincidentes con el presente estudio. El análisis concuerda con otros autores en que las actividades de aprendizaje relacionadas con la RA a menudo involucran enfoques innovadores con simulaciones participativas (Wu, Lee, Chang, & Liang, 2013). Dado el caso aplicado, se acordó que la naturaleza de estos enfoques de instrucción es bastante diferente del enfoque centrado en el docente (Kerawalla, Luckin, Seljeflot, & Woolard, 2006; Squire & Jan, 2007).

Este estudio corrobora la coherencia del planteamiento de Klopfer y Squire (2008) que detalla la necesidad de equilibrar los impulsos competitivos y facilitar los flujos descentralizados de información en las actividades educativas. Asimismo, los resultados coinciden con las ventajas de la colaboración y la gestión de la tecnología y la información como habilidades esenciales (Kerawalla & al., 2006; Klopfer & Squire, 2008; Squire & Jan, 2007).

Conclusiones

Si bien son abundantes los estudios teóricos sobre las posibilidades y diseño de aplicaciones de RA, no lo es tanto la investigación sobre los efectos en la mejora del aprendizaje del diseño de escenarios basados en el juego con RA, es decir, la aplicación en contextos diarios del aula. Se considera que globalmente los recursos y planteamientos analizados son beneficiosos en la práctica pedagógica y que existen proyectos y medios adecuados para el diseño y desarrollo de actividades educativas. A partir de una triangulación de datos (Cohen, Manion, & Morrison, 2000) y de los resultados en las dos dimensiones analizadas, se concluye:

1) A través de un uso de dispositivos móviles y ubicuidad en la búsqueda de información en Educación Artística, se detallan mejoras de rendimiento académico y una mejora en la búsqueda y análisis de información (Dimensión 1, Tabla 2, Tabla 3).

2) Los planteamientos con aprendizaje ubicuo, RA y búsqueda de información aportan mayor diversión y posibilidades colaborativas a los estudiantes (Dimensión 1, Tabla 2, Tabla 3).

3) Se observan mejoras estadísticamente significativas en el rendimiento académico cuando se aplican actividades en el entorno a partir del caso en la Dimensión 2 (Tabla 4, Tabla 5, Figura 3).

4) Se encuentran mejoras estadísticamente significativas en la motivación, la diversión, la búsqueda de información y en la colaboración. La aplicación pedagógica de la RA con ubicación en un proyecto sobre obras artísticas de Europa ha tenido éxito como estudio de caso y ha proporcionado resultados con numerosas ventajas (Tabla 4, Tabla 5).

Es evidente que una integración de este diseño pedagógico requiere de ciertos recursos, una infraestructura con una buena conexión, y una formación docente adecuada para integrarlo. Sin embargo, una vez que se cuenta con estos elementos, las ventajas y evidencias son claras en el presente estudio. Se pone de manifiesto que actualmente las aplicaciones disponibles que usan la ubicación y RA tienen claros objetivos lúdicos y de entretenimiento; empero, con algunas excepciones y, mediante un diseño organizado y planificado, pueden desarrollar actividades y proyectos que brinden ventajas, tal como se detalla en varios estudios y se verifica en este. En el caso investigado, hemos resaltado los valores con mejoras estadísticamente significativas en el rendimiento, motivación, diversión, búsqueda de información y colaboración entre los estudiantes. Desde la perspectiva de este caso, se garantiza que las actividades lúdicas y dinámicas que utilizan localización y RA brindan beneficios pedagógicos y son una oportunidad de éxito que permite la innovación educativa mediante la aplicación de tecnologías emergentes.

References

  1. AguadedI., . 2012.proficiency, an educational initiative that cannot wait. [La competencia mediática, una acción educativa inaplazable&author=Aguaded&publication_year= Media proficiency, an educational initiative that cannot wait. [La competencia mediática, una acción educativa inaplazable]]Comunicar 39:07-08
  2. AkkermanS., AdmiraalW., HuizengaJ., . 2009.in history education: A mobile game in and about medieval&author=Akkerman&publication_year= Storification in history education: A mobile game in and about medieval.Computers & Education 52(2):449-459
  3. BarrosoJ., CaberoJ., . 2016.de objetos de aprendizaje en realidad aumentada: Estudio piloto en el Grado de Medicina&author=Barroso&publication_year= Evaluación de objetos de aprendizaje en realidad aumentada: Estudio piloto en el Grado de Medicina.Enseñanza & Teaching 34(2):149-167
  4. BluntR., . 2007.game-based learning work? Results from three recent studies&author=Blunt&publication_year= Does game-based learning work? Results from three recent studies. In: , ed. Training, Simulation & Education Conference (I/ITSEC)&author=&publication_year= Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation & Education Conference (I/ITSEC). Florida, USA: NTSA. 1-11
  5. BottinoR.M., FerlinoL., OttM., TavellaM., . 2007.Developing strategic and reasoning abilities with computer games at primary school level.Computers & Education 49(4):1272-1286
  6. BrazueloF., GallegoD., CacheiroM.L., . 2017.docentes ante la integración educativa del teléfono móvil en el aula&author=Brazuelo&publication_year= Los docentes ante la integración educativa del teléfono móvil en el aula.Revista de Educación a Distancia 52:1-22
  7. BresslerD.M., BodzinA.M., . 2013.mixed methods assessment of students’ flow experiences during mobile augmented reality science game&author=Bressler&publication_year= A mixed methods assessment of students’ flow experiences during mobile augmented reality science game.Journal of Computer Assisted Learning 29(6):505-517
  8. BronackS.C., . 2011.role of immersive media in online education&author=Bronack&publication_year= The role of immersive media in online education.Journal of Continuing Higher Education 59(2):113-117
  9. BurbulesN., . 2014.El aprendizaje ubicuo: nuevos contextos, nuevos procesos.Entramados 1:131-133
  10. CaberoJ., BarrosoJ., . 2016.educational possibilities of augmented reality&author=Cabero&publication_year= The educational possibilities of augmented reality.Journal of New Approaches in Educational Research 5(1):44-50
  11. CaberoJ., GarcíaF., . 2016.aumentada&author=Cabero&publication_year= Realidad aumentada. Madrid: Síntesis.
  12. CaberoJ., MarínV., . 2018.Blended learning y realidad aumentada: Experiencias de diseño docente.RIED 21(1):57-74
  13. CantilloC., RouraM., SánchezA., . 2012.Tendencias actuales en el uso de dispositivos móviles en educación.La Educ@ción Digital Magazine 147:1-21
  14. CohenL., ManionL., MorrisonK., . 2000.Research methods in education. New York: Routledge Falmer.
  15. CózarR., De-MoyaM., HernándezJ., HernándezJ., . 2015.Tecnologías emergentes para la enseñanza de las ciencias sociales. Una experiencia con el uso de realidad aumentada en la formación inicial de maestros.Digital Education Review 27:138-153
  16. DedeC., . 2009.interfaces for engagement and learning&author=Dede&publication_year= Immersive interfaces for engagement and learning.Science 323(5910):66-69
  17. Diego-ObregonR., . 2014.Realidad aumentada en documentos e imágenes.Aula de Innovación Educativa 230:65-66
  18. DíezE., DíazJ.M., . 2018.learning ecologies for a critical cyber-citizenship. [Ecologías de aprendizaje ubicuo para la ciberciudadanía crítica&author=Díez&publication_year= Ubiquitous learning ecologies for a critical cyber-citizenship. [Ecologías de aprendizaje ubicuo para la ciberciudadanía crítica]]Comunicar 54:93-103
  19. DondlingerM.J., . 2007.Educational video games design: A review of the literature.Journal of Applied Educational Technology 4(1):21-31
  20. DunleavyM., DedeC., MitchellR., . 2009.and limitations of immersive participatory augmented reality simulations for teaching and learning&author=Dunleavy&publication_year= Affordances and limitations of immersive participatory augmented reality simulations for teaching and learning.Journal of Science Education and Technology 18(1):7-22
  21. EseryelD., LawV., IfenthalerD., GeX., MillerR., . 2014.An investigation of the interrelationships between motivation, engagement, and complex problem solving in game-based learning.Educational Technology & Society 17(1):42-53
  22. FombonaJ., . 2013.interactividad de los dispositivos móviles geolocalizados, una nueva relación entre personas y cosas&author=Fombona&publication_year= La interactividad de los dispositivos móviles geolocalizados, una nueva relación entre personas y cosas.Revista Historia y Comunicación Social 18:777-788
  23. FombonaJ., Vázquez-CanoE., . 2017.de utilización de la geolocalización y realidad aumentada en el ámbito educativo&author=Fombona&publication_year= Posibilidades de utilización de la geolocalización y realidad aumentada en el ámbito educativo.Educación XXI 1(20):319-342
  24. FombonaJ., PascualM.J., MadeiraM.F., . 2012.Realidad aumentada, una evolución de las aplicaciones de los dispositivos móviles.Píxel-Bit 41:197-210
  25. GeeJ.P., . 2004. , ed. que nos enseñan los videojuegos sobre el aprendizaje y el alfabetismo&author=&publication_year= Lo que nos enseñan los videojuegos sobre el aprendizaje y el alfabetismo. Málaga: Aljibe.
  26. GreenfieldP.M., . 2010.games revisited&author=Greenfield&publication_year= Video games revisited. In: Van-EckR., ed. and cognition: Theories and practice from the learning sciences&author=Van-Eck&publication_year= Gaming and cognition: Theories and practice from the learning sciences. Hershey, PA: IGI Global. 1-21
  27. HanJ., JoM., HyunE., SoH.J., . 2015.young children's perception toward augmented reality-infused dramatic play&author=Han&publication_year= Examining young children's perception toward augmented reality-infused dramatic play.Educational Technology Research and Development 63(3):455-474
  28. HuangC.S.J., YangS.J.H., ChiangT.H.C., SuA.Y.S., . 2016.Effects of situated mobile learning approach on learning motivation and performance of EFL students.Journal of Educational Technology & Society 19(1):263-276
  29. KamarainenA.M., MetcalfS., GrotzerT., BrowneA., MazzucaD., TutwilerM.S., DedeC., . 2013.Integrating augmented reality and probeware with environmental education field trips&author=Kamarainen&publication_year= EcoMOBILE: Integrating augmented reality and probeware with environmental education field trips.Computers & Education 68:545-556
  30. KatjaF., . 2012.Lernen in der Schule&author=Katja&publication_year= Mobiles Lernen in der Schule. In: Laufer.J., RölleckeR., eds. digitaler Medien für Kinder und Jugenlichen&author=Laufer.&publication_year= Chancen digitaler Medien für Kinder und Jugenlichen. München: Koepadverlag. 53-59
  31. KerawallaL., LuckinR., SeljeflotS., WoolardA., . 2006.it real’: Exploring the potential of augmented reality for teaching primary school science&author=Kerawalla&publication_year= ‘Making it real’: Exploring the potential of augmented reality for teaching primary school science.Virtual Reality 10(3):16-174
  32. KimH., HanS., . 2014.A framework for the automatic 3D city modeling using the panoramic image from mobile mapping system and digital maps. 2014 ieee virtual reality (vr)
  33. KlopferE., SquireK., . 2008.detectives: The development of an augmented reality platform for environmental simulations&author=Klopfer&publication_year= Environmental detectives: The development of an augmented reality platform for environmental simulations.Educational Technology Research and Development 56(2):203-228
  34. KlopferE., OsterweilS., SalenK., . 2009.Moving learning games forward. Cambridge, MA: The Education Arcade.
  35. KnausT., . 2017.Pädagogik des digitale: Phänomene, Potentiale, Perspektiven. In: EderS., MikatC., TillmannA., eds. takes command&author=Eder&publication_year= Software takes command. München: Kopaed. 40-68
  36. LiaoT., . 2015.or admented reality? The influence of marketing on augmented reality tecnologies&author=Liao&publication_year= Augmented or admented reality? The influence of marketing on augmented reality tecnologies.Information Communication & Society 18(3):310-326
  37. MathewsJ.M., . 2010.Using a studio-based pedagogy to engage students in the design of mobile-based media. English eaching: Practice and.Critique 9(1):87-102
  38. PenditU.C., ZaibonS.B., AbubakarJ.A., . 2015.interpretive media usage in cultural heritage sites at yogyakarta&author=Pendit&publication_year= Digital interpretive media usage in cultural heritage sites at yogyakarta.Jurnal Teknologi 75(4):71-77
  39. Pérez-RodríguezM.A., Delgado-PonceA., . 2012.digital and audiovisual competence to media competence: Dimensions and indicators. [De la competencia digital y audiovisual a la competencia mediática: Dimensiones e indicadores&author=Pérez-Rodríguez&publication_year= From digital and audiovisual competence to media competence: Dimensions and indicators. [De la competencia digital y audiovisual a la competencia mediática: Dimensiones e indicadores]]Comunicar 39:25-35
  40. PerrotaC., FeatherstoneG., AstonH., HoughtonE., . 2013.Game-based learning: Latest evidence and future directions.
  41. RamírezV., CassinerioS., . 2014.Realidad aumentada-trabajo cooperativo; nivel inicial. In: Iberoamericano de Ciencia, Tecnología&author=&publication_year= Congreso Iberoamericano de Ciencia, Tecnología. Buenos Aires: Innovación y Educación. 1-21
  42. RicoM.M., AgudoJ.E., . 2016.móvil de inglés mediante juegos de espías en Educación Secundaria&author=Rico&publication_year= Aprendizaje móvil de inglés mediante juegos de espías en Educación Secundaria.RIED 19(1):121-139
  43. RodewaldE.M., . 2017.Gross& R. Röllecke 175-181. In F., ed. ‘Smart Gaming’&author=Gross&publication_year= Profilklasse, ‘Smart Gaming’. München: Kopaed.
  44. RosenbaumE., KlopferE., PerryJ., . 2007.location learning: Authentic applied science with networked augmented realities&author=Rosenbaum&publication_year= On location learning: Authentic applied science with networked augmented realities.Journal of Science Education and Technology 16(1):31-45
  45. SlovacekK.A., ZovkicN., CekovicA., . 2014.A Language games in early school age as a precondition for the development of good communicative skills.Croatian Journal of Education 16(1):11-23
  46. SquireK., JanM., . 2007.city mystery: Developing scientific argumentation skills with a place-based augmented reality game on handheld computers&author=Squire&publication_year= Mad city mystery: Developing scientific argumentation skills with a place-based augmented reality game on handheld computers.Journal of Science Education and Technology 16(1):5-29
  47. SquireK., KlopferE., . 2007.reality simulations on handheld computers&author=Squire&publication_year= Augmented reality simulations on handheld computers.Journal of the Learning Sciences 16(3):371-413
  48. SquireK., GiovanettoL., DevaneB., DurgaS., . 2005.users to designers: Building a self-organizing game-basedlearning environment&author=Squire&publication_year= From users to designers: Building a self-organizing game-basedlearning environment.TechTrends 49(5):34-42
  49. SteinkuehlerC., DuncanS., . 2008.habits of mind in virtual worlds&author=Steinkuehler&publication_year= Scientific habits of mind in virtual worlds.Journal of Science Education and Technology 17:530-543
  50. WuH.K., LeeS.W.Y., ChangH.Y., LiangJ.C., . 2013.status, opportunities and challenges of augmented reality in education&author=Wu&publication_year= Current status, opportunities and challenges of augmented reality in education.Computers & Education 62:41-49
  51. Zamora-ManzanoJ.L., Bello-RodríguezS., . 2017.móviles como herramienta de aprendizaje en el mundo del Derecho&author=Zamora-Manzano&publication_year= Dispositivos móviles como herramienta de aprendizaje en el mundo del Derecho. In: Pérez-FeraM., Rodríguez-PulidoJ., eds. prácticas docentes del profesorado universitario&author=Pérez-Fera&publication_year= Buenas prácticas docentes del profesorado universitario. Barcelona: Octaedro. 139-152
  52. ZhaoZ., LinazaJ.L., . 2015.importancia de los videojuegos en el aprendizaje y el desarrollo de niños de temprana edad&author=Zhao&publication_year= La importancia de los videojuegos en el aprendizaje y el desarrollo de niños de temprana edad.Electronic Journal of Research in Educational Psychology 13(2):301-318
Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/09/19
Accepted on 30/09/19
Submitted on 30/09/19

Volume 27, Issue 2, 2019
DOI: 10.3916/C61-2019-06
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Views 117
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?