Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This paper analyzes the role of young consumers in the context of new communication processes arising from emerging technologies. It examines the use of mobile device applications that activate new, more complex social and communicative uses of technology. The applications for smartphones which link to commercial advertising and enable online purchases are a recent priority for communicative actors such as trademarks, banking and technology companies. In this context, this paper describes and encodes qualitatively how young users as prosumers understand, perceive and use these corporate branding applications. Research techniques were applied to four focus groups of Spanish undergraduates of Communication Studies, as they are users that show a predisposition towards an early adoption of these practices. The coding and grouping of their responses enabled us to develop a qualitative analysis of usage and interaction with trademark applications. These focus group responses also allowed us to classify such communicative practices. In conclusion, active consumers interact with commercial content, establishing social networks with the backing of the brand culture and image as a form of group cohesion. Other uses are related to entertainment and enquiries for information, but users are still reluctant to pay for products or services through their mobile devices.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction. Underlying issues

Smartphones, or the latest generation of phones, have become devices that are increasingly functional and capable of managing not only personal communication but also the ever-more complex life of the digital user. The possibility of incorporating a wide range of so-called branded applications for all kinds of purposes generates new potential communicative users who become not only active consumers of, among other things, advertising content and integrated social networking, but also prosumers or generators of content or value. These digital applications installed and used by current smart phone users act as a link for a trademark of products or services to the user’s phone. They allow the user to access a catalogue of brand names, purchase products, or get added value usage of promotions or exclusive products through the branded application; so the app becomes a specific, unique and increasingly frequented communication channel. The technological and communication revolution arising from the social use of mobile devices has led to an increase in research on interactive communication, marketing and commercialisation based on mobile devices. Earlier research identified the different social uses of mobile technology in relation to age (Castells, Fernandez-Ardèvol, Qiu & Sey, 2006: 41); young users are especially inclined to use emerging technologies, along with fascination for the brand as an identifier of social and group integration, which has recently been treated by Colás, González and de-Pablos (2013), Boase and Ling (2013) and Mihailidis (2014), among others. The latter author participated in an investigation that researched how university students used their mobile phones on a daily basis. This 2012 study worked with 793 students from eight universities across three continents, and the results showed the massive use of social mobile applications, with the difference between relationships that entail real contact and those that do not becoming increasingly unclear (Mihailidis, 2014: 70-72). Such users are therefore, an ideal target for trademarks and their strategies of social penetration through mobile software applications.

The devices are based on software and can run applications and connect to Internet; they also incorporate and work with different software applications designed for a variety of purposes: purchases, information, audio-visual creation, geolocation, etc. Brand applications would be no different from any other category in that vast catalogue of applications, except that they include within their denomination and purposes links to commercial and social actions, and proposals for a wide range of services related to the activity and image of their brand. They give increasing priority to commercial advertising, and join the traditional purchase of products or network services to aspects such as providing information or forming a bond between social and active users. In fact, the generation of social networks and contents by users are essential functions in the marketing strategy of brand applications. However, there are still relatively few investigations that follow an essentially qualitative methodology which address the description of motivations, social practices and features that users demand of these communicative forms; this is precisely the purpose of this research, which is based on focus group discussion of these issues. Dalhberg, Mallat and Ondrus (2008) presented an exhaustive review of up-to-date scientific literature on mobile device applications.

The state of the question was also dealt with by Varnali and Toker (2010), who demonstrated an exponential growth in research on mobile devices from 2000 to 2008 by assessing some 255 scientific articles from 83 research journals. Closer and even more related to this research are contributions by Kim, Mirusmonov and Lee (2010), who made an empirical study of the influences (social, technological, etc.) on the intended use of mobile devices; we can also cite Xu, Erman & al. (2011) or Yang, Lu, & al. (2012) who identify and define the ways mobile phones are used. Other contributions to qualitative research on the social use of mobile devices by groups are those by Fernández-Ardèvol (2011), in this case referring to older people, by Charness and Boot (2009) or Mallat (2007). For scientific communication research, focus groups are especially valid for studying the social uses of the new communication forms and the extent of use and interaction; all from a qualitative and humanistic perspective.

This qualitative and humanistic concept has been described by Porter (1998) from a business strategy, and by Pearce and Robinson (2005). A notable piece of research that used focus groups and also followed a qualitative methodology was that carried out by Mallat (2007). The investigation looked at individuals of various ages (from 14 to 60) and concluded that the adoption of these new uses is both dynamic and contextual, depending on situational factors such as urgency or need for speed; it also identifies barriers that hold users back, like the complexity of the system, connection rates, the possible lack of safety guarantees in transactions and the absence of a critical mass of users (Mallat, 2007: 231-232).

New users, particularly young adults, are beginning to change the traditional perception of the mobile telephone (wireless voice communication), considering it to be a personal device, a gateway to extensive, varied and enriching networking communication services. Although, these brands originally aimed to develop interactive actions with commercial, promotional or even advertising purposes, as indicated by Maqueira-Marin, Bruque-Cámara & Moyano-Fuentes (2009: 141-142), the fact is that they have evolved and now seek proactive interaction with the user with the idea of developing specific content. These social and cultural changes have been described by Dalhberg, Mallat, Ondrus and Zmijewska (2008: 169-170), identifying them as crucial in affecting interaction and consumption habits, with people constantly on the move and increasingly aware of their free-time possibilities; an essential factor for communication and personal use of mobile technology. Brand applications are increasingly intertwined with cultural values and the personal and social idiosyncrasies of their users.

All this is a recent phenomenon, but with huge potential for business communication that runs alongside the emergence of new prosumer practices. Bellman, Potter and others (2011) observed that persuasive communication was having a greater impact, regardless of the category of the brand and application. The concept of usability and its value as a strategic factor in the expansion of mobile interactions has also been analysed by Liu, Wang and Wang (2011): in particular, it defined the characteristics of content, ease of use, emotionality focused on the user and the medium. Kim, Ling and Sung (2013) also defined how users, especially young people, have a greater predisposition towards establishing interactive communication with the brand, institution or service via the application. This goes hand-in-hand with the capability of mobile telephones to spread viral, communitarian and social content, transforming the relationship between brands and digital users, as has recently been unveiled by Bermejo (2013). This is a creative, innovative and low-cost strategy for trademarks (Swanson, 2011). Shin, Jung and Chang (2012: 1418) claim in this regard that each new technology needs to be perceived as being useful for it to be accepted and assimilated into people’s daily routines.

2. Material and method

The research was centred on finding, describing and categorizing the knowledge, attitudes and types of usage among young Spanish university students in relation to their experience and social use of brand applications on their mobile devices. For Boase (2013: 58-59), the way data are collected and the analytical tools defined in any mobile phone study as an experience can determine the outcome of the results, this being a field that is still new. One of the greatest challenges for a study on mobile phone applications is access to user data and content (Humphreys, 2013: 23); content analysis here is a valid research technique aimed at formulating from certain data reproducible and valid inferences that can be applied to its context (Krippendorff, 1990: 28). According to Cook and Reichardt (1986: 29), qualitative research should contain as relevant criteria, among other reliable characteristics, solid and repeatable data; data that is valid, current, rich and deep, grounded in the process, based on reality and oriented to exploratory, ever-expanding, descriptive and inductive discoveries. This research method is one of the techniques adapted for the study subject set out here since, according to authors like Dahlberg and others (2008: 175), qualitative studies using interviews or focus groups can yield more details about the factors surrounding the adoption of these new communication tools. The treatment of the focus groups and intervention by the moderators follow the steps defined by Yin (2011: 141). This author sets out and analyses what a focus group should be in this area. It would be a medium-sized group to enable accurate data gathering following, for example, the techniques proposed by the often-cited Stewart, Shamdanasi and Rook (2007: 45-50). The focus group evolves because the researcher has selected individuals who have previously had common experiences, or who are believed to share the same points of view. The moderator is the researcher who establishes communication and talks with these groups, and encourages all the group members to express their opinions, with minimal and no guiding or influencing of their views and experiences.

In terms of qualitative data analysis, the process of how the collected information is organised and used by the researchers is understood as a way to establish relations, interpret them, extract meaning and draw conclusions, in the ethnographic way as described by Spradley (1980: 59-70). In the qualitative analysis, Yin (2011: 6) highlights a series of phases such as: recording social reality, its material conversion into some kind of expression and coding, and its transformation through a conceptual development process.

To analyse the focus groups, this research made a transcription of the recorded audio interviews and then examined these texts to discover more about the study subject and the research categories within, using the bias limiters already mentioned. With regards to these research categories, we considered the active use of brand applications, with reference to Varnali (2011) because it introduces personality variables and subjectivity in user behaviour; we also took into account Shin, Jung and Chang (2012), who built what they call the «Technology Acceptance Model», whose apex includes interactivity and quality motivations (2012: 1425). Nevertheless, it is not without its methodological challenges as a new medium, as indicated by Kobayashi and Boase (2012). All the references cited so far in this paper have enabled us to focus the research on users and their motivations.

The processes of category construction can cater to different typologies. The first is known as inductive and consists of drawing up categories based on the readings (of the transcripts) and review of the compiled material without taking into consideration the categories deployed at the start. In this way provisional or emerging categories can be proposed which, as the encoding process progresses, will be consolidated, modified or withdrawn from the data comparison included in other categories (Rodríguez, Gil & García, 1996: 210). Some authors call this task open coding (Strauss, 1987), a process in which one aspect of the search for concepts is to try to provide data. The second process is called deductive which, unlike the previous categories, establishes a priori the role of the researcher in order to adapt each unit to an already existing category. Finally, we arrive at the mixed process from which the researcher extracts categories, formulating others when they are shown to be ineffective; this means that they cannot be considered within the category system as a register unit. This research carried out in May and June 2013 used a mixed process by means of a specifically designed computer tool, categorisation and data management, all conceived for this type of analysis. These programs are created to manage mechanical and repetitive qualitative analysis processes of responses, and are known as CAQDAS (Computer Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis Software). The latest version of Atlas.ti, Win 7.0, was chosen from among the various solutions available in the market for this research. The overview diagram of working with this tool can be summarised in the following processes, which correspond to the different phases of the research.

• In the first place, it was deemed appropriate to create a Hermeneutic Unit to house the documents (in our case, the transcriptions of the opinions expressed by the participants of the groups).

• This is followed by reinterpretations of these texts to discover relevant passages and phrases to which codes and research reports are assigned,

• Thirdly, various analysis operations are developed on these codes, which are synthesised in family code groupings. In the present case, it was useful to group the visual networking concepts from which it was possible to retrieve the results of this research.

• Finally the QDA tools (including the one used in this work) allowed us to export the data in different formats and options.

The type of qualitative analysis carried out refers especially to category estimation, and infers relationships rather than verifies hypotheses (Krippendorff, 1990). The reference framework of our analysis is the description of real interaction and activity processes in mobile communication, focusing on the mobile brand applications. Within this context, the qualitative technique was applied to four focus groups of young university students aged between 18 and 24. Group composition consisted of 10 students in the first group, 12 in the second, 16 in the third and 10 students in the fourth. These groups can be classified as early adopters of technologies or services, according to marketing studies. Questions of an open and interpretative nature are related to the knowledge and use of, and communicative interaction within, the branded applications of mobile devices. This research was particularly on the look-out for indications of the depth of knowledge of these types of applications and, above all, the communicative practices established within the mobile phone’s brand applications; searching for traits that would identify the users as content generators in the brand’s social network.

3. Analysis and results

In the content analysis applied, the questions acted as parameters to guide the participants to contribute freely, which facilitated the work of the study and made it possible to establish codes or categories from the responses, offering indications of the interactive and social use of the applications. Relationships were also established between codes, code families and associations between codes, so the researchers could infer the uses, demands and objections of these young university students in terms of communication technologies. Finally, the results from the selected groups were validated and the sample validity verified.

The empirical encoding process is described below, and is the result of a dual process that takes advantage of the benefits inherent in the aforementioned computer tool. Firstly, after the transcription and reading of the responses from the four focus groups, an analysis was made of the content of the responses based on the theme underlying each of the questions, selecting significant fragments through a process called In Vivo Coding; that is to say, establishing the significant brands so that they can operate as future analysis codes; an inductive code process. A third review discovered semantic elements common to many of these codes and we proceeded to assign a code or category to encompass different responses. In this way, the researchers defined a total of 20 codes, of which 13 came from the responses to the questions on brand applications, use and interactivity, while the remaining seven related to advertising and payments made by mobile phone.

The process of category construction is also deductive (using a mixed method for the encodings), partly due to the categories having been established a priori. The questions asked by the researchers were related to the extent of knowledge and use of, and interaction with, the brand applications on the mobile devices. They also specifically asked about the possibilities of payment for goods and services with the application. The list of the codes found in the responses and related to the brand applications were: Entertainment, Ease of Use, Information, Purchases, Curiosity, Offline, Unnecessary Items, Technical Limitations, Advertising, Speed, Rejection, Usability and the Value Added. With respect to the use and perception of advertising and payments (NFC or others), the group participants gave opinions that were clustered into codes, such as Comfort and Ease of Use, Knowledge of the Technology Without Use, Expenditure Control, Social Influence, Concerns over Security, Technological Optimism and the Value Added.

It also proved to be convenient to build clusters of codes into supercodes or family codes, based on a search and analysis strategy. For example, the code family named «Users of Brand Applications» included the codes, and hence the quotes, of the participants related to information, purchases, entertainment, curiosity and advertising. It should be noted that certain codes belong to more than one family; for example, the «Information» code belongs equally to the «Users of Applications» family and to «Features in Demand».

The research results shown below include some that are particularly expressive and present information in the form of conceptual diagrams of the codification work and the qualitative analysis using the QDA software tool. The types of relations obtained mainly include «is associated with», «contradicts», «is part of», «is the cause of», among others, from the relationships established in a list of codes.


Draft Content 956445756-29647-en015.jpg

For a more complete, clear and significant understanding of the conceptual diagram, the more frequently mentioned categories are located above while the codes lower down represent a smaller number of appeals in the transcripts of the various participants in the focus groups. These relationships are included in figure 1.

The users of brand applications are numerous within the focus groups, and these apps are used, as seen in the previous results chart, for buying and obtaining information on products and services. The «Value Added» code is especially relevant: it includes the prosumer’s practices, particularly regarding personalised and exclusive promotions, communication with the brand and, above all, the generation of online content. Other minor, although significant uses, have to do with entertainment or downloading and occasional use out of sheer curiosity. A curious result emerges from the «Advertising» code. For example, the inclusion of advertising is principally rejected and contradicts the «Value Added» category, even though some users occasionally permit its use. Furthermore, students who had declared themselves to be non-users of branded applications expressed their opinions more strongly but less clearly than others. The majority said that they had found some applications to be unnecessary or of no significant use. Secondly, there is a categorical refusal to use these applications in abundance; and linked to the previous code, a very small number of users mention the technical limitations of the device, or refer to the network, arguing that they do not have smart phones, or a flat rate data tariff, or they complain about the difficulty of working on small screens, which are just some of the other reasons that have been encoded. This is displayed in figure 2. Understanding of «Branded Applications» is related to the family the researchers composed from the codes that responded to the questions referring to what the users would like to see as features in those applications regardless of whether they are users or not. The results can be seen in figure 3, in which the determining factor is that the applications contained «Value Added», this is to say, the ability to create content, brand communication, the creation of Usenet, speed, immediacy and exclusive products or services. The views of both groups on what the mobile applications should contain contradicted some categories; for example, a small number of non-users of branded applications also cited certain off-line services that could be included. These non-users are defined as not permanently connected to the network either for financial reasons or due to the technical limitations of their mobile device. This naturally clashes with «Value Added», or with use in terms of the access to immediate and constant «Information» that users demand. The non-users of these technologies also called for greater usability or ease of use of the applications.


Draft Content 956445756-29647-en016.jpg

While the mobile phone applications and their features were well-known and used by the majority of members of the four focus groups investigated, NFC mobile phone payment proved less popular. Nevertheless, in a vaguer and more imprecise way, a significant number of students were aware of the possibility of making payments by the mobile phone and other applications yet to be implemented. The technological optimism associated with a positive social influence was observed transversely in all focus groups. It is necessary to emphasize the scant or non-existent critical capacity of these young users of mobile applications in terms of the advertising and commercial strategies that the brand applications discreetly incorporate into the social networks, and the standing invitations to participate and generate content through the device’s software.


Draft Content 956445756-29647-en017.jpg

4. Conclusions and discussion of results

Young users of smart mobile devices are now pioneers in the use of the new social, communicative and cultural services provided by technological and communicative tools such as brand applications. These are related to user life experience and the creation of communities based on the values, lifestyles and idiosyncrasies of the brand. For companies, and this remains a subject to be discussed and researched further, these branded apps are extremely useful in building customer loyalty strategies.

The young university users surveyed show a very positive attitude towards downloading, installing and using brand applications. Their use broadens the communicative experience far beyond a mere commercial relationship. Therefore, in addition to the obvious usefulness of finding information, products and new services or commercial offers, the added social value is significant. The formation of virtual communities, the sharing of social and cultural experiences, and belonging to and identifying with brand values are essential elements for the youth groups. This is the main contribution of the prosumer.

In particular, use among the Spanish university population studied of brand applications was considerable, and this use extended to the applications for purchasing and obtaining product information, services and other added values, especially exclusive offers, discounts and instant communication with the brand as well as with other users. Other minor uses, although still significant, related to entertainment or sheer curiosity. Obviously complementary ethnographic research is necessary, as knowledge of these social groups’ lifestyles would enhance understanding of their communicative mobile uses.

The number of students who declared themselves to be «non-users of brand applications» was very few. They stated that this was mainly due to the presence of unnecessary applications, given that their use did not offer any significant value. To a lesser extent some expressed a categorical refusal to use these applications and a small number mentioned the technical limitations of their device or network, on the grounds that they do not have smart phones or a permanent flat rate data tariff plan. They also complained about the difficulty entailed in using small screens, among other things.

The focus groups expressed opinions on what a brand application should include in order for it to be attractive and interesting. In general, they referred to the inclusion of new features with respect to the corporate website, the possibility of specific utilities (such as the creation of networks, communities or making contact with other users) and payments through the application. The young university students approved of elements such as speed and immediacy in accessing content, exclusive sales offers and the discovery of products not found in stores or other establishments, as well as the community and cultural connection with the values or philosophy of a brand.

Technology as a positive social value, and the need for the integration and use by individuals of new communicative proposals were opinions on which almost all students agreed. This is further reinforced by the widespread technological optimism expressed by the young university students, as well as in regard to communicative interaction.

This study also demonstrates the influence of the economic crisis in the methods and channels of traditional commercial communication and advertising. The use of new media such as the telephone or mobile device, both closely linked to personal, intimate or private use, highlights the breakdown of the traditional mass media advertising model (television, radio).

The qualitative research only found one single and significant objection to the use of these technological resources: the feeling of insecurity when making payments via mobile devices. The security issues surrounding these purchasing transactions represent one of the greatest concerns among users and one of the biggest obstacles to increased purchase and payment activity via the mobile telephone. In turn, a small but significant number of users in the focus groups almost exclusively rejected the notion of making payments via their mobile devices.

Finally, and although the analysis developed excludes the quantitative aspect, it is interesting to note that the typology of the codes discovered, as well as the percentage corresponding to each one, ended up being very similar in all four focus groups. This indicates a uniformity in the typology of mobile application use among the Spanish university population, who are at the forefront in the adoption of new communicative, social and cultural uses of mobile technology.

Support and acknowledgements

The present study forms part of the work carried out by the «Cyberculture, audiovisual and communicative processes» (SEJ 508) research group of the Andalusia Plan for Research, Development and Innovation, as well as the Regional Autonomous Community of Andalusia’s Research Personnel (2013) scholarship program.

References

Bellman, S., Potter, R.F., Treleaven-Hassard, S., Robinson, J.A. & Varan, D. (2011). The Effectiveness of Branded Mobile Phone Apps. Journal of Interactive Marketing, 25, 4, 191-200. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.intmar.2011.06.001).

Bermejo, J. (2013). Masking as a Persuasive Strategy in Advertising for Young. Comunicar, 41, 157-165. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C41-2013-15).

Boase, J. & Ling, R. (2013). Measuring mobile phone use: Self-report versus Log Data. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 18, 4, 508-519. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcc4.12021).

Boase, J. (2013). Implications of Software-based Mobile Media for Social Research. Mobile Media & Communication, 1, 1-57. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2050157912459500).

Castells, M., Fernández-Ardèvol, M., Qiu, J.L. & Sey, A. (2006). Mobile Communication and Society: A Global Perspective. Cambridge (USA): MIT Press.

Charness, N. & Boot, W.R. (2009). Aging and Information Technology Use: Potential and Barriers. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 18, 5, 253-258. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8721.2009.01647.x)

Colás, P., González, T. & de Pablos, J. (2013). Young People and Social Networks: Motivations and Preferred Uses. Comunicar, 40, 15-23. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-01).

Cook, T.D. & Reichardt, CH.S. (1986). Métodos cualitativos y cuantitativos en investigación evaluativa. Madrid (España): Morata.

Dahlberg, T., Mallat, N., Ondrus, J. & Zmijewska, A. (2008). Past, Present and Future of Mobile Payments Research: A Literature Review. Electronic Commerce Research and Applications, 7, 2, 165-181. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.elerap.2007.02.001).

Fernández-Ardèvol, M. (2011). Mobile Telephony among the Elders: First Results of a Qualitative Approach. In P. Isaías & P. Kommers (Eds.), Proceedings of the IADIS International Conference e-Society 2011. (pp. 435-438). Lisboa: IADIS (International Association for Development of the Information Society).

Humphreys, L. (2013). Mobile Social Media : Future Challenges and Opportunities. Mobile Media & Communication, 1, 1-20. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2050157912459499).

Kim, C., Mirusmonov, M. & Lee, I. (2010). An Empirical Examination of Factors Influencing the Intention to Use Mobile Payment. Computers in Human Behavior, 26, 3, 310-322. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2009.10.013).

Kim, E., Ling, J-S. & Sung, Y. (2013). To App or Not to App: Engaging Consumers via Branded Mobile Apps. Journal of Interactive Advertising, 13, 1, 53-65. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15252019.2013.782780).

Kobayashi, T. & Boase, J. (2012). No Such Effect? The Implications of Measurement Error in Self-report Measures of Mobile Communication use. Communication Methods and Measures, 6, 2, 1-18. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19312458.2012.679243).

Krippendorf, K. (1990). Metodología de análisis de contenido: Teoría y práctica. Barcelona: Paidós.

Liu, Y., Wang, S. & Wang, X. (2011). A Usability-centred Perspective on Intention to Use Mobile Payment. International Journal of Mobile Communications, 9, 6, 541-562. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1504/IJMC.2011.042776)

Mallat, N. (2007). Exploring Consumer Adoption of Mobile Payments. A Qualitative Study. Journal of Strategic Information Systems, 16, 4, 413-432. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsis.2007.08.001).

Maqueira-Marín, J.M., Bruque-Cámara, S. & Moyano-Fuentes, J. (2009). What Does Grid Information Technology Really Mean? Definitions, Taxonomy and Implications in the Organizational Field. Technology Analysis Strategic Management, 21, 4, 491-513. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09537320902818991).

Mihailidis, P. (2014). A Tethered Generation: Exploring the Role of Mobile Phones in the Daily Life of Young People. Mobile Media & Communication, 2, 58-72. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2050157913505558).

Pearce, J. & Robinson, R. (2005). Strategic Management. New York (USA): McGraw-Hill.

Porter, M. (1998). Competitive Strategy. New York (USA): Free Press.

Rodríguez, G., Gil, J. & García, E. (1996). Métodos de investigación cualitativa. Málaga (España): Aljibe.

Shin, D-H., Jung, J. & Chang, B-H. (2012). Psychology Behind QR Codes: User Experience Perspective. Computers in Human Behavior, 28, 4, 1417-1426. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2012.03.004).

Spradley, J.P. (1980). Participant Observation. Orlando (USA): Harcourt Brace Jovanovich College Publishers.

Stewart, D., Shamdanasi, P. & Rook, P. (2007). Focus Groups. Theory and Practice. Thousand Oaks (USA): Sage Publications.

Strauss, A. (1987). Qualitative Analysis for Social Scientists. Cambridge (USA): Cambridge University Press.

Swanson, B. (2011). Bring mobility to your marketing. Accounting Today, 25, 6, 35-37.

Varnali, K. & Toker, A. (2010). Mobile Marketing Research: The-state-of-the-art. International Journal of Information Management, 30, 2, 144-151. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijinfomgt.2009.08.009).

Varnali, K. (2011). Personality Traits and Consumer Behavior in the Mobile Context. A Critical and Research Agenda. International Journal of E-Services and Mobile Applications, 3, 4, 1-20. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4018/jesma.2011100101).

Xu, Q., Erman, J. & al. (2011). Identifying Diverse Usage Behaviors of Smartphone Apps. Proceedings of the 2011 ACM SIGCOMM conference on Internet measurement. (pp. 329-344). New York, ACM. http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2068816.2068847).

Yang, S., Lu, Y., Gupta, S., Cao, Y. & Zhang, R. (2012). Mobile Payment Services Adoption across Time: An Empirical Study of the Effects of Behavioral Beliefs, Social Influences, and Personal Traits. Computers in Human Behavior, 28, 1, 129-142. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2011.08.019).

Yin, R.K. (2011). Qualitative Research from Start to Finish. New York, Guilford Press.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

El presente trabajo analiza el papel de los jóvenes consumidores en el contexto de los nuevos procesos comunicativos que surgen de tecnologías emergentes: el uso de las aplicaciones de marca en los dispositivos móviles. Éstos incorporan funcionalidades sociales y comunicativas cada vez más complejas y, entre ellas, las aplicaciones para teléfonos inteligentes que vinculan publicidad comercial y pagos forman un campo novedoso pero de interés prioritario para distintos actores comunicativos, como son las marcas comerciales, los servicios bancarios y las propias compañías tecnológicas. En ese contexto la presente investigación describe y codifica cualitativamente cómo los usuarios entienden, perciben y utilizan, como prosumidores, las aplicaciones de marca corporativa y los pagos. Para ello se aplican técnicas de investigación en cuatro grupos focales, de edades comprendidas entre los 18 y 24 años, compuestos por jóvenes universitarios españoles estudiantes en Comunicación, como usuarios que muestran una predisposición y una adopción temprana de estas prácticas. Las respuestas de las reuniones del grupo de discusión permitieron una clasificación de las prácticas comunicativas. En conclusión, se constata una alta predisposición de estos consumidores activos por interactuar con contenidos comerciales, estableciendo redes sociales bajo el amparo de una cultura e imagen de marca, como forma de cohesión grupal. Otros usos se relacionan con el entretenimiento y la información, al tiempo que aún se muestran reticentes al pago de productos o servicios mediante el dispositivo móvil.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción. Estado de la cuestión

Los teléfonos móviles inteligentes o de última generación se han convertido en dispositivos con funcionalidades crecientes y capaces de gestionar no solo la comunicación personal, sino la cada vez más compleja vida digital del usuario. La posibilidad de incorporar, entre un variado abanico de aplicaciones para todo tipo de fines y propósitos, las denominadas aplicaciones de marca, genera nuevas potencialidades comunicativas del usuario, que se convierte en consumidor activo, entre otros, de contenidos publicitarios, integrados en redes sociales, a la vez que en prosumidor o generador de contenidos o valores. Se trata de aplicaciones digitales para ser instaladas y utilizadas en móviles inteligentes actuales, con la particularidad que actúan como vínculo de una marca comercial de productos o servicios en el teléfono del usuario. Permiten el acceso del usuario al catálogo de la marca, a la compra de productos o a usos de valor añadido como promociones o productos exclusivos a través de la citada aplicación de marca; actúa como canal de comunicación específico, singular, y cada vez más utilizado.

La revolución tecnológica y comunicativa a partir del uso social de los dispositivos móviles induce a un incremento de la investigación sobre la comunicación interactiva, comercialización y mercantilización a partir de dispositivos móviles. Numerosos trabajos identificaron tempranamente los diferentes usos sociales de la tecnología móvil en función de la edad (Castells, Fernández-Ardèvol, Qiu & Sey, 2006: 41); los usuarios jóvenes son especialmente propicios al uso de las tecnologías emergentes, junto con la fascinación de la marca como identificador de una integración grupal y social, aspectos igualmente tratados más recientemente por Colás, González y de-Pablos (2013), Boase y Ling (2013) o Mihailidis (2014), entre otros. Este último participó en una investigación que exploraba cómo los estudiantes universitarios usaban el teléfono móvil en su vida diaria. Realizado en la primavera del año 2012, contando con 793 estudiantes de ocho universidades y en tres continentes, sus resultados evidenciaron el uso masivo de aplicaciones móviles de carácter social y la cada vez más difusa distinción entre relaciones con o sin contacto real (Mihailidis, 2014: 70-72). Se trata, por tanto, de un público propicio para la actuación de las marcas comerciales y su promoción social a través de aplicaciones de software móvil.

Las aplicaciones de marca en el teléfono móvil cumplen aquí, como describiremos, un papel esencial. Los dispositivos basados en software, y por tanto susceptibles de ejecutar aplicaciones y conectarse a Internet, son capaces de incorporar y trabajar con distinto software, aplicaciones diseñadas para una amplísima variedad de propósitos: compras, información, creación audiovisual, geolocalización, etc. Las aplicaciones de marca no serían más que una categoría de ese vasto catálogo de aplicaciones, pero que incluyen en su denominación y propósitos los ligados a la actividad comercial y social, proponiendo un universo de servicios ligados a la actividad e imagen de la marca. Tienen un interés prioritario y creciente en la publicidad comercial y unen la compra tradicional de productos o servicios en red con aspectos como la información o el vínculo social y activo entre los usuarios. De hecho, la generación de redes sociales y de contenidos por parte de los usuarios son funciones esenciales en la estrategia comercial de las aplicaciones de marca. Con todo, resultan aún relativamente escasas las investigaciones que, siguiendo una metodología esencialmente cualitativa, aborden la descripción de motivaciones, usos sociales y funcionalidades que los usuarios demandan a estas formas comunicativas: este es justamente el propósito de la presente investigación. Para ello, se indagó en el seno de grupos focales (focus groups) en torno a estas cuestiones. Dalhberg, Mallat, Ondrus y Zmijewska (2008) presentaron una revisión exhaustiva de la literatura científica sobre aplicaciones con dispositivos móviles hasta la fecha y resultó un referente para futuras investigaciones. Igualmente compiladora sobre el estado de la cuestión es la investigación de Varnali y Toker (2010), que mostraron el crecimiento exponencial de la investigación sobre dispositivos móviles desde el año 2000 hasta el 2008, valorando hasta 255 artículos científicos de 83 revistas de investigación. Más cercanos y mejor conectados con este texto son los trabajos que aporta Kim, Mirusmonov y Lee (2010), a partir de un estudio empírico sobre las influencias (sociales, tecnológicas, etc.) en la intención de uso de los dispositivos móviles; o también las investigaciones en ese sentido de Xu, Erman y otros (2011) o Yang, Lu y colaboradores (2012), que identifican y definen formas de uso de los teléfonos móviles. Otras aportaciones a la investigación cualitativa en el uso social de dispositivos móviles por grupos se encuentran también en los estudios de Fernández-Ardèvol (2011), en este caso referido a personas mayores, o los de Charness y Boot (2009) o Mallat (2007). Desde la investigación científica en comunicación, los grupos focales resultan especialmente válidos para conocer los usos sociales de las nuevas formas de comunicación y de su grado de interacción y uso, todo ello desde una perspectiva cualitativa y humanística.

Este concepto ha sido descrito por Porter (1998), desde la estrategia empresarial, y por Pearce y Robinson (2005). Una investigación destacable porque ha utilizado también grupos focales y se formula asimismo con naturaleza cualitativa, es la llevada a cabo por Mallat (2007). La indagación fue realizada a individuos de varios rangos de edad (desde 14 a 60 años). Se concluye que la adopción de estos nuevos usos es dinámica y contextual, dependiendo de factores situacionales como la urgencia o la necesidad de rapidez, e identifica asimismo las barreras en los usuarios como la complejidad del sistema, los precios de las conexiones, la posible inseguridad en las transacciones o la falta de masa crítica de usuarios (Mallat, 2007: 231-232).

Los nuevos usuarios, especialmente los adultos jóvenes, empiezan a cambiar la percepción tradicional del teléfono móvil (comunicación inalámbrica mediante voz) para considerarlo como un dispositivo personal, puerta de entrada a servicios comunicativos, amplios, variados, ricos y en red. Aunque en principio las marcas tendrían como objetivo desarrollar acciones interactivas con fines comerciales, promocionales o de comunicación publicitaria, como señalan Maqueira-Marin, Bruque-Cámara y Moyano-Fuentes (2009: 141-142), lo cierto es que han evolucionado buscando la interacción proactiva de los usuarios para que desarrollen contenidos específicos. Estos cambios sociales y culturales, han sido descritos por Dalhberg, Mallat, Ondrus y Zmijewska (2008: 169-170), identificándolos como esenciales, que afectan a los hábitos de interacción y consumo, con la movilidad permanente de las personas y el incremento de la apreciación del tiempo libre, factor indispensable para el uso comunicativo y personal de la tecnología móvil. Las aplicaciones de marca resultan cada vez más imbricadas con los valores culturales y la idiosincrasia personal y social de sus usuarios.

Todo ello es un fenómeno muy reciente, pero con un enorme potencial en la comunicación comercial, y en la gestación de nuevas prácticas de prosumidor. Bellman, Potter y otros (2011) observaron un impacto superior en la comunicación persuasiva, independientemente de la categoría de marca y aplicación. El concepto de usabilidad y su valor como factor estratégico en la expansión de las interacciones móviles ha sido analizado también por Liu, Wang y Wang (2011): en concreto se definieron las características de contenido, facilidad de uso, emocionalidad, centrado en el usuario y en el medio. Por su parte, Kim, Ling y Sung (2013) también han definido cómo los usuarios, especialmente los jóvenes, poseen una mayor predisposición a establecer la comunicación interactiva con la empresa, institución o servicio que encarne la aplicación. En relación con esto último, es necesario destacar la capacidad que presentan los teléfonos móviles para difundir los contenidos de forma viral, comunitaria y social, transformando la relación entre las marcas y los usuarios digitales, como ha desvelado recientemente Bermejo (2013). Para las marcas es una estrategia creativa, innovadora y de bajo coste (Swanson, 2011). Shin, Jung y Chang (2012: 1418) afirman en ese sentido que cada nueva tecnología necesita ser percibida como útil para que sea aceptada y asimilada dentro de las rutinas diarias de las personas.

2. Material y método

La investigación se centró en la búsqueda, descripción y categorización de los conocimientos, actitudes y usos de los jóvenes universitarios españoles en relación a su experiencia y uso social de las aplicaciones de marca en dispositivos móviles. Para Boase (2013: 58-59), la forma de recoger los datos y definir las herramientas analíticas en el estudio de los móviles como experiencia puede determinar los resultados, siendo este un campo todavía novedoso. Uno de los grandes desafíos del estudio de las aplicaciones móviles es el acceso a los datos de los usuarios y su contenido (Humphreys, 2013: 23); el análisis de contenido es aquí una técnica de investigación válida, destinada a formular, a partir de ciertos datos, inferencias reproducibles y válidas que pueden aplicarse a su contexto (Krippendorff, 1990: 28). Por su parte, para Cook y Reichardt (1986: 29), la investigación cualitativa contendría como elementos constitutivos, entre otras características, que es fiable, contiene datos sólidos y repetibles; válida, los datos son reales, ricos y profundos; está orientada al proceso; está fundamentada en la realidad, orientada a los descubrimientos, exploratoria, expansionista, descriptiva e inductiva. Singularmente, este método de investigación es una de las técnicas adecuadas para la temática de estudio que se propone aquí, ya que, de acuerdo con autores como Dahlberg y colaboradores (2008: 175), los estudios cualitativos que usen entrevistas o grupos focales pueden ayudar a revelar más detalles sobre los factores de adopción de estas nuevas herramientas de comunicación. Por su parte, el tratamiento de los grupos y la intervención de los moderadores siguen en este trabajo la definición de Yin (2011: 141); este autor enmarca y analiza lo que es considerado como un grupo focal en este ámbito. Este sería un tipo de grupo de moderado tamaño, sobre el que realizar tareas investigadoras de recolección de datos, siguiendo por ejemplo las técnicas propuestas por el ampliamente citado trabajo de Stewart, Shamdanasi y Rook (2007: 45-50). Los grupos se focalizan porque el investigador o ha seleccionado individuos que previamente han tenido experiencias comunes o porque se presume comparten los mismos puntos de vista. El investigador que entabla comunicación y conversa con estos grupos se convierte en moderador. Los moderadores intentan con precaución inducir a todos los miembros del grupo para que expresen su opinión, pero con mínima o ninguna dirección o mediatización de las opiniones y experiencias relatadas por los diversos integrantes del grupo.

Por otra parte, por análisis de datos cualitativos se entiende también el proceso mediante el cual se organiza y manipula la información recogida por los investigadores, para establecer relaciones, interpretar, extraer significados y obtener finalmente conclusiones, a la manera que ya describiera Spradley desde la etnografía (1980: 59-70). Respecto al análisis cualitativo, Yin (2011: 6) resalta que cabe destacar una serie de fases, como son: el registro de la realidad, su plasmación material en algún tipo de expresión y codificación, y finalmente su transformación mediante un proceso de elaboración conceptual.

En el presente trabajo, para el análisis dentro de los grupos, se realizó la transcripción de las entrevistas grabadas en audio y a continuación se procedió a una relectura de los textos resultantes para profundizar en la temática y en las categorías de indagación planteadas, que actuaron con los sesgos limitadores antes citados. Por lo que se refiere a las categorías de indagación en cuanto a uso activo de aplicaciones de marca, se tuvo también en cuenta a Varnali (2011), porque introduce la variable de la personalidad y la subjetividad en el comportamiento de los usuarios; y, de nuevo, a Shin, Jung y Chang (2012), que construyen lo que denominan «Modelo de Aceptación de la Tecnología», en cuyo vértice se encuentran la interactividad y las motivaciones de calidad (2012: 1425). Sin embargo ello no está exento de problemas metodológicos, como han puesto de manifiesto, al ser un nuevo medio, Kobayashi y Boase (2012). Todos ellos han sido referencias de trabajo en el presente artículo al centrar su investigación en el usuario y sus motivaciones.

Respecto al proceso de construcción de las categorías puede ser o atender a diferentes tipologías. El primero es el denominado inductivo y consiste en elaborar las categorías a partir de la lectura y examen del material recopilado sin tomar en consideración categorías de partida. De este modo se van proponiendo categorías provisionales o emergentes, que a medida que avanza la codificación se consolidan, modifican o suprimen a partir de la comparación de los datos incluidos en otras (Rodríguez, Gil & García, 1996: 210). Algunos autores denominan a esta tarea codificación abierta (Strauss, 1987), proceso en el que se parte de la búsqueda de conceptos que traten de cubrir los datos. El segundo proceso es el denominado deductivo, en el que al contrario del anterior las categorías están establecidas a priori siendo función del investigador adaptar cada unidad a una categoría ya existente. Finalmente, encontraríamos el proceso mixto a través del cual el investigador tomaría como categorías de partida las existentes, formulando alguna más cuando este repertorio de partida se muestre ineficaz, esto es, no contenga dentro de su sistema de categorías ninguna capaz de cubrir una unidad de registro. En la presente investigación se empleó un proceso mixto, durante los meses de mayo y junio de 2013, y se utilizó una herramienta informática de diseño, categorización y gestión de datos diseñada para este tipo de análisis. Se trata de programas creados para gestionar los procesos mecánicos y repetitivos de análisis cualitativo sobre las respuestas, denominadas herramientas CAQDAS (Computer Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis Software). Entre las diversas soluciones informáticas disponibles para la investigación en el mercado se optó por Atlas.Ti, en su actual versión Win 7.0. El diagrama general de trabajo con esta herramienta puede resumirse en los siguientes procesos, que coinciden con distintas fases de la investigación:

• En primer lugar, se procede a crear una Unidad Hermenéutica, a la que se asignan documentos primarios (en nuestro caso las transcripciones de las opiniones vertidas por los participantes en los grupos).

• Después se procede a diversas relecturas para descubrir frases y pasajes relevantes sobre las que se asignan códigos y memorias de investigación.

• En tercer lugar se desarrollan diversas operaciones de análisis sobre esos códigos, que se sintetizan en agrupaciones de códigos en familias. En el caso que nos ocupa resultó útil agrupar los conceptos en redes visuales, a partir de las cuales fue posible extraer los resultados de la investigación.

• Finalmente las herramientas QDA (incluyendo la utilizada en este trabajo) permiten exportar los datos en distintos formatos y opciones.

El tipo de análisis cualitativo que se ha llevado a cabo se refiere especialmente a la categoría «estimación» para inferir relaciones, más que para verificar hipótesis (Krippendorff, 1990). El marco de referencia de nuestro análisis ha sido, en primer lugar, la descripción de procesos reales de interacción y actividad en la comunicación móvil, centrándose en las aplicaciones móviles de marca. Dentro de ese contexto, se han construido unos grupos focales de análisis sobre los que aplicar la técnica cualitativa, esto es, cuatro grupos de jóvenes universitarios, con edades comprendidas entre los 18 y 24 años. Respecto a la composición de los miembros, el primer grupo estaba compuesto por diez personas, el segundo grupo lo componían doce personas, el tercer grupo dieciséis personas y el último de ellos también lo componían un total de diez personas. Se trata de grupos que pueden incluirse en lo que los estudios de mercado denominan como de adopción temprana de tecnologías o servicios (early adopters). Las preguntas, de carácter abierto e interpretativo, se referían al conocimiento, uso e interacción comunicativa en las aplicaciones de marca para los dispositivos móviles. En ese sentido, se buscaba especialmente, en primer lugar, el grado de conocimiento sobre este tipo de aplicaciones, y sobre todo las prácticas comunicativas que se establecían dentro de las aplicaciones de marca con los teléfonos móviles, buscando rasgos que identificaran a los usuarios como generadores de contenidos en la red social de la marca.

3. Análisis y resultados

En el análisis de contenido aplicado las preguntas funcionaron como parámetros que guiaron de forma general las libres aportaciones de los participantes, facilitando la labor de estudio, por lo que fue posible establecer códigos o categorías en las respuestas que ofrecían indicaciones sobre el uso interactivo y social de las aplicaciones. Igualmente se establecieron relaciones entre códigos, familias de códigos y asociaciones entre códigos, por lo que los investigadores pudieron inferir usos, demandas y objeciones del público universitario joven a estas tecnologías comunicativas. Por último se procedió a validar los resultados volviendo a los grupos seleccionados y verificando la validez del muestreo.

El proceso empírico de codificación seguido se describe a continuación, resultado de un doble proceso utilizando las posibilidades de la herramienta informática citada anteriormente. En primer lugar, tras la transcripción y lectura de las respuestas de los cuatro grupos focales, se procedió a un análisis del contenido de las respuestas en función de la temática buscada en cada una de las preguntas, seleccionando fragmentos significativos mediante el proceso denominado Code In Vivo, es decir, establecer marcas significativas que pudieran funcionar como futuros códigos de análisis: se trata de un proceso inductivo de códigos. Una tercera revisión descubrió elementos semánticos comunes a buena parte de esos códigos y se procedió a asignar un código o categoría que englobara a distintas respuestas. De esta forma los investigadores definieron un total de veinte códigos, de los cuales trece procedían de las respuestas a las cuestiones sobre aplicaciones de marca, uso e interactividad y los restantes siete códigos se referían a la publicidad y al pago móvil. El proceso de construcción de las categorías ha sido también el deductivo (se ha utilizado un método mixto para las codificaciones), ya que en parte las categorías se han establecido a priori. Las preguntas realizadas por los investigadores se referían al grado de conocimiento, uso, e interacción con las aplicaciones de marca de los dispositivos móviles. También se preguntó específicamente sobre las posibilidades de pago de bienes y servicios con la aplicación. El listado de esos códigos hallados en las respuestas ligadas a aplicaciones de marca fueron: «entretenimiento», «facilidad de uso», «información», «compras», «curiosidad», «fuera de línea», «innecesarias», «limitación técnica», «publicidad», «rapidez», «rechazo», «usabilidad» y «valor añadido». Respecto al uso y percepción de la publicidad y pagos (NFC u otras), los participantes de los grupos efectuaron opiniones que se agruparon en códigos como «comodidad y facilidad de uso», «conocimiento de la tecnología sin uso», «control del gasto», «influencia social», «inseguridad, optimismo tecnológico» y «valor añadido».

También resultó conveniente construir agrupaciones de códigos en supercódigos o familias, en función de una estrategia de búsqueda y análisis. Por ejemplo, en la familia denominada «Usuarios de aplicaciones de marca» se incluyen los códigos y por tanto las citas de los participantes que se referían a información, compras, entretenimiento, curiosidad y publicidad. Es necesario destacar que algunos códigos pertenecerían a más de una familia; por ejemplo el código «Información», que pertenece tanto a las familias «Usuarios de aplicaciones» como a «Funcionalidades que se demandan».

A continuación se muestran los resultados de la investigación, incluyendo en algún caso que resulte especialmente expresivo la información gráfica a partir de los diagramas conceptuales, resultado de la labor de codificación y análisis cualitativo utilizando la citada herramienta informática QDA. La tipología de relaciones obtenidas incluye principalmente «está asociado con», «contradice», «es parte de», «es causa de», entre otras, a partir de las relaciones establecidas en un listado de códigos.

Para una más completa, clara y significativa comprensión del diagrama conceptual obtenido, se sitúan más arriba las categorías más veces citadas; por el contrario, los códigos ubicados gráficamente en un nivel inferior representan una menor cantidad de apelaciones en los textos transcritos de los distintos participantes en los grupos focales. Igualmente se incluyen las relaciones que acabamos de describir, todo ello en la figura 1.


Draft Content 956445756-29647 ov-es015.jpg

Los usuarios de aplicaciones de marca son numerosos dentro de los grupos focales y las utilizan, como se visualiza en el anterior gráfico de resultados, para la compra y la obtención de información de productos y servicios. El código «valor añadido» es especialmente relevante: recoge las prácticas del prosumidor, especialmente las promociones exclusivas y personalizadas, la comunicación con la marca y sobre todo la generación de contenidos en red. Otros usos menores aunque significativos tienen que ver con el mero entretenimiento o incluso la descarga y el uso esporádico como simple curiosidad. Resultado singular se refiere al código «publicidad». Por ejemplo, la inclusión de inserciones publicitarias resulta mayoritariamente rechazada y entran en contradicción con la categoría «valor añadido» aunque algunos usuarios admiten su uso en contadas ocasiones. Por otra parte, las personas que se declararon de una forma u otra como no usuarios de aplicaciones de marca manifestaron opiniones más rotundas y menos matizadas que los anteriores. Mayoritariamente afirmaron que se trata de aplicaciones innecesarias, sin valor de uso significativo. En segundo lugar, se manifiesta un rechazo categórico a usar estas aplicaciones; por último y asociado al código anterior, un número muy reducido de usuarios hacen referencia a las limitaciones técnicas del dispositivo o de la Red, aduciendo que no poseen teléfonos inteligentes, o bien no disponen de tarifa de datos de manera permanente o bien se quejan de la dificultad del uso en pequeñas pantallas, entre otras razones que se han codificado. Ello se visualiza en la siguiente figura 2.

Una visualización relevante referida a las «aplicaciones de marca» es la familia que los investigadores compusieron a partir de los códigos que daban respuesta a las preguntas referidas a lo que les gustaría que contuviesen esas aplicaciones, independientemente de si se es usuario o no de ellas. El resultado se describe en la figura 3: el factor determinante es que las aplicaciones contuvieran «valor añadido», esto es, posibilidad de crear contenidos, comunicación con la marca, creación de redes de usuarios, rapidez, inmediatez y exclusividad en productos o servicios. Las opiniones de ambos grupos sobre lo que deberían contener las aplicaciones móviles entraban en contradicción en alguna categoría; por ejemplo, un número reducido de no usuarios de aplicaciones de marca hacía referencia también a que pudieran usarse para determinados servicios fuera de línea, esto es, no conectados a la Red permanentemente, bien por motivos económicos, bien por limitaciones técnicas de su dispositivo móvil. Ello naturalmente entra en colisión con el citado «valor añadido» o con el uso como «información» inmediata y constante que demandan los usuarios. En último término, los no usuarios de estas tecnologías apelaban también a una mayor usabilidad o facilidad en el uso de las aplicaciones.


Draft Content 956445756-29647 ov-es016.jpg

Mientras que las aplicaciones móviles y sus funcionalidades resultaban muy conocidas e incluso utilizadas por una mayoría de las personas integrantes de los cuatro grupos focales investigados, el pago móvil mediante tecnología NFC resultó menos popular en detalle. Sin embargo, de forma más vaga e imprecisa, un número importante de estudiantes conocía la posibilidad del pago mediante móvil y otras aplicaciones aún no implementadas. Se observa también de forma transversal en todos los grupos focales un optimismo tecnológico asociado a una influencia social positiva. Es necesario destacar la escasa o nula capacidad crítica de estos jóvenes usuarios de aplicaciones móviles sobre las estrategias publicitarias y comerciales que esconden las redes sociales de las aplicaciones de marca y las invitaciones permanentes a que participen y generen contenido a través del software del dispositivo.


Draft Content 956445756-29647 ov-es017.jpg

4. Conclusiones y discusión de resultados

Los usuarios más jóvenes de dispositivos móviles inteligentes están resultando pioneros en nuevos usos sociales, comunicativos y culturales de esta herramienta tecnológica y comunicativa, incluyendo las denominadas aplicaciones de marca. Estas se relacionan con la experiencia vital del usuario y la creación de comunidades en torno a los valores, estilos de vida e idiosincrasia de la marca. Para las empresas, y este es un tema a discutir e investigar con posterioridad a este trabajo, son realmente útiles en sus estrategias de fidelización de clientes.

Los usuarios jóvenes y universitarios muestran una actitud muy positiva hacia la descarga, instalación y uso de aplicaciones de marca. Su uso amplía la experiencia comunicativa mucho más allá de una simple relación comercial. Por tanto, además de utilidades obvias como buscar información, productos y servicios nuevos o promociones comerciales, resulta significativo el valor social añadido: formación de comunidades virtuales, prácticas sociales y culturales compartidas y pertenencia e identificación con valores de la marca, algo esencial para los grupos juveniles. Esa es su aportación principal en cuanto prosumidores.

En concreto, y dentro de la población universitaria española estudiada, los usuarios de aplicaciones de marca resultaron muy numerosos y las utilizan para la compra y la obtención de información de productos y servicios y otros valores añadidos, especialmente las promociones exclusivas, descuentos e inmediatez en la comunicación con la marca y con otros usuarios. Otros usos menores aunque también significativos tenían que ver con el mero entretenimiento o la simple curiosidad. Adicionalmente serían necesarias investigaciones etnográficas complementarias, porque el conocimiento de los modos de vida de estos grupos sociales mejoraría el conocimiento de sus usos comunicativos móviles.

Las personas que se declararon de una forma u otra como «no usuarios de aplicaciones de marca» son muy escasas. Mayoritariamente, afirmaron que se trataba de aplicaciones innecesarias, puesto que básicamente no les ofrecían un valor de uso significativo. En menor medida algunos manifestaron un rechazo categórico a usar estas aplicaciones y un número muy reducido de usuarios hicieron referencia a las limitaciones técnicas del dispositivo o de la Red, aduciendo que no poseen teléfonos inteligentes, o bien no disponen de tarifa de datos de manera permanente. También manifestaron quejas por la dificultad del uso en pequeñas pantallas, entre otras razones.

Los grupos focales analizados se expresaron en referencia a lo que debería incluir una aplicación de marca para que resultase atractiva e interesante. De forma genérica sus respuestas incluyeron referencias a la inclusión de novedades con respecto a la web corporativa, la posibilidad de utilidades específicas (como la creación de redes, comunidades o contacto con otros usuarios) y los pagos a través de la aplicación. Los jóvenes universitarios valoraron positivamente, en ese sentido, elementos como la rapidez y la inmediatez en el acceso a contenidos, las promociones de ventas exclusivas, el descubrimiento de productos no encontrados en tiendas u otros establecimientos, y la vinculación comunitaria y cultural con los valores o filosofía de una marca.

La tecnología como valor social positivo y la necesidad de integración y uso por parte de los individuos de nuevas propuestas comunicativas fueron opiniones que provocaron un consenso casi absoluto en todos los grupos analizados. Podemos concluir en ese sentido afirmando la existencia entre los jóvenes universitarios de un optimismo tecnológico generalizado, también en lo concerniente a la interacción comunicativa.

El presente estudio también demuestra la crisis de las formas y canales de la comunicación comercial y publicitaria tradicional. En un nuevo medio como es el teléfono o dispositivo móvil, muy ligado al uso personal, íntimo o privado, se pone de manifiesto la quiebra del modelo publicitario tradicional heredero de los medios de masas (televisión, radio).

La investigación cualitativa solo evidenció una única y significativa objeción a la utilización de estos recursos tecnológicos: la seguridad financiera en el pago mediante dispositivos móviles. La seguridad en las transacciones representa uno de los mayores temores de los usuarios y uno de los grandes problemas para una mayor implementación de las compras y pagos mediante el teléfono móvil. A su vez, un pequeño pero significativo número de usuarios españoles en los grupos focales, casi de manera exclusiva, planteaban un rechazo total al pago con el móvil.

Por último, y aunque el análisis desarrollado excluye lo cuantitativo, es interesante señalar que la tipología de códigos encontrados, así como el porcentaje de cada uno de ellos, resultaba muy similar en los cuatro grupos focales investigados, de forma muy homogénea. Ello indicaría una uniformidad en la tipología de usos de las aplicaciones móviles de la población universitaria española, en la vanguardia de la adopción de nuevos usos comunicativos, sociales y culturales en la movilidad.

Apoyos y agradecimientos

La presente investigación se enmarca en el contexto del Grupo de Investigación «Cibercultura, procesos comunicativos y medios audiovisuales» (SEJ-508) del Plan Andaluz de Investigación, Desarrollo e Innovación, así como del programa de becas de Personal Investigador (2013) de la Junta de Andalucía (España).

Referencias

Bellman, S., Potter, R.F., Treleaven-Hassard, S., Robinson, J.A. & Varan, D. (2011). The Effectiveness of Branded Mobile Phone Apps. Journal of Interactive Marketing, 25, 4, 191-200. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.intmar.2011.06.001).

Bermejo, J. (2013). Masking as a Persuasive Strategy in Advertising for Young. Comunicar, 41, 157-165. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C41-2013-15).

Boase, J. & Ling, R. (2013). Measuring mobile phone use: Self-report versus Log Data. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 18, 4, 508-519. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcc4.12021).

Boase, J. (2013). Implications of Software-based Mobile Media for Social Research. Mobile Media & Communication, 1, 1-57. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2050157912459500).

Castells, M., Fernández-Ardèvol, M., Qiu, J.L. & Sey, A. (2006). Mobile Communication and Society: A Global Perspective. Cambridge (USA): MIT Press.

Charness, N. & Boot, W.R. (2009). Aging and Information Technology Use: Potential and Barriers. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 18, 5, 253-258. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8721.2009.01647.x)

Colás, P., González, T. & de Pablos, J. (2013). Young People and Social Networks: Motivations and Preferred Uses. Comunicar, 40, 15-23. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-01).

Cook, T.D. & Reichardt, CH.S. (1986). Métodos cualitativos y cuantitativos en investigación evaluativa. Madrid (España): Morata.

Dahlberg, T., Mallat, N., Ondrus, J. & Zmijewska, A. (2008). Past, Present and Future of Mobile Payments Research: A Literature Review. Electronic Commerce Research and Applications, 7, 2, 165-181. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.elerap.2007.02.001).

Fernández-Ardèvol, M. (2011). Mobile Telephony among the Elders: First Results of a Qualitative Approach. In P. Isaías & P. Kommers (Eds.), Proceedings of the IADIS International Conference e-Society 2011. (pp. 435-438). Lisboa: IADIS (International Association for Development of the Information Society).

Humphreys, L. (2013). Mobile Social Media : Future Challenges and Opportunities. Mobile Media & Communication, 1, 1-20. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2050157912459499).

Kim, C., Mirusmonov, M. & Lee, I. (2010). An Empirical Examination of Factors Influencing the Intention to Use Mobile Payment. Computers in Human Behavior, 26, 3, 310-322. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2009.10.013).

Kim, E., Ling, J-S. & Sung, Y. (2013). To App or Not to App: Engaging Consumers via Branded Mobile Apps. Journal of Interactive Advertising, 13, 1, 53-65. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15252019.2013.782780).

Kobayashi, T. & Boase, J. (2012). No Such Effect? The Implications of Measurement Error in Self-report Measures of Mobile Communication use. Communication Methods and Measures, 6, 2, 1-18. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19312458.2012.679243).

Krippendorf, K. (1990). Metodología de análisis de contenido: Teoría y práctica. Barcelona: Paidós.

Liu, Y., Wang, S. & Wang, X. (2011). A Usability-centred Perspective on Intention to Use Mobile Payment. International Journal of Mobile Communications, 9, 6, 541-562. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1504/IJMC.2011.042776)

Mallat, N. (2007). Exploring Consumer Adoption of Mobile Payments. A Qualitative Study. Journal of Strategic Information Systems, 16, 4, 413-432. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsis.2007.08.001).

Maqueira-Marín, J.M., Bruque-Cámara, S. & Moyano-Fuentes, J. (2009). What Does Grid Information Technology Really Mean? Definitions, Taxonomy and Implications in the Organizational Field. Technology Analysis Strategic Management, 21, 4, 491-513. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09537320902818991).

Mihailidis, P. (2014). A Tethered Generation: Exploring the Role of Mobile Phones in the Daily Life of Young People. Mobile Media & Communication, 2, 58-72. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2050157913505558).

Pearce, J. & Robinson, R. (2005). Strategic Management. New York (USA): McGraw-Hill.

Porter, M. (1998). Competitive Strategy. New York (USA): Free Press.

Rodríguez, G., Gil, J. & García, E. (1996). Métodos de investigación cualitativa. Málaga (España): Aljibe.

Shin, D-H., Jung, J. & Chang, B-H. (2012). Psychology Behind QR Codes: User Experience Perspective. Computers in Human Behavior, 28, 4, 1417-1426. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2012.03.004).

Spradley, J.P. (1980). Participant Observation. Orlando (USA): Harcourt Brace Jovanovich College Publishers.

Stewart, D., Shamdanasi, P. & Rook, P. (2007). Focus Groups. Theory and Practice. Thousand Oaks (USA): Sage Publications.

Strauss, A. (1987). Qualitative Analysis for Social Scientists. Cambridge (USA): Cambridge University Press.

Swanson, B. (2011). Bring mobility to your marketing. Accounting Today, 25, 6, 35-37.

Varnali, K. & Toker, A. (2010). Mobile Marketing Research: The-state-of-the-art. International Journal of Information Management, 30, 2, 144-151. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijinfomgt.2009.08.009).

Varnali, K. (2011). Personality Traits and Consumer Behavior in the Mobile Context. A Critical and Research Agenda. International Journal of E-Services and Mobile Applications, 3, 4, 1-20. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4018/jesma.2011100101).

Xu, Q., Erman, J. & al. (2011). Identifying Diverse Usage Behaviors of Smartphone Apps. Proceedings of the 2011 ACM SIGCOMM conference on Internet measurement. (pp. 329-344). New York, ACM. http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2068816.2068847).

Yang, S., Lu, Y., Gupta, S., Cao, Y. & Zhang, R. (2012). Mobile Payment Services Adoption across Time: An Empirical Study of the Effects of Behavioral Beliefs, Social Influences, and Personal Traits. Computers in Human Behavior, 28, 1, 129-142. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2011.08.019).

Yin, R.K. (2011). Qualitative Research from Start to Finish. New York, Guilford Press.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/06/14
Accepted on 30/06/14
Submitted on 30/06/14

Volume 22, Issue 2, 2014
DOI: 10.3916/C43-2014-07
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 12
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?