Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Based on a survey of 122 journalists from four Spanish newspapers carried out from 2015 to 2016, this paper analyses to what extent these professionals perceive a disconnection –a gap– between their role conception and their perceived role enactment, that is between their professional ideals and their journalistic practice, and which are the most “conflicting” roles in a Polarized Pluralist media system. According to the perceptions of the professionals surveyed, journalists in Spain hold a role conflict when they work in a newspaper. The findings show significant differences between the role conception and the perceived role enactment in six of the seven professional roles. The biggest divergences are located in the watchdog, civic and disseminator roles. The conflict between the professional ideals and their implementation in the news is always resolved in favor of the media organizations. Our results are consistent and support the previous studies that have defined the Polarized Pluralist media system as a media ecosystem where journalists accumulate little power compared to the media organizations, which are in financial debt and dependent on political and economic powers. Results are discussed according to the literature review as well as the context in which the study was developed.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction and state of the art

The watchdog function is part of the DNA of journalists’ professional culture. However, the media –which are sometimes allies of political and economic actors– may favour information whose function is to support those in power instead of keeping watch over them. A journalist identified as having a watchdog role may in practice be compelled to play the status quo promoter role. That is the starting point of this article: journalists’ perceptions of the existence of role conflicts that give rise to a gap between their aspirations and their professional activity in practice.

The individual ideals by which journalists define and legitimize their functions in society are called ‘role conceptions’ (Weaver & Wilhoit, 1996; Vos, 2005; Hanitzsch, 2007). Roles are therefore central factors of their professional identities (Deuze, 2005). According to role theory (Burke & Reitzes, 1981), journalists try to enact their ideals when constructing their news stories (‘role enactment’). Tandoc, Hellmueller, and Vos (2013: 541) stated that “if a journalist perceives his role as being a disseminator, the desire for consistency will lead him to enact the same disseminator role” in society.

However, professional practice goes beyond the individual dimension since journalistic work is the outcome of a collective and relational process subject to negotiation (Mellado, 2015). It is influenced by organisational, political and economic factors (Shoemaker & Reese, 2013; Hanitzsch & Mellado, 2011), and the vagaries to which a journalist’s professional autonomy is prone (Mellado & Humanes, 2012; Reich & Hanitzsch, 2013). The news is shaped in that negotiation, with roles manifesting themselves in news content (role performance) (Mellado, 2015; Mellado & al., 2017). Journalists ultimately perceive how near or far such manifestation is from the enactment of their ideals (perceived role enactment).

Based on these assumptions, this article studies the extent to which Spanish journalists perceive a gap between their ideals (role conceptions) and their enactment thereof (perceived role enactment), and what the most conflicting roles are within the context of a Polarised Pluralist media system like Spain’s, which is characterised by weak professionalisation and high levels of political parallelism and instrumentalisation (Hallin & Mancini, 2004). To that end, the conceptualisation of journalistic roles into three dimensions (Mellado, 2015) is taken as the starting point. The dimensions are the presence of journalistic voice in the news item, journalism’s power relations, and audience approach. Each of these three dimensions comprises different roles. The first refers to the presence (interventionist role) or absence (disseminator role) of the journalist as an actor in the news. The second refers to relations between the media and economic and political powers and includes the watchdog and loyal-facilitator roles. The third (audience approach) is about how journalistic practices build relations with the audience through three roles: the service, infotainment, and civic roles. Details of the operationalisation of each role can be found in the Materials and Method section (Table 1).

This article is part of the international project entitled Journalistic Role Performance Around the Globe (www.journalisticperformance.org), which brings together researchers from more than 20 countries worldwide with the aim of comparing journalistic performance in different media systems.

1.1. The gap between ideals and practice within different contexts

The tensions and discrepancies between individual and collective aspects may give rise to “role conflict” when journalists feel that there is an inconsistency between their perceptions of what they ought to do and the work they think or say they do for their media outlets (Mellado, Hellmueller, & Donsbach, 2017). As a result of role conflict, it is possible to speak of a perceived gap between ideals and news that is conceptually different from a “real gap” between them (Mellado & van Dalen, 2014). While the former implies a perceived gap between journalists’ ideals and the enactment thereof, the latter represents a tangible and certain gap between their ideals and the manifestation of their work in news. Although there is no reason why the discrepancies and the perception of a gap by journalists should inevitably imply that a media outlet is malfunctioning (Mellado, Hellmueller, & Donsbach, 2017), the consequences of such perceptions may damage the profession in the long term (Nord, 2007). Indeed, they may generate frustration among journalists (Sigelman, 1973; Stark, 1962) and chip away at their commitment to a media outlet, causing an inevitable loss of quality in the news they produce (Pihl-Thingvad, 2015).

Regarding the object of study of this work, the perceived gap between a journalist’s ideals and the perceived enactment thereof, a number of examples within different contexts can be found.

In the study by Ramaprasad and Hamdy (2006), Egyptian journalists asserted that there was a mismatch between the importance placed on journalistic functions and how often they could manifest such functions in their work. For example, the democracy-sustaining function (second in order of importance) was the one they least enacted. Weaver, Beam, Brownley, Voakes, and Wilhoit (2007: 233) found a modest link between the roles that American journalists said they defended and the roles present in what they themselves considered their best works. Oi, Fukuda, and Sako (2012: 57) found that Japanese journalists placed considerable importance on the watchdog role. Despite that, they believed they were unsuccessful at “investigating the activities of the government”. In Denmark, more than 60% of journalists considered the watchdog function important or very important, but only 30% of them perceived that they could carry it out to the same levels (Pihl-Thingvad, 2015). Recently, Raemy, Beck, and Hellmueller (2018) found that Swiss journalists established a strong relationship between role conception and the perception of the work they thought they routinely did, with an apparent lack of influence from organisational factors, except in the case of the watchdog role.

None of these studies has specifically explored the perceived gap between journalists’ professional ideals and the perceived enactment thereof in a Polarised Pluralist media system like Spain’s.

1.2. Professional roles in Spain: from their conceptualisation to their materialization

Following on from studies on professional role conceptions (Cohen, 1963; Johnstone, Slawski, & Bowman, 1972; Janowitz, 1975; Weaver & Wilhoit, 1996; Weaver, 1998; Patterson & Donsbach, 1996; Hanitzsch et al., 2011; Weaver & Willnat, 2012), many works have helped to shape what we know about Spanish journalists’ ideals (Humanes, 1998; Canel & Sánchez-Aranda, 1999; Martín & Amurrio, 2003; Roses & Farias, 2010; Berganza, Lavín, & Piñeiro-Laván, 2017).

Focusing on the most recent publications, Spanish journalists have been found to identify themselves with the citizens’ spokesperson role more readily than they do with other functions such as the disseminator, adversary, watchdog, audience instructor, infotainment or status quo promoter ones (Berganza, & al., 2017). However, studies on the manifestation of roles in news suggest that the Spanish press is characterised by the prominence of the interventionist role. Roles like the watchdog one are determined, for example, by thematic beats, yet keeping watch over economic issues is dodged in practice despite the ideals that the surveyed journalists habitually manifested (Humanes & Roses, 2018).

Based on the differences found in research projects related to the importance placed on journalistic roles and their presence in news content, this study analyses –for the very first time in Spain– the perceived gap between journalists’ role conception and role enactment.

1.3. A context prone to “role conflict”

Is Spain’s media ecosystem prone to confronting journalists with professional role conflict? Previous studies have noted a number of characteristics to suggest that this may be the case.

The Spanish media system has been categorised as a Polarised Pluralist one (Hallin & Mancini, 2004). The press is characterised by political parallelism, external pluralism, and an underdeveloped market; the press audience is elitist and ideologically polarised; and the journalistic profession combines an opinion-based style with limited power and autonomy from lawmakers and media firms. To these empirically verified features (Humanes, Martínez-Nicolás, & Saperas, 2013; Casero, 2012), it is necessary to add several others that have become more prominent since the global financial crisis, such as media instrumentalisation and clientelism. The Spanish media are firms indebted to and dependent on economic powers because banks and investment groups are their main shareholders or creditors (Fernández-Fernández & Campos, 2014). Besides this economic weakness, the watchdog function has been eroded due to political pressure on journalists, which has been brought to bear by media groups and media outlets themselves (Casero, Izquierdo, & Doménech, 2014). Indeed, 79% of the news writers who are members of the Federación de Asociaciones de la Prensa de España (FAPE, Federation of Press Associations of Spain) acknowledge that they have been put under pressure while doing their job, with three-quarters of them succumbing to it. Moreover, 55% of the time such pressure comes from the directors of their respective media outlets, and 50% of the time the goal is to get them to change the orientation of a news item (APM, 2017).

All the described variables suggest that the framework of action of journalists in Spain is a hotbed of professional role conflict, especially in those roles related to the dimension of detachment from power, such as the watchdog and loyal-facilitator roles. Thus, we have formulated the following hypothesis: H1: The perceived gap between role conception and perceived role enactment would be wider in those roles related to detachment from power, such as the watchdog, status quo promoter and civic roles. In this respect, we expect journalists to perceive that, in journalistic practice, role conflict is settled in favour of those in power.

2. Materials and method

2.1. Sample

To test the formulated hypothesis, journalists working for the Spanish newspapers “Abc”. “El País”. “El Mundo” and “La Razón” (N=122) were surveyed between April 2015 and February 2016. As mentioned previously, this study forms part of an international project, the aim of which is to measure the gap between perceptions of professional roles and the enactment thereof, as analysed through news content (see instrument validation in Mellado & van Dalen, 2014). The sample design strategy was framed by the above. The journalists surveyed were selected from those who were the authors of news items analysed in the study on the materialization of journalistic roles in the four Spanish newspapers (Humanes & Roses, 2018). In total, there were 526 journalists in the news content analysis. The questionnaire was sent to all the aforementioned professionals, and the response rate was 23%1. Of the respondents, 55.1% were men, and they had a mean age of 41 years.

2.2. Measurements

The questionnaire contained 17 questions on indicators about journalistic practices, the functions of journalism, level of professional autonomy, and news production techniques, as well as questions about occupational status, educational level, demographic characteristics, and political leaning. This article focuses on the two questions where the respondents were asked to rate—on scales from 1 to 5—firstly, the importance they placed (1=not at all important, 5=extremely important) on each professional role (role conceptions) and, secondly, how often they believed (1=very seldom, 5=very often) those functions were present in the news they wrote (perceived role enactment). Table 1 shows the 23 indicators corresponding to the seven journalistic roles for which the gap between the importance placed on them and their perceived enactment was measured.


Roses-Campos Humanes-Humanes 2019a-69576-en012.png

To perform the statistical analyses, Cronbach’s alpha was used to calculate the internal consistency of the indicators of both role conception and the perceived enactment thereof.

In the disseminator role, only one item was considered (being an impartial observer), so reliability was not calculated. In interventionist role conception, three indicators (influencing public opinion, defending a particular point of view and influencing decisions on public policies) reached an acceptable level (?=.7). In interventionist role enactment, the same three items (influencing public opinion, defending a particular point of view and influencing decisions on public policies) had a value of ?=.62. In watchdog role conception, two items were considered (monitoring political leaders and keeping watch over economic powers (?=.63). In the perceived enactment of this role, the same two indicators plus a third one were considered (monitoring political leaders, keeping watch over economic powers and acting as a watchdog for civil society (?=.71). In the loyal-facilitator role, Cronbach’s alpha reached a value of 0.86, including the four indicators related to the importance placed on this function, and a value of .92 for the four indicators on role enactment frequency. In civic role conception, the six indicators had a Cronbach’s alpha value of .74. In the perceived enactment of this role, the same indicators had an acceptable value (?=.71).

In the infotainment and service roles, the Cronbach’s alpha values were below acceptable values. We therefore decided to use only one item for each of these two roles: offering the audience news that a more interesting to them –to measure the service role– and offering the type of news that attracts the largest audience to measure the infotainment role.

3. Analysis and results

Taking the data as a whole, the roles on which the surveyed Spanish journalists placed most importance were the watchdog role (M=4.60; SD=.618) and the disseminator role (M=4.05; SD=1.164), followed by the service role (M=3.76; SD=1.137) and the civic role (M=3.47; SD=.751). They placed the least important at the normative level on the interventionist role (M=2.94; SD=.652), the infotainment role (M=2.48; SD=1.180) and the loyal-facilitator role (M=1.72; SD=.729).

Figure 1 (next page) shows in more detail that the indicators rated most important were monitoring and investigating political leaders (M=4.67; SD=.612) and economic elites (M=4.53; SD=.839), providing a current affairs analysis (M=4.50; SD=.699), being an impartial observer (M=4.09; SD=1.145), and promoting tolerance and cultural diversity (M=4.31; SD=.955).

When considering how often the journalists said they enacted the seven roles, the most frequent functions were the disseminator role (M=3.46; SD=1.287), the watchdog role (M=3.37; SD=.618) and the service role (M=3.30; SD=1.137), and the least frequent ones were the civic role (M=2.96; SD=.751), the infotainment role (M=2.85; SD=1.299), the interventionist role (M=2.84; SD=.652) and the loyal-facilitator role (M=1.96; SD=1.033). Among the specific indicators (Figure 1), four correspond to those rated most important: monitoring and investigating political leaders (M=3.79; SD=1.092), providing a current affairs analysis (M=3.95; SD=1.049), being an impartial observer (M=3.45; SD=1.280), and promoting tolerance and cultural diversity (M=3.47; SD=1.256)2.

Our hypothesis proposes that the perceived gap between professional role conception and perceived role enactment will be wider in those roles related to detachment from power, such as the watchdog, status quo promoter and civic roles. To accept or reject our hypothesis, the Student’s t-test was performed for paired samples to establish which journalistic roles had statistically significant mean differences between the importance placed on them and the perceived enactment thereof. Table 2 shows that, in six out of the seven roles, the hypothesis test was significant; it was only in the interventionist role that the gap could not be corroborated.


Roses-Campos Humanes-Humanes 2019a-69576-en014.png

The biggest differences were found in the role of watchdog over political and economic powers (M=1.23; SD=1.06), followed by the disseminator role (M=.588; SD=1.33), the civic role (M=.504; SD=.503) and the service role (M=.453; SD=1.26). In these four functions, the journalists surveyed expressed the same tendency: they perceived that they enacted these four roles less often than they ought to, according to the importance they placed on them at the normative level. The exact opposite tendency emerged in the loyal-facilitator role (M=–.235; SD=.875) and the infotainment role (M=–.368; SD=1.32), in which the respondents stated that the frequency of their enactment thereof in news production was not commensurate with the little importance they placed on them.

These results corroborate our hypothesis because the journalists perceived that the role conflict was settled in favour of those in power in news production. If we take a look at the specific indicators, we find that the journalists always manifested bigger differences in those roles that related the media to those holding power more directly. Figure 1 shows that the biggest differences can be found in monitoring political powers (M=.899; SD=1.09) and, in particular, the economic elites (M=1.54; SD=1.37). Despite the fact that the journalists believed that such functions were quite important or very important, they only seldom enacted them when producing news. In contrast, the journalists perceived that their news bolstered functions such as supporting government policies (M=–.512; SD=1.176) and giving a positive image of political leaders (M=–.453; SD=.966) and of economic elites (M=–.391; SD=1.027), despite not placing that much importance on them as professional ideals.


Roses-Campos Humanes-Humanes 2019a-69576-en013.png

Figure 1. Differences between role conception and perceived role-enactment (indicators mean).

Also worthy of note is that the journalists manifested conflict between the normative and practical aspects of the functions that connected them to citizens. For example, the two indicators with the widest gap were: offering information that people needed to make political decisions (M=.761; SD=1.061) and to promote tolerance and cultural diversity (M=.793; SD=1.268), both of which pertain to the civic role of journalism.

4. Discussion and conclusions

This research project is the first to systematically and empirically study journalistic role conflict among press journalists in Spain. It quantifies the size of the perceived gap between ideals and journalistic practice. The data provided will help to gain a better understanding of the news production process in Spain, although the results should be interpreted in line with the characteristics of the media ecosystem within which the journalists surveyed work: daily newspapers in a polarised pluralist media system. Equally important is the need to consider the features of the time period in which the study was conducted: the financial crisis and political corruption scandals, among others.

Regarding the context, it is worth discussing the results of the disseminator/interventionist dimension. On the one hand, the fact that the gap between disseminator role conception and the perceived enactment thereof is one of the widest is consistent with a media system characterised by political parallelism. The journalists placed considerable importance on being impartial observers (persistence of the objectivity myth in the professional culture of Spanish journalism) but acknowledged that the role was not often enacted. Some journalists from the sample felt that although they wanted to inform impartially, they did not always manage to do so because they gave free rein to their own subjectivity. Others were unable to do so because their bosses imposed a certain point of view, thereby stopping them from producing impartial information.

On the other hand, we found a significant gap between ideals and practices in the interventionist role overall. However, this finding can be nuanced if we take a closer look at the items forming part of the measurement index of the variable. For example, the news writers perceived that they enacted the function of defending a particular point of view more often than their ideals would otherwise have dictated. This finding is logical when considering the interpretative and opinion-based tradition of the Spanish press, as well as the hypotheses on clientelism and on the instrumentalisation of newspapers. This nuance suggests that journalists and the media share a similar vision of the importance of functions such as influencing public opinion, influencing decisions on public policies, and providing a current affairs analysis. The root cause of the conflict is therefore located in either defending or not defending particular points of view. It may be the case that journalists attribute negative connotations to this function because of the normative strength of the objectivity myth.

Finally, regarding the initial hypothesis, the results are also consistent with the description of the Spanish media system, in which the main owners of newspaper groups are banks and/or investment funds and where clientelism and media instrumentalisation by political parties is rife. In a period of economic crisis –mainly financial and bankin– and the proliferation of political corruption cases, the journalists surveyed perceived a gap between professional role conception and their perceived enactment thereof was wider in those roles related to detachment from power, that is to say, in those functions connected with the media’s independence and social responsibility. Furthermore, according to the journalists’ testimonies, role conflicts were settled in favour of those holding power in all cases.

A clear example is the role of watchdog over economic and political powers, in which the journalists perceived the widest gap. Within a turbulent political and economic context, the professionals stated that they enacted the watchdog role less often than they wanted to. Similarly, they claimed that they were compelled to write news giving a positive image of political and economic leaders –status quo promoter role– more often than their ideals would otherwise have dictated. In the study by Raemy, Beck, and Hellmueller (2018), Swiss journalists also stated that, while placing considerable importance on the watchdog role, they were ultimately unable to enact it as often as they would have liked to. The tendency was the opposite in the loyal facilitator-role, in which the journalists asserted that they enacted it more often than they considered appropriate. In the absence of data for other countries, we can nevertheless glimpse a tendency for the perceived gap in the watchdog role to be the widest. This may be due to the fact that the watchdog myth gives rise to greater expectations among journalists, who consider it one of the key values of their professional culture overall (Hanitzsch & al., 2011).

Equally revealing is the perceived gap in the civic role. Again, we find that news writers wanted to enact functions such as encouraging people to take part in political activities and decision-making, defending social change and promoting tolerance and cultural diversity much more often than they did. Nor were the journalists’ expectations met in relation to their service role conception since the job of guiding and advising consumers was curtailed in practice. This highlights a tension between a professional culture interested in empowering citizens –at a time when inequalities had become more acute, and the abuses of the powerful had been uncovered– and certain journalistic firms who were inclined not to fuel the critical momentum against those holding power. Indeed, it is striking to find that the journalists acknowledged that they enacted the infotainment role more often than they wanted to. This finding can be interpreted in several ways: first, that those in power –through the instrumentalisation of the media– were interested in “dulling the senses”, in distracting the critical consciousness of citizens during that period by offering entertaining content; and second, that it was a symptom of the tendency towards commercialisation (the hypothesis of a shift from a Polarised Pluralist media system towards a Liberal media system introducing by Hallin and Mancini in 2004). However, regardless of the possible interpretations, the study data provide evidence of the fact that, at the height of the financial and political crisis and according to the news writers’ own accounts, journalists were not the citizens’ spokespersons as much as they would have like to be. Indeed, they mobilised citizens, politically educated them and promoted social change (civic role) less often than their ideals would otherwise have dictated. Conversely, they were compelled to entertain citizens more often than they considered fitting for their role in society.

We can conclude that the empirical tests support the assertion that the Spanish press system, as a prototypical case of the Polarised Pluralist media system, is prone to creating professional role conflict between journalists and the newspapers for which they work, especially within a context of political and financial crisis. The conflicts were always settled to the detriment of the journalists’ ideals, and the widest gaps were found in the watchdog role (curtailing control over those in power), the disseminator role (lessening impartiality), the civic role (discouraging their social catalyst role) and the service role (curtailing their capacity to advise on day-to-day matters). Likewise, the journalists were compelled to enact more than they considered necessary the loyal-facilitator role –promoting a positive image of the powerful– and the infotainment role–boosting entertainment.

Among future developments of this line of research, the following should be considered: a comparative analysis of the gap in other countries; a replication of the design with a sample of professionals working in other media (radio, television, native digital newspapers and social media); and an observation and analysis of the real gap between professional role conception and role manifestation in content.

Notes

1 The sample is comparable to those used in national and international studies on professional roles. For example, Berganza, Lavín, and Piñeiro-Laván (2017) surveyed 390 journalists working in 26 native digital media and 98 traditional media (newspapers, agencies, radio, television, and magazines). Mellado and van Dalen (2014) interviewed 75 Chilean journalists. And Tandoc, Hellmueller, and Vos (2012) used a sample of 56 American journalists.

2 Linear regression analyses were performed, taking into account sociodemographic variables (gender, age, educational level) as well as the perceived level of autonomy, ideology and professional experience to determine potential variations in the dependent variables. No acceptable models with explanatory power were found.

Funding Agency

This research has been carried out within the framework of the Research Project “Journalism models in the multiplatform context” from the Spanish Ministry of Economy, Industry and Competitiveness (CSO2017-82816-P).

References

APM (2017). Informe anual de la profesión periodística. Madrid: APM. https://bit.ly/2PHb7Np

Berganza, R., Lavín, E., & Piñeiro-Naval, V. (2017). La percepción de los periodistas españoles acerca de sus roles profesionales. [Spanish journalists’ perception about their professional roles]. Comunicar, 25(51), 83-92. https://doi.org/10.3916/C51-201

Burke, P., & Reitzes, D. (1981). The Link between Identity and role performance. Social Psychology Quarterly 44(2), 83-92. https://doi.org/10.2307/3033704

Canel, M.J., Rodríguez-Andrés, R., & Sánchez-Aranda, J.J. (2000). Periodistas al descubierto. Retrato de los profesionales de la información. Madrid: CIS. https://bit.ly/2oeHuXo

Casero-Ripollés, A. (2012). El periodismo político en España: Algunas características definitorias. In A. Casero-Ripollés (Ed.), Periodismo político en España: Concepciones, tensiones y elecciones (pp. 19-46). La Laguna: Sociedad Latina de Comunicación So

Casero-Ripollés, A., Izquierdo-Castillo, J., & Doménech-Fabregat, H. (2014). From watchdog to watched dog: Oversight and pressures between journalists and politicians in the context of mediatization. Trípodos, 34, 23-40. https://bit.ly/2vPa6tt

Cohen, B.C. (1963). The press and foreign policy. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. https://bit.ly/2wh6YHJ

Deuze, M. (2005). What is Journalism? Professional identity and ideology of journalists reconsidered. Journalism, 6(4), 442-464. https://doi.org/10.1177/1464884905056815

Fernández-Fernández, F., & Campos, F. (2014). Crisis financiera y brecha Norte-Sur en los grandes grupos mediáticos de la UE. El Profesional de la Información, 23(2), 126-133. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2014.mar.04

Hallin, D., & Mancini, P. (2004). Comparing media systems: Three models of media and politics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511790867

Hanitzsch, T. (2007). Deconstructing journalism culture: Toward a universal theory. Communication Theory, 17(4), 367-385. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2885.2007.00303.x

Hanitzsch, T., & Mellado, C. (2011). What shapes the news around the world? How journalists in eighteen countries perceive influences on their work. The International Journal of Press/Politics, 16(3), 404-426. https://doi.org/10.1177/1940161211407334

Hanitzsch, T., Hanusch, F., Mellado, C., Anikina, M., Berganza, R., Cangoz, I., … Yuen, E.K.W. (2011). Mapping journalism cultures across nations: A comparative study of 18 countries. Journalism Studies, 12(3), 273-293. https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670X.2

Humanes, M.L. & Roses, S. (2018). Journalistic role performance in the Spanish national press. International Journal of Communication, 12, 1032-1053. https://bit.ly/2McslmI

Humanes, M.L., Martínez-Nicolás, M., & Saperas, E. (2013). Political journalism in Spain. Practices, roles and attitudes. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico, 19(2), 715-731. https://doi.org/10.5209/rev_ESMP.2013.v19.n2.43467

Janowitz, M. (1975). Professional models in journalism: The gatekeeper and the advocate. Journalism Quarterly, 52, 618-626. https://doi.org/10.1177/107769907505200402

Johnstone, J., Slawski, E., & Bowman, W. (1972). The professional values of American newsmen. Public Opinion Quarterly, 36, 522–540. https://doi.org/10.1086/268036

Martín, R.M., & Amurrio, M. (2003). ¿Para qué sirven los periodistas? Percepciones de los y las profesionales de radio y televisión de la Capv. Zer, 8(14), 11-27. https://bit.ly/2M5Ksel

Mellado, C. (2015). Professional roles in news content: Six dimensions of journalistic role performance. Journalism Studies, 16(4), 596-614. https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670X.2014.922276

Mellado, C., & Humanes, M.L. (2012). Modeling perceived professional autonomy in Chilean journalism. Journalism, 13(8), 985-1003. https://doi.org/10.1177/1464884912442294

Mellado, C., & van-Dalen, A. (2014). Between rhetoric and practice: Explaining the gap between role conception and performance in journalism. Journalism Studies, 15(6), 859-878. https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670X.2013.838046

Mellado, C., Hellmueller, L., & Donsbach, W. (Eds.). (2017). Journalistic role performance: Concepts, contexts, and methods. New York: Routledge. https://bit.ly/2wh00Tg

Mellado, C., Hellmueller, L., Márquez-Ramírez, M., Humanes, M.L., Sparks, C., Stepinska, A., … Wang, H. (2017). The hybridization of journalistic cultures: A comparative study of journalistic role performance. Journal of Communication, 67(6), 944-967. ht

Nord, L. (2007). Investigative journalism in Sweden. Journalism, 8, 517-521. https://doi.org/10.1177/1464884907081045

Oi, S., Fukuda, M., & Sako, S. (2012). The Japanese journalist in transition: Continuity and change. In D. Weaver, & L. Willnat (Eds.), The global journalist in the 21th Century. News people around the World (pp. 52-65) London: Routledge. https://bit.ly/2

Patterson, T., & Donsbach, W. (1996). News decisions: Journalists as partisan actors. Political Communication, 13(4), 455-468. https://doi.org/10.1080/10584609.1996.9963131

Pihl-Thingvad, S. (2015). Professional ideals and daily practice in journalism. Journalism 16(3), 392-411. https://doi.org/10.1177/1464884913517658

Raemy, P., Beck, D., & Hellmueller, L. (2018). Swiss journalists’ role performance. Journalism Studies, https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670X.2018.1423631

Ramaprasad, J., & Hamdy, N. (2006). Functions of Egyptian journalists: Perceived importance and actual performance. International Communication Gazette, 68(2), 167-85. https://doi.org/10.1177/1748048506062233

Reich, Z., & Hanitzsch, T. (2013). Determinants of journalists’ professional autonomy: Individual and national level factors matter more than organizational ones. Mass Communication and Society, 16, 133-156. https://doi.org/10.1080/15205436.2012.669002

Roses, S., & Farias-Batlle, P. (2013). Comparison between the professional roles of Spanish and U.S. journalists: Importance of the media system as the main predictor of the professional roles of a journalist. Comunicación y Sociedad, 26(1), 170-195. http

Shoemaker, P., & Reese, S. (2013). Mediating the message in the 21st Century. A media sociology perspective. New York: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203930434

Sigelman, L. (1973). Reporting the news: An organizational analysis. American Journal of Sociology, 79(1), 132-151. https://doi.org/10.1086/225511

Starck, K., & Soloski, J. (1977). Effect of reporter predisposition in covering controversial story. Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, 54(1), 120-125. https://doi.org/10.1177/107769907705400117

Tandoc, E., Hellmuller, L., & Vos, T. (2013). Mind the gap: Between role conception and role enactment. Journalism Practice, 7(5), 539-554. https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2012.726503

Vos, T. (2005). Journalistic Role Conception: A bridge between the reporter and the press. International Communication Association (ICA) Conference, Journalism Studies Division. New York, NY, May 29. https://bit.ly/2BRaHkA

Weaver, D.H. (Ed.) (1998). The global journalist: News people around the world. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton.

Weaver, D.H., & Wilhoit, G.C. (1996). The American journalist in the 1990s: US news people at the end of an era. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. https://bit.ly/2Pb5WnP

Weaver, D.H., & Willnat, L. (Eds.) (2012). The global journalist in the 21st Century. New York: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203148679

Weaver, D.H., Beam, R., Brownlee, B., Voakes, P.S., & Wilhoit, G.C. (2007). The American journalist in the 21st century: U.S. News people at the dawn of a new millennium. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. https://bit.ly/2P8X1TM



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

A partir de una encuesta realizada entre 2015 y 2016 a 122 periodistas de cuatro diarios españoles, el artículo estudia en qué medida estos profesionales perciben una desconexión –una brecha– entre sus ideales y su puesta en práctica, y cuáles son los roles más «conflictivos» en el contexto de un sistema de medios de pluralismo polarizado. Los resultados indican, a tenor de la percepción de los profesionales encuestados, que los periodistas presentan un conflicto de roles ya que se hallaron diferencias significativas entre la concepción de seis de los siete roles profesionales y la percepción de la puesta en práctica de dichas funciones. Las mayores divergencias se localizan en los roles vigilante, cívico y diseminador. Los conflictos de roles se resolvieron en todos los casos a favor de los intereses de quienes detentan el poder y en contra de los ideales de los periodistas. Estos resultados son congruentes y apoyan los hallazgos de publicaciones previas que retratan al sistema de medios de pluralismo polarizado como un ecosistema mediático donde los profesionales del periodismo, como colectivo, acumulan poco poder frente al ostentado por las organizaciones de medios, endeudadas por una excesiva «financierización» y dependientes del poder político y económico. Los resultados se discuten de acuerdo con la literatura existente, así como con el contexto en que se realizó la investigación.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

La función de vigilante, también conocida como de perro guardián, forma parte del ADN de la cultura profesional de los periodistas. Sin embargo, los medios –en ocasiones aliados de los actores políticos y económicos– pueden favorecer informaciones cuya función es apoyar al poder en vez de vigilarlo. El periodista identificado con el rol del vigilante podría verse abocado en la práctica a cumplir el papel de favorecedor del statu quo. He aquí el punto de partida de este artículo: la percepción de los profesionales respecto de la existencia de conflictos de roles que dan lugar a una brecha entre sus aspiraciones y el ejercicio profesional en la práctica.

Denominamos concepciones de los roles profesionales (role conceptions) al conjunto de ideales individuales con los que los periodistas definen y legitiman sus funciones en la sociedad (Weaver & Wilhoit, 1996; Vos, 2005; Hanitzsch, 2007). Los roles son, por tanto, un factor central en su identidad profesional (Deuze, 2005). De acuerdo con la teoría del rol (Burke & Reitzes, 1981), los periodistas tratarán de poner en práctica sus ideales individuales a la hora de construir sus noticias (role enactment). De acuerdo con Tandoc, Hellmueller y Vos (2013: 541) si un periodista percibe que su rol es el de diseminador, el deseo de ser congruente con su papel en la sociedad le llevaría a tratar de poner en práctica dicho rol.

Sin embargo, el ejercicio profesional excede la dimensión individual, pues el trabajo periodístico es el resultado de un proceso colectivo y relacional sujeto a la negociación (Mellado, 2015). Está influenciado por factores organizativos, políticos y económicos (Shoemaker & Reese, 2013; Hanitzsch & Mellado, 2011), sujeto a los vaivenes a que se somete la autonomía profesional del periodista (Mellado & Humanes, 2012; Reich & Hanitzsch, 2013). En esta negociación se moldean las noticias, materializándose así los roles en los contenidos noticiosos (role performance) (Mellado, 2015; Mellado & al., 2017). Los periodistas, finalmente, perciben el grado en que dicha materialización se acerca o aleja de la puesta en práctica de sus ideales (perceived role enactment).

A partir de estos supuestos, este artículo estudia en qué medida los periodistas españoles perciben una brecha entre sus ideales (role conceptions) y su puesta en práctica (perceived role enactment) y cuáles son los roles más «conflictivos» en el contexto de un sistema de medios de pluralismo polarizado como es el español, caracterizado por una débil profesionalización y un alto nivel de paralelismo político e instrumentalización (Hallin & Mancini, 2004). Para ello, se ha partido de la conceptualización de los roles periodísticos en tres dimensiones (Mellado, 2015): la presencia de la voz del periodista en la noticia, la relación del periodismo con el poder y la forma en que se aborda a la audiencia. Cada una de estas tres dimensiones se compone de diferentes roles. El primer eje alude a la presencia (rol intervencionista) o ausencia (rol diseminador) del periodista como actor en las noticias. El segundo eje se refiere a las relaciones de los medios con el poder político y económico, y contiene el rol vigilante y el rol leal-facilitador. El tercer dominio (abordaje de las audiencias) entraña la forma en la que las prácticas periodísticas construyen su relación con la audiencia a través de tres roles: rol de servicio, rol de infoentretenimiento y el rol cívico. La operacionalización de cada rol se encuentra en la sección de material y método (Tabla 1).


Roses-Campos Humanes-Humanes 2019a-69576 ov-es012.png

Este artículo es parte del proyecto internacional «Journalistic role performance around the globe» (www.journalisticperformance.org), que reúne a investigadores de más de 20 países de todo el mundo con el objetivo de comparar la performance periodística en diferentes sistemas de medios.

1.1. La desconexión entre los ideales y la práctica en diferentes contextos

Las tensiones y discrepancias entre lo individual y lo colectivo pueden generar un «conflicto de roles» cuando el periodista aprecia una incongruencia entre lo que percibe que le corresponde hacer y el trabajo que piensa o dice que hace en su medio de comunicación (Mellado, Hellmueller, & Donsbach, 2017). Como resultado del conflicto de roles, podemos hablar de una «percepción de la brecha» que es conceptualmente diferente de la «brecha real» entre ideales y noticias (Mellado & Van-Dalen, 2014). Mientras que la primera implica una percepción de desconexión entre los ideales y su puesta en práctica, la segunda supone una desconexión tangible y cierta entre sus ideales y la materialización de su trabajo en las noticias. Si bien las discrepancias y la percepción de una brecha por parte de los periodistas no tienen por qué implicar siempre un mal funcionamiento del medio (Mellado, Hellmueller, & Donsbach, 2017), las consecuencias de estas percepciones sí podrían dañar a largo plazo la profesión (Nord, 2007), generando frustración entre los periodistas (Sigelman, 1973; Stark, 1962) y horadando su compromiso con el medio con una inevitable pérdida de calidad de las noticias (Pihl-Thingvad, 2015).

En lo que se refiere al objeto de estudio de este trabajo, la «percepción de la brecha» entre los ideales del periodista y la percepción de su puesta en práctica, encontramos algunos ejemplos en diferentes contextos.

En el trabajo de Ramaprasad y Hamdy (2006), los periodistas egipcios aseguraron que la importancia otorgada a las funciones periodísticas no se correspondía con la frecuencia con que podían materializarlas en su trabajo. Por ejemplo, la función de sustento de la democracia (segunda en importancia) era la que menos ponían en práctica. Weaver, Beam, Brownley, Voakes y Wilhoit (2007: 233) hallaron una asociación modesta entre los roles que los periodistas estadounidenses afirmaban defender y los roles presentes en lo que ellos mismos consideraban sus mejores trabajos. Oi, Fukuda y Sako (2012: 57) hallaron que los periodistas japoneses otorgaban una gran importancia al rol vigilante, sin embargo, creían que no tenían éxito al «investigar las actividades del gobierno». Y en Dinamarca más del 60% de los periodistas consideraba importante o muy importante la función de vigilante mientras que apenas un 30% percibía que pudieran llevarla a cabo en el mismo grado (Pihl-Thingvad, 2015). Recientemente, Raemy, Beck y Hellmueller (2018) hallaron que los periodistas suizos establecen una fuerte relación entre la concepción de los roles y la percepción sobre el trabajo que piensan que hacen en el día a día, con una aparente falta de influencia de factores organizacionales excepto en el caso del rol vigilante.

Ninguno de estos trabajos ha explorado de forma específica la «percepción de la brecha» entre los ideales profesionales de los periodistas y la percepción de su puesta en práctica en un sistema de medios de pluralismo polarizado como el español.

1.2. Los roles profesionales en España: de la conceptualización a su materialización

Siguiendo la tradición de estudios sobre las concepciones de los roles profesionales (Cohen, 1963; Johnstone, Slawski, & Bowman, 1972; Janowitz, 1975; Weaver & Wilhoit, 1996; Weaver, 1998; Patterson & Donsbach, 1996; Hanitzsch & al., 2011; Weaver & Willnat, 2012), numerosos trabajos han ayudado a perfilar lo que sabemos sobre los ideales de los periodistas españoles (Canel & Sánchez-Aranda, 1999; Martín & Amurrio, 2003; Roses & Farias, 2013; Berganza, Lavín, & Piñeiro-Laván, 2017, entre otros).

Centrándonos en las publicaciones más recientes, los periodistas españoles se identifican más con el papel de altavoz de la ciudadanía sobre otras funciones como la de difusor, adversario, vigilante, instructor de la audiencia, entretenedor y favorecedor del statu quo (Berganza, & al., 2017). Sin embargo, los estudios sobre la materialización de los roles en las noticias apuntan a que la prensa española se caracteriza por la relevancia de su papel intervencionista, donde roles –como el de vigilante– estarían determinados, por ejemplo, por las temáticas, siendo los asuntos económicos en los que la vigilancia estaría soslayada en la práctica pese a los ideales que manifiestan habitualmente los periodistas en las encuestas (Humanes & Roses, 2018).

A partir de la constatación de las diferencias entre lo encontrado en los trabajos sobre la importancia otorgada a los roles periodísticos y su presencia en los contenidos, en este trabajo se aborda por primera vez en España el análisis de la percepción de la brecha entre la concepción del rol de los periodistas y su puesta en práctica.

1.3. Un contexto proclive a los «conflictos de roles»

¿Es España un ecosistema mediático proclive a que los periodistas se enfrenten a conflictos de roles profesionales? Los estudios previos han señalado diferentes características que apuntan a ello.

El sistema de medios español ha sido encuadrado entre los sistemas de pluralismo polarizado (Hallin & Mancini, 2004), esto es, presenta una prensa con paralelismo político, pluralismo externo y un mercado poco desarrollado; la audiencia de la prensa es elitista y polarizada ideológicamente, y la profesión periodística aúna un estilo opinativo con un poder y autonomía limitados ante legisladores y empresas de comunicación. A estos rasgos que han sido probados empíricamente (por ejemplo, Humanes, Martínez-Nicolás, & Saperas, 2013; Casero, 2012), habría que añadir otros que habrían sido reforzados con la crisis económica como la instrumentalización de los medios o el clientelismo. Y es que los medios españoles son empresas endeudadas y dependientes del poder económico al ser la banca y los grupos de inversión sus principales accionistas o acreedores (Fernández-Fernández & Campos, 2014). A esta debilidad económica se sumaría el menoscabo de la función de vigilancia del poder por parte de presiones políticas hacia los periodistas, vehiculadas a través de los grupos de comunicación y los propios medios (Casero, Izquierdo, & Doménech, 2014). Así, el 79% de los redactores que son miembros de la Federación de Asociaciones de la Prensa de España reconoce recibir presiones en el ejercicio de su trabajo, sucumbiendo a ellas tres de cada cuatro. Además, en el 55% de las ocasiones éstas provienen de los directivos de su medio y el 50% de las veces el objetivo de la presión es cambiar la orientación de una noticia (APM, 2017).

Todas las variables glosadas sugieren que el marco de acción de los periodistas en España es un caldo de cultivo para el conflicto de roles profesionales, sobre todo, en aquellos relacionados con la dimensión de distancia al poder, que incluye el rol vigilante y el rol leal-facilitador. Por ello, planteamos la siguiente hipótesis: H1: La percepción de la brecha entre la concepción de los roles y la percepción de su puesta en práctica será mayor en aquellos roles relacionados con la distancia al poder como son el vigilante, el favorecedor del statu quo, y el rol cívico. Esperamos, en este sentido, que los periodistas percibirán que el conflicto de roles se dirime a favor del poder en la práctica periodística.

2. Material y métodos

2.1. Muestra

Para responder a la hipótesis planteada, se realizó una encuesta a periodistas de los diarios «ABC», «El País», «El Mundo» y «La Razón» (N=122) entre abril de 2015 y febrero de 2016. Como hemos señalado anteriormente, este trabajo forma parte de un proyecto internacional, cuyo objetivo principal es medir la brecha entre las percepciones de los roles profesionales y su puesta en práctica, analizada a través de los contenidos noticiosos (validación de instrumentos en Mellado & van-Dalen, 2014). Este hecho ha marcado la estrategia del diseño muestral. Los periodistas encuestados se seleccionaron entre aquellos que eran autores de las noticias analizadas en el estudio de la materialización de los roles periodísticos en los cuatro diarios españoles (Humanes & Roses, 2018). En total se contabilizaron 526 periodistas en el análisis de contenido de noticias. Se envió el cuestionario a todos estos profesionales, obteniendo una tasa de respuesta del 23%1. El 55,1% son hombres, y tienen una edad media de 41 años.

2.2. Medidas

El cuestionario incluía 17 preguntas sobre indicadores acerca de prácticas periodísticas, funciones del periodismo, nivel de autonomía profesional, y técnicas de producción de las noticias; y se completaba con preguntas relativas a la situación laboral, nivel educativo, características demográficas y orientación política. En este artículo trabajaremos con las dos preguntas en las que se solicitaba que cada encuestado expresara, primero, la importancia que otorga a cada uno de los roles profesionales en una escala donde 1 significa nada importante y 5 extremadamente importante (role conceptions), y, en segundo lugar, con qué frecuencia cree el periodista que están presentes estas funciones en las noticias que escribe (1 nada frecuente, 5 muy frecuente) (perceived role enactment). En la Tabla 1 se encuentran los 23 indicadores que se corresponden con los siete roles periodísticos sobre los que se ha medido la brecha entre importancia otorgada y percepción de su puesta en práctica.

Para realizar los análisis estadísticos, se procedió a calcular la consistencia interna a través del alpha de Cronbach, tanto para los indicadores de la concepción del rol como para los indicadores de la percepción de la puesta en práctica de esos mismos roles.

Para el rol diseminador sólo se contempló un ítem (ser un observador imparcial), por lo que no se calculó la fiabilidad. En la concepción del rol intervencionista, tres indicadores (influir sobre la opinión pública, defender un punto de vista particular, e influir en las decisiones sobre las políticas públicas) alcanzaron un nivel aceptable (alpha=0.70). En la puesta en práctica del rol intervencionista también tres ítems (influir sobre la opinión pública, analizar los hechos de actualidad, e influir en las decisiones sobre las políticas públicas) obtuvieron un valor alpha=0.62. En la concepción del rol vigilante se relacionaron los ítems monitorear a los líderes políticos y vigilar a los poderes económicos (?=0.63); mientras que en la percepción de la puesta en práctica de este rol se relacionaron los tres indicadores –monitorear a los líderes políticos, vigilar a los poderes económicos y actuar como vigilante de la sociedad civil– (?=0.71). Para el rol leal-facilitador, el valor del alpha de Cronbach alcanzó 0.86 incluyendo los cuatro indicadores relacionados con la importancia dada a esta función, y un valor del alpha de Cronbach de 0.92 para los cuatro indicadores sobre la frecuencia de puesta en práctica del rol. En la concepción del rol cívico, los seis indicadores obtuvieron un valor de ?=0.74, mientras que en la percepción de la puesta en práctica los mismos indicadores se obtuvieron un valor aceptable (?=0.71).

En los roles de infoentretenimiento y de servicio, el alpha de Cronbach estuvo por debajo de los niveles aceptables. Por lo tanto, decidimos usar sólo un ítem para cada uno de estos dos roles: ofrecer a la audiencia la información que es más interesante para ellos –para medir el rol de servicio–, y ofrecer la clase de noticias que atrae la mayor cantidad de audiencia, para el rol de infoentretenimiento.

3. Análisis y resultados

Considerando los datos globales, los roles a los que los periodistas españoles encuestados otorgan más importancia son el rol vigilante (M=4.60; DT=0.618) y el rol diseminador (M=4.05; DT=1.164), seguidos del rol de servicio (M=3.76; DT=1.137) y del rol cívico (M=3.47; DT=0.751), mientras que el rol intervencionista (M=2.94; DT=0.652), el de infoentretenimiento (M=2.48; DT=1.180) y el leal-facilitador (M=1.72; DT= 0.729) son los que menos relevancia reciben a nivel normativo.

La Figura 1 muestra con más detalle que los indicadores que reciben mayor importancia son monitorear e investigar a los líderes políticos (M=4.67; DT=0.612) y al poder económico (M=4.53; DT=0.839), entregar análisis sobre los hechos actuales (M=4.50; DT=0.699), ser un observador imparcial (M=4.09; DT=1.145) y promover la tolerancia y la diversidad cultural (M=4.31; DT=0.955).


Roses-Campos Humanes-Humanes 2019a-69576 ov-es013.png

Figura 1. Diferencias entre importancia y percepción de la puesta en práctica para cada indicador de los roles (media).

Cuando consideramos la frecuencia con la que los periodistas dicen poner en práctica los siete roles, entonces las funciones más comunes son la de diseminador (M=3.46; DT=1.287) la de vigilante (M=3.37; DT=0.618) y la de servicio (M=3.30; DT=1.137), y entre los roles menos frecuentes están el rol cívico (M=2.96; DT=0.751), el rol de infoentretenimiento (M=2.85; DT=1.299), el rol intervencionista (M=2.84; DT=0.652) y el rol leal-facilitador (M=1.96; DT=1.033). Entre los indicadores específicos (Figura 1), cuatro coinciden con los que se valoran como los más importantes: monitorear e investigar a los líderes políticos (M=3.79; DT=1.092), entregar análisis sobre los hechos actuales (M=3.95; DT=1.049), ser un observador parcial (M=3.45; DT=1.280) y promover la tolerancia y la diversidad cultural (M=3.47; DT=1.256)2.

Nuestra hipótesis plantea que la percepción de la brecha entre la concepción de los roles profesionales y la percepción de su puesta en práctica será mayor en aquellos roles relacionados con la distancia al poder como son la función de vigilante, el rol favorecedor del statu quo, y el rol cívico. Se ha procedido a realizar la prueba T de Student para muestras relacionadas para calcular en qué roles existen diferencias de medias estadísticamente significativas entre la importancia otorgada a un rol periodístico y la percepción de su puesta en práctica, y así poder corroborar o no nuestra hipótesis. La Tabla 2 muestra cómo en seis de los siete roles la prueba de contraste de hipótesis es significativa; sólo en el rol intervencionista no se ha corroborado la brecha.


Roses-Campos Humanes-Humanes 2019a-69576 ov-es014.png

Las diferencias mayores se producen en el rol vigilante de los poderes políticos y económicos (M=1.23; DT=1.06), seguido del rol diseminador (M=0.588; DT=1.33), del rol cívico (M=0.504; DT=0.503), y del rol de servicio (M=0.453; DT=1.26). En estas cuatro funciones, los periodistas encuestados expresan la misma tendencia: perciben que ponen en práctica estos tres roles con una menor frecuencia de la que les corresponderían según la importancia que ellos les otorgan en el nivel normativo. Justo la tendencia contraria aparece en los roles leal-facilitador (M=–0.235; DT=0.875) y de infoentretenimiento (M=–0.368; DT=1.32), en los cuales los encuestados expresan que la frecuencia con la que los ponen en práctica en la producción de noticias no es equiparable a la poca importancia que les otorgan.

Estos resultados corroboran nuestra hipótesis, puesto que los periodistas perciben que el conflicto de roles se dirime a favor del poder en la producción de las noticias. Si nos fijamos en los indicadores específicos, encontramos que los periodistas siempre manifiestan las mayores diferencias en aquellos roles que relacionan más directamente a los medios con quienes detentan el poder. En la Figura 1 observamos que monitorear a los poderes políticos (M=0.899; DT=1.09) y, especialmente, a las élites económicas (M=1.54; DT=1.37) acumulan las mayores diferencias. Los periodistas creen que estas funciones son bastante o muy importantes, pero a la vez sólo en algunas ocasiones las ponen en práctica cuando producen información. Por el contrario, los periodistas perciben que sus noticias sustentan funciones como apoyar las políticas del gobierno (M=–0.512; DT=1.176), otorgar una imagen positiva de los líderes políticos (M=–0.453; DT=0.966) o entregar una imagen positiva de los líderes económicos (M=–0.391; DT=1.027), aun cuando ellos no les conceden tanta importancia como ideales profesionales.

Destaca también que los periodistas manifiestan conflicto entre lo normativo y lo práctico en aquellas funciones que les ponen en relación con los ciudadanos. Por ejemplo, los dos indicadores en los que hay mayor distancia son: ofrecer información que la gente necesita para tomar decisiones políticas (M=0.761; DT=1.061) y promover la tolerancia y la diversidad cultural (M=0.793; DT=1.268), ambos pertenecientes al rol cívico del periodismo.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Esta investigación es la primera que estudia sistemática y empíricamente el conflicto de roles periodísticos en los comunicadores de la prensa en España, cuantificando la magnitud de la brecha percibida entre los ideales y la práctica periodística. Los datos aportados contribuyen a comprender mejor el proceso de producción de las noticias en España, si bien los resultados deben interpretarse de acuerdo con las características del ecosistema mediático en que trabajaban los periodistas encuestados: prensa diaria de un sistema de medios de pluralismo polarizado. Igualmente importante resulta considerar los rasgos del periodo de tiempo en que se circunscribe el estudio: crisis económica y escándalos de corrupción política, entre otros.

Considerando el contexto, merece la pena discutir los resultados del eje diseminador-intervencionista. Por un lado, es congruente que en un sistema de medios con paralelismo político, la brecha entre la concepción del rol diseminador y la percepción sobre su puesta en práctica sea una de las más altas. Los periodistas otorgaron una alta importancia a «ser un informador imparcial» (una persistencia del mito de la objetividad en la cultura profesional del periodismo español), pero reconocieron que esto no era tan frecuente en la praxis. Algunos periodistas de la muestra pudieron pensar que, aunque «querrían» informar con imparcialidad, no siempre lo consiguen por dar rienda suelta a su propia subjetividad. Otros, que sus jefes imponen un punto de vista determinado, impidiendo así la materialización de la información imparcial.

Por otro lado, no encontramos una brecha significativa entre ideales y prácticas referidos al rol intervencionista de forma global. Sin embargo, este resultado puede matizarse si observamos con detalle los ítems que forman parte del índice de medición de la variable. Así, los redactores perciben que ponen en práctica la función «defender un punto de vista particular» más de lo que le dictarían sus ideales. Este resultado es lógico si se asumen tanto la tradición interpretativa y de opinión de la prensa española como las hipótesis sobre el clientelismo y la instrumentalización de los diarios. Este matiz implica pensar que periodistas y medios comparten una visión similar sobre la importancia de funciones cómo influir en la opinión pública y en la toma de decisiones sobre políticas públicas, y proporcionar análisis sobre los hechos. El germen del conflicto se sitúa pues en defender o no puntos de vistas particulares. Quizás los periodistas atribuyan connotaciones negativas a esta función por la fuerza normativa del mito de la objetividad.

Por último, respecto de la hipótesis de partida, los resultados son también coherentes con la descripción del sistema de medios español en la que los principales propietarios de los grupos de los diarios son bancos y/o fondos de inversión y donde abunda el clientelismo y la instrumentalización de los medios por parte de los partidos políticos. En un periodo de crisis económica –principalmente financiera y bancaria– y de proliferación de causas por corrupción política, la percepción de la brecha entre la concepción de los roles profesionales de los periodistas encuestados y la percepción de su puesta en práctica fue mayor en aquellos roles relacionados con la distancia al poder, es decir, en aquellas funciones que tienen que ver con la independencia y con la responsabilidad social de los medios. Asimismo, de acuerdo al testimonio de los periodistas, los conflictos de roles se resolvieron a favor de quienes detentan el poder en todos los casos.

Sirva como claro ejemplo el rol de la vigilancia de los poderes económicos y políticos, donde los periodistas perciben la brecha de mayor tamaño. En un contexto político-económico convulso, los profesionales afirman que pusieron en práctica menos de lo que querrían el rol vigilante. Del mismo modo, alegan que se vieron abocados a redactar informaciones favorables a la imagen de los líderes políticos y económicos –rol favorecedor del statu quo– con mayor frecuencia de la que le dictaban sus ideales. En el estudio de Raemy, Beck y Hellmueller (2018) los periodistas suizos también afirmaron dar mucha más importancia al rol vigilante de lo que finalmente lo ponían en práctica; en cambio, la tendencia se invertía en el rol leal-facilitador. Los periodistas aseveraron ponerlo en práctica menos de lo que consideraban adecuado. A falta de disponer de datos de más países, podemos vislumbrar una tendencia a percibir la brecha sobre el rol vigilante como la más importante. Posiblemente se deba a que el mito del vigilante suscita expectativas más exigentes entre los periodistas al considerarse uno de los valores centrales de su cultura profesional a nivel global (Hanitzsch & al., 2011).

Igualmente reveladora resulta la brecha referida a la percepción del rol cívico. De nuevo observamos cómo los redactores querrían llevar a la práctica con mucha mayor frecuencia de la que lo hicieron cuestiones como motivar a la gente a participar en actividades políticas y tomar decisiones, defender el cambio social y promover la tolerancia y la diversidad cultural. Tampoco se cumplieron las expectativas de los periodistas respecto a su concepción del rol de servicio, reduciéndose en la práctica la labor de orientación y consejo al consumidor. Esto demuestra una tensión entre una cultura profesional interesada en empoderar a la ciudadanía, en un periodo en que se agudizaron las desigualdades y se desvelaron abusos de los poderosos, frente a unas empresas periodísticas proclives a no alimentar la masa crítica contra quienes detentan el poder. En esta línea de argumentación, llama la atención que los periodistas reconocieran llevar a la práctica con más frecuencia de lo que querrían el rol de infoentrenimiento. Caben varias interpretaciones a este resultado. Una de ellas plantea el interés del poder –instrumentalizando a los medios– por «adormecer», por distraer, mediante contenidos de entretenimiento la conciencia crítica de los ciudadanos en este periodo. Otra explicación puede ver este síntoma como una tendencia hacia la comercialización (hipótesis de la convergencia del sistema pluralista polarizado hacia el sistema de medios liberal de Hallin y Mancini, 2004). No obstante, independientemente de las posibles interpretaciones, los datos del estudio evidencian que, de acuerdo al relato de los redactores, en plena crisis económica y política los periodistas «fueron altavoces de los ciudadanos, los movilizaron, educaron políticamente y promovieron cambios sociales» (rol cívico) menos de lo que dictaban sus ideales; por el contrario, se vieron impelidos a «entretener» a la ciudadanía con mayor frecuencia de lo que consideraban acorde a su papel en la sociedad.

Podemos concluir que las pruebas empíricas avalan la aseveración de que el sistema de prensa español, como caso prototípico del sistema de pluralismo polarizado, es proclive al conflicto de roles profesionales entre los periodistas y los diarios en que trabajan, especialmente en un contexto de crisis política y económica. Las confrontaciones se resolvieron siempre en detrimento de los ideales de los periodistas, que acusan las mayores brechas en el rol vigilante –reduciendo el control al poder–, en el rol diseminador –menoscabando la imparcialidad–, en el rol cívico –desincentivando su papel de catalizador social– y en el rol de servicios, reduciendo su capacidad para aconsejar en asuntos cotidianos. Asimismo, los periodistas se vieron abocados a poner en práctica más de lo que consideraban necesario el rol leal-facilitador –promoviendo una imagen positiva de los poderosos– y el rol de infoentretenimiento, potenciando el divertimento.

Entre los futuros desarrollos de esta línea de investigación cabe plantear el análisis comparativo de la brecha con otros países, la replicación del diseño con una muestra de profesionales de diferentes soportes (radio, televisión, diarios nativos digitales y redes sociales) y la observación y análisis de la brecha real entre la concepción de los roles profesionales y su materialización en los contenidos.

Notas

1 La muestra es comparable a las utilizadas en trabajos nacionales e internacionales sobre roles profesionales. Por ejemplo, Berganza, Lavín y Piñeiro-Laván (2017) encuestaron a 390 periodistas en 26 medios digitales nativos y 98 medios tradicionales (periódicos, agencias, radio, TV y revistas). Mellado y Van-Dalen (2014) entrevistaron a 75 periodistas chilenos. Y Tandoc, Hellmueller y Vos (2012) emplearon una muestra de 56 periodistas en EEUU.

2 Se realizaron análisis de regresión lineal considerando variables sociodemográficas (sexo, edad, estudios), así como nivel percibido de autonomía, ideología y experiencia profesional para determinar posibles variaciones en las variables dependientes. No se encontraron modelos con capacidad explicativa aceptables.

Apoyos

Esta investigación fue realizada en el marco del Proyecto de Investigación «Modelos de Periodismo en el contexto multiplataforma» del Ministerio de Economía, Industria y Competitividad (CSO2017-82816-P).

Referencias

APM (2017). Informe anual de la profesión periodística. Madrid: APM. https://bit.ly/2PHb7Np

Berganza, R., Lavín, E., & Piñeiro-Naval, V. (2017). La percepción de los periodistas españoles acerca de sus roles profesionales. [Spanish journalists’ perception about their professional roles]. Comunicar, 25(51), 83-92. https://doi.org/10.3916/C51-201

Burke, P., & Reitzes, D. (1981). The Link between Identity and role performance. Social Psychology Quarterly 44(2), 83-92. https://doi.org/10.2307/3033704

Canel, M.J., Rodríguez-Andrés, R., & Sánchez-Aranda, J.J. (2000). Periodistas al descubierto. Retrato de los profesionales de la información. Madrid: CIS. https://bit.ly/2oeHuXo

Casero-Ripollés, A. (2012). El periodismo político en España: Algunas características definitorias. In A. Casero-Ripollés (Ed.), Periodismo político en España: Concepciones, tensiones y elecciones (pp. 19-46). La Laguna: Sociedad Latina de Comunicación So

Casero-Ripollés, A., Izquierdo-Castillo, J., & Doménech-Fabregat, H. (2014). From watchdog to watched dog: Oversight and pressures between journalists and politicians in the context of mediatization. Trípodos, 34, 23-40. https://bit.ly/2vPa6tt

Cohen, B.C. (1963). The press and foreign policy. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. https://bit.ly/2wh6YHJ

Deuze, M. (2005). What is Journalism? Professional identity and ideology of journalists reconsidered. Journalism, 6(4), 442-464. https://doi.org/10.1177/1464884905056815

Fernández-Fernández, F., & Campos, F. (2014). Crisis financiera y brecha Norte-Sur en los grandes grupos mediáticos de la UE. El Profesional de la Información, 23(2), 126-133. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2014.mar.04

Hallin, D., & Mancini, P. (2004). Comparing media systems: Three models of media and politics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511790867

Hanitzsch, T. (2007). Deconstructing journalism culture: Toward a universal theory. Communication Theory, 17(4), 367-385. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2885.2007.00303.x

Hanitzsch, T., & Mellado, C. (2011). What shapes the news around the world? How journalists in eighteen countries perceive influences on their work. The International Journal of Press/Politics, 16(3), 404-426. https://doi.org/10.1177/1940161211407334

Hanitzsch, T., Hanusch, F., Mellado, C., Anikina, M., Berganza, R., Cangoz, I., … Yuen, E.K.W. (2011). Mapping journalism cultures across nations: A comparative study of 18 countries. Journalism Studies, 12(3), 273-293. https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670X.2

Humanes, M.L. & Roses, S. (2018). Journalistic role performance in the Spanish national press. International Journal of Communication, 12, 1032-1053. https://bit.ly/2McslmI

Humanes, M.L., Martínez-Nicolás, M., & Saperas, E. (2013). Political journalism in Spain. Practices, roles and attitudes. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico, 19(2), 715-731. https://doi.org/10.5209/rev_ESMP.2013.v19.n2.43467

Janowitz, M. (1975). Professional models in journalism: The gatekeeper and the advocate. Journalism Quarterly, 52, 618-626. https://doi.org/10.1177/107769907505200402

Johnstone, J., Slawski, E., & Bowman, W. (1972). The professional values of American newsmen. Public Opinion Quarterly, 36, 522–540. https://doi.org/10.1086/268036

Martín, R.M., & Amurrio, M. (2003). ¿Para qué sirven los periodistas? Percepciones de los y las profesionales de radio y televisión de la Capv. Zer, 8(14), 11-27. https://bit.ly/2M5Ksel

Mellado, C. (2015). Professional roles in news content: Six dimensions of journalistic role performance. Journalism Studies, 16(4), 596-614. https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670X.2014.922276

Mellado, C., & Humanes, M.L. (2012). Modeling perceived professional autonomy in Chilean journalism. Journalism, 13(8), 985-1003. https://doi.org/10.1177/1464884912442294

Mellado, C., & van-Dalen, A. (2014). Between rhetoric and practice: Explaining the gap between role conception and performance in journalism. Journalism Studies, 15(6), 859-878. https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670X.2013.838046

Mellado, C., Hellmueller, L., & Donsbach, W. (Eds.). (2017). Journalistic role performance: Concepts, contexts, and methods. New York: Routledge. https://bit.ly/2wh00Tg

Mellado, C., Hellmueller, L., Márquez-Ramírez, M., Humanes, M.L., Sparks, C., Stepinska, A., … Wang, H. (2017). The hybridization of journalistic cultures: A comparative study of journalistic role performance. Journal of Communication, 67(6), 944-967. ht

Nord, L. (2007). Investigative journalism in Sweden. Journalism, 8, 517-521. https://doi.org/10.1177/1464884907081045

Oi, S., Fukuda, M., & Sako, S. (2012). The Japanese journalist in transition: Continuity and change. In D. Weaver, & L. Willnat (Eds.), The global journalist in the 21th Century. News people around the World (pp. 52-65) London: Routledge. https://bit.ly/2

Patterson, T., & Donsbach, W. (1996). News decisions: Journalists as partisan actors. Political Communication, 13(4), 455-468. https://doi.org/10.1080/10584609.1996.9963131

Pihl-Thingvad, S. (2015). Professional ideals and daily practice in journalism. Journalism 16(3), 392-411. https://doi.org/10.1177/1464884913517658

Raemy, P., Beck, D., & Hellmueller, L. (2018). Swiss journalists’ role performance. Journalism Studies, https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670X.2018.1423631

Ramaprasad, J., & Hamdy, N. (2006). Functions of Egyptian journalists: Perceived importance and actual performance. International Communication Gazette, 68(2), 167-85. https://doi.org/10.1177/1748048506062233

Reich, Z., & Hanitzsch, T. (2013). Determinants of journalists’ professional autonomy: Individual and national level factors matter more than organizational ones. Mass Communication and Society, 16, 133-156. https://doi.org/10.1080/15205436.2012.669002

Roses, S., & Farias-Batlle, P. (2013). Comparison between the professional roles of Spanish and U.S. journalists: Importance of the media system as the main predictor of the professional roles of a journalist. Comunicación y Sociedad, 26(1), 170-195. http

Shoemaker, P., & Reese, S. (2013). Mediating the message in the 21st Century. A media sociology perspective. New York: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203930434

Sigelman, L. (1973). Reporting the news: An organizational analysis. American Journal of Sociology, 79(1), 132-151. https://doi.org/10.1086/225511

Starck, K., & Soloski, J. (1977). Effect of reporter predisposition in covering controversial story. Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, 54(1), 120-125. https://doi.org/10.1177/107769907705400117

Tandoc, E., Hellmuller, L., & Vos, T. (2013). Mind the gap: Between role conception and role enactment. Journalism Practice, 7(5), 539-554. https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2012.726503

Vos, T. (2005). Journalistic Role Conception: A bridge between the reporter and the press. International Communication Association (ICA) Conference, Journalism Studies Division. New York, NY, May 29. https://bit.ly/2BRaHkA

Weaver, D.H. (Ed.) (1998). The global journalist: News people around the world. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton.

Weaver, D.H., & Wilhoit, G.C. (1996). The American journalist in the 1990s: US news people at the end of an era. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. https://bit.ly/2Pb5WnP

Weaver, D.H., & Willnat, L. (Eds.) (2012). The global journalist in the 21st Century. New York: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203148679

Weaver, D.H., Beam, R., Brownlee, B., Voakes, P.S., & Wilhoit, G.C. (2007). The American journalist in the 21st century: U.S. News people at the dawn of a new millennium. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. https://bit.ly/2P8X1TM

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/18
Accepted on 31/12/18
Submitted on 31/12/18

Volume 27, Issue 1, 2019
DOI: 10.3916/C58-2019-06
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Views 4
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?