Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Social laboratories, defined as experimental spaces for co-creation, have currently become the main centres of innovation. Medialabs are experimental laboratories of technologies and communication media which have co-evolved along with the digital society into becoming mediation laboratories of citizen experimentation, observing a confluence of both models. In the last years, these centres have expanded within the higher education context, generating new forms of innovation and posing the issue on how to measure the impact of such open spaces. This paper analyzes the origin and development of social laboratories in Spain. It first reviews their historical development since its antecedents in the 19th Century until the most recent initiatives. It focuses specifically on initiatives launched within the university context, highlighting their role as motors of innovation. Then, it presents the case of Medialab UGR, a co-creation and digital culture centre of social collaboration framed in the digital context. Finally, it offers a first approach towards the assessment of its social impact by using the Twitter and analyzes its capacity to mobilize and reach non-academic audiences. The findings show the plurality of actors involved in this type of networks as well as the difficulty and complexity of the task on the development of indicators that can comprise both, academic and social interests.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Social laboratories are platforms created to address social challenges. They are characterized by: 1) a social perspective, gathering together people with different backgrounds and approaches to working together; 2) an experimental perspective, dealing with cyclical creation processes; and, 3) a systemic perspective, working on the generation of prototypes that can solve great challenges. This is how Hassan (2014) explains it in his book “The Social Labs Revolution: A New Approach to Solving our Most Complex Challenges”. Here, he analyses the rise of this kind of platforms, which have developed particularly during the last two decades. Despite the great interest they currently generate, social experimentation and citizen participation are not recent approaches, but are deeply rooted intthe beginning of the 20th century, as we will detail in section 1.1.

This paper addresses the historical development of social laboratories, paying special attention to the role of medialabs, which are born in the university environment based on the concept of the social laboratory. The recent expansion of these digital innovation and social spaces in Spain, and their heterogeneity, brings new challenges, both in their structure and in the evaluation of their activity. With a triple orientation, university medialabs intend to, on the one hand, serve as a nexus between society and academia, resulting int a space for social cocreation and collaboration. Hence their teaching and informational profile, which serves as a bidirectional channel where citizens and researchers can influence each other and share knowledge. Furthermore, their research profile stands out as the engine of educational, social, and digital innovation. This research perspective makes them the ideal place for the experimentation and testing of new technologies, and educational and social involvement formulas. Due to this triple challenge, this paper aims to:

• Contextualize the phenomenon of social laboratories and, especially, medialabs in Spain, and in the university environment through a revision of the main historical milestones that define their development and evolution.

• Analyze the challenges these centers face in relation to the evaluation and development of indicators, and suggest the use of social networks as a strategy to monitor the acceptance of their proposals in different social sectors.

• Present the case of Medialab UGR as an example of a university initiative in the creation of social and innovative spaces for the cocreation of knowledge.

1.1. The origin of social laboratories and medialabs: definition and typologies

In the field of education, John Dewey founded the Laboratory School in 1896, a school partnered to the University of Chicago where they addressed educational innovation from an experimental approach. Dewey criticized the passivity of attitudes and the homogeneity of teaching methods (Dewey, 2009: 73). In contrast, he developed a method to produce innovation through an approach of learning by doing, while he designed a space where he could test the formulated theoretical proposals. The combination of methodological design, test in real environments, and impact evaluation is common to the current approaches of intervention in small social communities. These proposals can be escalated based on their viability and effectiveness.

Wilbur C. Phillips, within the field of Public Health, developed a social organization model named social unit plan. Created between 1917 and 1920, it consisted of a system that allowed a shared management of community issues by the citizens and the experts themselves. Phillips (1974) wrote about his experience in the work “Adventuring for democracy” published in 1940. In this case, citizen participation in the development of solutions to common problems together with the contribution of experts serves as an example of the application of the cocreation approaches which are currently being developed. There is equal recognition of the value of socially distributed knowledge as well as the opposing notion of specialized and accredited knowledge.

With the democratization of access to technology, social laboratories began to experiment with technology. This has led to a merging of these laboratories and medialabs in their approach to society. The medialab, as such, was created at the Massachussets Institute of Techonology (MIT) in 1985, leading to similar initiatives in other places. Ruiz & Alcalá (2016) refer to other former initiatives in the 1970s as “pioneer labs”: EAT Experiments in Art and Technology (New York, 1963), CAVS – Center for Advanced Visual Studies (Massachusetts, 1967), and Generative Systems (Chicago, 1968). Within “modern labs”, apart from the MIT Medialab, we can find initiatives such as ZKM (Karlsruhe, Germany, 1989), ARS Electronica Center (Linz, Austria, 1996), or NTT – Intercommunication Center (Tokyo, Japan, 1997). However, we cannot firmly confirm that current medialabs descend directly from them. This is the case of the “P” Space (https://goo.gl/cqsBqb), a pioneer project created in Madrid in the 1980s by a private initiative without any existing connection to an institution.

Nowadays, the reach of the medialab model, in its different forms, has suffered a significant shift due to the social expansion of digital technologies. The contemporary vision of a medialab is that of a laboratory where the influence of technology in social transformation towards an active society is explored. This evolution has meant that the “Media” part of these laboratories no longer focuses on the concept of mass media but of mediation (Ruiz & Alcalá, 2016). These mediation laboratories are framed within the digital culture framework. The rapid democratization of technology has transformed medialabs, which no longer present a technological profile but a social perspective (Tanaka, 2011: 1).

In “Estudio/Propuesta para la creación de un Centro de Excelencia en Arte y Nuevas Tecnologías” (Alcalá & Maisons, 2004: 8; cited by Martín, 2016) the medialab is defined as the new basilica for the organization of speeches; the meeting point for the traveler, and the stage for all the common experiences which require individual submission to the formulation of its new game rules. More recently, we can find new types of laboratories such as hacklabs, makespaces, fablabs, citylabs, etc.

There are many approaches to classifying new types of medialabs. Tanaka (2011) distinguishes the following:

• Industry labs. Medialabs based on the model of research and development sustained by the industry. For instance: Bell Labs or IBM TJ Watson.

• Media art labs. Laboratories which use technology for artistic experimentation. European projects such as Ars Electronica Futurelab (Linz) and ZKM Center for Art and Media (Karlsruhe) are references here. There are also more recent initiatives focused on media innovation (Salaverría, 2015).

• University Labs. They are created in the university environment focused on innovation and entrepreneurship. A good example of this is the Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center (EMPAC) at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

• Citizen labs. They are socially involved and based on citizen participation with a DoItYourself philosophy. One of the main examples of citizen labs is the Medialab Prado in Madrid, a reference in Spain.

1.2. Social laboratories in Spain and their development in the universities

In recent years, many initiatives have been launched by social laboratories, both public and private. It is difficult to establish a common pattern among them. In places described as labs, we find a wide range of diversified proposals. The unquestionable referent in Spain is Medialab Prado (https://goo.gl/SSKVE), a project from the local council in Madrid founded in 2000. It is defined as “a critical center dedicated to cultural production through experimentation with digital technologies”. They focus “their research on the intersection between art, science, technology, and society, where the interdisciplinarity brings together hackers, artists, academia, cultural producers, humanists, social scientists, and programmers who meet to experiment in the development of prototypes” (Estalella, Rocha, & Lafuente, 2013: 30).

Tanaka (2011) points out that the changes tested by European universities based on the Bologna process have fostered the emergence of this type of more experimental centers, with an outstanding focus on the development of competences. Some examples are Media Lab Helsinki (Aalto University) or Paragraphe (Université Paris 8). Another center is Nebrija MediaLab (https://goo.gl/4dp1x4), an initiative of the University of Nebrija that pursues the development of competences in the degrees taught at the Faculty of Communication Sciences (Grijalba & Toledano, 2014). This is a more educational approach with a special interest in media, rather than a wider approach focused on digital culture.

In IberoAmerica, there are many different and interesting initiatives within the program of citizen innovation laboratories (https://goo.gl/xtO0Zh), and the program organized by the General IberoAmerican Secretary and MedialabPrado. This is the case of Open Labs (https://goo.gl/P0V3pw) at the Tecnológico de Monterrey. It is defined on its website as “a platform to deal with the complexity of the social from the principles of openness, experimentation, inclusion, diversity, participation, and cooperation”. Ecuador is another country where different university medialabs have been created (i.e. Medialab UTPL).

2. Technological and social experimentation in the university through social laboratories

2.1. The laboratories in the frame of social innovation and the digital culture

Medialabs are built on the concept of social innovation. This concept is defined as the development and implementation of new technologies (products, services, and models) that satisfy community needs, and create new relationships and social collaborations (European Commission, 2013: 6). Social innovation transcends social entrepreneurship, it focuses on strategies, methods, and theories for change, promoting citizen participation in the development of shared solutions (Phills, Deiglmeier, & Miller, 2008). The concept of social innovation is wide enough to become the meeting point of public and private interests and projects, through the vision of the citizen as a prosumer (Scolari, 2008). The European Union has located it within the strategy of Europe for 2020 as a key player to stimulate innovation, entrepreneurship, and the knowledge society (European Commission, 2013).

Following this line of thought, Casebourne & Armstrong (2014) identify six key communities in the innovative European ecosystem: Communities of open software and hardware. Communities of developers, linked to startups. Laboratories of innovation, including Living Labs, Fablabs, Makespaces, etc. Communities of open data and open knowledge. Smart citizens. Communities of open democracy.

The role of the universities focused on innovation (European Union/The Young Foundation, 2010: 82) can be essential for social development. They offer safe spaces crucial for fostering and promoting innovation. According to Ruiz and Alcalá (2016: 15), “the transformation of traditional centers that implemented traditional cultures into dialogue spaces, creative ecosystems, dedicated to reflection and debate, research and production, training and socialization” is a key issue. This transformation is taking place in the university environment, the natural place for this type of experiences but, at the same time, resistant to innovations that involve institutional changes.

To understand the role of medialabs in promoting social innovation we must consider digital culture as the central concept of their program. Romero (2013: 30) outlines an agenda with elements which are common to the work plans of these laboratories: The analysis and participation in multiple digital cultures: culture of screens, of oral, of remix, of visual, of transmedia, of prototype, and design. Open culture derived from open software. The hacker ethics. The interdisciplinarity / transdisciplinarity / multidisciplinarity. The combination of transversatility and specialization. The cocreation and the replacement of coauthorship and the academic recognition. The entrepreneurship and the innovation testing new ways of knowledge transference and connections with the society.

2.2. Laboratories as an engine for innovation at the University

Social laboratories share the following operational principles (Kieboom, 2014):

• “Show it, don’t tell”. There is a clear orientation to action and prototypes.

• Consideration of the user as an expert. The participants act as the engine for the laboratory through their needs and capacities.

• Centered in ambitious social challenges. They pay attention to systematic problems in opposition to more contingent situations.

• Ask about the system where it is inmersed. It sets out alternative operation models.

• Development of new methodologies for change. The process is, at least, as important as the final output.

• Multidisciplinarity and transversality, forming teams with people from different backgrounds.

• Scalation of proposals. The aim of these proposals is that, once tested, they can be applied in other contexts.

Medialabs promote the value and potential of the digital culture, allowing a better fit in the informational environment developed in the digital society. From a university perspective, it is not easy to find the right place for these laboratories. Their origin is usually in disciplinary spaces like Departments or Faculties, looking for an institutional recognition. The same happens in the frame of public institutions, such as Medialab Prado and the difficulty to fit it within the local council, as its director, Marcos García, states (2015).

The development of medialabs in the university environment creates new opportunities for innovation, incorporating the hacker spirit (Himanen, 2003) within institutions which are sometimes hundreds of years old. Digital transformation, openness, and social implication acquire a new dimension which is uncommon in higher education institutions. Medialabs coexist with other managerial approaches where quality processes are prioritized, involving in many cases, a bureaucratic load which prevents innovation and experimentation. Medialabs can “hack” university structures in order to present alternative models in issues that require a more agile and flexible development such as, the relation with society or new technologies and epistemic models.

Medialabs allow the development of a social epistemology (Kusch, 2011), shared and collective (Surowiecki, 2005), where academia is an actor inside the community, within an environment in which knowledge is distributed. Here we highlight the role of the commons. These are “resources and collective goods managed in common through particular governance methods and whose property regimen is neither public nor private” (Estalella, Rocha, & Lafuente, 2013: 25).

These centers are characterized by an open and social conception. There are two ways to understand this relationship: 1) through a transference approach based on the quadruple helix (Arnkil & al., 2010) where society becomes the fourth pillar, and 2) citizen science (Socientize Consortium, 2013: 6). Medialabs serve as innovators in universities in the sense that they apply principles and methods learnt from the digital environment. They trigger innovation processes which are open and shared. They are configured like generative platforms focused on production, in opposition to the idea of a closed website that shows contents to consumer users. They are also a means to explore the continuity of the physical and digital dimensions, far from fake dichotomies between “the real” and “the virtual”. An example of this is the Campo de Cebada in Madrid. It is a citizen initiative celebrated in the category of “digital communities” in the annual awards of the Ars Electronica (Magro & García, 2012).

2.3. Social impact

A serious problem problem in academia is the assessment of impact. It is traditionally based on the research activity of universities, teaching quality or knowledge transference. There is a fourth transversal dimension: social impact. An example of that is the last Research Evaluation Framework that took place in the UK. The aim of this evaluation was to evaluate the benefits that universities brought to society (Wilsdon & al., 2015).

In the case of medialabs, the evaluation must combine both quantitative and qualitative indicators. This is even more complicated if we consider the nature of the digital devices created or the assessment of methodological learning, independent of its final success. This new approach is rooted in social claims and the development of the digital culture. Therefore, fields like bibliometrics are expanding their range of interests towards social media, developing new alternative indicators (Priem, 2013; TorresSalinas, CabezasClavijo & JiménezContreras, 2013).

3. A proposal for the assessment of social impact

In this section, we suggest the use of social networks as a tool to monitor and measure the social impact of this type of academic initiatives open to society. Social networks offer an opportunity and a challenge to identify different impacts from those which are found in the sciences. This is something particularly needed in university medialabs. The birth of Web 2.0 and its ongoing adoption in the research community (CabezasClavijo, TorresSalinas, & DelgadoLópezCózar, 2009) brought an opportunity to trace new evidences in the use of scientific publications beyond citation. This gave rise to “Scientometrics 2.0” as Priem & Hemminger (2010) called it. Since then, a new research trend focused on the analysis of these new metrics called “altmetrics” has emerged (TorresSalinas, CabezasClavijo, & JiménezContreras, 2013). These new metrics have provoked great reat interest from evaluators and policy makers measuring the impact of research on nonacademic audiences (Wilsdon & al., 2015). Nevertheless, no methodology has yet been developed showing the value of the altmetrics to measure the social impact of research (Sugimoto & Larivière, 2016).

The main shortcoming these studies have is their similarity to the citation model: they look for mentions of research papers. The fact that they try to establish a link with the publication when looking for impact traces limits their approach. However, in recent years we have observed more innovative methodologies, which shift the focus from the scientific paper to the researcher. This is the perspective used by MilanésGuisado & TorresSalinas (2014). They analyze the number of mentions of papers published by a sample of researchers in social media. They also explore the visibility these researchers have in these networks. By establishing the researcher as their unit of analysis, they can explore aspects related indirectly with research closer to social impact. As the approach is based on the subject and not on the output, we can develop an escalating methodology without establishing aggregation levels, in which the role of the analyzed subject can vary depending on their scale.

The perspective and goals of a researcher who uses social media to reach nonacademic audiences differ from the perspectives and goals of an institution or research center. This approach is appropriate when analyzing digital centers which are embedded in the Internet. Social media offer further advantages. They allow us to identify the audiences a researcher or a medialab reaches in real time, giving the manager the opportunity to analyze the potential of the center to reach its target audience.

This perspective is based on the conceptual framework presented by Nederhof (2006). He conceptualizes the limitations on the use of bibliometric indicators in Social Sciences and Humanities as a question of audiences. RobinsonGarcia, van Leeuwen & Rafols (2016) also mention this. They suggest the use of social networks as a proxy to identify interactions among social sciences and humanities researchers in a local context. Nederhof (2006) establishes three types of audiences these researchers usually address:

• Global scientific community: characterized by very standardized communication patterns.

• Local experts: formed by professionals and academia who work with the local community.

• Nonacademic public: a very heterogeneous group.

We suggest a strategic evaluation model that does not determine impact in a vertical and unidimensional way, but a model able to characterize the different types of audiences. This way, it is easier to make strategic decisions when analyzing if the medialab is reaching its goals. Medialab needs indicators that offer an important level of immediacy. Figure 1 summarizes the type of analysis we suggest. We consider using Twitter as an observational tool. This platform is characterized by its capacity both to identify offline communities and create online communities. At the same time, it serves as a social and cognitive space where the professional and private interests are intertwined. The type of relations established and the type of users is very heterogeneous. An account can be an institution, a person, an anonymous collective, or even a fictional character. The relations among users can be established through mentions, retweets, or the followers and followed.

Due to the volatility of the networks based on mentions and retweets, we define the population of interest as the population formed by users who follow and are followed by the analyzed center. We consider that the existing bidirectional relationship between the net and the medialab show a mutual interest in the activities performed by each other (Gruzd, Wellman, & Takhteyev, 2011). Once the population of interest is identified, we search for the same type of relationships between every subject, their type of audience and their geographical proximity to the unit of analysis. We can easily identify whether they reach the target audiences through a descriptive analysis of the different audiences. In section 4, we offer an example of the aforementioned model applied to Medialab UGR.

4. The case of Medialab UGR

In 2015, Medialab UGR – Laboratory for the Research of Culture and Digital Society (https://goo.gl/f2ASE2) was created at the University of Granada. It is a laboratory that, according to its website, is defined as “a meeting place for the analysis, research, and dissemination of the possibilities that digital technologies create in the culture and the society in general”. It develops its activities in different University spaces around the city, as well as in other places that do not belong to the institution. This distribution reflects in the physical distribution the networked structure that characterizes its activity in the Internet.

The management of the laboratory is flexible. For instance, it broadcasts in streams all the activities it organizes. It bases its activity on the following values: openness, active citizens, creativity, experimentation, flexibility, social innovation, knowledge transfer (University –society and society– University), entrepreneur attitude, and activism in favor of open knowledge and open Internet.

It is focused on three main themes: Digital Society, Digital Humanities, and Digital Science. Below are some of the innovations this university proposal has introduced in the University of Granada:

• Launch of a project about digital identities (https://goo.gl/mNOCmv). Its aim is to detect and recognize the value of the communication that different individuals and groups in the University engage in on the Internet. This initiative is connected to a Communication and Innovation Award in Digital Media. The purpose of this is to promote Digital Scholarship (Weller, 2011) within the University and in the new types of knowledge that appear in the digital society.

• Creation of the Platform Livemetrics (https://goo.gl/tWQwR6) for the visualization of bibliometric information in real time.

• Organization of several conferences and meetings open to the presentation of projects by the university community and the public with issues such as Open Education, Makers, eDemocracy, or Open Innovation.

The project was created at institutional level in 2015, but its origin is based on a noninstitutional initiative named GrinUGR – Colaboration about digital cultures in Social Sciences and Humanities (https://goo.gl/sy9pnd). The institutionalization of these practices is just one of the values of the case we present.

4.1. A quantified approach to the impact of a university medialab: an analysis of the audience through Twitter.

Medialab UGR develops its activity both digitally and physically, leaving a significant footprint of its action. Good evidence of this is its birth: it was announced on Twitter before its official opening (https://goo.gl/wxXMMN). From that moment on, Twitter has been a key tool within its dissemination strategy.

In May 2016, we performed an initial analysis to identify the type of audiences Medialab has reached, and learn to what extent it had become a link between the university and society. In that moment, Medialab UGR had already organized a total of 13 activities (four workshops, six sessions, a conference, and two round tables). The aim was to establish different types of audience and their geographic proximity. In May 2016, we downloaded the data from Twitter using Simply Measured. At that moment, Medialab UGR had 930 followers and was following 614 accounts. While the number of followers reflects the population interested in Medialab UGR, it is highly presumptuous to consider that this population participated actively in its activities. On the other hand, followed accounts can exercise influence on the activities of the Medialab, but they may well be accounts the lab is interested in following for strategic reasons or institutional recognition.

Therefore, we consider that, when a bidirectional relationship is established between two accounts, we can confirm that there is a common interest. The idea is based on the notion of conceiving the unit of analysis as a node inside a larger network, where people/institutions are grouped into communities. We identified a total of 351 accounts that showed the mentioned bidirectional relationship. This group is defined as population of interest´. In Table 1, we show the segmentation of this population according to its geographical proximity and the type of identified accounts.

In terms of geographic outreach, Medialab UGR has not only involved researchers (38.2%) and students (9.4%), but also 37% of the audience who belong to nonacademic sectors. 61.5% of the profiles are local, highlighting their integration within their social context. This percentage goes down to 48.5% if we only focus on the nonacademic audience. Profiles do not belong only to individuals, but also to institutions, associations, and collectives (30%). The higher presence of institutional accounts is formed by faculties, departments, and other university organisations (30), although we can find some public organisations too. Paradoxically, none of these accounts belong to any organisations related to the local council.

Figure 2 shows the type of audience according to their interests, based on the information provided by Twitter and a manual search of their background. We observe that the main nonacademic and local audience is formed by teachers (28), students (29) and the cultural sector (11). Global audiences are represented by the cultural sector (18), teachers (16), journalists (12) and new technologies (17).

The graphic presented is purely descriptive since it intends to serve as an information tool for decision making and not to establish comparisons between different units. We observe how, despite doing the analysis at an early stage in the consolidation of the medialab, there are positive trends in its efforts to connect with diverse nonacademic audiences both at local and global levels. This type of analysis offers a different perspective to previous studies focused on altmetrics since we move from an evaluative perspective to a strategic perspective that facilitates decision making.

5. Discussion and conclusions

In relation to the first aim, this paper introduces medialabs as a means of innovation in the university context. They are born in the heart of the digital culture and they come to life in formats and epistemologies that shift away from that perspective. We have established a connection between the concepts of social laboratories and medialabs.

According to the second goal, we have established how the open, social, and digital nature of these laboratories requires the creation of new metrics of social involvement that goes beyond the traditional assessment models. Since the problem extends to the university in general, this type of laboratories offer opportunities to design and test new methods that can be extended to more holistic and multidimensional evaluations on the impact of the universities.

In this context, the the need to have the right tools to monitor the reception of its activities is essential. In this paper, we suggest the analysis of the different audiences targeted through social networks as a methodological approach for the future development of impact indicators. A first implementation based on Medialab UGR shows promise in its potential use for decision making. However, there are still some limitations, both technical and conceptual, which must be analyzed subsequently. In this sense, the meaning of “following” someone on Twitter is difficult to discern, as is its capacity to predict how its results translate into citizen participation. We suggest further research using this methodology in different medialabs in order to analyze its consistency and potential for the development of benchmarking indicators.


Romero-Frias Robinson-Garcia 2017a-56745-en012.jpg


Romero-Frias Robinson-Garcia 2017a-56745-en013.jpg


Romero-Frias Robinson-Garcia 2017a-56745-en014.jpg

References

Alcalá, J.R., & Maisons, S. (2004). Estudio/Propuesta para la creación de un Centro de Excelencia en Arte y Nuevas Tecnologías. Madrid: Fundación Telefónica.

Arnkil, R., Järvensivu, A., Koski, P., & Piirainen, T. (2010). Exploring Quadruple Helix. Report of Quadruple Helix Research for the CLIQ Project. Tampere: Work Research Centre, University of Tampere.

Cabezas-Clavijo, Á., Torres-Salinas, D., & Delgado López-Cózar, E. (2009). Ciencia 2.0: Catálogo de herramientas e implicaciones para la actividad investigadora. El Profesional de la Información, 18(1), 72-79. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2009.ene.10

Casebourne, J., & Armstrong, K. (eds.) (2014). Digital Social Innovation. Second Interim Study Report. (https://goo.gl/FK0S8Q) (2016-12-23).

Dewey, J. (2009). Democracia y escuela. Madrid: Popular.

Estalella, A., Rocha, J., & Lafuente, A. (2013). Laboratorios de procomún: experimentación, recursividad y activismo. Teknokultura, 10(1), 21-48.

European Commission (2013). Guide to Social Innovation. (https://goo.gl/W9moUD) (2016-12-23).

European Union / The Young Foundation (2010). Study on Social Innovation. (https://goo.gl/dfY1gA) (2016-12-23).

García, M. (2015). Medialab-Prado: retos del presente. LabMeeting 2015 en Medialab Prado (Madrid). https://goo.gl/CjexQB (2016-12-23).

Grijalba, N., & Toledano, F. (2014). Nebrija MediaLab: un valor añadido a la docencia y al desarrollo de competencias. Historia y Comunicación Social, 19, 733-744. https:/doi.org/10.5209/rev_HICS.2014.v19.45061

Gruzd, A., Wellman, B., & Takhteyev, Y. (2011). Imagining Twitter as an Imagined Community. American Behavioral Scientist, 55(10), 1294-1318. https://doi.org/10.1177/0002764211409378

Hassan, Z. (2014). The Social Labs Revolution: A New Approach to Solving our Most Complex Challenges. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler Publishers.

Himanen, P. (2003). La ética del hacker y el espíritu de la era de la información. Barcelona: Destino.

Kieboom, M. (2014). Lab Matters: Challenging the Practice of Social Innovation Laboratories. Amsterdam: Kennisland.

Kusch, M. (2011). Social Epistemology. In S. Bernecker, & D. Pritchard (Eds.), The Routledge Companion to Epistemology (pp.874-884). London / New York: Routledge.

Magro, C., & García, M. (2012). Lugares de la transdisciplinariedad. Lugares para la transdisciplinariedad. Errata. Revista de Artes Visuales, 8. (https://goo.gl/2CzDEQ) (2016-12-26).

Milanés-Guisado, Y., & Torres-Salinas, D. (2014). Presencia en redes sociales y altmétricas de los principales autores de la revista «El Profesional de la Información». El Profesional de la Información, 23(4), 367-372. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2014.jul.04

Nederhof, T. (2006). Bibliometric Monitoring of Research Performance in the Social Sciences and Humanities: A Review. Scientometrics, 66(1), 81-100. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-006-0007-2

Phillips, W.C. (1940). Adventuring for Democracy. New York: Social Unit Press.

Phills, J.A., Deiglmeier, K., & Miller, D.T. (2008). Rediscovering Social Innovation. Social Innovation Review. (https://goo.gl/i1sbvO) (2016-12-23).

Priem, J. (2013). Scholarship: Beyond the Paper. Nature, 495, 437-440. https://doi.org/10.1038/495437a

Priem, J., & Hemminger, B. H. (2010). Scientometrics 2.0: New Metrics of Scholarly Impact on the Social Web. First Monday, 15(7). (https://goo.gl/ODM1tz) (2016-12-23).

Robinson-Garcia, N., Van-Leeuwen, T.N., & Rafols, I. (2016). SSH & the City. A Network Approach for Tracing the Societal Contribution of the Social Sciences and Humanities for Local Development. Science and Technology Conference 2016. Peripheries, Frontiers and Beyond, 14-16 September. (https://goo.gl/bgI3jU) (2016-12-23).

Romero-Frías, E. (2013). Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades Digitales: una visión introductoria. In E. Romero-Frías, & M. Sánchez-González (Eds.) (2014). Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades Digitales. Técnicas, herramientas y experiencias de e-Research e investigación en colaboración. Cuadernos Artesanos de Comunicación, 61. (https://goo.gl/CDzAL9) (2016-12-23).

Ruiz-Marti´n, J.M., & Alcala´-Mellado, J.R. (2016). Los cuatro ejes de la cultura participativa actual. De las plataformas virtuales al medialab. Icono 14(14), 95-122. https://doi.org/10.7195/ri14.v14i1.904

Salaverría, R. (2015). Los labs como fórmula de innovación en los medios. El Profesional de la Información, 24(4), 397-404. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2015.jul.06

Scolari, C.A. (2008). Hipermediaciones. Elementos para una teoría de la comunicación digital interactiva. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Socientize Consortium (2013). The Green Paper on Citizen Science. Brusels: European Commission. (https://goo.gl/7P3FYf) (2016-12-23).

Sugimoto, C.R., & Larivière, V. (2016). Social Media Metrics as Indicators of Broader Impact. OECD Blue Sky III Forum on Science and Innovation Indicators. Gent (Belgium), September, 19-21.

Surowiecki, J. (2005). The Wisdom of Crowds. New York: Anchor.

Tanaka, A. (2011). Situating within Society: Blueprints and Strategies for Media Labs. In A. Tanaka & al. (2011), A Blueprint for a Lab of the Future (pp. 12-20). Eindhoven: Baltan Laboratories.

Torres-Salinas, D., Cabezas-Clavijo, A., & Jiménez-Contreras, E. (2013). Altmetrics: New Indicators for Scientific Communication in Web 2.0. [Altmetrics: nuevos indicadores para la comunicación científica en la Web 2.0]. Comunicar, 41(XXI), 53-60. https://doi.org/10.3916/C41-2013-05

Weller, M. (2011). The Digital Scholar. How Technology is Transforming Scholarly Practice. London: Bloomsbury.

Wilsdon, J., & al. (2015). The Metric Tide: Report of the Independent Review of the Role of Metrics in Research Assessment and Management. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.4929.1363



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Los laboratorios sociales, como espacios de experimentación y cocreación, se han convertido en una de las principales instituciones de innovación en nuestros días. En este marco, los medialabs surgen como un tipo de laboratorios centrados en la experimentación con tecnologías y medios de comunicación y evolucionan, con el desarrollo de la sociedad digital, hacia laboratorios de mediación ciudadana e innovación social. En los últimos tiempos se ha producido una expansión de estos modelos en el contexto universitario, generando casos de gran interés para el desarrollo de nuevas métricas del impacto académico en la sociedad. El presente trabajo aborda, en primer lugar, el concepto, origen y desarrollo de los laboratorios sociales en España y globalmente, centrándose específicamente en el espacio universitario y en los medialabs. En segundo lugar, expone la problemática de las métricas alternativas del impacto social, aportando una propuesta de análisis basada en Twitter como herramienta para identificar los distintos tipos de públicos que muestran interés y el nivel de participación que despierta su actividad. Por último, se aplica este análisis al caso de Medialab UGR en la Universidad de Granada, un laboratorio de cultura digital enfocado en la cocreación y colaboración social. Los resultados muestran la pluralidad de actores vinculados a este tipo de redes, así como la dificultad y complejidad de establecer indicadores que concilien tanto intereses académicos como sociales.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Los laboratorios sociales son plataformas ideadas para abordar retos sociales que presentan tres rasgos: 1) su carácter social, congregando gente con distintas características y enfoques para trabajar de forma colectiva; 2) su carácter experimental, en tanto que procesos de creación continuados en el tiempo; 3) su carácter sistémico, trabajando en la generación de prototipos que pueden resolver grandes retos. Así lo explica Hassan (2014) en su libro «The Social Labs Revolution: A New Approach to Solving our Most Complex Challenges» donde analiza el auge de este tipo de plataformas que han ido gestándose con mayor intensidad a lo largo de las últimas dos décadas. A pesar de su actualidad, el enfoque de experimentación social y de participación ciudadana no es nuevo, sino que tiene referentes históricos reseñables como los dos que presentamos en el apartado 1.1 correspondientes a principios del siglo XX.

El presente trabajo aborda el desarrollo histórico de los laboratorios sociales centrándose especialmente en la figura de los medialabs, que surgen en el entorno universitario con una filosofía de laboratorio ciudadano o laboratorio social. La reciente expansión de estos espacios de innovación digital y social en España, así como su heterogeneidad, plantean nuevos retos tanto en su estructura como en la evaluación de su actividad. Con una triple orientación, los medialabs universitarios pretenden, por un lado, servir de nexo entre la sociedad y la academia, convirtiéndose en un espacio de cocreación y colaboración ciudadana. Muy relacionado con este perfil, está su carácter docente y divulgador, sirviendo de canal bidireccional a través del cual ciudadanos e investigadores se influyen mutuamente y comparten conocimientos. Por último, destaca su perfil investigador, siendo motor de innovación educativa, social y digital, y perfilándose como el lugar idóneo para la experimentación y el ensayo de nuevas metodologías y fórmulas educativas y de participación ciudadana. Ante este triple reto, el presente trabajo persigue los siguientes objetivos:

1) Contextualizar el fenómeno de los laboratorios sociales y concretamente los medialabs en nuestro país y en el entorno universitario mediante una revisión de los principales hitos históricos que definen su desarrollo y evolución.

2) Analizar los problemas que plantean estos centros de cara a la evaluación y al desarrollo de indicadores y proponer el uso de las redes sociales como estrategia para monitorizar la aceptación de sus propuestas en los distintos sectores sociales.

3) Presentar el caso del Medialab UGR como ejemplo de iniciativa universitaria en la creación de espacios sociales e innovadores de cocreación de conocimiento.

1.1. El origen de los laboratorios sociales y de los medialabs: definición y tipologías

En el ámbito de la educación, en 1896 John Dewey fundó el Laboratory School, un colegio vinculado a la Universidad de Chicago en el que se abordaba la innovación educativa desde un enfoque experimental. Dewey criticaba «la pasividad de actitudes, la masificación mecánica de los niños y la uniformidad en el programa escolar y en el método» (Dewey, 2009: 73). Como contraposición desarrolló un método para generar innovación desde un enfoque de «aprender haciendo», al tiempo que diseñó un espacio en el que poder observar las propuestas teóricas que se formulaban. La combinación de diseño metodológico, experimentación en entornos reales y evaluación del impacto es común a los actuales enfoques de intervenciones centradas en pequeñas comunidades ciudadanas con propuestas que son posteriormente escalables en función de su eficacia y viabilidad.

Wilbur C. Phillips, en el ámbito de la salud pública, desarrolló un modelo de organización social denominado «Social Unit Plan». Se trataba de un sistema, desarrollado entre 1917 y 1920, que permitía una gestión compartida de los asuntos comunitarios por parte de los ciudadanos y los propios expertos. Phillips (1940) dejó por escrito su experiencia en la obra «Adventuring for democracy». En este caso la implicación ciudadana en el desarrollo de soluciones a problemas comunes en conjunción con la aportación de los expertos responde a los enfoques de cocreación que se desarrollan actualmente. Se reconoce igualmente el valor del conocimiento distribuido socialmente frente al imperio de un saber especializado y acreditado.

En la línea de desarrollo de los laboratorios sociales podemos sumar las contribuciones que desde la experimentación con la tecnología realizan los laboratorios de medios o medialabs, unos laboratorios que, con la democratización del acceso a la tecnología, han acabado convergiendo con los primeros en su enfoque ciudadano. El medialab, bajo dicha nomenclatura, surge de forma canónica en el Massachussets Institute of Technology (MIT) en 1985, generando iniciativas similares en otros lugares. RuizMartín y AlcaláMellado (2016) denominan como «labs pioneros» a otras iniciativas previas en los años sesenta: Experiments in Art and Technology (EAT) (Nueva York, 1963), Center for Advanced Visual Studies (CAVS) (Massachusetts, 1967) y Generative Systems (Chicago, 1968). Dentro de los «labs modernos», junto con MIT Medialab se sitúan iniciativas como Karlsruhe (ZKM) (Alemania, 1989), Electronica Center (ARS) (Linz, Austria, 1996) o Intercommunication Center (NNT) (Tokio, Japón, 1997). Con todo no podemos afirmar que esta sea la única fuente de la que beben los medialabs actuales. El panorama es complejo con proyectos experimentales que empleaban tecnología para sus creaciones artísticas. Es el caso de Espacio P (https://goo.gl/cqsBqb), un proyecto pionero generado por iniciativa particular, sin vinculación institucional, que surge en Madrid a principios de los 80.

Actualmente el alcance del modelo medialab, en sus diferentes denominaciones, ha sufrido un significativo desplazamiento fruto de la expansión social de las tecnologías digitales. La visión contemporánea del medialab es la de un laboratorio donde se explora la influencia de la tecnología en los procesos de transformación social hacia una ciudadanía activa. La evolución ha hecho que la parte «Media» de estos laboratorios deje de centrarse esencialmente en la idea de medios de comunicación para incorporar la idea de mediación (RuizMartín & AlcaláMellado, 2016). Laboratorios de mediación que se enmarcan de forma natural dentro de las claves de la cultura digital. La rápida democratización de la tecnología ha hecho que los medialabs hayan pasado de presentar un perfil tecnológico a adoptar una perspectiva social (Tanaka, 2011).

En el «Estudio/Propuesta para la creación de un Centro de Excelencia en Arte y Nuevas Tecnologías» (Alcalá & Maisons, 2004: 8; citado por Martín, 2016) se define medialab como «la nueva basílica de la organización de los discursos, como lugar de encuentro del viajero y escenario de todas las experiencias colectivas que requiere del sometimiento individual a las formulaciones de sus nuevas reglas de juego». Más recientemente se le suman al complejo panorama de laboratorios nuevas formas como son «hacklabs», «makespaces», «fablabs», «citylabs», etc.

Existen muchos enfoques desde los que poder clasificar las diversas formas de medialab. Tanaka (2011) distingue los siguientes:

• Laboratorios de empresa (Industry labs). Medialabs basados en el modelo de los laboratorios de investigación y desarrollo mantenidos por las empresas. Por ejemplo: Bell Labs o IBM TJ Watson.

• Laboratorios de medios y arte (Media art labs). Laboratorios donde la tecnología se emplea para la experimentación artística. Destacan proyectos europeos como Ars Electronica Futurelab (Linz) y ZKM Center for Art and Media (Karlsruhe). También destacan iniciativas más recientes centradas en la innovación en medios de comunicación (Salaverría, 2015).

• Laboratorios universitarios (University labs). Laboratorios generados en el entorno universitario centrados en la innovación y el emprendimiento. Ejemplo de ellos es Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center (EMPAC) en el Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

• Laboratorios ciudadanos (Citizen labs). Laboratorios con implicación social y basados en la participación ciudadana con una filosofía DoItYourself (DIY). Uno de los principales ejemplos es el de Medialab Prado en Madrid, referente en España.

1.2. Los laboratorios sociales en España y su desarrollo en las universidades

En los últimos años han surgido numerosos laboratorios partiendo tanto de iniciativas privadas como públicas. Es difícil establecer un patrón común a todos ellos, bajo la denominación de «lab» podemos encontrar propuestas con valores muy diversos. El referente indiscutible en España por su trayectoria, es Medialab Prado (https://goo.gl/SSKVE), un proyecto del Ayuntamiento de Madrid fundado en 2000. Se define como un «centro crítico dedicado a la producción cultural a través de la experimentación con las tecnologías digitales», situando «su investigación en la intersección entre arte, ciencia, tecnología y sociedad donde la interdisciplinaridad congrega a hackers, artistas, académicos, productores culturales, humanistas, científicos sociales y programadores que se reúnen para experimentar en el desarrollo de prototipos» (Estalella, Rocha, & Lafuente, 2013: 30).

Tanaka (2011) apunta que los cambios experimentados por las universidades europeas, a raíz del proceso de Bolonia, han promovido la aparición de este tipo de centros de carácter más experimental, con un marcado foco en el desarrollo de competencias. Algunos ejemplos son Media Lab Helsinki (Aalto University) o Paragraphe (Université Paris 8). Otro centro es Nebrija MediaLab (https://goo.gl/4dp1x4), una iniciativa de la Universidad Nebrija que persigue desarrollar competencias en los grados impartidos en la Facultad de Ciencias de la Comunicación (Grijalba & Toledano, 2014). Estamos ante un enfoque principalmente docente con especial interés por los medios de comunicación frente a un enfoque más amplio centrado en cultura digital.

Dentro del programa de los laboratorios de innovación ciudadana en Iberoamérica (https://goo.gl/xtO0Zh) y en el marco del programa de residencias organizado por la Secretaría General Iberoamericana y MedialabPrado, han surgido distintas iniciativas de especial interés. Es el caso del Open Labs (https://goo.gl/P0V3pw) dentro del Tecnológico de Monterrey. Se define en su web como «una plataforma para abordar la complejidad de lo social desde los principios de apertura, experimentación, inclusión, diversidad, participación y colaboración». Ecuador es otro de los países donde han surgido diversos medialabs universitarios (por ejemplo, Medialab UTPL).

2. La experimentación tecnológica y social en la universidad a través de los laboratorios sociales

2.1. Los laboratorios en el marco de la innovación social y la cultura digital

Los medialabs se construyen sobre el concepto de innovación social. Esta se define como el desarrollo y la implementación de nuevas ideas (productos, servicios y modelos) que satisfagan las necesidades de la comunidad y creen nuevas relaciones y colaboraciones sociales (European Commission, 2013). La innovación social va más allá del emprendimiento social, atendiendo a las estrategias, tácticas y teorías de cambio, que activan la participación ciudadana en el desarrollo de soluciones compartidas (Phills, Deiglmeier, & Miller, 2008). El concepto de innovación social es lo suficientemente amplio como para convertirse en el espacio de encuentro de intereses y proyectos públicos y privados, todos ellos a través de una visión del ciudadano como prosumidor (Scolari, 2008). La Unión Europea lo ha situado dentro de la estrategia de Europa para el 2020 como una pieza importante para estimular la innovación, el emprendimiento y la sociedad del conocimiento (European Commission, 2013).

Siguiendo esta línea, Casebourne & Armstrong (2014) identifican seis comunidades clave en el ecosistema innovador europeo: comunidades de software y hardware libre; comunidades de desarrolladores, vinculados al ámbito de las startups; laboratorios de innovación, incluyendo «living labs», «fablabs», «makespaces», etc.; comunidades de datos abiertos y conocimiento abierto; «smart citizens»; y comunidades de democracia abierta.

El papel de las universidades centradas en innovación (European Union/The Young Foundation, 2010) puede ser clave en el desarrollo social. Proporcionan espacios seguros cruciales para que la innovación social se asiente y crezca. Para RuizMartí´n & Alcalá´Mellado (2016: 15) es clave «la transformación de centros tradicionales que implementaron culturas tradicionales en espacios de diálogo, en ecosistemas creativos, simultáneamente dedicados a la reflexión y al debate, a la investigación y la producción, a la formación y a la socialización». Esta transformación se está produciendo en el espacio universitario, lugar natural para este tipo de experiencias, pero a la vez refractario a innovaciones de complejo encaje institucional.

Para entender el papel de los medialabs en la innovación social debemos sumar la cultura digital como eje esencial de su programa. RomeroFrías (2013) esboza una agenda con elementos comunes a los programas de trabajo de los laboratorios: el análisis y participación en múltiples culturas digitales: cultura de las pantallas, de lo oral, del remix, de lo visual, de lo transmedia, del prototipo y del diseño; la cultura libre derivada del software libre; la ética hacker; lo interdisciplinar/transdiciplinar/multidisciplinar; la combinación de transversalidad y especialización; la cocreación y el replanteamiento de las formas de autoría y del reconocimiento académico; y el emprendimiento y la innovación experimentando nuevas formas de transferencia de conocimiento y conexiones con la sociedad.

2.2. Los laboratorios como motor de innovación en la Universidad

Los laboratorios sociales comparten los siguientes principios de funcionamiento (Kieboom, 2014):

• «Muéstralo, no lo cuentes». Hay una clara orientación a la acción y al prototipado.

• Consideración del usuario como un experto. Son los propios participantes los que a través de sus necesidades y capacidades actúan como motor del laboratorio.

• Centrado en problemas sociales ambiciosos. Se presta atención a problemas sistémicos frente a situaciones de caáctr más contingente.

• Cuestionamiento del sistema en el que se halla inmerso. Plantea modelos alternativos de funcionamiento.

• Desarrollo de nuevas metodologías para el cambio. El proceso adquiere al menos tanta importancia como el resultado final.

• Multidisciplinariedad y transversalidad, combinando en equipos a personas de muy diverso perfil.

• Escalabilidad de las propuestas generadas. La vocación de las propuestas que se generan es, una vez probadas, que puedan ser aplicadas en contextos más amplios.

Los medialabs añaden los valores y el potencial de la cultura digital, permitiendo un mejor acople dentro del entorno informacional que se desarrolla en la sociedad digital. Desde una perspectiva universitaria cabe destacar que el encaje de estos centros genera problemas a la hora de ubicarlos dentro de las estructuras institucionales. Así, su origen suele estar en espacios disciplinares como son los Departamentos o las Facultades, en busca de una legitimación institucional. Ocurre lo mismo en el marco de otras instituciones públicas, como Medialab Prado y la dificultad de su adscripción dentro del Ayuntamiento de Madrid, como manifiesta su director, Marcos García (2015).

El desarrollo de los medialabs en el entorno universitario genera nuevas oportunidades para la innovación, incorporando el espíritu hacker (Himanen, 2003) dentro de instituciones en ocasiones centenarias. La transformación digital, la apertura y la implicación social adquieren una nueva dimensión poco frecuente en las instituciones de educación superior. Los medialabs conviven con otros enfoques de gestión que priman procesos de garantía de la calidad generando, en algunos casos, una carga burocrática que dificulta la innovación y experimentación. El medialab puede cumplir el papel de «hackear» las propias estructuras universitarias para presentar modelos alternativos en temas que requieren un desarrollo más ágil y flexible como, por ejemplo, la relación con la ciudadanía o nuevas metodologías y modelos epistemológicos.

Suponen el desarrollo de una epistemología social (Kusch, 2011), compartida y colectiva (Surowiecki, 2005), en la que la academia es un actor más dentro de su comunidad, en un entorno en el que el conocimiento está distribuido. Se reivindica el papel de los procomunes, que son «recursos y bienes colectivos gestionados en común mediante unas formas de gobernanza particulares y cuyo régimen de propiedad no es ni público ni privado» (Estalella, Rocha, & Lafuente, 2013: 25).

Hemos insistido en la concepción abierta y ciudadana de estos centros. Dos formas de entender esta relación son: 1) a través del enfoque de transferencia basado en la cuádruple hélice (Arnkil, Järvensivu, Koski, & Piirainen, 2010) donde la ciudadanía se convierte en ese cuarto pilar, y 2) de la ciencia ciudadana (Socientize Consortium, 2013: 6). La innovación que el medialab aporta a la institución universitaria se concreta en la materialización de los principios y formas de relación aprendidos en el ámbito digital. Se generan procesos de innovación abiertos y compartidos. Se configuran como plataformas generativas orientadas a la producción, frente a la idea de portal que muestra unos contenidos ya cerrados a unos usuarios consumidores. Suponen también una forma de explorar la continuidad de las dimensiones física y digital, lejos de falsas dicotomías entre «lo real» y «lo virtual». Un ejemplo es el Campo de Cebada en Madrid, iniciativa ciudadana premiada en la categoría de «comunidades digitales» en los premios que anualmente entrega Ars Electronica (Magro & García, 2012).

2.3. El impacto social

Un problema clave en el ámbito académico es el de la valoración del impacto, que tradicionalmente se basa en la actividad investigadora de las universidades, o en la medición de la calidad docente o de la transferencia de conocimiento. Existe una cuarta dimensión transversal al resto: el impacto social. Muestra de ello es la última evaluación nacional a la que se sometieron las universidades británicas donde el objetivo era evaluar los beneficios que las universidades reportaban a la sociedad (Wilsdon & al., 2015).

En el caso de iniciativas del tipo medialab la evaluación debe combinar indicadores tanto cuantitativos como cualitativos. Todo ello se hace aún más complejo si tenemos en cuenta la naturaleza singular de los artefactos digitales generados o la valoración del aprendizaje metodológico con independencia del éxito final de la solución alcanzada. Esta nueva aproximación surge por las demandas sociales, así como por el desarrollo de la cultura digital. Reflejo de ello es el hecho de que campos como el de la bibliometría amplíen su campo de interés hacia las redes sociales desarrollando nuevos indicadores alternativos (Priem, 2013; TorresSalinas, CabezasClavijo, & JiménezContreras, 2013).

3. Una propuesta de medición aumentada del impacto social

En esta sección proponemos el uso de las redes sociales como herramienta para monitorizar y captar el impacto social de este tipo de iniciativas académicas abiertas a la ciudadanía. Las redes sociales plantean una oportunidad y un reto aún mayor para identificar indicios de impacto más allá del científico, algo especialmente necesario en iniciativas como los medialabs universitarios. El nacimiento de la Web 2.0 y su progresiva adopción entre la comunidad investigadora (CabezasClavijo, TorresSalinas, & DelgadoLópezCózar, 2009) brindó la oportunidad para rastrear nuevas evidencias del uso de las publicaciones científicas más allá de la citación, dando lugar a lo que Priem y Hemminger (2010) bautizaron como «Cienciometría 2.0». Desde ese momento, se inició una corriente de investigación centrada en el análisis de estas nuevas métricas denominadas «altmetrics» (TorresSalinas & al., 2013). Estas métricas han despertado un gran interés por parte de evaluadores y gestores en política científica por su potencial para medir el impacto de la investigación dentro de audiencias no científicas (Wilsdon & al., 2015). No obstante, aún no se han podido desarrollar metodologías que muestren el valor de las altmétricas para medir el impacto social de la investigación (Sugimoto & Larivière, 2016).

El principal problema radica en que la aproximación que se hace sigue siendo muy similar a la de la citación: se buscan menciones/citas a trabajos de investigación. El hecho de que se intente establecer el vínculo con la publicación a la hora de buscar indicios de impacto que vayan más allá del puramente científico supone una limitación. Sin embargo, en los últimos años se está apostando por metodologías más innovadoras cambiando el foco de la publicación científica y centrándose en el investigador. Esta es la perspectiva empleada por MilanésGuisado & TorresSalinas (2014) donde se analiza el número de menciones que reciben los trabajos de una muestra de investigadores en las redes sociales, y la visibilidad que tienen dichos autores en las redes sociales. La introducción del investigador como unidad de análisis y la exploración de indicadores no basados en publicaciones permite profundizar en aspectos relacionados indirectamente con la investigación más cercanos a lo que se concibe como impacto social. Al plantear un enfoque basado en el sujeto y no en el output, se puede desarrollar una metodología escalable sin necesidad de establecer niveles de agregación, en la que la función del sujeto analizado puede variar en función de su escala.

La perspectiva y los objetivos a conseguir por parte de un investigador que emplea las redes sociales para alcanzar audiencias no académicas difieren de la perspectiva y objetivos de una institución o un centro de investigación. Esta aproximación resulta adecuada cuando nos referimos a centros digitales cuyo ámbito natural es la red. Las redes sociales ofrecen ventajas adicionales, ya que no solamente permiten identificar las audiencias a las que llega un investigador o un medialab, sino que lo hacen en tiempo real, dando la oportunidad al gestor de analizar el potencial del centro para alcanzar a las audiencias objetivo.

Esta perspectiva se basa en el marco conceptual presentado por Nederhof (2006) donde analiza las razones por las que es problemático utilizar indicadores bibliométricos en las disciplinas de las Ciencias Sociales y Humanas por una cuestión de audiencias. RobinsonGarcia, VanLeeuwen y Rafols (2016) también plantean utilizar las redes sociales como proxy para identificar interacciones entre investigadores de ciencias sociales y humanas con el entorno local. Nederhof (2006) establece tres tipos de audiencias a las que estos investigadores se suelen dirigir:

• La comunidad científica global: caracterizada por unos patrones de comunicación muy estandarizados.

• Expertos locales: formada por profesionales y académicos que trabajan con el entorno local.

• El público no académico: conjunto muy heterogéneo.

Proponemos un modelo de evaluación estratégico, que no determine el impacto de manera vertical y unidimensional, sino que permita caracterizar los tipos de audiencias. Así, se facilita la toma de decisiones estratégicas al analizar si el medialab está cumpliendo con sus objetivos. Los medialabs necesitan de indicadores que ofrezcan un importante grado de inmediatez. El Gráfico 1 resume el tipo de análisis que proponemos. Planteamos emplear Twitter como herramienta de observación. Esta plataforma se caracteriza por su capacidad tanto para identificar comunidades offline como para crear comunidades online, sirviendo como espacio social y cognitivo donde se reflejan intereses profesionales y privados. El tipo de relaciones que se establecen y el tipo de usuarios es muy heterogéneo. Una cuenta puede ser una institución, un individuo, un colectivo anónimo o incluso un personaje de ficción. Las relaciones entre usuarios se pueden establecer a través de menciones, retuits o seguidores y seguidos.

Debido a la volatilidad de las redes basadas en menciones y retuits, definimos la población de interés como aquella compuesta por usuarios que siguen y son seguidos por el centro analizado. Se considera que al existir una relación bidireccional entre la red y el medialab se evidencia un interés mutuo por la actividad que realiza el otro (Gruzd, Wellman, & Takhteyev, 2011). Una vez identificada la población de interés, se buscan relaciones del mismo tipo entre cada uno de los sujetos para establecer comunidades, y se caracterizan cada uno de ellos según el tipo de audiencia y el alcance geográfico. Mediante un análisis descriptivo de los tipos de audiencias se permite rápidamente identificar si de hecho se está alcanzando el público objetivo. En la sección 4 ofrecemos un ejemplo de dicho modelo aplicado a Medialab UGR.

4. El caso de Medialab UGR

En 2015 se crea Medialab UGR (Laboratorio de Investigación en Cultura y Sociedad Digital) (https://goo.gl/f2ASE2), de la Universidad de Granada. Se trata de un laboratorio que se concibe, según su web, como «un espacio de encuentro para el análisis, investigación y difusión de las posibilidades que las tecnologías digitales generan en la cultura y en la sociedad en general». Desarrolla sus actividades en los diversos espacios que la Universidad tiene distribuidos por la ciudad, así como en otros lugares ajenos a la institución. Esa distribución refleja en el espacio físico la estructura en red que es característica de su actividad en Internet.

La gestión del laboratorio es flexible, emitiendo, por ejemplo, en streaming, todas las actividades que se realizan. Los valores en los que basa su trabajo son: apertura, ciudadanía activa, creatividad, experimentación, flexibilidad, innovación social, transferencia de conocimiento (universidad/sociedad y sociedad/universidad), actitud emprendedora y activismo en favor del conocimiento abierto y una Internet libre.

Se centra en tres líneas principales: Sociedad Digital, Humanidades Digitales y Ciencia Digital. Señalamos algunas de las innovaciones que esta propuesta universitaria ha introducido en el ámbito de la Universidad de Granada:

• Lanzamiento de un proyecto sobre identidades digitales (https://goo.gl/mNOCmv) con el objeto de detectar y reconocer el valor de la comunicación que los distintos individuos y grupos de la universidad llevan a cabo en Internet. Esta iniciativa se conecta con un Premio de Comunicación e Innovación en Medios Digitales. Todo ello se enmarca en la línea de promover el Digital Scholarship (Weller, 2011) en la universidad, así como en las nuevas formas de conocimiento que emergen en la sociedad digital.

• Creación de la plataforma «Livemetrics» (https://goo.gl/tWQwR6) para visualización de información bibliométrica en tiempo real.

• Organización de múltiples jornadas y encuentros abiertos a la presentación de proyectos por parte de la comunidad universitaria y de la sociedad en general en temas como Educación Abierta, Makers, eDemocracia o Innovación Abierta. Si bien institucionalmente el proyecto se crea en 2015, su origen está en una iniciativa no institucional denominada GrinUGR

• «Colaboratorio sobre culturas digitales en Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades» (https://goo.gl/sy9pnd). El proceso de institucionalización de estas prácticas es justamente uno de los valores del caso que presentamos.

4.1. Una aproximación cuantificada al impacto de un medialab universitario: análisis de audiencias a través de Twitter

Medialab UGR desarrolla su actividad tanto digital como presencialmente dejando en las redes sociales una huella significativa de su acción. Buena evidencia de ello es su nacimiento, que quedó patente en Twitter antes de su inauguración oficial (https://goo.gl/wxXMMN). Desde entonces, Twitter ha sido una importante herramienta dentro de su estrategia de difusión.

En mayo de 2016, abordamos un primer análisis para identificar el tipo de audiencias del Medialab y saber hasta qué punto era enlace entre sociedad y universidad. En ese momento, ya se habían celebrado un total de 13 actividades (cuatro talleres, seis jornadas, una conferencia y dos mesas redondas). El objetivo era establecer los diferentes tipos de audiencia y su alcance geográfico. En mayo de 2016 descargamos los datos de Twitter utilizando Simply Measured. En ese momento, Medialab UGR contaba con 930 seguidores y 614 seguidos. Mientras que el número de seguidores refleja la población interesada, resulta muy ambicioso presumir que dicha población participa de manera activa en sus actividades. Por otro lado, los seguidos pueden ejercer cierta influencia en las actividades del Medialab o simplemente son fuentes que al centro le interesa seguir por razones estratégicas o de reconocimiento institucional.

Se considera, por tanto, que cuando se establece una relación bidireccional entre dos cuentas es cuando podemos aseverar que hay un interés común. La idea se basa en la noción de concebir a la unidad de análisis como un nodo dentro de una red mayor, donde los individuos/instituciones se agrupan en comunidades. Identificamos a un total de 351 cuentas que mostraban dicha relación bidireccional. Esta es la que definimos como población de interés. En la Tabla 1 se muestra la segmentación de dicha población según su proximidad geográfica y el tipo de cuentas identificadas.

En términos de alcance geográfico, Medialab UGR no solo ha implicado a investigadores (38,2%) y estudiantes (9,4%), sino también cuenta con un 37% de la audiencia de sectores no académicos. El 61,5% de los perfiles son locales, resaltando la integración con su entorno social. Este porcentaje desciende al 48,5% si nos centramos solo en la audiencia no académica. Los perfiles no son solo de individuos, también encontramos instituciones, asociaciones y colectivos (30%). La mayor presencia de cuentas institucionales está formada por facultades, departamentos y otros organismos universitarios (30), aunque también destacan algunos organismos públicos. Paradójicamente ninguna de estas cuentas pertenece a organismos asociados con el ayuntamiento local.

El Gráfico 2 muestra el tipo de audiencia según sus intereses de acuerdo a la descripción de su información biográfica en Twitter así como de la búsqueda manual de su ocupación laboral. En ella observamos que, dentro del ámbito no académico las principales audiencias locales están formadas por educadores (28), estudiantes (29) y del sector cultural (11). Fuera del ámbito local, destaca el ámbito cultural (18), educadores (16), periodistas (12) y las nuevas tecnologías (7).

La visión que se presenta es puramente descriptiva, puesto que lo que pretende es servir como herramienta informativa para la toma de decisiones y no establecer comparaciones entre distintas unidades. Observamos cómo, a pesar de realizar el análisis en una fase inicial de consolidación del medialab, se observan tendencias positivas en sus esfuerzos por conectar con audiencias diversas no académicas tanto a nivel local como global. Este tipo de análisis ofrece una perspectiva distinta a los estudios previos centrados en altmetrics al ir de una perspectiva evaluativa y vertical a una perspectiva estratégica que facilite la toma de decisiones.

5. Discusión y conclusiones

En relación con el primer objetivo, el presente trabajo introduce los medialabs como una forma de innovación en el ámbito universitario que nace del corazón de la cultura digital y se materializa en formatos y epistemologías que escapan de esa propia dimensión adquiriendo una materialidad en espacios físicos. Hemos establecido la conexión entre los conceptos de laboratorios sociales y medialabs.

De acuerdo con el segundo objetivo, se ha establecido cómo la naturaleza abierta, ciudadana y digital de estos laboratorios exige la generación de nuevas métricas de implicación social que vayan más allá de los modelos de medición tradicionales. Si bien la problemática es extensiva a la institución universitaria en general, este tipo de laboratorios ofrece oportunidades para diseñar y probar modelos que pueden extenderse a valoraciones más holísticas y multidimensionales del impacto de las universidades.

En este contexto, la necesidad de contar con las herramientas adecuadas para monitorizar la recepción de sus actividades es esencial. En este trabajo se propone el análisis de las audiencias a través de las redes sociales como aproximación metodológica para el futuro desarrollo de indicadores de impacto. Una primera aproximación a su implementación en el caso de Medialab UGR invita al optimismo y a su posible utilización para la toma de decisiones. No obstante, existen aún ciertas limitaciones tanto técnicas como conceptuales que deben ser analizadas previamente. En este sentido, el significado ‘seguir’ a alguien en Twitter es difícil de discernir, así como su implementación para predecir en qué se traduce en términos de participación activa. El ejemplo presentado aquí emplea Twitter, pero también es de interés analizar otras plataformas. Se plantea como futura línea de investigación su aplicación a diversos medialabs a fin de analizar su consistencia y su potencial para el desarrollo de indicadores comparativos.


Romero-Frias Robinson-Garcia 2017a-56745 ov-es012.jpg


Romero-Frias Robinson-Garcia 2017a-56745 ov-es013.jpg


Romero-Frias Robinson-Garcia 2017a-56745 ov-es014.jpg

Referencias

Alcalá, J.R., & Maisons, S. (2004). Estudio/Propuesta para la creación de un Centro de Excelencia en Arte y Nuevas Tecnologías. Madrid: Fundación Telefónica.

Arnkil, R., Järvensivu, A., Koski, P., & Piirainen, T. (2010). Exploring Quadruple Helix. Report of Quadruple Helix Research for the CLIQ Project. Tampere: Work Research Centre, University of Tampere.

Cabezas-Clavijo, Á., Torres-Salinas, D., & Delgado López-Cózar, E. (2009). Ciencia 2.0: Catálogo de herramientas e implicaciones para la actividad investigadora. El Profesional de la Información, 18(1), 72-79. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2009.ene.10

Casebourne, J., & Armstrong, K. (eds.) (2014). Digital Social Innovation. Second Interim Study Report. (https://goo.gl/FK0S8Q) (2016-12-23).

Dewey, J. (2009). Democracia y escuela. Madrid: Popular.

Estalella, A., Rocha, J., & Lafuente, A. (2013). Laboratorios de procomún: experimentación, recursividad y activismo. Teknokultura, 10(1), 21-48.

European Commission (2013). Guide to Social Innovation. (https://goo.gl/W9moUD) (2016-12-23).

European Union / The Young Foundation (2010). Study on Social Innovation. (https://goo.gl/dfY1gA) (2016-12-23).

García, M. (2015). Medialab-Prado: retos del presente. LabMeeting 2015 en Medialab Prado (Madrid). https://goo.gl/CjexQB (2016-12-23).

Grijalba, N., & Toledano, F. (2014). Nebrija MediaLab: un valor añadido a la docencia y al desarrollo de competencias. Historia y Comunicación Social, 19, 733-744. https:/doi.org/10.5209/rev_HICS.2014.v19.45061

Gruzd, A., Wellman, B., & Takhteyev, Y. (2011). Imagining Twitter as an Imagined Community. American Behavioral Scientist, 55(10), 1294-1318. https://doi.org/10.1177/0002764211409378

Hassan, Z. (2014). The Social Labs Revolution: A New Approach to Solving our Most Complex Challenges. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler Publishers.

Himanen, P. (2003). La ética del hacker y el espíritu de la era de la información. Barcelona: Destino.

Kieboom, M. (2014). Lab Matters: Challenging the Practice of Social Innovation Laboratories. Amsterdam: Kennisland.

Kusch, M. (2011). Social Epistemology. In S. Bernecker, & D. Pritchard (Eds.), The Routledge Companion to Epistemology (pp.874-884). London / New York: Routledge.

Magro, C., & García, M. (2012). Lugares de la transdisciplinariedad. Lugares para la transdisciplinariedad. Errata. Revista de Artes Visuales, 8. (https://goo.gl/2CzDEQ) (2016-12-26).

Milanés-Guisado, Y., & Torres-Salinas, D. (2014). Presencia en redes sociales y altmétricas de los principales autores de la revista «El Profesional de la Información». El Profesional de la Información, 23(4), 367-372. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2014.jul.04

Nederhof, T. (2006). Bibliometric Monitoring of Research Performance in the Social Sciences and Humanities: A Review. Scientometrics, 66(1), 81-100. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-006-0007-2

Phillips, W.C. (1940). Adventuring for Democracy. New York: Social Unit Press.

Phills, J.A., Deiglmeier, K., & Miller, D.T. (2008). Rediscovering Social Innovation. Social Innovation Review. (https://goo.gl/i1sbvO) (2016-12-23).

Priem, J. (2013). Scholarship: Beyond the Paper. Nature, 495, 437-440. https://doi.org/10.1038/495437a

Priem, J., & Hemminger, B. H. (2010). Scientometrics 2.0: New Metrics of Scholarly Impact on the Social Web. First Monday, 15(7). (https://goo.gl/ODM1tz) (2016-12-23).

Robinson-Garcia, N., Van-Leeuwen, T.N., & Rafols, I. (2016). SSH & the City. A Network Approach for Tracing the Societal Contribution of the Social Sciences and Humanities for Local Development. Science and Technology Conference 2016. Peripheries, Frontiers and Beyond, 14-16 September. (https://goo.gl/bgI3jU) (2016-12-23).

Romero-Frías, E. (2013). Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades Digitales: una visión introductoria. In E. Romero-Frías, & M. Sánchez-González (Eds.) (2014). Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades Digitales. Técnicas, herramientas y experiencias de e-Research e investigación en colaboración. Cuadernos Artesanos de Comunicación, 61. (https://goo.gl/CDzAL9) (2016-12-23).

Ruiz-Marti´n, J.M., & Alcala´-Mellado, J.R. (2016). Los cuatro ejes de la cultura participativa actual. De las plataformas virtuales al medialab. Icono 14(14), 95-122. https://doi.org/10.7195/ri14.v14i1.904

Salaverría, R. (2015). Los labs como fórmula de innovación en los medios. El Profesional de la Información, 24(4), 397-404. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2015.jul.06

Scolari, C.A. (2008). Hipermediaciones. Elementos para una teoría de la comunicación digital interactiva. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Socientize Consortium (2013). The Green Paper on Citizen Science. Brusels: European Commission. (https://goo.gl/7P3FYf) (2016-12-23).

Sugimoto, C.R., & Larivière, V. (2016). Social Media Metrics as Indicators of Broader Impact. OECD Blue Sky III Forum on Science and Innovation Indicators. Gent (Belgium), September, 19-21.

Surowiecki, J. (2005). The Wisdom of Crowds. New York: Anchor.

Tanaka, A. (2011). Situating within Society: Blueprints and Strategies for Media Labs. In A. Tanaka & al. (2011), A Blueprint for a Lab of the Future (pp. 12-20). Eindhoven: Baltan Laboratories.

Torres-Salinas, D., Cabezas-Clavijo, A., & Jiménez-Contreras, E. (2013). Altmetrics: New Indicators for Scientific Communication in Web 2.0. [Altmetrics: nuevos indicadores para la comunicación científica en la Web 2.0]. Comunicar, 41(XXI), 53-60. https://doi.org/10.3916/C41-2013-05

Weller, M. (2011). The Digital Scholar. How Technology is Transforming Scholarly Practice. London: Bloomsbury.

Wilsdon, J., & al. (2015). The Metric Tide: Report of the Independent Review of the Role of Metrics in Research Assessment and Management. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.4929.1363

Back to Top
GET PDF

Document information

Published on 31/03/17
Accepted on 31/03/17
Submitted on 31/03/17

Volume 25, Issue 1, 2017
DOI: 10.3916/C51-2017-03
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 5
Views 85
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?