Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Education’s gamification has represented an opportunity to boost students’ interaction, motivation and participation. ARG (Alternate Reality Games) offer a new highly immersive tool that can be implemented in educational achievements. One of the strongest points of these immersive games is based on applying the sum of students participating efforts and resources (so called collective intelligence) for problem resolution. In addition, ARG combine online and offline platforms a factor that improves the realism on the game experience. In this regard, this present work aims to summarise ARG potentialities, limitations and challenges of these immersive games in higher and further education context. In terms of methodology, this research draws from an appropriate theoretical corpus and, analyses the educational potential of AGR that, in fields like marketing or corporate communication, has already started successfully, but it has still not been studied in depth in education. This study compiles, also, best practices developed in several subjects and academic degrees all around the world and not easily traceable. It concludes that, given the antecedents, potentialities and the exposed analysis, the possibility of incorporating alternate reality games into the university teaching practice in the frame of an educational strategy that determines its aims and more suitable system of evaluation, has to be considered.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

In the age of convergence (Jenkins, 2006) methodologies, tools or educational spaces have been involved in a dynamic process of continuous transformation, characterized by greater flexibility and adoption of new technologies, formats and languages. The concept of literacy has also been redefined. Besides the skills of reading and writing now it also refers to a multifaceted set of practices that apply this knowledge so as to accomplish specific purposes, in specific contexts, strongly influenced by the available technologies (Bonsignore & al., 2011). These trends have been integrated in the design of teaching strategies to share channels and languages ??with «digital natives» (Prensky, 2001) in order to achieve a meaningful learning (Gikas & Grant, 2013).

Changes in higher education and the new educational methods emerging in recent decades have aroused the interest of a large number of authors from around the world (Altbach, Reisberg & Rumblety, 2009). Among the teaching methods that have attracted most interest in recent years in educational institutions, public authorities, academia and other entities is Massive Open Online Course (MOOCs). This interest has made The New York Times declare 2012 as the year of MOOCs (Pappano, 2012).

Given the high volume of registrations, these types of courses offer to universities and teachers an intermediate area for the teaching-learning process between the highly organized and structured classical classroom and the open web with a huge volume of extremely fragmented information and chaotic organization (McAuley & al., 2010). Also, as Siemes (2013) highlights, in addition to distribution, the importance of MOOCs lies in autonomy given to students owing to the control over their own learning as well as the use of many tools and technologies during the course deliveries (Siemes, 2013: 8). In some cases, the design of these courses as well as the participants’ use of certain tools, involve the creation of a user community that can get to form a real learning network. These types of Massive Open Online Courses are discursive communities that create knowledge together (Lugton, 2012; Scopeo, 2013; Siemes, 2013).

The popularity of MOOCs led to the adaptation of teaching strategies based on gamification to this new context. The voluntary and autonomous nature that characterizes the enrolment in an open online course involves, more than another mode of instruction, an individual decision to learn and think independently encouraged by the use of digital games as providers of motivation and external stimulus (Cebrián de la Serna, 2013: 186).

This perspective led Borden, in 2012, to change the typical content of open courses into a learning experience based on the concept of teaching and learning gamification, by creating various alternate reality games (ARG).

This is not the only experience in this sense, in fact, it is worth noting the teaching innovation project The Games Mooc (http://gamesmooc.shivtr.com) of Colorado Community College System, which encourages the use of ARG and other type of digital games in MOOCs as well as in other areas of higher education, from the open training of teachers and people interested in their design and development.

These initiatives have linked two leading trends in education today: MOOCs and integration of games in the teaching-learning process. If 2012 was the year of massive open online courses, gamification of higher education is a close reality, according to the prospective issues of Horizon Report Higher Education 2014.

This work is an approach to the use of ARG in education, the features of their use with teaching purpose and their potential. To this end, we have undertaken an exhaustive literature review of the state of play as well as some of the initiatives successfully developed.

2. Alternate Reality Games (ARG). Definition, characteristics, scope

Alternative Reality Games are an emerging genre of immersive interactive experiences where players collaboratively locate clues, organize scattered information and solve puzzles to advance the storytelling that combines both real and online environments (Doore, 2013).

The first far-reaching ARG was used for the advertising campaign of the film «Artificial Intelligence: AI» (2001) by Steven Spielberg. Under the name of «The Beast», this ARG launched in 2001 in the United States began with hidden clues in the movie posters that attracted the public’s curiosity and led to an expedition through the real and online world, in order to have information related to the film (Valencia, 2013). Beyond that, their use with transmedia universes has increased in order to: build loyalty, entertain and amuse, create «engagement» or make the project profitable (Scolari, 2013, Dena, 2008).

Marketing and corporate communications are other areas where they have been used successfully. The game dynamics allow the participation of the public, who are introduced into the story and enjoy it thanks to an experience linked to the brand (Tuten, 2008; Estanyol, Montaña & Lalueza, 2013).

However, depending on the structure, it would be a crossmedia storytelling because games are about finding clues, solving puzzles and getting information from an initial clue «rabbit hole», so that there is a necessary circuit from one content to another (from some information to another, so it is required to access all the content).

One of the keys to this game is its leitmotif: «This is not a game». This implies that realism / authenticity is one of the main points, so all platforms that are used must be active (websites, e-mail addresses, phone numbers, QR codes, etc.). It refers also to the continuation of the game in the real world, which is one of the most important defining features.

«In game genre terms, ARG are a subset of pervasive games, because their multiplatform distribution of content spills into players’ everyday lives via SMS messages, phone calls, email and social media orchances to meet non-player characters (NPCs) face to face» (Hansen, Bonsignori, Ruppel, Visconti & Krauss, 2013: 1530)1.

This offline-online combination also helps the immersion process of participants, who «live» adventure directly (Arrojo, 2013).

This is conditioned by one of the distinctive features regarding other games, duration. While gaming lasts minutes or hours (or you can continue the game on different days), ARG provide a more or less continuous experience during weeks and months, where participants star in an adventure besides living their life.

Another main point is collaborative storytelling dynamics. «We suggest that ARG are a form of collective storytelling. Although game designers hold most of the story in hand, players have much influence on how the story unfolds. Because players discuss the game in public forums, game designers adjust the story and clues based on player feedback. As a result, the story co-evolves between the groups» (Kim & al., 2009)2.

Designers and producers of ARG (the so-called puppetmasters) construct storytelling in collaboration with users and players, as it develops. «A successful ARG, then, is not simply the result of an audience doing the right thing at the right time but, instead, it is a dynamic and mutable interplay between producer and player, one that relies on the overlapping literacies of each» (Bonsignore & al, 2012: 2)3.

Collaboration also occurs among players, so some authors (McGonigal, 2007, Jenkins, 2006) think it is a practical example of «collective intelligence» (Lévy, 2007) based on the exchange of information and help through network. «Many game puzzles can or must be solved only by the collaborative efforts of multiple players, sometimes requiring one or more players to «get up from their computers to go outside to find clues or other planted assets in the real world» (Brackin & al, 2008: 5)4.

Basically, it is a practice of co-creation, that is, collective creation also in line with the principles of the Web 2.0. «In comparison to the static Web 1.0 that focused on information, this new concept of the Web [2.0] is focused on the user and the tools for creation, production and dissemination of content by a community of interagents» (Costa-Sánchez, Piñeiro-Otero, 2012: 186).

This group collaboration generates the formation of a community around the game, joining forces and resources in order to achieve a goal. Establishing a community requires the completion of three stages (McGonigal, 2007): 1) collective knowledge; 2) cooperation and 3) coordination. These stages correspond to three ARG design elements: 1) content massively distributed; 2) ambiguity in meaning and 3) respond capacity in real time, three requirements to be considered when creating it.

In short, the defining characteristics of ARG are: 1) Expansion of the game into reality and the combination of offline and online platforms at the service of adventure (we live in real places, with channels and platforms that exist and are available, with fictional characters in the real world, etc.). 2) On the basis of the above, the ability of players to get immersed. 3) The dynamics of the game involve researching and solving a mystery, so one needs to gather information, find clues and solve puzzles. It is based, therefore, on discovering and creating knowledge. 4) The storytelling is collaborative, so that puppetmasters are adding or modifying the story according to the response of players. 5) Collaboration also occurs when solving the game, with participants helping each other, so it is considered an example of practical application of «collective intelligence».

The popularity of ARG over the last few years has led to the delimitation of subtypes of such games according to some features both convergent and divergent. Convergent to all the games that belong to the same type of ARG and divergent if compared to other sub-genres.

In this regard, the International Game Developers Association (IGDA) proposes a classification of ARG taking into account the context of other similar games and their purpose. This proposal classifies ARG into five categories, which include training-education (Barlow, 2006). Also Brackin & al. (2008) pay special attention to these ARG in their classification as part of non-commercial typology.

3. An approach to educational ARG

Over recent decades, researchers have paid particular attention to how digital games influence learning processes and their effects on the overall educational process (Gee, 2004; Kafai, 1998; Prensky, 2001; Squire & Jenkins, 2003). For several authors (Prensky, 2007), the educational setting has changed in terms of context and also the profile of the agents involved in it, so that in the new educational model that promotes independent learning, the old teaching dynamics must amend.

Most studies conducted in an educational context have demonstrated positive results concerning gamification of the teaching-learning process in terms of increased motivation and task commitment as well as enjoyment around them (Hamari & al., 2014: 4: Cebrián, 2013). Cebrián (2013: 192) also stresses the ability of the game to encourage digital literacy by enabling the individual to encode-decode his storytelling, and deepen communicative, creative and recreational skills.

In the last decade there have been several considerations of the educational benefits of ARG, mostly Anglo-Saxon. The importance of social web and its tools, the ubiquity of Internet thanks to mobile technologies and the increasing use of multimedia content in general, have led teachers and trainers to adopt new strategies using ICT to attract the attention of students and increase their level of commitment to their own education and training process. Educational ARG have common elements with other types of games, but promote a non-traditional product that goes beyond formats, platforms and languages ??to be as simple and complex as knowledge (IGDA, 2006: 19). These immersive games are a powerful tool that has become a teaching tool in the third millennium (ARGology, 2009; McGonigal, 2011).

In ??primary and secondary education there some initiatives of educational ARG such as HARP (2006), Ecomuve (2009) and, in Latin America, Mentira (2009) can be highlighted. These games for primary and secondary education have been designed by experts from Harvard University, University of Wisconsin, MIT and the University of New Mexico (Center4Edupunx, 2012). In Europe, the EMAPPS Project (2005), an educational ARG project developed by various entities and funded by Sixth Framework Programme stands out.

ARG have an additional advantage: they can adapt their story to different contexts, age groups, locations, subjects and disciplines, as well as learning objectives (Connolly, 2009). This ability to be adapted allows the creation of ARG by external academic institutions, to be used by various schools in different school contexts. The changes introduced by players can be adapted to the global story and we can point out differences of use in terms of the required results (Whitton, 2008).

The academic nature of these initiatives advances the important weight that educational ARG have for higher education. Alexander, a pioneer in the integration of these games in teaching strategies, started using ARG for teaching Arts in 2002, just a year after the premiere of «The Beast» (ARGology, 2009).

Initiatives like «Blood on the Stacks» (2006), «World without oil» (2007), «The Great History Conundrum» (2008), ARGOSI ??(2008), «Just Press Play» (2011), «EVOKE» (2010) or «The Arcane Gallery of Gadgetry» (2011) are some of the ARG that have been successfully implemented in the context of higher education.

4. Potential of ARG integration in higher education

Alternate Reality Games combine the features of gaming and social software and, therefore, the teaching potential of both tools (Lee, 2006). They are collaborative, players must work together to solve puzzles, they are active and experimental and provide real contexts and objectives for the activity in the real and virtual world (Whitton, 2008; Lee, 2006).

However, ARG offer additional learning benefits. First, players are not limited by the possibilities of an avatar or a fictional character but are their own agents and use their own experience and knowledge to move forward in the game. Tests and puzzles make participants cooperate and they do not have predefined safe spaces that set the time and logistical limits of gaming. Due to this cooperation among participants Brackin & al. (2008) refer to the social network as the backbone of ARG. Lee (2006) also stresses that these games feature changing situations that require quick decisions, while the regular delivery of tests stimulates reflection (Moseley, 2008).

In regard to primary and secondary education, authors such as Turner and Morrison (2005) have explored the use of ARG as pedagogical tools, seeking greater engagement and involvement of primary and secondary students in their own learning process. ARG are an integral part of a distinct class that provides students the opportunity for personalized learning, matching their proficiency and understanding (Center4Edupunx, 2012).

In the context of higher education, we can approach the potential of ARG in teaching and learning on the basis of the work of several authors, among them Moseley (2008) and Fujimoto (2010).

An ARG requires that its public follows each of the activities and collaborate and interact with other users-participants (De Freitas and Griffiths, 2008). Besides greater involvement of students in their own learning process, taking an active role in the creation of content may affect the design of the game world (Whitton, 2008). Such interference of players in game results -following Moseley- means a higher level of commitment and participation.

It is collaborative learning. In many cases, the community of players becomes a support network where most experienced players help new ones (Whitton, 2008). This kind of peer-to-peer education community becomes more important in those contexts where students have followed different personal and educational paths, since the divergence of knowledge and skills complement each other to achieve the objectives (Dunleavy, Dede & Mitchell, 2009; De Freitas and Griffiths, 2008). As Hernández, González and Muñoz (2013) point out collaboration and learning may arouse interesting personal and social opportunities, while generating deep impact that requires a review of the pedagogical, organizational and technological elements within a particular virtual environment for learning.

It is a learning process from situation, while ARG create a context of real life, which is based on problem solving (Whitton, 2008; Moseley, 2008; Moseley & al. 2009). ARG also provide a multimodal and multimedia learning, which makes players move through various platforms, formats and languages.

5. Dealing with the design of an educational ARG

One of the most challenging aspects when designing an educational ARG is to create a credible setting, suitable for learners, which makes them commit to the experience. As Fujimoto (2010) points out, if the game setting is seen as educational this will not only entail the rejection of some players, it will also make it lose its recreational nature to become school work. If the main feature of an ARG is precisely its «non-game» nature, in education an oxymoron occurs: it must be credible and fun, entertaining but promoting commitment to some activities.

There are three components in any ARG: exposition, interaction and change (Phillips, 2006). Beyond these components, it is difficult to determine what form, structure or what elements an educational ARG should contain. As Fujimoto (2010) notes there are countless games and game rules, ranging from something as simple as a treasure hunt to something more complex, as an educational experience based on problem solving.

Davies, Kriznova and Weiss (2006) suggest some guidelines for ARG design in order to promote progress, imagination and curiosity: 1) players must be able to perceive the ARG outcome; 2) the main goal and sub ??goals should be challenging; 3) it must involve mental activity; 4) at the beginning of the game, the end must be uncertain; 5) the ARG should require that the player develops strategies to succeed; 6) it should offer different paths to reach the goal; 7) the game must have appropriate tests and obstacles meeting maturity and prior knowledge of the players. Dealing with the design of an educational ARG is difficult, as its structure must involve players so to encourage them to participate and complete the experience, while they should complete the learning goals. Some of the barriers identified by Balanskat (2008) for the effective use of ARG include access to new technologies among the participants in the project, teacher training, safety issues, difficulties to combine games and school curriculum goals or lack of assessment of social skills.

6. Discussion and conclusions

Higher education must adapt to technological and social context in which students live. The classroom as a teaching and learning space should not ignore what happens outside. The integration of social media in teaching is an interesting opportunity at the service of motivation, participation and creation of shared knowledge (Menéndez and Sánchez, 2013: 156). Gamification, meanwhile, is an upward trend in various fields because it promotes an active role in players-participants, collaboration in problem solving with available resources and motivation to achieve goals (McGonigal, 2011).

In the context of the European Higher Education Area, ARG are a useful tool in the acquisition of skills, understood as the proven ability to bring into play knowledge and skills, personal, social and methodological capacity. ARG are also beneficial in meeting European Parliament requirements for responsibility and autonomy (European Parliament, 2007). Many of the transversal competences (instrumental, personal or systemic) are related to the operating dynamics proposed by ARG: problem solving and decision making, teamwork, individual learning, use of ICT, ability to apply theoretical knowledge in practice and communication skills, for instance. These types of immersive games are based on three elements: convergence, participatory culture and collective intelligence, becoming illustrative examples of the new media ecology described by Jenkins (2006).

In terms of specific skills of the Degree in Audiovisual Communication, designing an ARG can be a useful task for students (not just experimenting) when implementing creative strategies and using ICT in a communication campaign, as already happens in marketing and film promotion. Students must learn to apply their knowledge, improve their social and communication skills and they are expected at university to develop their values ??and attitudes so as to succeed in the workplace (Teichler, 2007).

Apart from the potential benefits enumerated above, creating surprise and mystery, stimulating commitment and -given the use of ICT and 2.0 tools- extensive access without too many production costs should be added/considered

In Spain, there are no studies on the use of these types of games as a teaching tool at university, reflecting that it is not a standardized activity. Designing an ARG is an arduous task that can make teachers reject its use. In this sense, authors like Carson, Joseph and Silva (2009) have proposed the use of mini-ARG to achieve specific and concrete objectives. This work reflects on ARG as a new option when raising content and educational methodology in higher education. It emphasizes its adequacy for teamwork, since they favor the assignment of objectives, the setting of dynamics to achieve them, collaboration among participants, the overcoming of small puzzles (which can be associated with the subject content) and a high degree of involvement in the experience. In any case, as an educational tool, it should be part of the education planning process to ensure the achievement of its objectives and provide for a system to value the extent of compliance with the goals (Chin, Dukes & Gamson, 2009; Connolly, 2009).

Notes

1 «In game genre terms, ARG are a subset of pervasive games, because their multiplatform distribution of content spills into players’ everyday lives via SMS messages, phone calls, email, and social media orchances to meet non-player characters (NPCs) face-to-face» (Hansen, Bonsignori, Ruppel, Visconti, Krauss, 2013: 1530).

2 «We suggest that ARG are a form of collective storytelling. Although game designers hold most of the story in hand, players have much influence on how the story unfolds. Because players discuss the game in public forums, game designers adjust the story and clues based on player feedback. As a result, the story co–evolves between the groups» (Kim & al., 2009).

3 «A successful ARG, then, is not simply the result of an audience doing the right things at the right time but, instead, it is a dynamic and mutable interplay between producer and player, one that relies on the overlapping literacies of each» (Bonsignore & al., 2012: 2).

4 «Many game puzzles can or must be solved only by the collaborative efforts of multiple players, sometimes requiring one or more players to «get up from their computers to go outside to find clues or other planted assets in the real world» (Brackin & al., 2008: 5).

References

Altbach, P.G., Reisberg, L. & Rumbley, L.E. (2009). Trends in Global Higher Education: Tracking an Academic Revolution (unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0 018/0 01831/183168e.pdf) (25-03-2014).

ARGology (2009). ARG in Education & Training (http://goo.gl/FZhGYr) (25-03-2014).

ARGOSI (2008). (http://goo.gl/O1IHzp) (25-03-2014).

Arrojo-Baliña, M.J. (2013). Algo más que juegos de realidad alternativa: ‘The Truth about Marika’, ‘Conspiracy for Good’ y ‘Alt-minds’. Análisis del caso. In B. Lloves & F. Segado (Coords.), I Congreso Internacional de Comunicación y Sociedad Digital (http://goo.gl/s96LAO) (25-03-2014).

Barlow, N. (2006). Types of ARG. In A. Martin, B. Thomson & T. Chatfield (Eds.). Alternate reality games. White paper. (pp. 15-20). International Game Developers Association. (http://goo.gl/IWUpao) (25-03-2014).

Blood on the Stacks (http://goo.gl/HNlru1) (25-03-2014).

Bonsignore, B.; Goodlander, G.; Derek, H.; Johnson, M.; Kraus, K. & Visconti, A. (2011). Poster: The Arcane Gallery of Gadgetry: A Design Case Study of an Alternate Reality Game. Digital Humanities 2011 (http://goo.gl/oEVNU5) (25-03-2014).

Bonsignore, E., Hansen, D., Kraus, K. & Ruppel, M. (2012). Alternate Reality Games as Platforms for Practicing 21st-Century Literacies. International Journal of Learning, 4(1), 25-54. (DOI: http://doi.org/tnn).

Borden, J. (2014). Always Learning. Flipping the MOOC (http://goo.gl/yUihxM) (25-03-2014).

Brackin, A.L., Linehan, T., Terry, D., Waligore, M. & Channell, D. (2008). Tracking the Emergent Properties of the Collaborative Online Story «Deus City» for Testing the Standard Model of Alternate Reality Games (University of Texas).

Carson, B., Joseph, D. & Silva, S. (2009). ARG Leverage Intelligence: Improving Performance through Collaborative Play (http://goo.gl/BTV906) (25-03-2014).

Cebrián de la Serna, M. (2013). Juegos digitales para procesos educativos. In I. Aguaded & J. Cabero (Coords.), Tecnologías y medios para la educación en la E-sociedad. (pp. 185-210). Madrid: Alianza.

Center4Edupunx (2012). Alternate Reality Game. ARG academy K-12. Virtual 4T Conference. Teachers Teaching Teachers about Technology. Mayo 2012 (http://goo.gl/8ukF2V) (25-03-2014).

Chin, J., Dukes, R. & Gamson, W. (2009). Assessment in Simulation and Gaming: A Review of the Last 40 Years. Simulation & Gaming, 40(4), 553-568. (DOI: http://doi.org/d4k5v3).

Connolly, T. (2009). Tower of Babel ARG: Methodology manual (http://goo.gl/L5ddOJ) (25-03-2014).

Costa-Sánchez, C. & Piñeiro-Otero, T. (2012). ¿Espectadores o creadores? El empleo de las tecnologías creativas por los seguidores de las series españolas. Comunicaca?o e Sociedade, 22, 184-204. (http://goo.gl/VV90Mc) (25-06-2014).

Davies, R., Kriznova, R. & Weiss, D. (2006). eMapps.com: Games and Mobile Technology in Learning. In W. Nejdl & K. Tochtermann (Eds.), Proceedings of First European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning, EC-TEL, 103-110. (DOI: http://doi.org/fk68tq).

De-Freitas, S. & Griffiths, M. (2008). The Convergence of Gaming Practices with other Media Forms: What Potential for Learning? A Review of the Literatura. Learning, Media & Technology, 33 (1), 11-20. (DOI: http://doi.org/dstms4).

Dena, C. (2008). Emerging Participatory Culture Practices: Player-created Tiers in Alternate Reality Games. Convergence. The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, 14(1), 41-57. (DOI: http://doi.org/d5j7wh).

Doore, K. (2013). Alternate Realities for Computational Thinking. In Proceedings of the Ninth Annual International ACM Conference on International Computing Education Research. (pp. 171-172). New York: ACM. (DOI: http://doi.org/tnp).

Dunleavy, M., Dede, C. & Mitchell, R. (2009). Affordances and Limitations of Immersive Participatory Augmented Reality Simulations for Teaching and Learning. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 18(1), 7-22. (DOI: http://doi.org/bp5dzr).

Ecomuve. (http://goo.gl/NhJc3h) (25-03-2014).

EMAPPS Project. (http://goo.gl/gwjsjA) (25-03-2014).

Estanyol, E., Montaña, M. & Lalueza, F. (2013). Comunicar jugando. Gamificación en publicidad y relaciones públicas. In K. Zilles, J. Cuenca & J. Rom (Eds.), Breaking the Media Value Chain. (pp. 171-172). Barcelona: Universitat Ramon Llul. (http://goo.gl/PFn8nO) (25-03-2014).

EVOKE (2010). (http://goo.gl/Ciob9x) (25-03-2014).

Fujimoto, R. (2010). Designing an Educational Alternate Reality Game. (http://goo.gl/7U6jix) (25-03-2014).

Gee, J. P. (2004). Good videogames and good learning. (http://goo.gl/7j18mJ) (25-03-2014).

Gikas, J. & Grant, M. M. (2013). Mobile Computing Devices in Higher Education: Student Perspectives on Learning with Cellphones, Smartphones & Social Media. The Internet and Higher Education, 19, 18-26. (DOI: http://doi.org/tnq).

Hansen, D., Bonsignore, E., Ruppel, M., Visconti, A. & Kraus, K. (2013). Designing Reusable Alternate Reality Games. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 1529-1538. (DOI: http://doi.org/tnr).

Harp. (http://goo.gl/mCRt5z) (25-03-2014).

Hernández, N., González, M. & Muñoz, P.C. (2014). La planificación del aprendizaje colaborativo en entornos virtuales. Comunicar, 42, 25-33. (DOI: http://doi.org/tmp).

IGDA (2006). Alternate Reality Games White Paper. (http://goo.gl/bXhuOC) (25-03-2014).

Jenkins, H. (2006). Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide. Nueva York: NYU Press.

Just Press Play. (play.rit.edu/) (25-03-2014).

Kafai, Y.B. (1998). Children as Designers, Testers, and Evaluators of Educational Software. In A. Druin (Ed.), The Design of Children's Technology. (pp. 123-145). San Francisco: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers Inc.

Kim, J., Lee, E., Thomas, T. & Dombrowski, C. (2009). Storytelling in NewMedia : The Case of Alternate Reality Games, 2001-2009. First Monday, 14(6). (http://goo.gl/WvCcS1) (25-03-2014).

Lee, T. (2006). This is not a Game: Alternate Reality Gaming and its Potential for Learning. Futurelab. (http://goo.gl/0GRZR8) (25-03-2014).

Lévy, P. (2007). Cibercultura: la cultura de la sociedad digital. Barcelona: Anthropos.

Lugton, M. (2012). What is a MOOC? What are the Different Types of MOOC? xMOOCS y CMOOCs. (http://goo.gl/UhKgqm) (25-03-2014).

McAuley, A., Stewart, B., Siemes, G. & Cormier, D. (2010). The MOOC Model for Digital Practice. (http://goo.gl/9KCfOi) (25-03-2014).

McGonigal, J. (2007). Why I Love Bees: A Case Study in Collective Intelligence Gaming. In John D. y Catherin, T. (Eds.) The Ecology of Games: Connecting Youth, Games, and Learning. (pp. 199-227). Cambridge: The MIT Press. (http://goo.gl/F7QX45) (25-03-2014).

McGonigal, J. (2011). Reality is Broken. London: Penguin Press HC.

Mentira. (http://goo.gl/xRJMF5) (25-03-2014).

Moseley, A. (2008). An Alternative Reality for Higher Education? Lessons to be Learned from Online Reality Games. In ALT-C 2008, Leeds, UK, 9-11th September 2008. (http://goo.gl/gRDphJ) (25-03-2014).

Moseley, A., Culver, J., Piatt, K. & Whitton, N. (2009). Motivation in Alternate Reality Gaming Environments and Implications for Learning. In 3rd European Conference on Games Based Learning. Graz: Academic Conferences Limited. (http://goo.gl/LQJPoU) (25-03-2014).

NMC (2014). The Horizont Report. 2014 Higher Education Edition. (http://goo.gl/XUYqqu) (25-03-2014).

Pappano, L. (2012). The Year of the MOOC. (http://goo.gl/tdI5px) (25-03-2014).

Parlamento Europeo (2007). Posición del Parlamento Europeo adoptada en primera lectura el 24 de octubre de 2007 con vistas a la adopción de la Recomendación 2008/.../CE del Parlamento Europeo y del Consejo relativa a la creación del Marco Europeo de Cualificaciones para el aprendizaje permanente. (http://goo.gl/qXcvsl) (25-06-2014).

Phillips, A. (2006). Methods and Mechanics. In A. Martin, B. Thomson & T. Chatfield (Eds.). Alternate reality games. White paper. (pp. 31-43). International Game Developers Association. (http://goo.gl/IWUpao) (25-03-2014).

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants part 1. On the Horizon, 9(5), 1-6. (DOI: http://doi.org/cxwdzq).

Scolari, C. (2013). Narrativas tranmedia : cuando todos los medios cuentan. Barcelona: Centro libros PAPF.

SCOPEO (2013). Scopeo Informe, 2: MOOC: Estado de la situación actual, posibilidades, retos y futuro. Junio 2013. (http://goo.gl/bjyaYr) (25-03-2014).

Siemes, G. (2013). Massive Open Online Courses: Innovation in Education? In R. MacGrea, W. Kinuthia & S. Marshall (Eds.), Open Educational Resources: Innovation, Research and Practice. (pp. 5-17). Vancouver: Commonwealth of Learning & Athabasca University. (http://goo.gl/OmUFne) (25-03-2014).

Squire, K. & Jenkins, H. (2003). Harnessing the power of games in education. Insight, 3(1), 5-33 (http://goo.gl/zyvZYJ) (25-03-2014).

Teichler, U (2007). Does Higher Education Matter? Lessons from a Comparative Graduate Survey. European Journal of Education, 42, 11-34. (DOI: http://doi.org/dm7k2j).

The Arcane Gallery of Gadgetry (http://goo.gl/jyHBFX) (25-03-2014).

Turner, J. & Morrison, A. (2005). Suit Keen Renovator: Alternate Reality Design. In Y. Pisan (Ed.) Australasian Conference on Interactive Entertainment. (pp. 209-213). Sidney: University of Technology.

Tuten, T.L. (2008). Advertising 2.0: Social Media Marketing in a Web 2.0 World. Westport: Greenwood Publishing Group.

Valencia, B. F. (2013). Juegos de realidad alternativa (ARG). Análisis de la realización de este tipo de juego como herramienta educativa. Trabajo Fin de Grado. Universidad de Palermo. (http://goo.gl/WtNCLf) (25-03-2014).

Whitton, N. (2008). Alternate Reality Games for Developing Student Autonomy and Peer Learning. In A. Comrie, N. Mayes, T. Mayes & K. Smytg (Eds.), Proceedings of the LICK 2008 Symposium. (pp. 32-40). Edimburgh: Napier University. (http://goo.gl/jrj2K5) (25-03-2014).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

La ludificación de la educación ha representado una oportunidad para fomentar la interacción, la motivación y la participación del alumnado. Los ARG (las siglas inglesas de juegos de realidad alternativa) ofrecen una nueva herramienta altamente inmersiva que puede implementarse en el logro de los objetivos docentes. Uno de sus puntos fuertes consiste en la suma de esfuerzos y recursos (la llamada inteligencia colectiva) aplicada a la resolución de problemas. A esto se añade su combinación de plataformas en los entornos online y offline, lo que favorece el «realismo» de la experiencia. En este sentido, el presente trabajo pretende condensar las potencialidades, limitaciones y retos de los ARG al servicio de la educación universitaria. Basándose, a nivel metodológico, en la elaboración de un corpus teórico relevante y adecuado, analiza el potencial educativo de esta herramienta que, en ámbitos como el marketing o la comunicación corporativa ya ha despegado con éxito, pero que en el área educativa todavía no había sido abordada en profundidad. Recopila, además, ejemplos satisfactorios que se han desarrollado en diversas disciplinas académicas en otros países y que no resultan fácilmente localizables. Se concluye que, dados los antecedentes, potencialidades y análisis expuesto, debe valorarse la posibilidad de incorporar los juegos de realidad alternativa a la práctica de la docencia universitaria en el marco de una estrategia educativa que determine sus objetivos y sistema de evaluación más adecuado.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

En la era de la convergencia (Jenkins, 2006) las metodologías, herramientas o los espacios educativos se han visto inmersos en un proceso dinámico, de transformación continua, marcado por una mayor flexibilización y la adopción de nuevas tecnologías, formatos y lenguajes. El propio concepto de alfabetización también se ha redimensionado. De las habilidades de lectura y escritura ha pasado a referirse a un multifacético conjunto de prácticas que aplican estos conocimientos para lograr determinados propósitos, en contextos específicos, fuertemente influenciados por las tecnologías disponibles (Bonsignore & al., 2011). Estas tendencias se han ido integrando en el diseño de estrategias didácticas para compartir canales y lenguajes con los «nativos digitales» (Prensky, 2001) de cara a lograr un aprendizaje significativo (Gikas & Grant, 2013).

Los cambios vividos por la educación superior y las nuevas fórmulas educativas surgidas en las últimas décadas han suscitado el interés de un elevado número de autores de todo el mundo (Altbach, Reisberg & Rumblety, 2009). Entre las fórmulas didácticas que han acaparado mayor interés en los últimos años entre instituciones educativas, poderes públicos, comunidad académica y otras entidades, destacan los Massive Open Online Course (MOOCs). Un interés que ha llevado al New York Times a declarar 2012 como el año del MOOC (Pappano, 2012).

Dado el alto volumen de registros, esta tipología de cursos ofrece a universidades y docentes un área intermedia para el proceso de enseñanzaaprendizaje entre el aula clásica, altamente organizada y estructurada, y la web abierta con un volumen ingente de información extremadamente fragmentada y de organización caótica (McAuley & al., 2010). Asimismo, como destaca Siemes (2013), además de la distribución, la importancia de los MOOCs radica en la autonomía que dan al estudiante, tanto por el control sobre su propio aprendizaje como por el uso de numerosas herramientas y tecnologías durante las entregas del curso (Siemes, 2013: 8). En algunos casos, tanto el diseño de estos cursos como la adopción de determinadas herramientas por los participantes, conlleva la creación de una comunidad de usuarios que pueden llegar a conformar una verdadera red de aprendizaje. Esta tipología de los «massive open online courses» constituye comunidades discursivas que crea conocimiento juntas (Lugton, 2012; Scopeo, 2013; Siemes, 2013).

La popularidad de los MOOCs propició la adaptación de estrategias educativas basadas en el juego a este nuevo contexto. El carácter voluntario y autónomo que caracteriza la suscripción en un curso online abierto implica, más que otro tipo de educación, una decisión individual de querer aprender que podría estar animada tanto por una motivación y entretenimiento externo como por el uso de los juegos digitales (CebriándelaSerna, 2013: 186).

Esta perspectiva llevó en 2012 a Borden (2014) a transformar el contenido típico de los cursos abiertos en una enriquecedora experiencia, basada en el concepto de la ludificación de la enseñanzaaprendizaje, con la creación de diversos juegos de realidad alternativa (ARG, según sus siglas en inglés).

No se trata de la única experiencia en esta línea, de hecho, resulta destacable el proyecto de innovación educativa The Games Mooc (http://goo.gl/GzLSRS) de la Colorado Community College System, que fomenta el uso de ARG y otra tipología de juegos digitales en los MOOCs así como en otros ámbitos de la educación superior, a partir de la formación abierta de profesores y personas interesadas en el diseño y desarrollo de los mismos.

Estas iniciativas han ligado dos tendencias punteras en la educación actual: los MOOCs y la integración de los juegos en el proceso de enseñanzaaprendizaje. Si 2012 fue el año de los «masive open online course», la ludificación de la enseñanza superior constituye una realidad próxima, siguiendo las prospectivas del Horizont Report Higher Education 2014.

El presente trabajo constituye una aproximación a la utilización de los ARG en el ámbito educativo, a las características de su uso con finalidad didáctica y a sus potencialidades. Para ello se ha efectuado una revisión bibliográfica exhaustiva del estado de la cuestión así como de algunas de las iniciativas desarrrolladas con éxito.

2. Juegos de realidad alternativa (ARG). Definición, características, ámbitos de aplicación

Los juegos de realidad alternativa constituyen un género emergente de experiencias interactivas inmersivas donde los jugadores de forma colaborativa localizan claves, organizan información dispersa y resuelven enigmas para avanzar en la narrativa que combina tanto el entorno real como el online (Doore, 2013).

El primer ARG con gran repercusión se empleó en la campaña de promoción de la película, dirigida por Steven Spielberg, «A.I.: Inteligencia Artificial» (2001). Bajo el nombre de «The Beast», este ARG lanzado en 2001 en Estados Unidos comenzó con pistas ocultas en los carteles de la película que suscitaron la curiosidad del público y propiciaron una expedición a través del mundo real y en línea, para así tener información relacionada con la película (Valencia, 2013). A partir de aquí, su empleo al servicio de universos transmedia se ha multiplicado con objeto de conseguir: fidelizar, entretener y divertir, generar «engagement» o ayudar a rentabilizar el proyecto (Scolari, 2013; Dena, 2008).

El marketing y la comunicación corporativa son otros de los ámbitos donde han sido utilizados con éxito. La dinámica de juego permite la participación de los públicos, que se introducen en la historia y se divierten gracias a una experiencia vinculada a la marca (Tuten, 2008; Estanyol, Montaña & Lalueza, 2013).

Sin embargo, atendiendo a su estructura, se trataría de una narrativa crossmedia (no transmedia; lo cual no implica que no pueda integrarse en un proyecto transmedia mayor), pues la dinámica de juego consiste en ir descubriendo pistas, resolviendo puzles y logrando información a partir de una clave inicial «rabbit hole», de manera que existe un circuito necesario de unos contenidos a otros (de una información para llegar a otra, con lo que es requisito el acceso a todos los contenidos).

Una de las claves de esta forma de juego es su leitmotiv: «This is not a game». Esta clave implica que su realismo/verosimilitud es una de sus principales aportaciones, por lo que todas las plataformas que se empleen deben estar activas (webs, direcciones de email, números de teléfono, códigos QR, etc.). Hace alusión también a la continuación del juego en el mundo real, lo que constituye una de sus características definitorias más importantes.

«En lo que respecta al género de juego, los ARG son un subconjunto de los juegos ubicuos, porque su contenido distribuido a través de múltiples plataformas inunda las vidas cotidianas de los jugadores a través de mensajes SMS, llamadas telefónicas, emails y social media o posibilita conocer personajes no jugadores (NPCs) cara a cara» (Hansen & al., 2013: 1.530)1.

Esta combinación offlineonline ayuda también al proceso de inmersión de los participantes, que «viven» directamente la aventura (ArrojoBaliña, 2013).

Esto se ve condicionado por uno de sus elementos diferenciales respecto de otros juegos, su duración. Mientras que los videojuegos duran minutos u horas (o puedes continuar la partida en distintos días), los ARG ofrecen una experiencia más o menos continua de semanas y meses, a lo largo de los que los participantes además de vivir su vida, protagonizan una aventura.

Otra de sus claves principales es la dinámica de «storytelling» colaborativo. «Sugerimos que los ARG son una forma de storytelling colectivo. Pese a que los diseñadores del juego tienen en su mano el control del juego, los jugadores tienen demasiada influencia en cómo se desarrolla la historia. Porque los jugadores hablan del juego en foros públicos, los diseñadores configuran la historia y las pruebas del juego basándose en el feedback recibido. Como resultado, la historia coevoluciona entre los grupos» (Kim & al., 2009)2.

Los diseñadores y productores del ARG (llamados «puppetmasters») construyen la narrativa en colaboración con los usuariosjugadores, a medida que se va desarrollando. «Un ARG de éxito, entonces, no es simplemente el resultado de una audiencia que hace las cosas correctamente en el tiempo adecuado, al contrario, se trata de una interacción dinámica y mutable entre el productor y el jugador que depende de la superposición de los conocimientos de cada uno» (Bonsignore & al., 2012: 2)3.

La colaboración, además, también se da entre jugadores, por lo que algunos autores (McGonigal, 2007; Jenkins, 2006) lo consideran un ejemplo práctico de «inteligencia colectiva» (Lévy, 2007) basado en el intercambio de información y ayuda por medio de la Red. «Muchos juegos de acertijos pueden o deben ser resueltos a través de los esfuerzos colaborativos de múltiples jugadores, en ocasiones requieren que uno o más jugadores se levanten de sus ordenadores y vayan fuera para encontrar pistas u otro tipo de recursos en el mundo real» (Brackin & al., 2008: 5)4.

En el fondo, se trata de una práctica de cocreación, es decir, de creación colectiva acorde también a los principios de la Web 2.0. «Frente a la Web 1.0 estática y centrada en la información, este nuevo concepto de Web [la 2.0] está enfocada en el usuario y en aquellas herramientas de creación, producción y difusión de contenidos por parte de una comunidad de interagentes» (CostaSánchez & PiñeiroOtero, 2012: 186).

Esta colaboración grupal genera la formación de una comunidad en torno al juego, que une sus fuerzas y recursos en pro de conseguir su objetivo. Para ello, se siguen tres etapas (McGonigal, 2007): 1) Conocimiento colectivo; 2) Cooperación; 3) Coordinación, que se corresponden con tres elementos del diseño del ARG: 1) Contenido distribuido masivamente; 2) Ambigüedad en el significado; 3) Capacidad de respuesta en tiempo real, tres requisitos a tener en cuenta en su creación.

En resumen, son características definitorias de los ARG: 1) La expansión del juego al entorno real y la combinación de plataformas offline y online al servicio de la aventura (que se vive en lugares reales, con canales y plataformas que existen y están disponibles, con personajes –de la ficción– en el mundo real, etc.); 2) La capacidad de inmersión que, en base a lo anterior, permite a los jugadores; 3) La dinámica del juego es de búsqueda y de resolución de un misterio, por lo que hay que reunir información, descubrir pistas y resolver puzles. Se basa, por tanto, en descubrir o generar conocimiento; 4) El «storytelling» es colaborativo, de forma que los «puppetmasters» van añadiendo o modificando la trama según la respuesta de los jugadores; 5) La colaboración se produce también a la hora de resolver el juego, gracias a la ayuda de los participantes entre sí, por lo que se considera un ejemplo de aplicación práctica de «inteligencia colectiva».

La popularidad alcanzada en los últimos años por los ARG ha propiciado la delimitación de subtipologías de dichos juegos atendiendo a unas características a la vez convergentes y divergentes. Convergentes a todos los juegos que pertenecen a una misma tipología de ARG y divergentes respecto a los restantes subgéneros.

En este sentido, la International Game Developers Association (IGDA) propone una categorización de los ARG que tiene en cuenta tanto el contexto de otros juegos similares como el propósito de los mismos. Esta propuesta clasifica los ARG en cinco categorías dentro de las cuales se encuentra la formativaeducativa (Barlow, 2006). También Brackin & al. (2008) prestan especial atención a este tipo ARG en su categorización, como parte de la tipología no comercial.

3. ARG educativos. Una aproximación

En las últimas décadas, los investigadores han prestado especial atención a cómo los juegos digitales influyen en los procesos de aprendizaje, así como sus efectos sobre el proceso educativo en general (Gee, 2004; Kafai, 1998; Prensky, 2001; Squire & Jenkins, 2003). Para diversos autores (Prensky, 2007), el escenario educativo ha cambiado a nivel de contexto y de perfil de los agentes que en él participan, por lo que, en el nuevo modelo educativo que favorece el autoaprendizaje, las antiguas dinámicas docentes deben adaptarse.

La mayoría de los estudios desarrollados en un contexto educativo han demostrado resultados positivos de la ludificación del proceso de enseñanzaaprendizaje en términos de incremento de la motivación y el compromiso con las tareas, así como el disfrute en torno a ellas (Hamari & al., 2014: 4; Cebrián, 2013). Cebrián (2013: 192) también subraya la capacidad del juego de estimular la alfabetización digital en tanto que permite al individuo codificardecodificar sus narrativas, y profundizar las propias capacidades comunicativas, creativas y lúdicas.

En la última década han sido diversas las aproximaciones en torno a los beneficios pedagógicos de los ARG, en su mayoría desde el ámbito anglosajón. La importancia de la web social y sus herramientas, la ubicuidad de la Red gracias a las tecnologías portátiles y el creciente consumo de contenidos multimedia en general, han llevado a docentes y formadores a adoptar nuevas estrategias utilizando las TIC para captar la atención de los estudiantes e incrementar su nivel de compromiso en su propio proceso de educación o formación. Los ARG educativos cuentan con elementos comunes a otras tipologías de juego aunque promueven un producto no tradicional que va más allá de formatos, plataformas y lenguajes para ser algo tan simple y complejo como el conocimiento (IGDA, 2006: 19). Estos juegos inmersivos constituyen una potente herramienta que supone una herramienta de enseñanza del tercer milenio (ARGology, 2009; McGonigal, 2011).

En el ámbito de educación primaria o secundaria se pueden destacar iniciativas de ARG educativos como la de HARP (2006), Ecomuve (2009) o, ya en el ámbito latino, Mentira (2009). Estos juegos para los primeros ciclos de enseñanza han sido diseñados por expertos de la Universidad de Harvard, la Universidad de Wisconsin, el MIT o la Universidad de Nuevo México (Center4Edupunx, 2012). Ya en el ámbito europeo resulta reseñable EMAPPS Project (2005), un proyecto de ARG educativo desarrollado por diversas entidades y financiado por el 6º Programa Marco.

Los ARG cuentan con una ventaja adicional: pueden adaptar su narración a diversos contextos, grupos de edades, localizaciones o materias y disciplinas, así como objetivos de aprendizaje (Connolly, 2009). Esta posibilidad de adaptación dota de sentido a la creación de un ARG por entidades académicas externas, para que sean utilizados por diversos centros educativos en diversos contextos escolares. Los cambios que introducen los jugadores pueden adaptarse al global de la historia y se pueden señalar diferencias de uso en función de los resultados requeridos (Whitton, 2008).

El carácter académico de estas iniciativas adelanta el importante peso que los ARG educativos tienen en el ámbito de la educación superior. Alexander, pionero en la integración de estos juegos en las estrategias didácticas, comenzó a utilizar los ARG para la enseñanza de Humanidades en 2002, apenas un año después del estreno de «The Beast» (ARGology, 2009).

Iniciativas como «Blood on the Stacks» (2006), «World without oil» (2007), «The Great History Conundrum» (2008), ARGOSI (2008), «Just Press Play» (2011), «EVOKE» (2010) o «The Arcane Gallery of Gadgetry» (2011) son algunos de los ARG que se han implementado con éxito en el contexto de la educación superior.

4. Potencialidades de la integración de los ARG en la educación superior

Los Alternate Reality Games aúnan las características de los videojuegos y del software social y, por tanto, de las potencialidades educativas de ambas herramientas (Lee, 2006). Son colaborativos, los jugadores deben trabajar juntos para resolver los acertijos, son activos y experimentales y proveen auténticos contextos y objetivos para la actividad, en el mundo real y virtual (Whitton, 2008; Lee, 2006). No obstante los ARG ofrecen ventajas educativas adicionales. En primer lugar los jugadores no están limitados por las posibilidades de un avatar o un personaje de ficción sino que se configuran como sus propios agentes y usan sus propias experiencias y conocimientos para avanzar en el juego. Las tareas y acertijos requieren que los participantes cooperen entre sí y no cuentan con los espacios seguros predefinidos que marcan los límites temporales y logísticos de los videojuegos.

Esta cooperación entre participantes ha llevado a Brackin & al.(2008) a referirse a la red social como la columna vertebral de los ARG. Lee (2006), además, subraya que estos juegos presentan situaciones cambiantes que exigen decisiones rápidas, al tiempo que la entrega regular de pruebas suscita la reflexión (Moseley, 2008).

En lo que respecta a los primeros ciclos educativos, autores como Turner y Morrison (2005) han explorado el uso de ARG como herramientas pedagógicas, buscando un mayor compromiso e implicación de los estudiantes de primaria y secundaria en su propio proceso educativo. ARG son una parte integral de una clase bien diferenciada que provee a los estudiantes de la oportunidad de un aprendizaje individualizado, adaptado a su grado de dominio y entendimiento (Center4Edupunx, 2012).

En el contexto de la educación superior, se puede efectuar una aproximación a las potencialidades de los ARG en el proceso de enseñanzaaprendizaje a partir del trabajo de diversos autores, entre los que destacan Moseley (2008) o Fujimoto (2010).

Un ARG requiere que su público siga cada una de las actividades y colabore e interactúe con otros usuariosparticipantes (DeFreitas & Griffiths, 2008). Además de una mayor implicación del estudiante en su propio proceso de aprendizaje, su asunción de un papel activo en la creación de contenidos puede repercutir en el diseño del universo del juego (Whitton, 2008). Dicha injerencia de los jugadores en los resultados del juego implica –siguiendo a Moseley– un mayor nivel de compromiso y participación.

Se trata de un aprendizaje colaborativo. En muchos casos, la propia comunidad de jugadores se constituye como una red de apoyo donde los más veteranos dan soporte a los nuevos jugadores (Whitton, 2008). Esta especie de comunidad educativa entre pares adquiere especial peso en aquellos contextos en los que los estudiantes cuentan con diferentes trayectorias vitales y académicas, dado que esta divergencia de conocimientos y habilidades se complementan para alcanzar los objetivos marcados (Dunleavy, Dede & Mitchell, 2009; DeFreitas & Griffiths, 2008). Como señalan Hernández, González y Muñoz (2013) el binomio colaboraciónaprendizaje puede suscitar interesantes oportunidades de carácter personal y social, al tiempo que genera repercusiones profundas que reclaman una reconsideración de los elementos pedagógicos, organizativos y tecnológicos que configuran un determinado entorno virtual de aprendizaje.

Se trata de un aprendizaje de situación, en tanto que los ARG crean un contexto de la vida real, que está basado en la resolución de problemas (Whitton, 2008; Moseley, 2008; Moseley & al., 2009). Asimismo los ARG proporcionan un aprendizaje multimodal y multimedia, que obliga a los jugadores a moverse a través de diversas plataformas, formatos y lenguajes.

5. Abordar el diseño de un ARG educativo

Uno de los aspectos más desafiantes del diseño de un ARG educativo es el de crear un escenario creíble, adecuado a los discentes, que los lleve a comprometerse con la experiencia. Tal como señala Fujimoto (2010), si el escenario de juego se evidencia como educativo no solo conllevará el rechazo de algunos de los jugadores, también le restará carácter de juego para convertirlo en una tarea escolar. Si la principal característica de un ARG es, precisamente, su carácter de «no juego», en el ámbito educativo se produce un oxímoron: debe ser creíble y divertido, entretenido pero propiciar el compromiso con algunas actividades.

Existen tres componentes integrados en todo ARG: exposición, interacción y cambio (Phillips, 2006). Más allá de dichos componentes, resulta complejo determinar qué forma, estructura o qué elementos debería contener un ARG educativo. Como señala Fujimoto (2010) hay innumerables juegos y reglas de juego, que van de algo tan simple como una búsqueda del tesoro a algo más complejo, como una experiencia educativa basada en la resolución de problemas.

Davies, Kriznova y Weiss (2006) señalan algunas pautas para el diseño de ARG en la línea de promover el avance, la imaginación y la curiosidad: 1) Los jugadores deben ser capaces de percibir el resultado del ARG; 2) El objetivo principal y los subobjetivos deben ser un reto; 3) Debe implicar actividad mental; 4) Al inicio del juego, el final debe ser incierto; 5) El ARG debe requerir que el jugador desarrolle estrategias para tener éxito; 6) Debe ofrecer diversos caminos para alcanzar la meta; 7) El juego debe contar con pruebas y obstáculos adecuados a la madurez y a los conocimientos previos de los jugadores. Abordar un diseño de ARG educativo implica cierta complejidad, en tanto su estructura debe envolver a los jugadores de modo que les incite a participar y a completar la experiencia, al tiempo que deben ayudar a completar los objetivos de aprendizaje. Algunas de las barreras para el uso efectivo de ARG son el acceso a las nuevas tecnologías entre los participantes en el proyecto, la formación del profesorado, cuestiones vinculadas a la seguridad, las dificultades de combinar juegos con los objetivos del currículo escolar o la falta de valoración de habilidades sociales.

6. Discusión y conclusiones

La docencia universitaria debe adaptarse al contexto tecnológicosocial en el que viven sus protagonistas. El aula como espacio educativo y de aprendizaje no debe ser ajena a lo que sucede fuera de ella. La integración de los «social media» en la docencia constituye una oportunidad de interés al servicio de la motivación, de la participación y de la creación de un conocimiento compartido (Menéndez & Sánchez, 2013: 156). La ludificación, por su parte, es una tendencia al alza en ámbitos diversos porque promueve un rol activo en los jugadoresparticipantes, la colaboración en la resolución de problemas con los recursos disponibles y la motivación para lograr las metas (McGonigal, 2011).

En el contexto del Espacio Europeo de Educación Superior, los ARG constituyen una herramienta útil en la adquisición de competencias, entendidas como la capacidad demostrada para poner en juego conocimientos y destrezas, habilidades personales, sociales y metodológicas. O, en la línea apuntada por el Parlamento Europeo, en la adquisición de responsabilidad y autonomía (Parlamento Europeo, 2007). Muchas de las competencias transversales (tanto instrumentales, como personales o sistémicas) están relacionadas con la dinámica de funcionamiento que proponen los ARG: resolución de problemas y toma de decisiones, trabajo en equipo, aprendizaje autónomo, empleo de las TIC, capacidad para aplicar los conocimientos teóricos en la práctica o las habilidades de comunicación, por citar solo algunas de ellas.

Esta tipología de juegos inmersivos opera en torno a tres espacios: el de la convergencia, la cultura participativa y la inteligencia colectiva, convirtiéndose en ejemplos ilustrativos de la nueva ecología mediática descrita por Jenkins (2006).

En cuanto a las competencias específicas, relacionadas con el Grado en Comunicación Audiovisual, el diseño de un ARG puede ser una tarea útil para el alumnado (no solo su experimentación), a la hora de poner en práctica estrategias de creatividad y de utilización de las TIC en una campaña de comunicación, tal y como ya sucede en el ámbito del marketing y la promoción cinematográfica. Los estudiantes deben aprender a aplicar su conocimiento, a mejorar sus habilidades sociocomunicativas y se espera que –durante su etapa universitaria– hayan desarrollado valores y actitudes para tener éxito en el ámbito laboral (Teichler, 2007). A estas potencialidades resulta preciso sumar otras como la creación de sorpresa y misterio, estimular el compromiso y –dada la utilización de las TIC y las herramientas 2.0– el acceso masivo sin demasiados costes de producción.

En España, no existen estudios sobre el uso de este tipo de juegos como herramienta didáctica en el ámbito universitario, lo que refleja que no se trata de una actividad normalizada. Asumir el diseño de un ARG es una ardua tarea que puede llevar a los profesores a descartar su uso. En este sentido, autores como Carson, Joseph y Silva (2009) han propuesto la utilidad de los miniARG para alcanzar objetivos específicos y concretos. El presente trabajo reflexiona sobre los ARG como una nueva opción a la hora de plantear contenidos y metodología educativa aplicada al ámbito universitario. Destaca su adecuación para los trabajos en equipo, pues favorecen la asignación de objetivos, el establecimiento de dinámicas para lograrlos, la colaboración entre los participantes, la superación de pequeños puzles (que pueden asociarse a los contenidos de la materia) y un elevado grado de implicación en la experiencia. En cualquier caso, como herramienta educativa, debe enmarcarse en un proceso de planificación de la enseñanza que garantice sus objetivos, así como prever un sistema de valoración que determine el grado de cumplimiento de las metas marcadas (Chin, Dukes & Gamson, 2009; Connolly, 2009).

Notas

1 «In game genre terms, ARG are a subset of pervasive games, because their multiplatform distribution of content spills into players’ everyday lives via SMS messages, phone calls, email, and social media orchances to meet nonplayer characters (NPCs) facetoface» (Hansen, Bonsignori, Ruppel, Visconti, Krauss, 2013: 1530).

2 We suggest that ARG are a form of collective storytelling. Although game designers hold most of the story in hand, players have much influence on how the story unfolds. Because players discuss the game in public forums, game designers adjust the story and clues based on player feedback. As a result, the story co–evolves between the groups» (Kim & al., 2009).

3 «A successful ARG, then, is not simply the result of an audience doing the right things at the right time but, instead, it is a dynamic and mutable interplay between producer and player, one that relies on the overlapping literacies of each» (Bonsignore & al., 2012: 2).

4 «Many game puzzles can or must be solved only by the collaborative efforts of multiple players, sometimes requiring one or more players to «get up from their computers to go outside to find clues or other planted assets in the real world» (Brackin & al., 2008: 5).

Referencias

Altbach, P.G., Reisberg, L. & Rumbley, L.E. (2009). Trends in Global Higher Education: Tracking an Academic Revolution (unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0 018/0 01831/183168e.pdf) (25-03-2014).

ARGology (2009). ARG in Education & Training (http://goo.gl/FZhGYr) (25-03-2014).

ARGOSI (2008). (http://goo.gl/O1IHzp) (25-03-2014).

Arrojo-Baliña, M.J. (2013). Algo más que juegos de realidad alternativa: ‘The Truth about Marika’, ‘Conspiracy for Good’ y ‘Alt-minds’. Análisis del caso. In B. Lloves & F. Segado (Coords.), I Congreso Internacional de Comunicación y Sociedad Digital (http://goo.gl/s96LAO) (25-03-2014).

Barlow, N. (2006). Types of ARG. In A. Martin, B. Thomson & T. Chatfield (Eds.). Alternate reality games. White paper. (pp. 15-20). International Game Developers Association. (http://goo.gl/IWUpao) (25-03-2014).

Blood on the Stacks (http://goo.gl/HNlru1) (25-03-2014).

Bonsignore, B.; Goodlander, G.; Derek, H.; Johnson, M.; Kraus, K. & Visconti, A. (2011). Poster: The Arcane Gallery of Gadgetry: A Design Case Study of an Alternate Reality Game. Digital Humanities 2011 (http://goo.gl/oEVNU5) (25-03-2014).

Bonsignore, E., Hansen, D., Kraus, K. & Ruppel, M. (2012). Alternate Reality Games as Platforms for Practicing 21st-Century Literacies. International Journal of Learning, 4(1), 25-54. (DOI: http://doi.org/tnn).

Borden, J. (2014). Always Learning. Flipping the MOOC (http://goo.gl/yUihxM) (25-03-2014).

Brackin, A.L., Linehan, T., Terry, D., Waligore, M. & Channell, D. (2008). Tracking the Emergent Properties of the Collaborative Online Story «Deus City» for Testing the Standard Model of Alternate Reality Games (University of Texas).

Carson, B., Joseph, D. & Silva, S. (2009). ARG Leverage Intelligence: Improving Performance through Collaborative Play (http://goo.gl/BTV906) (25-03-2014).

Cebrián de la Serna, M. (2013). Juegos digitales para procesos educativos. In I. Aguaded & J. Cabero (Coords.), Tecnologías y medios para la educación en la E-sociedad. (pp. 185-210). Madrid: Alianza.

Center4Edupunx (2012). Alternate Reality Game. ARG academy K-12. Virtual 4T Conference. Teachers Teaching Teachers about Technology. Mayo 2012 (http://goo.gl/8ukF2V) (25-03-2014).

Chin, J., Dukes, R. & Gamson, W. (2009). Assessment in Simulation and Gaming: A Review of the Last 40 Years. Simulation & Gaming, 40(4), 553-568. (DOI: http://doi.org/d4k5v3).

Connolly, T. (2009). Tower of Babel ARG: Methodology manual (http://goo.gl/L5ddOJ) (25-03-2014).

Costa-Sánchez, C. & Piñeiro-Otero, T. (2012). ¿Espectadores o creadores? El empleo de las tecnologías creativas por los seguidores de las series españolas. Comunicaca?o e Sociedade, 22, 184-204. (http://goo.gl/VV90Mc) (25-06-2014).

Davies, R., Kriznova, R. & Weiss, D. (2006). eMapps.com: Games and Mobile Technology in Learning. In W. Nejdl & K. Tochtermann (Eds.), Proceedings of First European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning, EC-TEL, 103-110. (DOI: http://doi.org/fk68tq).

De-Freitas, S. & Griffiths, M. (2008). The Convergence of Gaming Practices with other Media Forms: What Potential for Learning? A Review of the Literatura. Learning, Media & Technology, 33 (1), 11-20. (DOI: http://doi.org/dstms4).

Dena, C. (2008). Emerging Participatory Culture Practices: Player-created Tiers in Alternate Reality Games. Convergence. The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, 14(1), 41-57. (DOI: http://doi.org/d5j7wh).

Doore, K. (2013). Alternate Realities for Computational Thinking. In Proceedings of the Ninth Annual International ACM Conference on International Computing Education Research. (pp. 171-172). New York: ACM. (DOI: http://doi.org/tnp).

Dunleavy, M., Dede, C. & Mitchell, R. (2009). Affordances and Limitations of Immersive Participatory Augmented Reality Simulations for Teaching and Learning. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 18(1), 7-22. (DOI: http://doi.org/bp5dzr).

Ecomuve. (http://goo.gl/NhJc3h) (25-03-2014).

EMAPPS Project. (http://goo.gl/gwjsjA) (25-03-2014).

Estanyol, E., Montaña, M. & Lalueza, F. (2013). Comunicar jugando. Gamificación en publicidad y relaciones públicas. In K. Zilles, J. Cuenca & J. Rom (Eds.), Breaking the Media Value Chain. (pp. 171-172). Barcelona: Universitat Ramon Llul. (http://goo.gl/PFn8nO) (25-03-2014).

EVOKE (2010). (http://goo.gl/Ciob9x) (25-03-2014).

Fujimoto, R. (2010). Designing an Educational Alternate Reality Game. (http://goo.gl/7U6jix) (25-03-2014).

Gee, J. P. (2004). Good videogames and good learning. (http://goo.gl/7j18mJ) (25-03-2014).

Gikas, J. & Grant, M. M. (2013). Mobile Computing Devices in Higher Education: Student Perspectives on Learning with Cellphones, Smartphones & Social Media. The Internet and Higher Education, 19, 18-26. (DOI: http://doi.org/tnq).

Hansen, D., Bonsignore, E., Ruppel, M., Visconti, A. & Kraus, K. (2013). Designing Reusable Alternate Reality Games. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 1529-1538. (DOI: http://doi.org/tnr).

Harp. (http://goo.gl/mCRt5z) (25-03-2014).

Hernández, N., González, M. & Muñoz, P.C. (2014). La planificación del aprendizaje colaborativo en entornos virtuales. Comunicar, 42, 25-33. (DOI: http://doi.org/tmp).

IGDA (2006). Alternate Reality Games White Paper. (http://goo.gl/bXhuOC) (25-03-2014).

Jenkins, H. (2006). Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide. Nueva York: NYU Press.

Just Press Play. (play.rit.edu/) (25-03-2014).

Kafai, Y.B. (1998). Children as Designers, Testers, and Evaluators of Educational Software. In A. Druin (Ed.), The Design of Children's Technology. (pp. 123-145). San Francisco: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers Inc.

Kim, J., Lee, E., Thomas, T. & Dombrowski, C. (2009). Storytelling in NewMedia : The Case of Alternate Reality Games, 2001-2009. First Monday, 14(6). (http://goo.gl/WvCcS1) (25-03-2014).

Lee, T. (2006). This is not a Game: Alternate Reality Gaming and its Potential for Learning. Futurelab. (http://goo.gl/0GRZR8) (25-03-2014).

Lévy, P. (2007). Cibercultura: la cultura de la sociedad digital. Barcelona: Anthropos.

Lugton, M. (2012). What is a MOOC? What are the Different Types of MOOC? xMOOCS y CMOOCs. (http://goo.gl/UhKgqm) (25-03-2014).

McAuley, A., Stewart, B., Siemes, G. & Cormier, D. (2010). The MOOC Model for Digital Practice. (http://goo.gl/9KCfOi) (25-03-2014).

McGonigal, J. (2007). Why I Love Bees: A Case Study in Collective Intelligence Gaming. In John D. y Catherin, T. (Eds.) The Ecology of Games: Connecting Youth, Games, and Learning. (pp. 199-227). Cambridge: The MIT Press. (http://goo.gl/F7QX45) (25-03-2014).

McGonigal, J. (2011). Reality is Broken. London: Penguin Press HC.

Mentira. (http://goo.gl/xRJMF5) (25-03-2014).

Moseley, A. (2008). An Alternative Reality for Higher Education? Lessons to be Learned from Online Reality Games. In ALT-C 2008, Leeds, UK, 9-11th September 2008. (http://goo.gl/gRDphJ) (25-03-2014).

Moseley, A., Culver, J., Piatt, K. & Whitton, N. (2009). Motivation in Alternate Reality Gaming Environments and Implications for Learning. In 3rd European Conference on Games Based Learning. Graz: Academic Conferences Limited. (http://goo.gl/LQJPoU) (25-03-2014).

NMC (2014). The Horizont Report. 2014 Higher Education Edition. (http://goo.gl/XUYqqu) (25-03-2014).

Pappano, L. (2012). The Year of the MOOC. (http://goo.gl/tdI5px) (25-03-2014).

Parlamento Europeo (2007). Posición del Parlamento Europeo adoptada en primera lectura el 24 de octubre de 2007 con vistas a la adopción de la Recomendación 2008/.../CE del Parlamento Europeo y del Consejo relativa a la creación del Marco Europeo de Cualificaciones para el aprendizaje permanente. (http://goo.gl/qXcvsl) (25-06-2014).

Phillips, A. (2006). Methods and Mechanics. In A. Martin, B. Thomson & T. Chatfield (Eds.). Alternate reality games. White paper. (pp. 31-43). International Game Developers Association. (http://goo.gl/IWUpao) (25-03-2014).

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants part 1. On the Horizon, 9(5), 1-6. (DOI: http://doi.org/cxwdzq).

Scolari, C. (2013). Narrativas tranmedia : cuando todos los medios cuentan. Barcelona: Centro libros PAPF.

SCOPEO (2013). Scopeo Informe, 2: MOOC: Estado de la situación actual, posibilidades, retos y futuro. Junio 2013. (http://goo.gl/bjyaYr) (25-03-2014).

Siemes, G. (2013). Massive Open Online Courses: Innovation in Education? In R. MacGrea, W. Kinuthia & S. Marshall (Eds.), Open Educational Resources: Innovation, Research and Practice. (pp. 5-17). Vancouver: Commonwealth of Learning & Athabasca University. (http://goo.gl/OmUFne) (25-03-2014).

Squire, K. & Jenkins, H. (2003). Harnessing the power of games in education. Insight, 3(1), 5-33 (http://goo.gl/zyvZYJ) (25-03-2014).

Teichler, U (2007). Does Higher Education Matter? Lessons from a Comparative Graduate Survey. European Journal of Education, 42, 11-34. (DOI: http://doi.org/dm7k2j).

The Arcane Gallery of Gadgetry (http://goo.gl/jyHBFX) (25-03-2014).

Turner, J. & Morrison, A. (2005). Suit Keen Renovator: Alternate Reality Design. In Y. Pisan (Ed.) Australasian Conference on Interactive Entertainment. (pp. 209-213). Sidney: University of Technology.

Tuten, T.L. (2008). Advertising 2.0: Social Media Marketing in a Web 2.0 World. Westport: Greenwood Publishing Group.

Valencia, B. F. (2013). Juegos de realidad alternativa (ARG). Análisis de la realización de este tipo de juego como herramienta educativa. Trabajo Fin de Grado. Universidad de Palermo. (http://goo.gl/WtNCLf) (25-03-2014).

Whitton, N. (2008). Alternate Reality Games for Developing Student Autonomy and Peer Learning. In A. Comrie, N. Mayes, T. Mayes & K. Smytg (Eds.), Proceedings of the LICK 2008 Symposium. (pp. 32-40). Edimburgh: Napier University. (http://goo.gl/jrj2K5) (25-03-2014).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/14
Accepted on 31/12/14
Submitted on 31/12/14

Volume 23, Issue 1, 2015
DOI: 10.3916/C44-2015-15
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 5
Views 1
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?