Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Media convergence and massive usage of Internet-connected devices, distinguishing features of our current society, cause changes in the way that new generations learn and access knowledge. In addition, emerging new digital skills are necessary for the Z generation to face the challenges of a digital society. This quantitative study, with a sample of 678 Primary School students, aims to provide empirical evidence about the level of digital skills of students belonging to this generation. The results show that the acquisition of digital competences is not inherent to use, but require specific instruction. Otherwise, there is a danger of creating a digital divide, not due to frequency of use or access to connected devices but to lack of instruction on how to use them. The absence of significant variance in the overall level of digital competence among Primary School students of different grades reflects, to some extent, that this level is largely acquired by informal activities with ICTs in an informal context, rather than by developing competences in a school context that affords gradual and progressive skills acquisition. The results show the need to address digital competence in schools, focusing on the systematic development and enhancement of its component areas to move beyond the informal level and reach the academic level, thus facilitating digital natives’ access to future employment.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

The knowledge society generates immense and irreversible epistemological and structural changes in all facets of life. Education is not oblivious to all these transformations but is rather immersed in finding answers to one of the challenges derived from this new information context: educating a generation born and raised in an era of technological explosion and currently encompassing the student body of our schools.

These are students who, as described by Feixa (2006: 13), “from the moment they begin to understand their environment, are surrounded by electronic devices that have configured their vision of life and the world”. Many terms have been fashioned to refer to this group since Prensky (2001) mentioned digital natives, among which we find, as described by Fernandez & Fernandez (2016), the Z Generation, the V (Virtual) Generation, the C (Contents or Community) Generation, the Silent Generation, the Internet Generation or even the Google Generation, where the common link is technophilia and the incorporation of ICTs in their daily activities.

The expeditious transformation that ICTs impart to essential habits, learning styles and interaction modalities produces a vast array of possibilities as unknown as they are incalculable (Wolton, 2000; Tapscott, 2008), which education must not only confront, but also offer educational responses. This fact underscores the importance of knowing in depth the characteristics of the above mentioned Z Generation (Schroer, 2008), a term that identifies the cohort born between 1995 and 2012 –most of whom are currently incorporated in the education system– with the objective of pondering the use of ICTs by this generation, the degree to which they are integrated in daily life, and the level of digital skills that should be reflected on the teaching-learning processes developed in the classroom.

1.1. Characteristics of the Z Generation student body

From a socio-cognitive perspective, the Z Generation student body is characterized by distinctive features that differ from students of previous generations, amply described by Bennett & al. (2008), Gallardo (2012), and Fernández & Fernández (2016). These authors coincide in emphasizing a capacity of said generation for rapid response, a desire for immediacy and for continuous interaction. In the same vein, the authors state that the student body of the Z Generation considers itself as expert and competent in ICT, attributing high expectations to technology, where learning tends to be independent or autodidactic.

Other notable characteristics are a preference for visual information and ease of performance in digital and visual environments accomplishing several tasks simultaneously, a phenomenon known as multitasking (Cassany & Atalaya, 2008; Reig & Viched 2013). These characteristics are evidenced in the context of a formal education that must adapt to a student body also known as the “copy and paste in school” generation (Mut & Morey, 2008), which is increasingly distinguished from previous generations in the distinct needs, demands, and behavior patterns brought into and clearly displayed in the classroom. In this regard, some authors such as Fernández and Fernández (2016) question the capacity of current teachers to meet adequate teaching-learning processes for Z Generation students; a concern seeking answers to the issues arising from inadequate skills in preparing future citizens for the demands of their adult lives.

1.2. Digital literacy within the context of Primary Education

The Spanish education system regards digital literacy as a third key proficiency for the student body to acquire by the end of the compulsory schooling phase. As reflected in Order ACD/65/2015 of 21 January, “digital skills are those that encompass creative, critical, and safe use of ICTs to reach the goals related to work, employability, knowledge, use of free time, inclusion, and participation in society. These skills assume, in addition to an ease in adjustment to changes introduced by new technologies in literacy, reading, and writing, the capacity to adapt to a new set of knowledge, abilities and attitudes that are necessary in this day and age to be competent in a digital environment” (Order ECD/65/2015, I).

Digital skills and new literacies for Primary School students are priority themes on government agendas (A Digital Agenda for Europe and a Digital Agenda for Spain). In this regard, as indicated by González & al. (2012), this priority is substantiated by the directives of what is known as School 2.0 and summarized in a modified definition of literacy: digital literacy.

The term refers to a multidimensional outlook comprising the cognition, attitude, and capacity of individuals to utilize digital tools and sources to recognize, access, negotiate, evaluate, analyze and synthesize digital resources to build knowledge, create multimedia contents, communicate with others, and exercise critical skills in virtual contexts, so that constructive social actions are established. (Martin, 2008; Thomson & al., 2014).

In a European context, the most representative study on digital skills was conducted by the Institute for Prospective Technological Studies. Started in 2011, the research yielded four reports that constitute the most comprehensive European study on digital skills and is the foundation on which all subsequent actions are based (Ala-Mutka, 2011; Janssen & Stoyanov, 2012, Ferrari, 2012; 2013). That investigation gave rise to the development of digital skills in five competence areas: information, communication, content creation, problem solving, and security (used for the construction of the instrument).

It is important to note that research regarding digital skills in an education context has mostly addressed higher levels of education, i.e., secondary education and particularly in a university context (Cabero & Llorente, 2008; Larraz, 2013; Gros & Forés, 2013; Sendín, Gaona & García, 2014), where the evaluation and development of digital skills has been the focus of the largest number of investigations. A review of the research conducted in a primary education context in Spain finds investigative work related to the incorporation of Internet and ICTs (Sigalés & Mominó, 2004; Sigalés & al., 2008), contributions which primarily analyze the impact on innovation and improvement in education. There are also studies on the attitude of primary teachers towards ICTs (Almerich & al., 2005; Sáez, 2011). However, specific research on the digital skills or digital literacy of the Primary School student body in our education system has not been, in general, a focus of study, despite the existence of some comprehensive research on the matter (Aguaded & al., 2015; Pérez-Escoda, 2015).

Therefore, we consider it important to conduct a diagnostic evaluation of digital skills of the student body at this level, which corresponds to the Z Generation: Primary School students from 2nd to 6th year (aged 7 to 12). With that aim we propose the following investigation, focusing on the achievement of five objectives:

• Determine the extent of the use of technological devices as well as the Internet by the student body in informal environments.

• Ascertain the degree to which ICTs are integrated into the daily life of the Z Generation.

• Ascertain the levels of digital skills by competency areas: information, communication, context creation, security, and problem solving.

• Analyze the results as a function of the sample characteristics for a better generalization of findings.

• Understand the possible implications of the findings in terms of teaching and training of the student body and, in view of the results obtained, study the curricular inclusion potential.

2. Material and method

2.1. Sample

The sample comprised pupils in primary education from the Spanish region of Castile and Leon. It was a convenience sampling, consisting of 678 students: 347 public school children and 331 children from private schools. Eight schools in Castile and Leon, from rural as well as urban environments, and from Leon, Salamanca, Segovia, Zamora, Valladolid, Burgos and Avila, collaborated with the study.

The sample consisted of 52.4% boys and 47.6% girls, ranging in age from seven to twelve. There were 52 students from 2nd grade (7-8 yrs.), 125 students from 3rd grade (8-9 yrs.), 164 from 4th grade (9-10), 178 students from 5th grade (10-11) and 159 students from 6th grade (11-12 yrs.). First-grade students (6-7 yrs.) did not participate in the study as they have not yet mastered their reading-writing skills, which would have created an impediment in the methodological application of questionnaires.

Although the sample is limited in its ability to generalize, we consider that the results obtained can be considered representative and of interest to the education community, since there was a diagnostic evaluation process of digital skills of a primary education student body that aims to trigger, through its findings, thoughtful consideration of the status of such skills.


Draft Content 310652850-52767-en018.jpg

2.2. Information gathering instrument

The choice was to design a questionnaire of closed questions in order to simplify answering by the children and control the consistency level, thus avoiding confusion for the children as they answered the questions (Creswell, 2009). The questionnaire was composed of four differentiated blocks (table 1) as a function of variable type and data collected.

The first block addresses contextual variables, demographic data and sample identification. The second block consists of five questions to evaluate ICT usage and time spent utilizing them. The third block evaluates the degree of integration of ICTs into daily life. Finally the fourth block, composed of 21 items, focuses on the dimensions of digital skills by competency areas.

The internal consistency of the designed questionnaire was measured for validity and reliability. An initial exploratory analysis of the set of items allowed us to conclude that, given the nature of questionnaire blocks, it was better to perform psychometric analyses in a differential manner and with the purpose of obtaining a clear justification, particularly in the block that measured digital skills. Thus, in block three we found the Cronbach’s a correlation coefficient of item-total values to be higher than 0.89, which indicates a high reliability in the block. The content was validated with a pilot application of 15 children from different grade levels with the aim of evaluating from 2nd grade to 6th grade of Primary School. This pilot was used to obtain the final version of the questionnaire, with semantic modifications applied according to comments made by the group.

The phases that guided the investigation took full account of the ethical issues that should steer any investigation involving children, ensuring their freedom to participate. The schools’ management teams were contacted first, to explain the project and its goal. Once a favorable response to participation was obtained, information circulars were sent to families describing the proposed study and requesting their approval for involvement.

To promote a sense of security among the students, data collection was performed in the participating schools by their own teachers, who were instructed about how to proceed, thus avoiding the presence of strangers in the classrooms. The questionnaires were administered in writing due to the impossibility of online access for all students in participating schools that lacked the adequate infrastructure.


Draft Content 310652850-52767-en019.jpg

3. Analysis and results

3.1. ICT use and computer time used

The data gathered from the questionnaire reveal a high frequency in the use of technological devices by the Primary School student body, with computers being the most utilized (77.3%) followed by tablets (75.5%), mobiles (74.3%) and laptops (54%). These findings suggest the hegemony of the computer and its pervasive presence in the homes of the students.

Data analyses of findings by grade (see figure 1) indicate the laptop as the least utilized device at all levels. When results are analyzed by grades, we see that Primary School 2nd graders use computers more often than those in higher grades, 82.7% of 2nd graders versus 77.3% of 6th graders. Another interesting finding is that 75% of 2nd graders use mobile devices.

Results obtained in this content block show how the student body in Primary Schools is capable of using different technological devices with ease in their daily life. In fact, 82.7% of 2nd graders claim to use more than one device, and the numbers increase with the academic level, with 96.9% of 6th graders stating that they use more than one technological device in their daily life.

Regarding the item “with whom did you learn to use the computer and Internet,” data show the highest percentages corresponded to family (68% of students) and autodidactic; friends or by themselves was indicated by 29.7% of students; while the response “with teachers” was the least selected, at 19.2%. An analysis of these findings in relation to the context variable “rural or urban environment” demonstrates that rural students are more likely to have learned from teachers (21.2%) compared to those from urban environments (16.9%). However, students from an urban environment say they have learned more with family (78.9%) than those from a rural environment (59%). Finally, the student body in rural environments tends to be more autodidactic (29.4%) than those in an urban environment (21.5%).

The analysis of the variable “time spent” addresses those students who say they use computers in their daily life by asking how often they use them. As can be observed in figure 2, the majority of students in all grades use the computer once or twice per week. Students from 2nd and 4th grade report the highest use of computers (almost daily).

Computer use and specifically Internet use by the Primary School student body leads us to analyze how long children have been accessing the Net. In this regard, the data throw up striking results, since over 34% of 2nd graders have been using the Net for over a year. Almost 30% of third graders have been accessing the Net for over 3 years and finally, 22% of 4th graders, 26% of 5th graders, and 16.4% of 6th graders have been surfing the Net for over 5 years. These findings demonstrate an increasing trend of younger children using the Internet. When looking at the gender variable to analyze this indicator, it is revealing that girls have started to use Internet and computers earlier, as shown by figure 3 (https://goo.gl/K2wUC1), even though an independent sample t-test as a function of gender did not find statistically significant differences (n.s. 0,05) in the use of ICTs between gender and frequency of use (Table 2).


Draft Content 310652850-52767-en020.jpg

3.2. Degree of integration of ICTs in daily activities

In this section we analyze the degree of ICT integration in daily activities: play, search for information, search for videos, watch movies, do homework, chat, and write emails. As seen in table 3, data show that the most popular activity is play, with the highest mean (1.5), followed by searching for information (1.34) and searching for videos or music (1.3). However, when analyzing the frequency of use of different devices, data show each activity has a different device frequently used. By way of example, play and searching for videos/music, a tablet is most frequently used, with 64.9% and 49% respectively, while the computer is the most utilized device to search for information on Internet (48.7%), to do homework (50.4%) and to watch movies (33.3%). Finally, the mobile device has the highest frequency of use for chatting and talking with friends (58.2%) and writing emails.


Draft Content 310652850-52767-en021.jpg

The distribution of the amount of time students use ICTs for daily activities (table 4) indicates that the tasks to which they dedicate most time (almost every day) are playing (32.7%), chatting or talking with friends using technological devices (31.3%) and searching for videos or music (31.3%).

3.3. Level of digital skills among Primary School students

The third proposed objective was to determine the level of digital skills by competency areas as reported by the students, in order to establish lines of action aimed at enhancing their training. Three digital skill levels were established for this purpose according to the answers students gave to each item. Using a Likert scale, the levels were determined as nil, low, little, some, sufficient, and much. Based on the answers, the levels were finalized as follows:


Draft Content 310652850-52767-en022.jpg

• Level nil: From lowest value to 19th percentile.


Draft Content 310652850-52767-en023.jpg

• Level low: Percentiles 20 to 41.

• Level medium: Percentiles 42 to 63.

• Level advanced: Percentiles 64 to maximum value.

Table 5 shows the number and percentage of students in each established competency level.


Draft Content 310652850-52767-en024.jpg

From the distribution of the student body among the three levels of digital skills, it is evident that competency is heterogeneous; but it is remarkable that only 5% of the student body is classified in the advanced level versus 22.5% that show no digital skills at all (see more details by competency areas in table 5.1 (https://goo.gl/ZweFIV). Digital skills levels can be affected by conditional variables such as grade level, gender, rural or urban environment of the student. Because of this, if we study the block by variables, the tendency is confirmed. Table 6 shows specifically how the lowest percentages are found in the advanced level for all grades.

Furthermore, an analysis of the gender variable yields statistically significant differences, especially in the content creation competency level, where an independent sample t-test shows disparity between genders with significant bilateral values 0.030, 0.000 and 0.007 for the three variables in this area (as shown in table 7: https://goo.gl/AnZ1uW).

Finally, in the ANOVA analysis of variance the differences in this block are studied according to grade levels. Evidently, the striking feature here is not the difference in skills levels among grades (which is completely expected) but the absence of statistically significant differences between the youngest and the oldest with the item “record videos” (within the content creation competency level, Table 8: https://goo.gl/lx6io5).


Draft Content 310652850-52767-en025.jpg

4. Discussion and conclusions

The coexistence of the student body corresponding to the Z Generation, currently at the primary education stage, and ICTs is clear. Access to technology at an early age is a characteristic of this generation, as noted in the theoretical framework (Prensky, 2001; Feixa, 2006; Schroer, 2008). This is also apparent from the present investigation, where we found that the student body at lower grade levels (2nd grade of primary) uses ICTs and demonstrates an amount of usage time higher than that of the student body in the highest primary grade. These data reinforce the arguments that with increasing precocity children are intensely engaged with screens (García, Callejo, & Walzer, 2004; Blanco & Römer, 2011), since - as research demonstrates - before they learn to read and write with ease they surf the Net and use all kinds of digital devices.

However, this study demonstrates that simple exposure to, use of and coexistence with media and technology do not imply development of digital skills. Data obtained in the evaluation of digital competency of the student body belonging to the Z Generation indicate low skill levels, in contrast with expectations of digital natives. These results point to a new type of digital divide among those born with technologies, not due to lack of use or access but to a lack of digital skills (Van-Deursen & Van-Dijk, 2010). We therefore agree with the premise indicated by several authors (Cabra-Torres & Marciales-Vivas, 2009; Cobo & Moravec, 2011) who refer to the fallacy of the digital native. From our perspective, this concept would assume that the child has access to and coexists with ICTs, not that the child knows how to use digital technologies. In this regard, Horizon Report Europe 2014 (Johnson & al., 2014) points to the insufficient digital skills of European children and adolescents, which corresponds to the present findings of the sample we analyzed, where the lack of significant variance in the general level of digital skills among the students in primary education grades reflects, to some extent, that such a level is acquired by coexisting with ICTs and not because of adequate development in a school context that increases acquisition in a gradual and progressive manner.

While we understand that this study has limitations, it does nonetheless offer objective clues for future lines of investigation that reinforce the need to address digital skills in school, focusing on the development of their component areas, enhancing them to surpass the level of daily use and raise them to an academic level that will eventually facilitate the development of digital abilities for the world of employment (Diario Oficial de la UE, C451, 2014). If, as we have noted, current digital skill levels correspond largely to the stimulation of a socio-familiar context and the child’s contact with ICTs, there is a danger that these skills, if not well developed or cared for in an educational context, will propitiate inequalities in the promotion of digital competency. Education has the challenge and responsibility of offering a response tailored to this reality, transitioning toward a School 2.0 that does not overestimate the digital skills of the student body and that allows students the possibility to not just sit in front of screens, but to do so in an effective manner, repositioning the need for critical and participative literacy in the handling, creation, and dissemination of information (Suñé & Martínez, 2011).

To achieve this it is necessary to sensitize teaching staff as to the actual digital competence level of the student body, focusing on the fact that digital literacy is not inherently achieved through the use of technology but rather needs adequate instruction (Cabero & Marín, 2014). The following are some guidelines that may steer the teaching-learning process of the student body of a Z Generation, which tends to place high expectations on technology and develops independent or autodidactic learning, and perhaps facilitate a real and effective inclusion of digital skills in the Primary School curriculum:

• Design assignments that assume the student body will apply skills and strategies to access information, to decode and construct new messages in an ethical and critical manner that favors the development of transmedia navigation and an ability to follow the flow of media information.

• Organize tasks and undertakings that entail the utilization of technology in a collaborative manner, incorporating networking activities.

• Organize activities that entail the development of critical judgment to evaluate the reliability and veracity of the information sources being accessed.

• Assume that the role of the instructor in the classroom should be more as an energizer and supervisor and not so much as a transmitter of information.

• Develop problem-solving through technological resources from a collective, participative and active perspective.

• Introduce gamification as a teaching strategy, incrementing motivation, team work and development of ethical values.

These strategies, in our view, should help favor the development of a School 2.0 that responds with quality and efficacy to the need for digital and media literacy in a student body which is exposed to electronic devices and should acquire digital skills to utilize technologies in a critical and effective manner (Ferrés, García, & al., 2011).

References

Aguaded, I., Marín-Gutiérrez, I., & Díaz-Pareja, E. (2015). La alfabetización mediática entre estudiantes de Primaria y Secundaria en Andalucía (España). RIED, 18(2), 275-298. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5944/ried.18.2.13407.

Ala-Mutka, K. (2011). Mapping Digital Competence: Towards a Conceptual Understanding. IPTS, European Commission. Luxembourg: European Commission. (http://goo.gl/S3bN3H) (2016-05-12).

Almerich, G., Suárez, J., Orellana, N., Belloch, C., Bo, R., & Gastaldo, I. (2005). Diferencias en los conocimientos de los recursos tecnológicos en profesores a partir del género, edad y tipo de centro. Revista Electrónica de Investigación y Evaluación Educativa, 11(2). (https://goo.gl/SNg7yF) (2016-05-22).

Bennett, S., Maton, K., & Kervin, L. (2008). The Digital Natives Debate: A Critical Review of the Evidence. British Journal of Educational Technology, 39 (5), 775-786. doi: http://doi:10.1111/-j.1467-8535.2007.00793.x

Blanco, I., & Römer, M. (2011). Los niños frente a las pantallas. Madrid: Universitas.

Cabero, J., & Llorente, M.C. (2008). La alfabetización digital de los alumnos. Competencias digitales para el siglo XXI. Revista Portuguesa de Pedagogía, 42(2), 7-28. (http://goo.gl/k30zXH) (2016-04-17).

Cabero, J., & Marín, V. (2014). Miradas sobre la formación del profesorado en TIC. Enl@ce, 11 (2), 11-24. (https://goo.gl/BEBkcG) (2016-04-20).

Cabra-Torres, F., & Marciales-Vivas, G.P. (2009). Mitos, realidades y preguntas de investigación sobre los 'nativos digitales': una revisión. Universitas Psychologica, 8(2), 323-338. (http://goo.gl/TzPrWO) (2016-05-15).

Cassany, D., & Ayala, G. (2008). Nativos e inmigrantes digitales en la escuela. CEE, Participación Educativa, 9, 53-71. (http://goo.gl/VSFlg1) (2016-03-20).

Cobo, C., & Moravec, J.W. (2011). Aprendizaje invisible. Hacia una nueva ecología de la educación. Col.lecció Transmedia XXI. Barcelona: Laboratori de Mitjans Interactius / Publicacions i Edicions de la Universitat de Barcelona. (http://goo.gl/kzAMW6) (2016-05-17).

Creswell, J.W. (2009). Research Design. Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

DO, Diario Oficial de las Comunidades Europeas C451 (2014). Dictamen del Comité Económico y Social Europeo sobre la Sociedad Digital: Acceso, educación, formación, empleo, herramientas para la igualdad. (http://goo.gl/Vol1NC) (2016-02-20).

Feixa, C. (2006). Generación XX. Teorías sobre la juventud en la era contemporánea. Revista latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales, Niñez y Juventud, 4(2), 21-45. (http://goo.gl/kmdCI2) (2016-01-12).

Fernández, F.J., & Fernández, M.J. (2016). Los docentes de la Generación Z y sus competencias digitales [Generation Z's Teachers and their Digital Skills]. Comunicar, 46, 97-105. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C46-2016-10

Ferrari, A. (2012). Digital Competence in Practice: An Analysis of Frameworks. JRC Technical Reports. Joint Research Center. European Commission. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.2791/82116

Ferrari, A. (2013). A Framework for Developing and Understanding Digital Competence in Europe. IPTS Reports. Luxembourg: European Commission. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.2788/52966

Ferrés, J., García-Matilla, A., Aguaded, I., Fernández, J. Figueras, M., & Blanes, M. (2011). Competencia mediática. Investigación sobre el grado de competencia de la ciudadanía en España. Madrid: Instituto de Tecnología Educativa. (http://goo.gl/ZRfeHm) (2016-02-15).

Gallardo, E. (2012). Hablemos de estudiantes digitales y no de nativos digitales. UT, Revista de Ciències de l´Educació, 7-21. (https://goo.gl/6mxgj7) (2016-05-12).

García, A., Callejo, J., & Walzer, A. (2004). Los niños y los jóvenes frente a las pantallas: situación de los medios de comunicación y las nuevas tecnologías de la información en España en el ámbito de la infancia y la adolescencia. Madrid: INJUVE, Ministerio de Trabajo y Asuntos Sociales.

González, J., Espuny, C., & de-Cid, M.J. (2012). INCOTIC-ESO. Cómo autoevaluar y diagnosticar la competencia digital en la Escuela 2.0. Revista de Investigación Educativa, 30(2), 287-302. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.6018/rie.30.2.117941

Gros, B., & Forés, A. (2013). Usos de la geolocalización en Educación Secundaria para la mejora del aprendizaje situado: Análisis de dos estudios de caso. Relatec, 12(2), 41-53. (http://goo.gl/20eVLJ) (2016-02-19).

Janssen, J., & Stoyanov, S. (2012). Online Consultation on Experts´ Views on Digital Competence. JCR Technical reports. Joint Research Center. Luxembourg: European Commission. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.2791/97099

Johnson, L., Adams- Becker, S., Estrada, V., Freeman, A., Kampylis, P., Vuorikari, R., & Punie, Y. (2014). Horizon Report Europe: 2014 Schools Edition. Luxembourg: Publications Office of the European Union, & Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium. (https://goo.gl/swgTRu) (2016-05-16).

Larraz, V. (2013). La competencia digital a la Universitat. (Tesis doctoral). Universitat d´Ándorra. (http://goo.gl/WvYJHq) (2016-02-07).

Martin, A. (2008). Digital Literacy and the Digital Society. In C. Lankshear, & M. Knobel, (Eds.), Digital Literacies: Concepts, Policies and Practices (pp.151-176). New York: Peter Lang.

Mut, A., & Morey, M. (2008). Preferencias en el uso de Internet, televisión, videoconsolas y teléfonos móviles entre los menores de las Islas Baleares. Edutec, 27. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.21556/edutec.2008.27.460

Orden ECD/65/2015, de 21 de enero, por la que se describen las relaciones entre las competencias, los contenidos y los criterios de evaluación de la Educación Primaria, la Educación Secundaria Obligatoria y el Bachillerato. Boletín Oficial del Estado, 25, de 29 de enero de 2015. (http://goo.gl/opAkCi) (2016-02-16).

Pérez-Escoda, A. (2015). Alfabetización digital y competencias digitales en el marco de la evaluación educativa: Estudio en alumnos y profesores de Educación Primaria de Castilla y León. (Tesis Doctoral). Salamanca: Universidad de Salamanca. (http://goo.gl/1AvJBP) (2016-03-16).

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. Part 1. On the Horizon, 9(5), 1-6. (http://goo.gl/93tth3) (2016-01-05).

Reig, D., & Vilchez, L. (2013). Los jóvenes en la era de la hiperconectividad: tendencias, claves y miradas. Madrid: Fundación Telefónica.

Sáez, J.M. (2011). Opiniones y práctica de los docentes respecto al uso pedagógico de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación. Revista Electrónica de Investigación y Docencia, 5, 95-113. (http://goo.gl/tVwLv1) (2016-04-27).

Schroer, W. (2008). Defining, Managing and Marketing to Generations X, Y and A. The Portal, 10, 9. (http://goo.gl/1sKPQr) (2016-04-10).

Sendín, J., Gaona, P., & García, A. (2014). Nuevos medios: usos comunicativos de los adolescentes. Perspectivas desde los nativos digitales. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico, 20(1), 265-280. (http://goo.gl/btHTR8) (2016-05-02).

Sigalés, C., & Mominó, J. (Eds.) (2004). La escuela en la sociedad Red. Internet en el ámbito educativo no universitario. Barcelona: UOC. (http://goo.gl/VZHjUo) (2016-05-02).

Sigalés, C., Mominó, J.M., Meneses, J., & Badia, A. (2008). La integración de Internet en la educación escolar española: situación actual y perspectivas de futuro. Informe de Investigación. Barcelona: Universitat Oberta de Catalunya / Fundación Telefónica. (http://goo.gl/FlGO9j) (2016-11-06).

Suñé, X., & Martínez, I.S. (2011). La Escuela 2.0 en tus manos. Panorama, instrumentos y propuestas. Madrid: Anaya Multimedia.

Tapscott, D. (2008). Grown Up Digital: How the Net Generation is Changing Your World. Madrid: McGraw-Hill.

Thomson, K., Jaeger, P., Greene, N., Subramanian, M., & Bertot, J. (2014). Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion. Meryland: Rowman & Littlefield.

Van-Deursen, A., & Van-Dijk, J. (2010). Internet Skills and Digital Divide. New Media and Society, 13 (6), 893-911. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1461444810386774

Wolton, D. (2000). Surviving the Internet. Barcelona: Gedisa.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

La convergencia mediática y el uso masivo de dispositivos conectados a Internet, rasgos distintivos de la sociedad actual, provocan cambios en el modo en el que las nuevas generaciones aprenden y acceden al conocimiento. Además, emergen nuevas competencias, las digitales, que la Generación Z necesita para afrontar los retos de una sociedad digitalizada. El estudio presentado, de corte cuantitativo, con una muestra de 678 alumnos de Educación Primaria, pretende aportar evidencias empíricas sobre el nivel de competencia digital del alumnado perteneciente a dicha generación. Los resultados revelan que no adquieren habilidades digitales de forma inherente sino que precisan de educación al respecto, atisbándose el peligro de una brecha digital, no por uso o acceso a ellas, sino por falta de competencia. La ausencia de diferencia significativa en el nivel general de competencia digital entre el alumnado de diferentes cursos de la etapa de Educación Primaria refleja que, en cierta medida, ese nivel se adquiere más por convivencia con las TIC en contextos informales que por un adecuado desarrollo en el contexto escolar que potencie gradual y progresivamente su adquisición. De los resultados se desprende, por tanto, la necesidad de abordar la competencia digital en la escuela, incidiendo en el desarrollo de las áreas que la componen y potenciándola para superar el nivel de uso en la vida cotidiana y acercarla al nivel académico que facilitará su inclusión al mundo laboral.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

La sociedad del conocimiento está generando enormes e irreversibles cambios epistemológicos y estructurales en todos los ámbitos de la vida; la educación no es ajena a todas estas trasformaciones y se halla inmersa en dar respuesta a uno de los retos que se deriva de este nuevo contexto informacional: la educación de una generación que ha nacido y crecido en la era de la explosión tecnológica y que actualmente conforma el alumnado de nuestras escuelas.

Estudiantes que, como señala Feixa (2006: 13), «desde que tienen uso de razón les han rodeado instrumentos electrónicos que han configurado su visión de la vida y del mundo». Muchos términos se han acuñado para referirse a este grupo poblacional desde que Prensky (2001) mencionara a los nativos digitales, entre los que encontramos, tal y como relatan Fernández y Fernández (2016), la Generación Z, la Generación V (por virtual), Generación C (por comunidad o contenido), Generación Silenciosa, Generación de Internet o incluso, Generación Google, cuyo nexo común es su tecnofilia y la incorporación de las TIC en el desenvolvimiento de su vida cotidiana.

La vertiginosa transformación que las TIC imprimen en hábitos vitales, estilos de aprendizaje y modalidades de interacción es un mar de posibilidades tan desconocidas como infinitas (Wolton, 2000; Tapscott, 2008) a las que la educación no solo debe enfrentarse, sino también dar respuestas educativas. Este hecho nos hace ver la importancia de conocer en profundidad las características de la denominada Generación Z (Schroer, 2008) término referido a la cohorte de personas nacidas entre los años 1995 y 2012 –la mayoría actualmente incorporadas el sistema educativo– con el objeto de reflexionar sobre el uso de las TIC de esta generación, su grado de integración en la vida cotidiana y el grado de competencias digitales que deben verse reflejadas en los procesos de enseñanza-aprendizaje desarrollados en las aulas escolares.

1.1. Características del alumnado de la Generación Z

Desde el punto de vista socio-cognitivo el alumnado de la Generación Z se caracteriza por unos rasgos diferenciadores con respecto a aquellos alumnos de generaciones anteriores ampliamente descritos por Bennett y otros (2008); Gallardo (2012) y Fernández y Fernández (2016). Entre ellos, los autores coinciden en destacar la capacidad de respuesta rápida de esta generación, su deseo de inmediatez y de interacción continua. En esta línea, dichos autores constatan que el alumnado perteneciente a la Generación Z se concibe a sí mismo como experto y competente en TIC, atribuyendo expectativas muy elevadas hacia la tecnología, donde el aprendizaje suele ser independiente o autodidacta.

Otras características reseñables son la preferencia hacia la información visual y el fácil desenvolvimiento de esta generación en entornos digitales y visuales gestionando varias tareas al mismo tiempo, fenómeno conocido como multitasking (Cassany & Atalaya, 2008; Reig & Vilchez, 2013). Estas características se manifiestan en el contexto de una educación formal que tiene que adaptarse a un alumnado también conocido como la generación del «copiar y pegar en la escuela» (Mut & Morey, 2008), y que les distingue cada vez más con las generaciones anteriores presentando unas necesidades, demandas y patrones de comportamiento claramente diferenciados que se trasladan y ponen de manifiesto en las aulas. Al respecto, algunos autores como Fernández y Fernández (2016) cuestionan la preparación del profesorado actual para afrontar los procesos de enseñanza-aprendizaje de los alumnos de la Generación Z; una preocupación que busca respuestas a la problemática que plantea no estar preparando adecuadamente a los futuros ciudadanos de la era digital en las competencias necesarias para afrontar su futuro.

1.2. Las competencias digitales en el marco de la Educación Primaria

En el sistema educativo español se concibe la competencia digital como la tercera competencia clave a adquirir por el alumnado al finalizar la escolaridad obligatoria. Tal y como se refleja en la Orden ECD/65/2015, de 21 de enero, «la competencia digital es aquella que implica el uso creativo, crítico y seguro de las TIC para alcanzar los objetivos relacionados con el trabajo, la empleabilidad, el aprendizaje, el uso del tiempo libre, la inclusión y participación en la sociedad. Esta competencia supone, además de la adecuación a los cambios que introducen las nuevas tecnologías en la alfabetización, la lectura y la escritura, un conjunto nuevo de conocimientos, habilidades y actitudes necesarias hoy en día para ser competente en un entorno digital» (Orden ECD/65/2015, I).

Las competencias digitales y las nuevas alfabetizaciones en alumnos de Educación Primaria son temas prioritarios en las agendas de los gobiernos (Una Agenda Digital para Europa y una Agenda Digital para España). En este sentido, tal y como señalan González y otros (2012) esta prioridad se ha materializado en las directrices de la llamada Escuela 2.0 que se engloba en una definición modificada de alfabetización: la alfabetización digital. Se trata de una visión multidimensional que conjuga la consciencia, la actitud y la capacidad de los individuos para utilizar herramientas y fuentes digitales para reconocer, acceder, gestionar, evaluar, analizar y sintetizar recursos digitales para la construcción de conocimiento, la creación de contenido multimedia, la comunicación con otros y la capacidad crítica en contextos virtuales y, con ello establecer acciones sociales constructivas (Martin, 2008; Thomson & al., 2014).

En el contexto europeo el estudio más representativo sobre la competencia digital se llevó a cabo desde el Institute for Prospective Technological Studies, que puesto en marcha en 2011 dio como resultado cuatro informes que suponen el estudio europeo más completo llevado a cabo sobre la competencia digital y base sobre la que se sustenta cualquier acción posterior (Ala-Mutka, 2011; Janssen & Stoyanov, 2012, Ferrari, 2012; 2013). La investigación dio lugar al desarrollo de dicha competencia en cinco áreas competenciales: información, comunicación, creación de contenido, resolución de problemas y seguridad (utilizadas para la construcción del instrumento).

Es importante señalar que el estudio de la competencia digital en el contexto educativo ha sido mayoritariamente abordado en etapas educativas superiores, siendo en la Educación Secundaria y, sobre todo, en el contexto universitario (Cabero & Llorente, 2008; Larraz, 2013; Gros & Forés, 2013; Sendín, Gaona, & García, 2014), donde la competencia digital, su evaluación y desarrollo han sido objeto de mayor número de investigaciones.

Si repasamos los estudios realizados en el ámbito de la Educación Primaria en España, encontramos trabajos de investigación relacionados con la incorporación de Internet y la introducción de las TIC en esta etapa (Sigalés & Mominó, 2004; Sigalés & al., 2008), aportaciones en su mayoría, que analizan las repercusiones en la innovación y la mejora educativa. También, encontramos estudios sobre la actitud de los docentes de Primaria frente a las TIC (Almerich & al., 2005; Sáez, 2011). Sin embargo, las investigaciones específicas en cuanto a competencias digitales o alfabetización digital del alumnado de la Educación Primaria de nuestro sistema educativo escolar no ha sido, en general, objeto de estudio aunque se encuentre algún estudio exhaustivo al respecto (Aguaded & al., 2015; Pérez-Escoda, 2015).

Consideramos, por lo tanto, importante realizar una evaluación diagnóstica de las competencias digitales del alumnado de esta etapa, que se corresponde con la Generación Z, desde 2º a 6º de Educación Primaria (alumnos de 7 a 12 años). Para ello nos planteamos la siguiente investigación, orientada a la consecución de cinco objetivos:

• Determinar el grado de uso tanto de dispositivos tecnológicos como de Internet por parte del alumnado en entornos informales.

• Conocer el grado de integración en la vida cotidiana de las TIC en esta Generación Z.

• Conocer los niveles de competencia digital por áreas competenciales: información, comunicación, creación de contenidos, seguridad y resolución de problemas.

• Analizar los resultados obtenidos en función de las características de la muestra para una mayor profundización en los resultados.

• Conocer qué posibles implicaciones tienen los resultados que se obtienen en términos de formación y de aprendizaje del alumnado y estudiar la posibilidad de una inclusión curricular a partir de los resultados.

2. Material y método

2.1. Muestra

La muestra estuvo conformada por alumnos de Educación Primaria de la comunidad de Castilla y León. El muestreo para el estudio fue por conveniencia estando compuesto por 678 alumnos, 347 niños escolarizados en centros públicos y 331 niños que asisten a centros educativos de titularidad privada-concertada. La investigación contó con la colaboración de ocho colegios de Castilla y León ubicados tanto en entornos rurales como urbanos pertenecientes a León, Salamanca, Segovia, Zamora, Valladolid, Burgos y Ávila.

El 52,4% de la muestra son niños y el 47,6% niñas, oscilando la edad de estos entre los siete y los doce años, accediendo a un total de 52 alumnos de segundo de Educación Primaria (7-8 años), 125 alumnos de tercero (8-9 años), 164 alumnos de cuarto (9-10 años), 178 niños de quinto (10-11 años) y 159 alumnos de sexto (11-12 años). Los alumnos del primer curso (6-7 años) no fueron objeto de estudio por no tener completamente adquiridas las competencias lecto-escritoras, lo que suponía un impedimento en la aplicación metodológica de los cuestionarios.

A pesar de que la muestra sea limitada para poder establecer generalizaciones, consideramos que los resultados obtenidos pueden ser representativos y de interés para la comunidad educativa ya que se presenta un proceso de evaluación diagnóstica de las competencias digitales del alumnado de Educación Primaria que pretende abrir, a través de sus resultados, la reflexión sobre el estado de dicha competencia.


Draft Content 310652850-52767 ov-es018.jpg

2.2. Instrumento de recogida de la información

Se optó por el diseño de un cuestionario de preguntas cerradas para facilitar las respuestas de los niños y controlar el nivel de univocidad evitando así que los alumnos se desorientasen a la hora de contestarlo (Creswell, 2009). El cuestionario consta de cuatro bloques diferenciados (tabla 1) en función del tipo de variables y de los datos que recogen.

El primer bloque responde a variables contextuales, información demográfica y de identificación de la muestra. El segundo consiste en un bloque de cinco preguntas que valoran el uso de las TIC y el tiempo de utilización. El tercer bloque evalúa el grado de integración de las TIC en actividades cotidianas y por último, el cuarto bloque a través de 21 ítems se centra en la medición de las dimensiones de la competencia digital por áreas competenciales.

La consistencia interna del cuestionario diseñado se midió a partir del cálculo de la validez y la fiabilidad. Un análisis exploratorio inicial del conjunto de ítems permitió concluir que dada la naturaleza de los bloques del cuestionario era preferible realizar los análisis psicométricos de manera diferenciada con el propósito de obtener una justificación clara, sobre todo en el bloque para la medición de las dimensiones de la competencia digital. Así, en el bloque tres encontramos unos valores de correlación ítem-total para el a de Cronbach superiores a 0,89, lo que transluce una alta fiabilidad del bloque. La validación de contenido se realizó a través de una aplicación-piloto con 15 niños de los diferentes cursos que se pretendía evaluar: desde 2º de Educación Primaria hasta 6º curso. De ahí se obtuvo una versión definitiva del cuestionario que sufrió modificaciones semánticas a partir de la apreciación del grupo.

Las fases que guiaron la investigación tuvieron muy presentes las cuestiones éticas que deben orientar cualquier investigación con niños, velando por la libertad de participación. En un primer momento se contacta con el equipo directivo de los centros escolares explicando el proyecto y su finalidad. Una vez obtenida una respuesta favorable de participación, se envían circulares informativas a las familias sobre el estudio que se pretende realizar solicitando su aprobación.

Para favorecer un sentimiento de seguridad entre el alumnado, la recogida de datos se realizó por el propio profesorado de los centros a los que se les orientó en todo momento sobre cómo hacerlo, evitando así la presencia de una persona extraña en las aulas. Los cuestionarios fueron cumplimentados en papel ante la imposibilidad de hacerlo de forma online por falta de infraestructura en los centros escolares participantes.


Draft Content 310652850-52767 ov-es019.jpg

3. Análisis y resultados

3.1. Uso de las TIC y tiempo de utilización

Los datos que se desprenden del cuestionario ponen de manifiesto un elevado uso de dispositivos tecnológicos por parte del alumnado de la Educación Primaria siendo el ordenador lo más utilizado 77,3%, seguido por la tableta 75,5%, el móvil 74,3% y el ordenador portátil 54%. Destaca de estos datos la hegemonía del ordenador y su alta penetración en los hogares del alumnado.

Del análisis de los datos por curso (véase figura 1) resulta reseñable que el portátil es la herramienta tecnológica menos utilizada en todos los niveles de la etapa. Analizando los datos por cursos encontramos que el alumnado de 2º curso de Educación Primaria hace un uso del ordenador mayor que los del último curso, un 82,7% los de 2º frente a un 77,3% los de 6º. Asimismo, es importante señalar un dato llamativo y es que el 75% de los niños de 2º curso de Educación Primaria utilizan el móvil.

Los resultados obtenidos en este bloque de contenido muestran cómo el alumnado de Educación Primaria es capaz de utilizar diferentes dispositivos tecnológicos sin dificultad en su vida cotidiana. Así un 82,7% de los alumnos de segundo curso afirman manejar más de un dispositivo, incrementándose estos datos conforme se eleva el curso académico, siendo en sexto curso un 96,9% de alumnado el que manifiesta manejar más de un dispositivo tecnológico en su vida cotidiana.

En relación al ítem con quién han aprendido a utilizar el ordenador e Internet, los datos muestran cómo los porcentajes más elevados se registran en la familia, 68% de los alumnos y de forma autodidacta, con amigos o solos, el 29,7% siendo la respuesta «con los profesores» una de las menos seleccionada, el 19,2% del total de alumnos. El análisis de estos resultados atendiendo a la variable del contexto (entorno rural o urbano) evidencia que son los alumnos de ámbito rural los que dicen haber aprendido más de sus profesores que los de ámbito urbano, un 21,2% frente a un 16,9%. Sin embargo, los de ámbito urbano dicen haber aprendido más con la familia (78,9%) que los de ámbito rural (59%). Finalmente, el alumnado de contextos rurales tiende a ser más autodidacta 29,4%, que los del ámbito urbano, 21,5%.

El análisis de la variable tiempo tiene en consideración a aquellos alumnos que dicen utilizar el ordenador en su vida cotidiana preguntándoles durante cuánto tiempo lo usan. Como se puede observar en el gráfico 2, el tramo de tiempo en el que mayor porcentaje de alumnos de todos los cursos, usa el ordenador es 1 ó 2 veces a la semana. Son los alumnos de 2º curso y los de 4º los que tienen mayor uso casi todos los días del ordenador.

El uso del ordenador y concretamente de Internet en el alumnado de Educación Primaria nos lleva a analizar desde cuándo llevan los niños accediendo a la Red. En este sentido, los datos arrojan unos resultados llamativos pues más del 34% de los alumnos de 2º curso lleva más de un año usando Internet. En 3º casi un 30% lleva más de 3 años usándolo, y por último, el 22% del alumnado de 4º, el 26% de los alumnos de 5º curso y el 16,4% de los niños de 6º lleva más de cinco años navegando por Internet. Estos datos muestran una tendencia de que cada vez con menor edad los niños acceden a la navegación por Internet. Si atendemos a la variable sexo para analizar este indicador resulta revelador que las niñas comenzaron antes a usar internet y el ordenador como muestra la figura 3 (https://goo.gl/sTu2Wv) pese a que en el análisis de la prueba t para muestras independientes en función del género no se encuentran diferencias estadísticamente significativas (n.s. 0,05) entre géneros para el uso de las TIC y la frecuencia de uso (tabla 2).


Draft Content 310652850-52767 ov-es020.jpg

3.2. Grado de integración de las TIC en las actividades cotidianas

En este epígrafe se analiza el grado de integración de las TIC en actividades cotidianas: jugar, buscar información, buscar vídeos, ver películas, hacer un trabajo de clase, chatear y escribir mensajes de correo electrónico. Los datos demuestran tal y como se puede observar en la tabla 3, que la actividad más realizada con TIC es jugar, que tiene la media más alta, 1,5, seguida de buscar información en Internet, con 1,34 y buscar vídeos o música con un 1,30 de media. Por otro lado, analizando la frecuencia de uso de los distintos dispositivos se advierte que cada actividad tiene un dispositivo diferente de uso más frecuente, por ejemplo, para jugar y buscar vídeos o música el dispositivo más usado es la tableta, con un 64,9% y un 49% respectivamente, sin embargo, para buscar información el más usado es el ordenador, con 48,7%, al igual que para hacer deberes o ver películas, con un 50,4% y 33,3% respectivamente. Por último, el móvil, se lleva la puntuación más alta para chatear o hablar con amigos con 58,2% y escribir mensajes de correo electrónico.


Draft Content 310652850-52767 ov-es021.jpg

La distribución del tiempo en el que los alumnos usan las TIC para tareas cotidianas (Tabla 4) indica que las tareas a las que más tiempo dedican son jugar ya que un 32,7% señala que casi todos los días chatea o habla con los amigos a través de dispositivos electrónicos y un 27,7% casi todos los días dice buscar vídeos o música.

3.3. Nivel de competencias digitales del alumnado de Educación Primaria

El tercero de los objetivos propuestos era conocer los niveles de competencia digital de los alumnos por áreas competenciales para establecer líneas de actuación encaminadas a la formación del alumnado. Para este propósito se establecen tres niveles de competencia digital de los alumnos según la respuesta que dan a cada ítem (siendo las posibilidades en escala Likert: nada, poco, algo, bastante y mucho). En función de la respuesta los niveles quedan establecidos del siguiente modo:


Draft Content 310652850-52767 ov-es022.jpg

• Nivel nulo: del valor mínimo al percentil 19.


Draft Content 310652850-52767 ov-es023.jpg

• Nivel bajo: del percentil 20 al 41.

• Nivel medio: del percentil 42 al 63.

• Nivel avanzado: del percentil 64 al valor máximo.

En la tabla 5 (página siguiente) se observa el número y porcentaje de alumnos en cada nivel competencial establecido.


Draft Content 310652850-52767 ov-es024.jpg

Como se puede apreciar la distribución del alumnado entre los tres niveles de competencia digital es heterogéneo, sin embargo, resulta muy llamativo el porcentaje de alumnos que muestra un nivel avanzado en competencia digital, tan solo un 5% frente a un 22,5% que no tiene ninguna competencia digital (más detallado por áreas competenciales en la tabla 5.1 (https://goo.gl/RNmIv1). Los niveles de competencia digital pueden verse sujetos a condicionantes como el curso, el género o el entorno rural o urbano del alumno. Por ese motivo si realizamos un estudio del bloque por variables la tendencia se confirma. En la tabla 6 (siguiente página) se observa de forma específica cómo los porcentajes minoritarios se encuentran en el nivel avanzado en todos los cursos.

Por otro lado, el análisis de la variable género arroja diferencias estadísticamente significativas sobretodo en el área competencial de creación de contenido, donde la prueba de t para muestras independientes muestra disparidades entre géneros con valores Sig. Bilateral 0,030, 0,000 y 0,007, para los tres ítems de esta área (como se aprecia en la tabla 7: https://goo.gl/AeMzSg).

Finalmente, en el análisis de la varianza ANOVA se estudian las diferencias en este bloque por cursos, evidentemente, lo que llama la atención no es la diferencia de nivel competencial entre cursos (algo totalmente esperable) sino la ausencia de estas diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre los más pequeños y los más mayores, en concreto en el ítem Grabas vídeos (dentro del área competencial de creación de contenido, tabla 8: https://goo.gl/QKcYRB).


Draft Content 310652850-52767 ov-es025.jpg

4. Discusión y conclusiones

La convivencia con las TIC del alumnado que se corresponde con la Generación Z y que actualmente cursa la etapa de Educación Primaria está clara. El acceso a la tecnología en edades tempranas es una característica de esta generación como se ha apuntado en el marco teórico (Prensky, 2001; Feixa, 2006; Schroer, 2008). Así se manifiesta en la investigación presentada donde encontramos que el alumnado de cursos inferiores (2º Primaria) usa las TIC y presenta un tiempo de utilización superior al del alumnado del último curso de la etapa. Estos datos refuerzan los argumentos de que los niños, cada vez con mayor precocidad están de modo intensivo frente a las pantallas (García, Callejo, & Walzer, 2004; Blanco & Römer, 2011), pues tal y como se muestra en la investigación, antes de saber leer y escribir con soltura navegan por Internet y utilizan todo tipo de dispositivos.

Sin embargo, el estudio realizado muestra que la mera exposición, uso y convivencia con los medios y la tecnología, no supone el desarrollo de la competencia digital. Los datos obtenidos de la evaluación del nivel de competencia digital del alumnado de la Generación Z son realmente bajos, en contraposición a lo esperado en los nativos digitales. Con estos resultados podríamos apuntar un nuevo tipo de brecha digital entre los nacidos con las tecnologías, no por uso o acceso a ellas sino por falta de competencia (Van-Deursen & Van-Dijk, 2010). Coincidimos, por tanto, con la premisa apuntada por diferentes autores (Cabra-Torres & Marciales-Vivas, 2009; Cobo & Moravec, 2011) que hablan de la falacia del nativo digital. Este concepto supondría desde nuestra perspectiva, que el niño tiene acceso y convive con las TIC, no que sepa utilizar las tecnologías digitales. Al respecto, el Informe Horizon 2014 Europa (Johnson & al., 2014) apunta a un nivel insuficiente de competencia digital en niños y adolescentes europeos, datos que se corresponden con los presentados en la muestra analizada, donde la falta de diferencia significativa en el nivel general de competencia digital entre el alumnado de los diferentes cursos que componen la etapa de Educación Primaria refleja, que en cierta medida, ese nivel se adquiere por la convivencia con las TIC y no por un adecuado desarrollo en el contexto escolar que potencie de modo gradual y progresivo su adquisición.

Si bien entendemos que el estudio presenta sus limitaciones, sí da pistas objetivas sobre futuras líneas de investigación que refuercen la necesidad de abordar la competencia digital en la escuela, incidiendo en el desarrollo de las áreas que la componen, potenciándola para superar el nivel de uso en la vida cotidiana y acercarla al nivel académico que con posterioridad facilitará el desarrollo de habilidades digitales para el mundo laboral (Diario Oficial de la UE, C451, 2014). Si tal y como venimos señalando, el nivel actual de dicha competencia corresponde principalmente a la estimulación del contexto socio-familiar y el contacto del niño con las TIC en este ámbito, se corre el peligro, si esta competencia no es bien desarrollada y atendida desde el contexto escolar, de fomentar desigualdades en la promoción de la competencia digital. La educación tiene el reto y la responsabilidad de ofrecer una respuesta ajustada a esta realidad, transitando hacia una escuela 2.0 que no sobreestime la competencia digital de su alumnado, y que ponga a su disposición la posibilidad no solo de situarse frente a pantallas, sino de hacerlo de forma efectiva, decantándonos hacia la necesidad de una alfabetización crítica y participativa en el manejo, creación y difusión de la información (Suñé & Martínez, 2011).

Para ello, es preciso sensibilizar al profesorado sobre el nivel real de competencia digital del alumnado, incidiendo en que el niño no adquiere habilidades digitales de forma inherente sino que precisa de educación al respecto (Cabero & Marín, 2014). Algunas claves que orienten el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje del alumnado correspondiente a la Generación Z que tiende a depositar expectativas muy elevadas hacia la tecnología, y desarrollar un aprendizaje independiente o autodidacta y que pueden facilitar una inclusión real y eficaz de la competencia digital en el currículum de Educación Primaria son:

• Plantear tareas que supongan que el alumnado aplique técnicas y estrategias de acceso a la información, para la decodificación y construcción de nuevos mensajes de forma ética y crítica que favorezcan el desarrollo de la navegación trasmediática, y la habilidad para seguir el flujo de información mediática.

• Organizar tareas y actividades que impliquen la utilización de la tecnología de forma colaborativa incorporando el trabajo en Red.

• Organizar actividades que supongan el desarrollo de juicio crítico para evaluar la fiabilidad y veracidad de las fuentes de información a las que se accede.

• Asumir que el papel del docente en el aula debe ser más el de dinamizador y supervisor y no tanto de un transmisor de información.

• Desarrollar la resolución de problemas a través de recursos tecnológicos desde una perspectiva colectiva, participativa y activa.

• Introducir la gamificación como estrategia de enseñanza, potenciando la motivación, el trabajo en equipo y el desarrollo de valores éticos.

Entendemos que estas estrategias debieran favorecer el desarrollo de una escuela 2.0 que responda con calidad y eficacia a la necesidad de alfabetización digital y mediática de un alumnado que está expuesto a los medios y que debe adquirir competencias digitales para utilizar las tecnologías de manera crítica y efectiva (Ferrés, García, & al., 2011).

Referencias

Aguaded, I., Marín-Gutiérrez, I., & Díaz-Pareja, E. (2015). La alfabetización mediática entre estudiantes de Primaria y Secundaria en Andalucía (España). RIED, 18(2), 275-298. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5944/ried.18.2.13407.

Ala-Mutka, K. (2011). Mapping Digital Competence: Towards a Conceptual Understanding. IPTS, European Commission. Luxembourg: European Commission. (http://goo.gl/S3bN3H) (2016-05-12).

Almerich, G., Suárez, J., Orellana, N., Belloch, C., Bo, R., & Gastaldo, I. (2005). Diferencias en los conocimientos de los recursos tecnológicos en profesores a partir del género, edad y tipo de centro. Revista Electrónica de Investigación y Evaluación Educativa, 11(2). (https://goo.gl/SNg7yF) (2016-05-22).

Bennett, S., Maton, K., & Kervin, L. (2008). The Digital Natives Debate: A Critical Review of the Evidence. British Journal of Educational Technology, 39 (5), 775-786. doi: http://doi:10.1111/-j.1467-8535.2007.00793.x

Blanco, I., & Römer, M. (2011). Los niños frente a las pantallas. Madrid: Universitas.

Cabero, J., & Llorente, M.C. (2008). La alfabetización digital de los alumnos. Competencias digitales para el siglo XXI. Revista Portuguesa de Pedagogía, 42(2), 7-28. (http://goo.gl/k30zXH) (2016-04-17).

Cabero, J., & Marín, V. (2014). Miradas sobre la formación del profesorado en TIC. Enl@ce, 11 (2), 11-24. (https://goo.gl/BEBkcG) (2016-04-20).

Cabra-Torres, F., & Marciales-Vivas, G.P. (2009). Mitos, realidades y preguntas de investigación sobre los 'nativos digitales': una revisión. Universitas Psychologica, 8(2), 323-338. (http://goo.gl/TzPrWO) (2016-05-15).

Cassany, D., & Ayala, G. (2008). Nativos e inmigrantes digitales en la escuela. CEE, Participación Educativa, 9, 53-71. (http://goo.gl/VSFlg1) (2016-03-20).

Cobo, C., & Moravec, J.W. (2011). Aprendizaje invisible. Hacia una nueva ecología de la educación. Col.lecció Transmedia XXI. Barcelona: Laboratori de Mitjans Interactius / Publicacions i Edicions de la Universitat de Barcelona. (http://goo.gl/kzAMW6) (2016-05-17).

Creswell, J.W. (2009). Research Design. Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

DO, Diario Oficial de las Comunidades Europeas C451 (2014). Dictamen del Comité Económico y Social Europeo sobre la Sociedad Digital: Acceso, educación, formación, empleo, herramientas para la igualdad. (http://goo.gl/Vol1NC) (2016-02-20).

Feixa, C. (2006). Generación XX. Teorías sobre la juventud en la era contemporánea. Revista latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales, Niñez y Juventud, 4(2), 21-45. (http://goo.gl/kmdCI2) (2016-01-12).

Fernández, F.J., & Fernández, M.J. (2016). Los docentes de la Generación Z y sus competencias digitales [Generation Z's Teachers and their Digital Skills]. Comunicar, 46, 97-105. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C46-2016-10

Ferrari, A. (2012). Digital Competence in Practice: An Analysis of Frameworks. JRC Technical Reports. Joint Research Center. European Commission. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.2791/82116

Ferrari, A. (2013). A Framework for Developing and Understanding Digital Competence in Europe. IPTS Reports. Luxembourg: European Commission. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.2788/52966

Ferrés, J., García-Matilla, A., Aguaded, I., Fernández, J. Figueras, M., & Blanes, M. (2011). Competencia mediática. Investigación sobre el grado de competencia de la ciudadanía en España. Madrid: Instituto de Tecnología Educativa. (http://goo.gl/ZRfeHm) (2016-02-15).

Gallardo, E. (2012). Hablemos de estudiantes digitales y no de nativos digitales. UT, Revista de Ciències de l´Educació, 7-21. (https://goo.gl/6mxgj7) (2016-05-12).

García, A., Callejo, J., & Walzer, A. (2004). Los niños y los jóvenes frente a las pantallas: situación de los medios de comunicación y las nuevas tecnologías de la información en España en el ámbito de la infancia y la adolescencia. Madrid: INJUVE, Ministerio de Trabajo y Asuntos Sociales.

González, J., Espuny, C., & de-Cid, M.J. (2012). INCOTIC-ESO. Cómo autoevaluar y diagnosticar la competencia digital en la Escuela 2.0. Revista de Investigación Educativa, 30(2), 287-302. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.6018/rie.30.2.117941

Gros, B., & Forés, A. (2013). Usos de la geolocalización en Educación Secundaria para la mejora del aprendizaje situado: Análisis de dos estudios de caso. Relatec, 12(2), 41-53. (http://goo.gl/20eVLJ) (2016-02-19).

Janssen, J., & Stoyanov, S. (2012). Online Consultation on Experts´ Views on Digital Competence. JCR Technical reports. Joint Research Center. Luxembourg: European Commission. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.2791/97099

Johnson, L., Adams- Becker, S., Estrada, V., Freeman, A., Kampylis, P., Vuorikari, R., & Punie, Y. (2014). Horizon Report Europe: 2014 Schools Edition. Luxembourg: Publications Office of the European Union, & Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium. (https://goo.gl/swgTRu) (2016-05-16).

Larraz, V. (2013). La competencia digital a la Universitat. (Tesis doctoral). Universitat d´Ándorra. (http://goo.gl/WvYJHq) (2016-02-07).

Martin, A. (2008). Digital Literacy and the Digital Society. In C. Lankshear, & M. Knobel, (Eds.), Digital Literacies: Concepts, Policies and Practices (pp.151-176). New York: Peter Lang.

Mut, A., & Morey, M. (2008). Preferencias en el uso de Internet, televisión, videoconsolas y teléfonos móviles entre los menores de las Islas Baleares. Edutec, 27. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.21556/edutec.2008.27.460

Orden ECD/65/2015, de 21 de enero, por la que se describen las relaciones entre las competencias, los contenidos y los criterios de evaluación de la Educación Primaria, la Educación Secundaria Obligatoria y el Bachillerato. Boletín Oficial del Estado, 25, de 29 de enero de 2015. (http://goo.gl/opAkCi) (2016-02-16).

Pérez-Escoda, A. (2015). Alfabetización digital y competencias digitales en el marco de la evaluación educativa: Estudio en alumnos y profesores de Educación Primaria de Castilla y León. (Tesis Doctoral). Salamanca: Universidad de Salamanca. (http://goo.gl/1AvJBP) (2016-03-16).

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. Part 1. On the Horizon, 9(5), 1-6. (http://goo.gl/93tth3) (2016-01-05).

Reig, D., & Vilchez, L. (2013). Los jóvenes en la era de la hiperconectividad: tendencias, claves y miradas. Madrid: Fundación Telefónica.

Sáez, J.M. (2011). Opiniones y práctica de los docentes respecto al uso pedagógico de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación. Revista Electrónica de Investigación y Docencia, 5, 95-113. (http://goo.gl/tVwLv1) (2016-04-27).

Schroer, W. (2008). Defining, Managing and Marketing to Generations X, Y and A. The Portal, 10, 9. (http://goo.gl/1sKPQr) (2016-04-10).

Sendín, J., Gaona, P., & García, A. (2014). Nuevos medios: usos comunicativos de los adolescentes. Perspectivas desde los nativos digitales. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico, 20(1), 265-280. (http://goo.gl/btHTR8) (2016-05-02).

Sigalés, C., & Mominó, J. (Eds.) (2004). La escuela en la sociedad Red. Internet en el ámbito educativo no universitario. Barcelona: UOC. (http://goo.gl/VZHjUo) (2016-05-02).

Sigalés, C., Mominó, J.M., Meneses, J., & Badia, A. (2008). La integración de Internet en la educación escolar española: situación actual y perspectivas de futuro. Informe de Investigación. Barcelona: Universitat Oberta de Catalunya / Fundación Telefónica. (http://goo.gl/FlGO9j) (2016-11-06).

Suñé, X., & Martínez, I.S. (2011). La Escuela 2.0 en tus manos. Panorama, instrumentos y propuestas. Madrid: Anaya Multimedia.

Tapscott, D. (2008). Grown Up Digital: How the Net Generation is Changing Your World. Madrid: McGraw-Hill.

Thomson, K., Jaeger, P., Greene, N., Subramanian, M., & Bertot, J. (2014). Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion. Meryland: Rowman & Littlefield.

Van-Deursen, A., & Van-Dijk, J. (2010). Internet Skills and Digital Divide. New Media and Society, 13 (6), 893-911. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1461444810386774

Wolton, D. (2000). Surviving the Internet. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/09/16
Accepted on 30/09/16
Submitted on 30/09/16

Volume 24, Issue 2, 2016
DOI: 10.3916/C49-2016-07
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 18
Views 3
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?