Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The dissonance between what teenagers learn in classrooms and their everyday lives is not a recent phenomenon, but it is increasingly relevant as school systems are unable to follow the evolution of media and society beyond traditional concerns regarding the protection of young people. An overly scholarly view of learning continues to prevail in our society, which seems to marginalize the knowledge that young people develop with and through media and digital platforms. Based on questionnaires, workshops, and interviews conducted with Portuguese teenagers, aged 12 to 16 years old (N=78), attending an urban and a rural school in the North of the country, this paper aims to understand how these teens are learning to use the media, what motivates them, and if their media practices contribute to the acquisition of skills and competencies useful to their lives inside and outside school. The research main results confirm the existence of a gap between formal and informal education. Informal education is mainly motivated by their needs and peer influence. Colleagues and family, alongside the Internet and self-discovery, appear as important sources of knowledge. Another important conclusion is that informal learning strategies contribute to the development of skills and competencies that are useful from a school viewpoint.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction and theoretical framework

This article is centred on young people's media uses and perceptions, namely the ones related to learning. Within the scope of the international project “Transmedia Literacy”, 78 Portuguese youngsters were enrolled in ethnographic-based research about their media-related informal learning strategies and practices. These youngsters, aged between 12 and 16 years old, are part of a generation with abundant contact with different media –old and new (Delicado & Alves, 2010; Pereira, Pinto, & Moura, 2015b)– and subject to diverse expectations regarding how they are using them and for what. The ways schools are keeping their pace and relevance in their daily lives are also approached, namely by the students' views on the connection between formal and informal learning sites. Before moving to the presentation of the research and its outcomes, the connection between school and media, formal and informal learning, are briefly discussed.

Schools are sociocultural institutions: their organization and the accreditation of their role are “culturally and historically dependent on societies’ visions of the purposes of education” (Livingstone & Sefton-Green, 2016: 30). Therefore, multiple actors intervene in the definition of what school, as the most relevant instance of formal education, is about. Among those actors are the students; however, their voices are recurrently the least heard. According to Gonnet (2007: 70), “the children’s questions stay outside schools”. Livingstone & Sefton-Green (2016: 3) sustain this same argument based on research with a class of 13 to 14 years old students. The researchers “were struck by the lack of close attention to young people’s voices and experiences” (Livingstone & Sefton-Green, 2016: 31-32). As stated by Sarmento, schools deal not with children and teenagers, but with students: “In a certain way, in front of the institution, the child “dies” as a concrete subject, with its own knowledge and emotions, aspirations, feelings and desires, to give place to the learner, receiver of the adult’s action, agent of prescribed behaviours by which he/she is evaluated, rewarded or punished” (Sarmento, 2011: 588).

Therefore, adults –and broad societal and cultural values– are traditionally the key players that define the purposes of formal education and, alongside it, the very concepts of children and teenagers. Within the traditional school model based on curricula, unidirectional communication and individual assessment (Jonnaert & al., 2006; Erstad & Sefton-Green, 2013; Livingstone & Sefton-Green, 2016), youngsters are too often seen “through the lens of who they might or should become” (Livingstone & Sefton-Green, 2016: 33). According to Pereira (2013: 175), despite more than three decades of growing acknowledgment of the importance of youth's voice, young people are still recurrently framed “as the adults they will become” and conceptualized by the adults themselves, based on their values and worldviews, often neglecting the ones from youth. Teachers and parents play a crucial role. The first when they comply –reluctantly or willingly– with the broader educational system; the latter due to their expectations of what school is about– much based on the prospects of reproducing their own experience – and what they believe that should be done as a way of preparing their children to the future. Gonnet (2007: 81) wrote that “the child, the adolescent, inside the classroom, willing or not, brings with him their parents, in his mind”. Those whose voice is left aside (young people) may also accept the externally defined system. For instance, Livingstone & Sefton-Green (2016: 242) “saw young people’s ready internalization of [schools organization towards] standards and metrics, into their everyday talk, interactions, and sense of self”, despite their own concerns seldom being part of what was evaluated. Nevertheless, worries regarding the inadequacy of the traditional school system are recurrent. The expected lack of appeal of the school amidst students, the loss of its hegemonic position as a learning site or its outdated –because inflexible and unidirectional– structure, which neither corresponds with the needs of late modernity nor is synched with the young people’s practices, are frequent arguments (Perrenoud, 1999; Jonnaert & al., 2006; Pérez-Tornero, 2007; Jenkins & al., 2009; Livingstone & Sefton-Green, 2016). According to Erstad & Sefton-Green (2013: 89), the beliefs regarding the effects of digital and online media –allegedly capable of creating a new generation, born within it and being their main users– gave strength to the expectations about the gap between “what is expected in terms of guiding and teaching the young and what they are presented with on a day-to-day basis”.

Analogic and digital media are “the new support for public knowledge” (Pérez-Tornero, 2007: 33). As stated by Buckingham (2003: 189), “there has been a growing acknowledgements that the school is not the only preserve of education; and that learning can and does occur in the workplace, in the home and the context of leisure activities”. According to Gee (2004: 77), “people learn best when their learning is part of a highly motivated engagement with social practices which they value”, and digital media makes it possible. It can easily bring people together based on shared interests and purposes, forming affinity spaces, and their affordances also allow more relational and realistic learning situations (Gee, 2004; Costa, Cuzzocrea, & Nuzzaci, 2014; Aaen & Dalsgaard, 2016). As stated by Barrett (1992: 2), who wrote before the widespread availability of ICT, “the work we do in and outside the classroom involves people reading and talking and writing to each other in order to synthesize their thoughts about various topics using lots of information available to them”. This was stressed by digital media as it supposedly facilitated the emergence of a participatory culture characterized by affiliations in online affinity spaces, networking, and participation, production, and circulation of contents, from and among their members, and collaborative problem solving (Jenkins & al., 2009). Young people are key elements of this culture, engaging in a great diversity of informal learning situations (Scolari, 2018), which have been, according to Buckingham (2005) or Erstad & Sefton-Green (2013), too many times presented in competition or opposition to formal learning and as the elixir for its problems. However, as Buckingham (2005) remembers, there should be caution with utopian discourses regarding informal learning, overlooking youth's own uses and questions for the sake of adults' hopes and beliefs. Formal attributes of learning can also be present in digital media and the risks of neglecting the learners' voices are real, despite the media’s affordances (Greenhow & Lewin, 2016).

Warschauer & Ware (2008) systematized three main tendencies amidst the discourses relating ICT, learning, and literacy. The main one is related with schools’ conservativism and the gap between formal and informal learning; another one is related to youth empowerment through ICT; the last is concerned with its use as another educational tool, “interpreted in terms of how they fit into the system of standardization that regulates educational practices” (Erstad & Sefton-Green, 2013: 95). According to Buckingham (2005), how media is used in and outside of school is so different that it constitutes a new digital divide. Livingstone & Sefton-Green (2016) and Snyder (2009) found a gap between popular culture and media evoked by teachers in school and the one preferred by their students. Therefore, youth questions and practices regarding the media continue to stay outside of most classrooms, despite their pervasiveness in everyday life. Besides, Pereira, Pereira & Melro (2015a), who studied the Portuguese One Laptop per Child Programme, found a simplistic focus on access, rather than on pedagogical or critical uses; the computers had a scarce presence in classroom routines. As the official Portuguese Media Education Guidance noted, “children and young people are becoming more and more intensely identified as consumers and producers of media” (Pereira, Pinto, & Madureira, 2014: 5), and schools can neither ignore the learning outcomes of these practices nor the questions they stimulate.

2. Material and methods

Short-term ethnography was the approach followed in the “Transliteracy European” project, where both quantitative and qualitative methods were applied1. For this specific paper, data provided by questionnaires, workshops, and interviews were used in order to gain “several perspectives on the same phenomenon” (Jensen, 2002: 272). This triangulation of methods allows a richer and multi-layered analysis, acknowledging practices and giving account of students’ perceptions and motivations, which are at the centre of the analysis.

The sample consisted of 78 teens, aged between 12 and 16 (the average age is 14 y/o; 46 are girls and 32 boys), from two public schools in the northern part of Portugal – one situated in a mostly urban county (Braga, 43 students involved) and the other in a mostly rural area (Montalegre, 35 students)2. In each school, two classes participated: one from the 7th and the other from the 10th level of schooling.

77 students completed a questionnaire whose main objective was to collect general information about teens' socio-cultural backgrounds and media access, uses and perceptions. The workshops involved the total sample (78) and consisted of 8 sessions (2 sessions by workshops and by classes). Each class was divided into two groups according to students' preferences –video games or participatory cultures– and each group performed an activity related to these topics. The workshops enabled the immersive exploration of the teens' transmedia practices and their informal learning strategies, engaging them in gameplay and media production. For the interviews, five students from each workshop group were invited, totalling 40 interviews. The aim was to deepen the adolescents’ understanding of transmedia practices, with special emphasis on the creative skills and informal learning strategies they perform in video games, content production, and social media.

The study methods are represented in Figure 1.


Pereira et al 2019a-69574-en010.png

Figure 1. Portuguese research methodology within the “Transliteracy Literacy” project.

Based on the data provided by these three methods, this paper aims to contribute to a better understanding of how teenagers are using media in their everyday life and what perceptions they have about media use in the classroom, seeking to understand the relation between informal and formal learning. It also intends to find out how they are learning with media and to what extent their informal learning strategies have an impact on formal education.

This analysis is part of the “Transmedia Literacy” project, whose general goals were to identify teenagers’ transmedia practices from eight European and non-European countries and exploit their transmedia skills and informal learning strategies to improve formal education. The research was not intended to be representative, given its eminently qualitative nature.

3. Analysis and results

3.1. Teen’s media access and uses

The questionnaires confirmed that the youngsters are part of a connected generation: all respondents report having a television at home, a mobile phone and a computer. These are also the three most used devices, with mobile phones taking the lead. A huge majority (74) report having a wi-fi connection and, on a five-point scale –ranging from 1 (totally disagree) to 5 (totally agree)– the statement “I always like to be connected” receives an average score of 4.19. This connection is, for most of them, a synonym of being logged in social media. A great number of students (68) claim that they use social media on a daily basis. That is a frequency of use that only television can approach, with 64 respondents reporting that they watch it every day. The prominent role of social media is corroborated by the answers to the questionnaires’ open-ended questions. Social media was mentioned 38 times when they were invited to complete the sentence “What interests me the most on the Internet is…”.

Regarding social media, Youtube (music and YouTubers’/Gamers’ videos) and Facebook are their favourites. Just two respondents do not use YouTube regularly, and six do not use Facebook. Less used, but still popular, are Instagram (56 users), Snapchat (52) and WhatsApp (48).

Considering variables such as geographical area (urban/rural), age and gender, significant differences were not found. The exceptions were playing video games (mostly a boys’ practice) and creating content intended for online publication (made more frequently by girls). Digital services and platforms have broken somehow the disparities of media access by young people from the urban and the rural areas, although they have not erased inequalities in terms of uses, practices, and opportunities (Pereira & al., 2015a). This brief characterization of the sample’s media access and uses allows framing the analysis below, focused on the role of media at school and in the learning process of these teenagers.

3.2. Media presence at school: Teenagers’ perceptions

Despite being regular media users, their use is mostly confined to the youngsters’ leisure time, being away from school – or rather, from the classroom, because they remain present during breaks. During the interviews, just two students mentioned having learned something about media with their teachers in the classroom. A 15 y/o boy recalled the day his teacher taught him how to create a profile on a social network. A girl of the same age considered that the ICT subject helped her “to work with computers and software”. She goes on to say, “if we want to go a little further, ICT classes are not enough”. So, according to these students, at school, media are only present at recess, rarely becoming a subject of exploitation, conversation or analysis with teachers. The students themselves do not expect too much from their teachers in this sense, drawing a line between these two realities: “They are two different worlds. School is work; videogames are leisure”, stated a 16 y/o boy. Youngsters notice a gap between the reality inside and outside the classroom, but they consider it natural. So natural that it seems they have never thought that media messages and their media practices could be discussed and analysed at school.

The only point of contact between school and media is confined to online safety issues. This approach at school has an impact on the way students behave on the Internet, showing concern and care in publishing contents and in contacting strangers. A 13 y/o boy remembered a talk at his school about precautions in using the Internet, where students were advised: “not to talk with strange people, not to arrange meetings with people they do not know”. A 12 y/o girl answered the question “Have you ever heard about social media at school?” by replying: “Just about dangers”.

These talks mirror a protectionist vision that school still has about media – one that does not necessarily match the youngsters’ concerns regarding online dangers (Giménez-Gualdo & al., 2018). Teenagers did not mention any activity or conversation with teachers aimed at preparing them to critically deal with media, that is, work based on an empowerment perspective.

3.3. Teens’ informal learning strategies with media

Despite few or even no opportunities in the classroom to learn about and with media, wich constitute a daily component of their lives, young people learn with media through informal strategies. Through interview and workshop analysis, three main informal learning strategies were often mentioned: trial and error, to imitate/be inspired by someone and search for information, as represented in Table 1 and explained below.


Pereira et al 2019a-69574-en011.png

While at workshops about video games, participants were unanimous about the best way of learning about them: through trial and error, that is, playing. They were sure that experience is the best way to learn, as illustrated by these statements: “To know about video games I simply play them” (boy, 16 y/o); “I bought the game, and I started playing, and playing, and playing. I often lost, but after a while, I did it” (boy, 14 y/o); “It was by trial and error [that I learnt]” (boy, 12 y/o). Trial and error was also a popular strategy to deal with other media products (Table 1).

Besides, imitation is also a recurrent strategy. Following YouTubers –gamers, in particular– was a useful mean to learn to play or progress in video games for many teens. As a boy (14 y/o) stated, “Now, everything I’ve learned, so to speak… on YouTube was thanks to him [Tiagovski, a Portuguese YouTuber]”. Another boy, 15 y/o, also claimed that he learned by observing other players: “When I started I didn’t know anyone who played. I started watching videos, watching live streams of people playing, I started doing research and trying to learn”. Another boy, 16 y/o, went further: “That’s where YouTube’s magic begins. I always search on YouTube, there are always YouTubers giving advice about how to play”.

Students also use the Internet for other purposes: they go online to search, for example, how to solve problems with mobile phones, apps, and video production. In this context, the Internet (mainly YouTube) allows them to learn more about video games and other leisure activities, but also about school topics or to complete assignments from their teachers.

This conclusion is reinforced by questionnaires. Considering the answers given to the open question “What I learn from the Internet is…”, the important role Internet plays as a source of both theoretical (“learn things”) and practical (learn “how to do things”) knowledge stands out. The Web emerges as something that students can summon to clarify an issue, satisfy a curiosity, expand their knowledge and learn how to do something, review and further discuss school topics. Inside the category “learn things”, there were ten specific references to the Internet has as a source of learning for school topics (about specific subjects, to clarify concepts they didn’t understand in the classroom).

Aside from self-learning, social relationships represent a crucial informal learning strategy. Teenagers resort to schoolmates/friends and family (mainly those who are closer in age: brothers, sisters, cousins) asking for help in diverse subjects. When online, students showed a preference for being in touch with people from their everyday life. Therefore, family and friends also have a great influence on young people's interest in learning more about a specific topic/application/video game. In the interviews, a lot of examples support this idea: “When I realized all my friends, and a lot of people were playing it, I got more interested” (boy, 15 y/o); “At that moment everyone already had one [account on Facebook]. Among my friends I must have been the last” (boy, 16 y/o); “My friends also had a profile, and I wanted to have one to publish my things and so on” (boy, 12 y/o); “Because here in school everybody started playing [8 Ball Pool]. Then, I got addicted” (girl, 15 y/o).

Teens understand the digital media possibilities for socialization, but also their potential contribution to learning. Social media appear in the interviews as an important tool to communicate about school items: “90% of the conversations [he has on Messenger] have to do with school” (boy, 16 y/o); “before tests we take photos of summaries and share them there [on Messenger]” (boy, 15 y/o). A girl, 15 y/o, agrees that social media are useful for school: “Some of us had private tutors, and we were always sharing photos of the notes we took or of the tests we did to practice. It was really nice. [And useful?] Yes, quite a lot. Sometimes, before tests, I send messages to the teachers asking for help… and they help!”.

3.4. The informal meets the formal: Using skills acquired out of school

Considering formal learning as synonymous of school learning in the classroom context and associating the term informal to knowledge and abilities acquired outside the school, it is interesting to see that there are many respondents who consider that they learn with video games and that what they learn is useful to them in a school context.

In this respect, there’s a difference in the sample concerning their geographical context. Students from the rural area have more difficulty realising what they learn with video games, in line with the perception that school and media are two worlds apart. However, the contribution of video games for English improvement is a common perception amongst the sample:

• “I have learned more English with video games than with English classes. Because I need to keep in touch with people on my team, I felt the need to improve my English. Even before League of Legends (LOL), in other games, I used to speak English a lot (…). To study for my English tests I play, LOL” (boy, 16 y/o).

• “Most of the games are in English without translation into Portuguese” (boy, 12 y/o).

Students from the urban school (mainly from the 10th grade) are able to identify other learning skills they develop while playing video games, besides English learning:

• “I think they help in school… In sciences, we are speaking about minerals, and in Minecraft there are a lot of caves with minerals - diamonds, emeralds, gold, iron, charcoal… Before I played Minecraft, I didn't know charcoal even existed. Then, when we spoke about it in Chemistry and Physics, I immediately remembered Minecraft because I'd already seen there that charcoal comes from wood” (girl, 12 y/o).

• “I think we can always learn something with them. For example, with LOL maybe it is more about reasoning speed and things like that because we need to make fast decisions. With FIFA the learning is more about football. Each video game teaches us something according to its context” (boy, 16 y/o).

• “Because they make you think about different things at the same time, video games improve reflexes” (boy, 15 y/o).

For a 16 y/o boy, video games are a springboard to find out more about their themes. Shogun 2 fostered his curiosity about the history of Japan, and other games have done the same for World War II. He had been investigating the types of weapons used in that period, their names, and the most important generals of that conflict. However, this was not consonant with the school curriculum. “It is always History of Portugal”, he regretted, adding: “If someone asks me the names of the generals and so on, I know almost everything. What I have been looking for more recently is German tanks because of the game itself”.

To some students, games also constitute a way to develop abilities like resilience, curiosity and surpassing oneself that can be helpful in their studies and in other dimensions of their lives. Different respondents present the self-learning strategy mentioned before not only as an informal learning strategy, but also as a challenge:

• “I don’t feel good when I do it [going online looking for the solution]... then I feel the credit for getting to the end of the game is not all mine” (boy, 15 y/o).

• “I don’t think it is ever really acceptable to use codes because a game is to be unveiled, the goal is to find out a strategy, it is up to us to solve the game ourselves” (girl, 15 y/o).

• “It used to be fun [use tricks] because I couldn't do anything. Now I can. I also lose but I've become better at thinking, and I want to try a little bit” (boy, 16 y/o).

Although students consider they can learn by playing video games, no one has spoken about learning as a motivation to play. They play because it allows them to have fun, to relax, to socialize and to assume different roles.

4. Discussion and conclusions

More than 40 years after Porcher (1974) considered the media an authentic parallel school and Jacquinot (2002) spoke about a perpendicular school, the media continue in many schools outside of the classroom. The data from this study shows a large gap between formal and informal learning practices. As in the past, these two worlds remain separate. The exception seems to be where issues regarding the protection of young people from “inappropriate content and online predators” (Hartley, 2009: 130) are concerned. As boyd (2014) emphasized, most formal education systems do not see digital literacy as a priority because they mistakenly assume that teenagers already know everything as if they were born knowing.

Media uses, practices, experiences and learning enter school with students but are not explored or discussed inside the classroom. This educational, cultural and technological gap between the lives of young people inside and outside the classroom is not a recent phenomenon, but it became even more pronounced in the digital era, with the presence of media everywhere, even carried by students in their own pockets.

In our society, there is an overly scholarly view of learning, which marginalizes the knowledge acquired by young people in their leisure time, in digital platforms, in peer communication. Curricular learning does not intersect with what they learn outside. Therefore, to respond to the multiple and constant appeals of the digital universe, young people develop learning strategies on their own and with peer groups. The media continue to be a subject only for break time and are hardly recognized as a source of learning; they are seen mainly as a source of entertainment and leisure, also by students.

One of the astonishing aspects of this project was the realization on the fact that students themselves also consider natural the gap between those two worlds. They also identify school as the world of work, learning and effort; and media as the world of entertainment, fun, pleasure. It is not in a natural and immediate way that they regard media as sources of information and learning. However, when these issues are discussed with them, they realize the important role the media play in their lives as a source of information, and they recognize the skills they develop within and from media.

Because of their importance in young people lives, video games deserve a particular mention. Teens perceive video games as positive, allowing them to develop several skills, particularly for learning English as a foreign language, but also for other subjects: Physic and Chemistry, History or Geometry. There are still teens that underline the importance of video games for behavioural and cognitive behaviour, for example, self-improvement, resilience, and reasoning, arouse curiosity and teamwork.

It should be noted that the practices and preferences of those who are closer to teens have a great influence on the interests they develop. Thus, family and friends are still important sources of motivation for the informal learning experienced by young people.

Although these data are related only to this sample and cannot be extrapolated, they confirm and help to explain the data from other studies (Pereira & al., 2015a; 2015b) that do not mirror only the Portuguese reality. There are, evidently, interesting media literacy projects in schools, but they are usually punctual and episodic, lacking a policy that supports them. From the data analysis, some explanatory hypotheses for this situation are raised, but they can also be defined as recommendations for effective implementation of media literacy in schools:

• Regarding media and technology, the concerns of educational policies (at least in Portugal) have been essentially related to access (Pereira & al., 2015a) and technical skills. In other words, the emphasis on functional literacy has come at great expense to critical literacy that values aspects such as critical thinking, communication and culture, as recommended by the Portuguese Guide to Media Education (Pereira & al., 2014) promoted by the Ministry of Education itself. Therefore, educational policies should be more precise and more effective in the implementation of media literacy in schools. If school should prepare students for life, for an increasingly digital environment, and the demands of the 21st-century labour market, it is necessary to qualify them not only from a technical point of view but also from a humanist perspective. Also, fostering their critical thinking and empowering them to understand the intensely mediated world in which they live, implementing and going beyond the “The European Digital Competence Framework for Citizens” (Carretero, Vuorikari, & Punie, 2017).

• Strong educational policy in this field has to foresee and be accompanied by a teacher training plan, either initial or in-service training. Teachers teach what they know, the subjects they are trained for and the ones for which they are sensitized and motivated (Pinto & Pereira, 2018). A significant number of documents are produced annually, drawing attention to the importance of conducting Media Literacy programmes and projects, some targeting the young public, other directed at other generations, in a lifelong learning base. This is the case of the recent disinformation phenomenon that could represent a risk for democracy. Teachers should play an important role in empowering students to face the problems of the digital information age, but for that, teacher's training should be supported and media literacy needs to be integrated into all subject-learning, which could demand a new school curricula reform. The present study showed how the media remain outside the classroom and how they continue restricted to break times at school.

• The third and last point is related to the previous two. It defends the need to produce and disseminate resources that support and motivate the development of Media Literacy competencies. In recent years, there has been a significant increase in media literacy resources directed mainly at teachers, as it is the case of outcomes of the European project eMEL – e-Media Education Lab that promoted an innovating and online resource centre for Media Education teacher trainers in (https://e-mediaeducationlab.eu/en/). Also, the Teachers Kit produced within the “Transmedia Literacy” European project that aims to exploit transmedia skills in the classroom (http://transmedialiteracy.upf.edu/en). Resources are undoubtedly crucial for conducting projects and initiatives, but they are unlikely to succeed unless they are held up to a policy framework that encourages and supports Media Literacy.

Notes

1 For more detailed information on the project methodology, please consult: https://bit.ly/2BgqMzX

2 Following the classification made by Statistics Portugal (Relatório Tipologia de Áreas Urbanas, 2014), related to the organization of the Portuguese parishes as mostly urban, averagely urban and mostly rural.

References

Aaen, J., & Dalsgaard, C. (2016). Student Facebook groups as a third space: Between social life and schoolwork. Learning, Media and Technology, 41(1), 160-186. https://doi.org/10.1080/17439884.2015.1111241

Barret, E. (1992). Socimedia : An introduction. In E. Barret (Ed.), Sociomedia – multimedia, hypermedia, and the social construction of knowledge (pp. 1-10). Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press. boyd, D. (2014). It's complicated: the social lives of n

Buckingham, D. (2003). Media education: Literacy, learning and contemporary culture. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Buckingham, D. (2005). Schooling the digital generation. Popular culture, new media and the future of education. London: Institute of Education.

Carretero, S., Vuorikari, R., & Punie, Y. (2017). DigComp 2.1: The digital competence framework for citizens with eight proficiency levels and examples of use. Luxembourg: Publications Office of the European Union. https://bit.ly/2pGtGIl

Costa, S., Cuzzocrea, F. & Nuzzaci, A. (2014). Use of the Internet in educative informal contexts. Implication for formal education. Comunicar, 43, 163-171. https://doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-16

Delicado, A., & Alves, N. A. (2010). Children, Internet cultures and online social networks. In S. Octobre, & R. Sirota (Dir.), Actes du colloque enfance et cultures: Regards des sciences humaines et sociales (pp. 1-12). https://bit.ly/2PbvKkt

Erstad, O., & Sefton-Green, J. (2013). Digital disconect? The ‘digital learner’ and the school. In O. Erstad, & J. Sefton-Green (Eds.), Identity, community, and learning lives in the digital age (pp. 87-104). New York: Cambridge University Press. https:/

Gee, J.P. (2004). Situated language and learning: A critique of traditional schooling. New York & London: Routledge.

Giménez-Gualdo, A.M., Arnaiz-Sánchez, P., Cerezo-Ramírez, F. & Prodócimo, E. (2018). Teachers’ and students’ perception about cyberbullying. Intervention and coping strategies in primary and secondary Education. Comunicar, 56, 29-38. https://doi.org/10.3

Gonnet, J. (2007). Educação para osmedia : As controvérsias fecundas. Porto: Porto Editora.

Greenhow, C., & Lewin, C. (2016). Social media and education: reconceptualizing the boundaries of formal and informal learning. Learning, Media and Technology, 41(1), 6-30. https://doi.org/10.1080/17439884.2015.1064954

Hartley, J. (2009). Uses of YouTube. Digital literacy and the growth of knowledge. In J. Burgess, & J. Green (Eds.), YouTube. Online video and participatory culture (pp. 126-143). Cambridge, UK & Malden, MA: Polity.

Jacquinot, G. (2002). Les relations des jeunes avec les medias… Qu’en savons nous? In G. Jacquinot (Ed.), Les jeunes et les medias (pp. 13-35). Paris: L’Harmattan.

Jenkins, H., Purushotma, R., Weigel, M., Clinton, K., & Robison, A.J. (2009). Confronting the challenges of participatory culture: Media education for the 21st century. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. https://goo.gl/MXE4EX

Jensen, K. B. (2002). The complementarity of qualitative and quantitative methodologies in media and communication research. In K. B. Jensen (Ed.), A Handbook of Media and Communication Research (pp. 254-272). London & New York: Routledge.

Jonnaert, P., Barrette, J., Masciotra, D., & Yaya, M. (2006). Revisiting the concept of competence as an organizing principle for programs of study: From competence to competent action. Montréal: ORÉ/UQAM. https://bit.ly/2PbqM7o

Livingstone, S., & Sefton-Green, J. (2016). The class: Living and learning in the digital age. New York: New York University Press. https://doi.org/10.18574/nyu/9781479884575.001.0001

Pereira, S, Pinto, M., & Madureira, E.J. (2014). Media education guidance for preschool education, basic education and secondary education. Lisboa: DGE/ME. https://bit.ly/2MsFf0m

Pereira, S. (2013). More Technology, Better Childhoods? The Case of the Portuguese ‘One Laptop per Child’ Programme. CM: Communication Management Quarterly, 29, 171-198. https://doi.org/10.5937/comman1329171P

Pereira, S., Pereira, L., & Melro, A. (2015a). The Portuguese programme one laptop per child: Political, educational and social impact. In S. Pereira (Ed.), Digital literacy, technology and social inclusion. Making sense of one-to-one computer programmes

Pereira, S., Pinto, M., & Moura, P. (2015b). Níveis de literacia mediática: Estudo exploratório com jovens do 12.º ano. Braga: CECS. https://bit.ly/2o1ML4r

Pérez-Tornero, J.M. (2007). As escolas e o ensino na sociedade da informação. In J.M. Pérez-Tornero (Coord.), Comunicação e educação na sociedade da informação (pp. 29-45). Porto: Porto Editora.

Perrenoud, P. (1999). Construire des compétences, est-ce tourner le dos aux savoirs? Pédagogie collégiale, 12(3), 14-17. https://bit.ly/2Peeqv8

Pinto, M., & Pereira, S. (2018). Experiências, perceções e expectativas da formação de professores em educação para os media em Portugal. Revista Interuniversitaria de Formación del Profesorado, 91(32-1), 83-103. https://bit.ly/2MNmRz6

Porcher, L. (1974). A escola paralela. Lisboa: Livros Horizonte.

Sarmento, M.J. (2011). A reinvenção do ofício de criança e de aluno. Atos de Pesquisa em Educação, 6(3), 581-602. https://goo.gl/qfqqte

Scolari, C.A. (2018). Informal learning strategies. In C.A. Scolari (Ed.), Teens, media and collaborative cultures – Exploiting teens’ transmedia skills in the classroom (pp. 78-85). Barcelona: Universitat Pompeu Fabra. https://bit.ly/2vMXPGX

Snyder, I. (2009). Shuffling towards the future: The enduring dominance of book culture in literacy education. In M. Baynham, & M. Prinsloo (Eds.), The future of literacy studies (pp. 141-159). Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave MacMillan.

Warschauer, M., & Ware, P. (2008). Learning, change, and power: Competing frames of technology and literacy. In J. Coiro, M. Knobel, C. Lankshear, & D.J. Leu (Eds.), Handbook of research on new literacies (pp. 215-240). New York: Lawrence Erlbaum Associat



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

La disonancia entre lo que aprenden los jóvenes en clase y en su vida cotidiana no es un fenómeno reciente, pero es cada vez más relevante, ya que la escuela no es capaz, evidentemente, de acompañar la evolución. En nuestra sociedad, sigue prevaleciendo una visión demasiado escolarizada del aprendizaje, que parece marginalizar los conocimientos que los jóvenes desarrollan con y a través de los medios y de las plataformas digitales. Basado en cuestionarios, entrevistas y talleres realizados con jóvenes portugueses entre los 12 y los 16 años (N=78), de una escuela urbana y otra rural del norte del país, este artículo pretende comprender cómo están estos jóvenes aprendiendo a usar los medios, lo que les motiva y si lo que hacen con ellos contribuye a la adquisición de capacidades y competencias útiles para sus vidas dentro y fuera de la escuela. Los principales resultados de la investigación confirman la existencia de un foso entre la educación formal e informal. La educación informal es sobretodo motivada por sus necesidades y por la influencia de sus pares. Los compañeros y la familia, junto con Internet y con lo que descubren por ellos mismos, aparecen como importantes fuentes de conocimiento. También se concluyó que las estrategias informales de aprendizaje contribuyen al desarrollo de capacidades y competencias útiles desde un punto de vista escolar.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y marco teórico

Este artículo se centra en los usos y la percepción de los medios por parte de los jóvenes, en particular los relacionados con el aprendizaje. En el ámbito del proyecto internacional «Transmedia Lliteracy», 78 jóvenes portugueses participaron en una investigación etnográfica sobre sus estrategias y prácticas de aprendizaje informal a través de los medios. Estos jóvenes, con edades entre los 12 y los 16 años, forman parte de una generación que mantiene un gran contacto con los diferentes medios, antiguos y nuevos (Delicado & Alves, 2010; Pereira, Pinto, & Moura, 2015b), y que está sujeta a diversas expectativas sobre cómo y para qué los usan. Por otro lado, también se aborda la forma en la que las escuelas intentan acompañar esta realidad y la relevancia que tiene en la vida cotidiana de los jóvenes, en particular según la perspectiva de los alumnos sobre la relación entre los espacios de aprendizaje formal e informal. Antes de presentar la investigación y sus resultados, trataremos brevemente la relación entre la escuela y los medios, entre el aprendizaje formal e informal.

Las escuelas son instituciones socioculturales: su organización y la acreditación de su papel «dependen cultural e históricamente de la visión de las sociedades sobre el propósito educativo» (Livingstone & Sefton-Green, 2016: 30). Por ello, en la definición de qué es la escuela, en cuanto ejemplo más importante de la educación formal, intervienen varios agentes. Entre estos agentes también se encuentran los alumnos, cuya voz se escucha, casi siempre, por último. Según Gonnet (2007: 70), «las dudas de los niños se mantienen fuera de las escuelas». Livingstone y Sefton-Green (2016: 3) defienden este mismo argumento, basado en una investigación realizada con alumnos de 13 y 14 años. A los investigadores «les impresionó la falta de atención prestada a las opiniones y experiencias de los jóvenes» (Livingstone & Sefton-Green, 2016: 31-32). Como señala Sarmento, las escuelas no tratan con niños y adolescentes, sino con alumnos: «En cierto modo, para la institución el niño «desaparece» como un ser concreto, con conocimientos, emociones, aspiraciones, sentimientos y voluntad propios, y se sustituye por el alumno o el destinatario de las acciones del adulto, como un agente con comportamientos impuestos que son evaluados, recompensados o sancionados» (Sarmento, 2011: 588).

Por ello, son los adultos, y los valores culturales y sociales globales, quienes definen las finalidades de la educación formal y, al mismo tiempo, los conceptos de niño y adolescente. En el modelo tradicional de escuela, basado en planes de estudios, una comunicación unidireccional y una evaluación individual (Jonnaert & al., 2006; Erstad & Sefton-Green, 2013; Livingstone & Sefton-Green, 2016), los jóvenes suelen verse «desde la perspectiva de la persona que pueden o deben ser» (Livingstone & Sefton-Green, 2016: 33). Según Pereira (2013: 175), a pesar de más de tres décadas de reconocimiento de la importancia de la opinión de los jóvenes, estos son enmarcados repetidamente «como los adultos que un día serán» y conceptualizados por los propios adultos, según sus valores y su visión del mundo, descuidando muchas veces los de los jóvenes. Los profesores y los padres tienen un papel fundamental. Los primeros, cuando cumplen, a regañadientes o voluntariamente, el sistema educativo general; los segundos, debido a sus expectativas sobre lo que tiene que ser la escuela, en gran medida basadas en su propia experiencia, y en lo que creen que se debe hacer para preparar a sus hijos para el futuro. Gonnet (2007: 81) escribió que «dentro de la clase, el niño o el adolescente, lo quiera o no, tiene a sus padres en mente». El sistema definido externamente puede también ser aceptado por aquellos cuya opinión se deja de lado (los jóvenes). Por ejemplo, Livingstone y Sefton-Green (2016: 242) «observaron la internalización que existe entre los jóvenes de [escuelas organizadas hacia] los estándares y métricas en sus conversaciones e interacciones diarias y en la conciencia de sí mismos», a pesar de que sus preocupaciones raramente forman parte de la evaluación. Aun así, son recurrentes los problemas relacionados con la inadecuación del sistema escolar tradicional. El poco atractivo de la escuela entre los alumnos, la pérdida de su posición hegemónica como espacio de aprendizaje, o su estructura desactualizada (inflexible y unidireccional), que no responde a las necesidades de una modernidad tardía, ni está sincronizada con la práctica de los jóvenes, son argumentos frecuentes (Perrenoud, 1999; Jonnaert & al., 2006; Pérez-Tornero, 2007; Jenkins & al., 2009; Livingstone & Sefton-Green, 2016). Según Erstad y Sefton-Green (2013: 89), las ideologías sobre los efectos de los medios digitales y en línea (supuestamente capaces de crear una nueva generación, que nace dentro de esta cultura y que incluye a sus principales usuarios) dan fuerza a las perspectivas sobre la brecha entre «lo esperado en términos de orientación y educación de los jóvenes y lo que estos encuentran diariamente».

Los medios, analógicos y digitales, son «el nuevo soporte del conocimiento público» (Pérez-Tornero, 2007: 33). Como señala Buckingham (2003: 189), «existe un reconocimiento creciente de que la escuela no es la única reserva de educación; y que el aprendizaje puede ocurrir, y de hecho ocurre, en el lugar de trabajo, en casa y en el contexto de las actividades recreativas». Según Gee (2004: 77), «las personas aprenden mejor cuando el aprendizaje forma parte de una participación altamente motivada en prácticas sociales valoradas por estas» y los medios digitales permiten esta situación. Es posible reunir fácilmente personas con los mismos intereses y objetivos, creando espacios de afinidad, y sus potencialidades también permiten una situación de aprendizaje más relacional y realista (Gee, 2004; Costa, Cuzzocrea, & Nuzzaci, 2014; Aaen & Dalsgaard, 2016). Como señala Barrett (1992: 2), cuya publicación es anterior a la disponibilidad generalizada de las TIC, «el trabajo que hacemos dentro y fuera del aula incluye a personas que leen, hablan y escriben entre sí, para sintetizar sus pensamientos sobre diversos temas, a través de la abundante información disponible». Los medios digitales han acentuado esta situación, ya que se supone que facilitan el surgimiento de una cultura participativa, caracterizada por asociaciones a espacios de afinidad en línea, creación de redes y participación, elaboración y circulación de contenidos, de y entre sus miembros, así como por la colaboración para resolver problemas (Jenkins & al., 2009). Los jóvenes son elementos clave de esta cultura, que participan en una gran diversidad de situaciones de aprendizaje informal (Scolari, 2018), y que muchas veces han sido, según Buckingham (2005) o Erstad y Sefton-Green (2013), presentadas como la competencia o la oposición al aprendizaje formal y como un elixir para sus problemas. Sin embargo, como recuerda Buckingham (2005), debe existir prudencia con los discursos utópicos sobre el aprendizaje informal, ignorando los usos y dudas de los propios jóvenes por el bien de las aspiraciones y convicciones de los adultos. Las características formales del aprendizaje también deben estar presentes en los medios digitales y los riesgos de hacer caso omiso de la opinión de los alumnos son reales, a pesar de las potencialidades de los medios (Greenhow & Lewin, 2016).

Warschauer y Ware (2008) han organizado las tres principales tendencias entre los discursos sobre las TIC, el aprendizaje y la alfabetización. La tendencia mayoritaria está relacionada con el conservadurismo de las escuelas y la brecha entre los aprendizajes formal e informal; otra se refiere al empoderamiento de los jóvenes a través de las TIC; y la última se refiere al uso de estas como una herramienta educativa más, «interpretada según su adaptación al sistema de normalización que regula las prácticas educativas» (Erstad & Sefton-Green, 2013: 95).

Según Buckingham (2005), la forma cómo los medios se usan dentro y fuera de la escuela es tan diferente que constituye una nueva división digital. Livingstone y Sefton-Green (2016) y Snyder (2009) han encontrado una brecha entre la cultura popular y los medios mencionados por los profesores en la escuela y los medios preferidos de los alumnos. Así, y a pesar de la presencia omnipresente de los medios en su vida diaria, las dudas y los métodos de los jóvenes siguen quedando fuera del aula. Además, Pereira, Pereira y Melro (2015a), que estudiaron el programa portugués de un portátil por niño, encontraron un enfoque simplista sobre el acceso, en vez de sobre los usos pedagógicos o importantes; los ordenadores presentaban una escasa presencia en las rutinas del aula. De acuerdo con el Media Education Guidance (Marco de Referencia para la Educación para los Medios), «los niños y los jóvenes se identifican cada vez más como consumidores y productores de medios» (Pereira, Pinto, & Madureira, 2014: 5) y las escuelas no deben ignorar los resultados del aprendizaje de estas prácticas, ni las cuestiones suscitadas por estas.

2. Material y métodos

El enfoque seguido por el proyecto europeo «Transmedia Literacy» fue la etnografía a corto plazo, en el que se aplicaron los métodos cuantitativo y cualitativo1. Para este artículo, se usaron datos aportados por cuestionarios, talleres y entrevistas que ofrecen «diferentes perspectivas sobre el mismo fenómeno» (Jensen, 2002: 272). Esta triangulación de métodos permite un análisis más rico y estratificado, que refleja las prácticas y da cuenta de las percepciones y motivaciones de los alumnos, que son el centro del análisis.

La muestra consistió en 78 jóvenes, con edades entre los 12 y 16 años (el promedio de edades era de 14 años; 46 chicas y 32 chicos), de dos escuelas públicas del norte de Portugal, una de ellas de un área urbana (Braga, con 43 alumnos) y la otra de un área más rural (Montalegre, con 35 alumnos)2. Participaron dos cursos de cada escuela: uno del 7º y otro del 10º nivel de escolaridad.

77 de los alumnos completaron un cuestionario cuyo principal objetivo era recopilar información general sobre sus antecedentes socio-culturales y el acceso a los medios, su uso y percepciones. En los talleres participó el total de la muestra (78) y consistieron en ocho sesiones (dos sesiones por taller y por curso). Cada curso se dividió en dos grupos según las preferencias de los alumnos, videojuegos o culturas participativas, y cada uno de los grupos realizó una actividad relacionada con estos temas. Los talleres permitieron investigar de forma inmersiva las prácticas transmedia y sus estrategias de aprendizaje informal, a través de su participación en juegos y producción de medios. Para las entrevistas se seleccionaron cinco alumnos de cada grupo de los talleres, con un total de 40 entrevistas. El objetivo fue profundizar la comprensión de los adolescentes sobre las prácticas transmedia, con especial hincapié en las habilidades creativas y las estrategias de aprendizaje informal que estos usan en los videojuegos, en la producción de contenidos y en las redes sociales.

Los métodos de estudio se representan en la Figura 1.


Pereira et al 2019a-69574 ov-es010.png

Figura 1. Metodología de investigación portuguesa dentro del Proyecto «Transmedia Literacy».

Con los datos aportados a través de estos tres métodos, este artículo pretende contribuir a una mejor comprensión del uso, por parte de los adolescentes, de los medios en su vida diaria, y de su percepción sobre el uso de los medios en el aula, para entender la relación entre el aprendizaje informal y formal. También pretende descubrir cómo aprenden con los medios y en qué medida las estrategias de aprendizaje informal influyen en la educación formal.

Este análisis forma parte del Proyecto «Transmedia Literacy», cuyos principales objetivos son identificar las prácticas transmedia de los adolescentes de ocho países dentro y fuera de Europa, y utilizar sus competencias transmedia y sus estrategias de aprendizaje informal para mejorar la educación formal. La investigación no pretende ser representativa porque su carácter es eminentemente cualitativo.

3. Análisis y resultados

3.1. Acceso y uso de los medios por los jóvenes

Los cuestionarios confirmaron que los más jóvenes forman parte de una generación conectada: todos los encuestados afirmaron tener televisión en casa, un móvil y un ordenador. Estos también son los tres dispositivos más usados, con los móviles en primer lugar. La gran mayoría (74) señaló tener conexión wi-fi y, en una escala de cinco valores, de 1 (totalmente en desacuerdo) a 5 (totalmente de acuerdo), la frase «Me gusta estar siempre conectado» recibió una puntuación media de 4,19. Para la mayoría, esta conexión es sinónimo de estar conectado a las redes sociales. Un considerable número de los alumnos (68) afirmó usar las redes sociales todos los días. Esta frecuencia de uso solo es comparable a la de la televisión, que 64 encuestados apuntaron ver diariamente. Este papel destacado de las redes sociales se confirma a través de las respuestas a las preguntas abiertas de los cuestionarios. Las redes sociales se mencionaron 38 veces en la respuesta para completar la frase «Lo que más me interesa en Internet es…».

De las redes sociales, YouTube (música y vídeos de YouTubers/jugadores) y Facebook son las favoritas. Solo dos de los encuestados afirmaron no usar YouTube regularmente y seis no usan Facebook. Menos usadas, pero aun así populares, son Instagram (56 usuarios), Snapchat (52) y WhatsApp (48).

Teniendo en cuenta variables como el área geográfica (urbana/rural), la edad y el género, no se encontraron diferencias significativas. Las excepciones son los videojuegos (jugados en su mayoría por chicos) y la creación de contenido para publicar en línea (realizado con más frecuencia por chicas). Los servicios y plataformas digitales han quebrantado de alguna manera las disparidades del acceso a los medios por parte de los jóvenes de las áreas urbanas y rurales, aunque no han eliminado las desigualdades en términos de usos, prácticas y oportunidades (Pereira & al., 2015a). Esta breve descripción del acceso a los medios y sus usos por parte de la muestra permite encuadrar el siguiente análisis, centrado en el lugar que los medios ocupan en la escuela y en el proceso de aprendizaje de estos adolescentes.

3.2. Presencia de los medios en la escuela: percepciones de los adolescentes

A pesar de ser usuarios habituales de los medios, estos se encuentran casi limitados al tiempo libre de los jóvenes, cuando están fuera de la escuela, o mejor, fuera del aula, porque su uso se mantiene durante las pausas. Durante las entrevistas, apenas dos alumnos señalaron haber aprendido algo sobre los medios con sus profesores en el aula. Un chico de 15 años recuerda el día en el que su profesor le enseñó cómo crear un perfil en una red social. Una chica de la misma edad consideró que la clase de TIC le ayudó «a trabajar con los ordenadores y los softwares». Pero luego indicó que «después, si queremos ir un poco más lejos, las clases de TIC ya no son suficientes». Así, y según estos alumnos, la presencia de los medios en la escuela se limita al tiempo de descanso, y casi nunca es tema de valoración, conversación o análisis con los profesores. Los propios alumnos no esperan mucho de sus profesores en este sentido, trazando una línea entre estas dos realidades: «Son dos mundos diferentes. La escuela es trabajo, los videojuegos son placer», como afirmó un joven de 16 años. Los más jóvenes notan que existe una brecha entre la realidad dentro y fuera del aula, pero consideran que es normal. Tan normal que parece que nunca han pensado que sus mensajes y métodos en los medios podrían discutirse y analizarse en la escuela.

El único punto de contacto entre la escuela y los medios se limita a los asuntos de la seguridad en línea. Este enfoque en la escuela influye en la forma cómo los alumnos se comportan en Internet, mostrando preocupación y cuidado con la publicación de contenidos y en el contacto con extraños. Un adolescente de 13 años recordó una charla en su escuela sobre los cuidados al usar Internet, en la que se aconsejaba a los alumnos a «no hablar con extraños y a no encontrarse con personas que no conocen». Una chica de 12 años contestó a la pregunta «¿Has escuchado alguna vez hablar de redes sociales en la escuela?» con la siguiente respuesta: «Solo sobre los peligros».

Estas charlas reflejan la visión proteccionista de la escuela sobre los medios, visión que no corresponde exactamente a las preocupaciones de los jóvenes con respecto a los peligros en línea (Giménez-Gualdo & al., 2018). Los adolescentes no mencionaron ninguna actividad o conversación con los profesores con el objetivo de prepararlos para enfrentar de forma crítica los medios, o sea, un trabajo basado en una perspectiva de empoderamiento.

3.3. Estrategias de aprendizaje informal de los jóvenes con los medios

A pesar de las pocas o ningunas oportunidades de aprender en el aula sobre y con los medios, estos forman parte de sus vidas todo el día y todos los días, y los jóvenes aprenden con estos a través de las estrategias informales. En las entrevistas y los talleres se mencionaron frecuentemente tres estrategias principales de aprendizaje informal: ensayo y error, imitación/inspiración de alguien y búsqueda de información, como se muestra en la Tabla 1 y se explica más abajo.

En los talleres sobre videojuegos, los participantes fueron unánimes sobre la mejor forma de aprender: ensayo y error, es decir, jugando. Todos aseguraron que la experiencia es la mejor forma de aprender, como se muestra a través de estas afirmaciones: «Para saber más sobre videojuegos, simplemente juego» (chico de 16 años); «Compro el juego y empiezo a jugar, y a jugar, y a jugar. Muchas veces pierdo, pero al poco tiempo, lo consigo» (adolescente de 14 años); «[Aprendí] a través de probar y fallar» (joven de 12 años). La estrategia de ensayo y error también fue popular para tratar con otros productos multimedia (Tabla 1).


Pereira et al 2019a-69574 ov-es011.png

La imitación también es una estrategia recurrente. Para varios jóvenes, seguir a YouTubers, en particular a jugadores, es un medio útil para aprender a jugar o para avanzar en los videojuegos. Como en el caso del chico (14 años) que dijo: «Ahora, todo lo que he aprendido, por decirlo así… en YouTube fue gracias a él [Tiagovski, YouTuber portugués]». Otro joven de 15 años también afirmó haber aprendido a través de la observación de otros jugadores: «Cuando empecé no conocía a nadie que jugase. Empecé a ver vídeos, a ver transmisiones en vivo de gente jugando, después empecé a realizar búsquedas para intentar aprender». Otro joven de 16 años fue más lejos: «Es dónde empieza la magia de YouTube. Busco siempre en YouTube, hay siempre YouTubers que dan consejos sobre cómo jugar».

Los alumnos también usan Internet con otras finalidades: por ejemplo, para buscar cómo resolver problemas con móviles, apps o producción de vídeo. En este contexto, Internet –sobre todo YouTube– les permite aprender más sobre videojuegos y otras actividades recreativas, pero también sobre temas de la escuela o sobre cómo realizar una tarea asignada por un profesor.

Esta conclusión se refuerza con los cuestionarios. Teniendo en cuenta las respuestas a la pregunta abierta «Lo que aprendo en Internet es…», se destaca que Internet tiene un papel importante como fuente de conocimiento, tanto teórico (aprender cosas), como práctico (aprender cómo hacer algo). La web surge como un recurso que los alumnos usan para aclarar un asunto, para satisfacer su curiosidad, ampliar sus conocimientos y aprender cómo hacer algo, revisar y analizar con más detalle los temas escolares. Dentro de la categoría «aprender cosas», encontramos diez referencias específicas a Internet como fuente de aprendizaje de temas escolares (sobre asuntos específicos o para aclarar conceptos que no han entendido en el aula).

Aparte del autoaprendizaje, las relaciones sociales también son una estrategia de aprendizaje informal muy importante. Los adolescentes acuden a sus compañeros/amigos y familiares (principalmente los que tienen una edad más cercana: hermanos, hermanas, primos) para pedir ayuda sobre diversos asuntos. Cuando están conectados, los alumnos han mostrado preferir mantenerse en contacto con las personas de su día a día. Por ello, la familia y los amigos influyen en el interés de los jóvenes por saber más sobre un tema/aplicación/videojuego específicos. Esta idea se respalda con muchos ejemplos de las entrevistas: «Cuando me di cuenta de que mis amigos, y mucha otra gente, jugaban, empezó a interesarme más» (chico de 15 años); «En ese momento, todo el mundo tenía una [cuenta de Facebook]. De mis amigos, creo que fui el último» (joven de 16 años); «Mis amigos también tenían un perfil y yo quise tener uno para poder publicar mis cosas y eso» (adolescente de 12 años); «Porque aquí en la escuela todos empezaron a jugar [8 Ball Pool]. Después ya no podía dejarlo» (chica de 15 años).

Los jóvenes entienden las posibilidades de los medios digitales para socializar, pero también su potencial contribución para aprender. Las redes sociales surgen en las entrevistas como una herramienta importante para comunicar sobre asuntos de la escuela: «El 90% de las conversaciones [que tiene en Messenger] son sobre la escuela» (joven de 16 años); «antes de los exámenes sacamos fotos de los resúmenes y las compartimos [por Messenger]» (chico de 15 años). Una chica de 15 años señala que las redes sociales son útiles para la escuela: «Algunos tenemos profesores particulares y compartimos fotos de los apuntes que hacemos o de los exámenes que hacemos para practicar. Está muy bien. [¿Y es útil?] Sí, mucho. A veces, antes de los exámenes, envío mensajes a los profesores para pedir ayuda… ¡Y me ayudan!».

3.4. De lo informal a lo formal: utilizar las capacidades adquiridas fuera de la escuela

Considerando el aprendizaje formal como sinónimo del aprendizaje en la escuela, en el aula, y asociando el término informal al conocimiento y a las competencias adquiridas fuera de la escuela, es interesante comprobar que muchos de los encuestados consideran que aprenden con los videojuegos y que lo que aprenden es útil para ellos en un contexto escolar.

A este respecto, existe una diferencia entre la muestra según su contexto geográfico. A los alumnos del área rural les cuesta más darse cuenta de lo que aprenden con los videojuegos, en consonancia con la percepción de que la escuela y los medios son dos mundos distintos. Sin embargo, la contribución de los videojuegos en la mejora del inglés es una percepción común entre la muestra:

• «He aprendido más inglés con los videojuegos que en las clases de inglés. Como tengo que mantenerme en contacto con las personas de mi equipo, siento la necesidad de mejorar mi inglés. Incluso antes de League of Legends (LOL), en otros juegos, ya hablaba mucho en inglés (…). Para estudiar para los exámenes de inglés, juego LOL» (joven de 16 años).

• «La mayoría de los juegos están en inglés y no hay traducción en portugués» (adolescente de 12 años).

Los alumnos de la escuela urbana (principalmente del 10º nivel) identificaron otras habilidades de aprendizaje desarrolladas con los videojuegos, además del inglés:

• «Yo creo que ayudan en la escuela… En ciencias hablamos de minerales y en Minecraft existen muchas grutas con minerales: diamantes, esmeraldas, oro, hierro, carbón… Antes de jugar Minecraft ni siquiera sabía que el carbón existía. Después, cuando hablamos sobre este asunto en física o química, me acordé inmediatamente de Minecraft, porque ya sabía que el carbón viene de la madera» (chica de 12 años).

• «Creo que siempre aprendemos algo con los videojuegos. Por ejemplo, con LOL tal vez sea la velocidad de raciocinio y cosas así, porque tenemos que tomar decisiones rápidas. Con FIFA el aprendizaje es más sobre fútbol. Cada videojuego nos enseña algo según su contexto» (joven de 16 años).

• «Como te obligan a pensar sobre varias cosas al mismo tiempo, los videojuegos mejoran los reflejos» (chico de 15 años).

Para un joven de 16 años, los videojuegos son un trampolín para descubrir más sobre los temas que tratan. Shogun 2 despertó su curiosidad sobre la historia de Japón y otros juegos han hecho lo mismo con la Segunda Guerra Mundial. Por ello, ha investigado los tipos de armas usadas durante este periodo, sus nombres y los generales más importantes de este conflicto. Sin embargo, esto no coincidió con el plan de estudios de la escuela. «Es siempre la historia de Portugal», se lamentó, y añadió: «Si alguien me pregunta los nombres de los generales y eso, me lo sé casi todo. Lo que he estado buscando más recientemente son los tanques alemanes, debido al juego».

Para algunos alumnos, los juegos son también una forma de desarrollar competencias como la resiliencia, la curiosidad y la capacidad de superarse, que pueden ser útiles en sus estudios y en otros aspectos de sus vidas. Algunos de los encuestados refirieron la ya mencionada estrategia de autoaprendizaje no solo como una estrategia de aprendizaje informal, sino también como un reto:

• «No me siento bien cuando lo hago [buscar la solución en Internet]... después siento que el reconocimiento por haber llegado al final del juego no es solo mío» (adolescente de 15 años).

• «No creo que sea realmente aceptable usar códigos, porque el objetivo de un juego es descubrirlo, encontrar una estrategia, nos cabe a nosotros solucionar el juego» (chica de 15 años).

• «Antes era divertido [usar trucos] porque no sabía hacer nada. Pero ahora ya sé. Sigo perdiendo, pero como he mejorado mi capacidad de pensar, ahora me apetece intentarlo un poco más» (joven de 16 años). Aunque los alumnos han considerado que pueden aprender mientras juegan videojuegos, ninguno ha mencionado el aprendizaje como motivación para jugar. Juegan porque les permite divertirse, relajarse, socializar y asumir diferentes papeles.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Más de 40 años después de que Porcher (1974) considerara los medios como una verdadera escuela paralela y de que Jacquinot (2002) hablara sobre una escuela perpendicular, los medios siguen estando, en muchas escuelas, fuera del aula. Los datos de este estudio muestran una gran brecha entre las prácticas del aprendizaje formal e informal. Tal y como sucedía antes, estos dos mundos siguen estando separados. La excepción parecen ser los asuntos relacionados con la protección de los jóvenes ante «contenidos impropios y depredadores» (Hartley, 2009: 130). Como señaló boyd (2014), la mayoría de los sistemas educativos formales no ven la alfabetización digital como una prioridad, porque, erróneamente, asumen que los adolescentes ya lo saben todo, como si nacieran enseñados.

El aprendizaje, la experiencia, las prácticas y los usos de los medios entran en la escuela con los alumnos, pero no se analizan ni se discuten dentro del aula. Esta brecha tecnológica, cultural y educativa entre la vida de los jóvenes fuera y dentro del aula no es un fenómeno reciente, pero en esta era digital se nota aún más, con los medios presentes en todos los sitios, incluidos los bolsillos de los alumnos.

En nuestra sociedad, existe una perspectiva demasiado académica del aprendizaje, que margina el conocimiento adquirido por los jóvenes en su tiempo libre, en plataformas digitales y en la comunicación entre pares. El aprendizaje escolar no se cruza con lo que aprenden fuera del aula. Por ello, para dar respuesta a las muchas y constantes solicitudes del universo digital, los jóvenes desarrollan, por sí mismos y en grupos afines, estrategias de aprendizaje. Los medios siguen siendo un asunto de los tiempos de descanso y raramente se reconocen como una fuente de aprendizaje; normalmente, están asociados a una fuente de entretenimiento y de ocio, incluso por parte de los alumnos.

Uno de los aspectos más sorprendentes de este proyecto fue descubrir que los propios alumnos consideran normal esta brecha entre los dos mundos. Ellos también identifican la escuela como un mundo de trabajo, aprendizaje y esfuerzo, y los medios como un mundo de entretenimiento, diversión y placer. No consideran los medios, de forma natural e inmediata, como fuentes de información y aprendizaje. Sin embargo, al discutir estos temas, se dan cuenta del importante papel de los medios en sus vidas como fuente de información y reconocen las capacidades que desarrollan con y a través de estos medios.

Debido a su importancia en la vida de los jóvenes, los videojuegos merecen una referencia particular. Los adolescentes perciben los videojuegos como algo positivo, que les permite desarrollar muchas capacidades, en particular el aprendizaje del inglés como lengua extranjera, pero también otros aspectos: física o química, historia o geometría. También existen algunos adolescentes que destacan la importancia de los videojuegos en la conducta comportamental y cognitiva, como, por ejemplo, la mejora personal, la resiliencia y el raciocinio, la curiosidad o el trabajo en equipo.

Cabe destacar que los métodos y las preferencias de las personas más cercanas influyen mucho en los intereses desarrollados por los adolescentes. Así, la familia y los amigos son importantes fuentes de motivación para el aprendizaje informal de los jóvenes.

A pesar de que estos datos solo se relacionan con esta muestra y no se pueden extrapolar, confirman y ayudan a explicar los datos de otros estudios (Pereira & al., 2015a; 2015b) que no reflejan solo la realidad portuguesa. Por supuesto que existen proyectos de alfabetización mediática muy interesantes en algunas escuelas, pero normalmente son puntuales y episódicos, y carecen de una política de apoyo. Del análisis de los datos resultan algunas hipótesis explicativas para esta situación, que también se pueden definir como recomendaciones para una aplicación efectiva de la alfabetización mediática en las escuelas:

• En el caso de los medios y de la tecnología, las preocupaciones de las políticas educativas (al menos en Portugal) han sido sobre todo sobre el acceso (Pereira & al., 2015a) y las capacidades técnicas. Es decir, se ha destacado la alfabetización funcional a expensas de la alfabetización crítica que valora aspectos como el pensamiento crítico, la comunicación y la cultura, como recomienda el consejo de educación de los medios portugueses (Pereira & al., 2014) y promovidos por el propio Ministerio de Educación. Por consiguiente, las políticas educativas deben ser más claras y eficaces en la implementación de la alfabetización mediática en las escuelas. Si la escuela tiene que preparar a los alumnos para la vida, para un entorno cada vez más digital y para las exigencias del mercado de trabajo del siglo XXI, será necesaria una capacitación no solo del punto de vista técnico, sino también desde una perspectiva humanista, fomentando su pensamiento crítico y su empoderamiento, para permitirles entender el mundo en el que viven (intensamente mediado por los medios), llevando a la práctica, pero también superando, el «European digital competence framework for citizens» (Carretero, Vuorikari, & Punie, 2017).

• En este campo, es esencial una fuerte política educativa que debe acompañarse de un plan de formación de los profesores, con formación inicial o continua. Los profesores enseñan lo que saben, los asuntos en los que han tenido formación y aquellos para los que están sensibilizados o motivados (Pinto & Pereira, 2018). Cada año se elabora un gran número de documentos para llamar la atención sobre la importancia de realizar programas y proyectos de alfabetización mediática, algunos de los cuales se dirigen al público más joven y otros a otras generaciones, según una base de aprendizaje permanente. Es el caso del fenómeno de la desinformación, que representa un riesgo para la democracia. Los profesores tienen un papel importante en el empoderamiento de los alumnos ante los problemas de la era de la información digital, pero, para ello, deben tener formación y la alfabetización mediática ha de ser integrada en el aprendizaje de todas las asignaturas, y esto puede suponer una reforma del plan de estudios de las escuelas. Este estudio muestra cómo los medios siguen estando fuera del aula y cómo siguen restringidos a las pausas.

• El tercer y último punto está relacionado con los anteriores. Aquí se defiende la necesidad de producir y difundir recursos que apoyen y motiven el desarrollo de las competencias de la alfabetización mediática. En los últimos años, ha existido un aumento significativo de los recursos de alfabetización mediática dirigidos a los profesores, como es el caso de los resultados del proyecto europeo eMEL (e-Media Education Lab), que promueve un centro de recursos innovador y en línea para los formadores de profesores en educación mediática (https://e-mediaeducationlab.eu/en/), así como un Kit para profesores, producido dentro del Proyecto europeo de «Transmedia Literacy», que pretende desarrollar las competencias transmedia en el aula (http://transmedialiteracy.upf.edu/en). Los recursos son, sin duda, fundamentales para realizar proyectos e iniciativas, pero estos no funcionarán si no tienen el soporte de un marco político que fomente y apoye la alfabetización mediática.

Notas

1 Para información más detallada sobre la metodología del proyecto, consultar: https://bit.ly/2BgqMzX

2 Según la clasificación del instituto de estadística portugués (Relatório Tipologia de Áreas Urbanas, 2014), relacionado con la organización de las localidades portuguesas como mayormente urbanas, medianamente urbanas y mayormente rurales.

Referencias

Aaen, J., & Dalsgaard, C. (2016). Student Facebook groups as a third space: Between social life and schoolwork. Learning, Media and Technology, 41(1), 160-186. https://doi.org/10.1080/17439884.2015.1111241

Barret, E. (1992). Socimedia : An introduction. In E. Barret (Ed.), Sociomedia – multimedia, hypermedia, and the social construction of knowledge (pp. 1-10). Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press. boyd, D. (2014). It's complicated: the social lives of n

Buckingham, D. (2003). Media education: Literacy, learning and contemporary culture. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Buckingham, D. (2005). Schooling the digital generation. Popular culture, new media and the future of education. London: Institute of Education.

Carretero, S., Vuorikari, R., & Punie, Y. (2017). DigComp 2.1: The digital competence framework for citizens with eight proficiency levels and examples of use. Luxembourg: Publications Office of the European Union. https://bit.ly/2pGtGIl

Costa, S., Cuzzocrea, F. & Nuzzaci, A. (2014). Use of the Internet in educative informal contexts. Implication for formal education. Comunicar, 43, 163-171. https://doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-16

Delicado, A., & Alves, N. A. (2010). Children, Internet cultures and online social networks. In S. Octobre, & R. Sirota (Dir.), Actes du colloque enfance et cultures: Regards des sciences humaines et sociales (pp. 1-12). https://bit.ly/2PbvKkt

Erstad, O., & Sefton-Green, J. (2013). Digital disconect? The ‘digital learner’ and the school. In O. Erstad, & J. Sefton-Green (Eds.), Identity, community, and learning lives in the digital age (pp. 87-104). New York: Cambridge University Press. https:/

Gee, J.P. (2004). Situated language and learning: A critique of traditional schooling. New York & London: Routledge.

Giménez-Gualdo, A.M., Arnaiz-Sánchez, P., Cerezo-Ramírez, F. & Prodócimo, E. (2018). Teachers’ and students’ perception about cyberbullying. Intervention and coping strategies in primary and secondary Education. Comunicar, 56, 29-38. https://doi.org/10.3

Gonnet, J. (2007). Educação para osmedia : As controvérsias fecundas. Porto: Porto Editora.

Greenhow, C., & Lewin, C. (2016). Social media and education: reconceptualizing the boundaries of formal and informal learning. Learning, Media and Technology, 41(1), 6-30. https://doi.org/10.1080/17439884.2015.1064954

Hartley, J. (2009). Uses of YouTube. Digital literacy and the growth of knowledge. In J. Burgess, & J. Green (Eds.), YouTube. Online video and participatory culture (pp. 126-143). Cambridge, UK & Malden, MA: Polity.

Jacquinot, G. (2002). Les relations des jeunes avec les medias… Qu’en savons nous? In G. Jacquinot (Ed.), Les jeunes et les medias (pp. 13-35). Paris: L’Harmattan.

Jenkins, H., Purushotma, R., Weigel, M., Clinton, K., & Robison, A.J. (2009). Confronting the challenges of participatory culture: Media education for the 21st century. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. https://goo.gl/MXE4EX

Jensen, K. B. (2002). The complementarity of qualitative and quantitative methodologies in media and communication research. In K. B. Jensen (Ed.), A Handbook of Media and Communication Research (pp. 254-272). London & New York: Routledge.

Jonnaert, P., Barrette, J., Masciotra, D., & Yaya, M. (2006). Revisiting the concept of competence as an organizing principle for programs of study: From competence to competent action. Montréal: ORÉ/UQAM. https://bit.ly/2PbqM7o

Livingstone, S., & Sefton-Green, J. (2016). The class: Living and learning in the digital age. New York: New York University Press. https://doi.org/10.18574/nyu/9781479884575.001.0001

Pereira, S, Pinto, M., & Madureira, E.J. (2014). Media education guidance for preschool education, basic education and secondary education. Lisboa: DGE/ME. https://bit.ly/2MsFf0m

Pereira, S. (2013). More Technology, Better Childhoods? The Case of the Portuguese ‘One Laptop per Child’ Programme. CM: Communication Management Quarterly, 29, 171-198. https://doi.org/10.5937/comman1329171P

Pereira, S., Pereira, L., & Melro, A. (2015a). The Portuguese programme one laptop per child: Political, educational and social impact. In S. Pereira (Ed.), Digital literacy, technology and social inclusion. Making sense of one-to-one computer programmes

Pereira, S., Pinto, M., & Moura, P. (2015b). Níveis de literacia mediática: Estudo exploratório com jovens do 12.º ano. Braga: CECS. https://bit.ly/2o1ML4r

Pérez-Tornero, J.M. (2007). As escolas e o ensino na sociedade da informação. In J.M. Pérez-Tornero (Coord.), Comunicação e educação na sociedade da informação (pp. 29-45). Porto: Porto Editora.

Perrenoud, P. (1999). Construire des compétences, est-ce tourner le dos aux savoirs? Pédagogie collégiale, 12(3), 14-17. https://bit.ly/2Peeqv8

Pinto, M., & Pereira, S. (2018). Experiências, perceções e expectativas da formação de professores em educação para os media em Portugal. Revista Interuniversitaria de Formación del Profesorado, 91(32-1), 83-103. https://bit.ly/2MNmRz6

Porcher, L. (1974). A escola paralela. Lisboa: Livros Horizonte.

Sarmento, M.J. (2011). A reinvenção do ofício de criança e de aluno. Atos de Pesquisa em Educação, 6(3), 581-602. https://goo.gl/qfqqte

Scolari, C.A. (2018). Informal learning strategies. In C.A. Scolari (Ed.), Teens, media and collaborative cultures – Exploiting teens’ transmedia skills in the classroom (pp. 78-85). Barcelona: Universitat Pompeu Fabra. https://bit.ly/2vMXPGX

Snyder, I. (2009). Shuffling towards the future: The enduring dominance of book culture in literacy education. In M. Baynham, & M. Prinsloo (Eds.), The future of literacy studies (pp. 141-159). Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave MacMillan.

Warschauer, M., & Ware, P. (2008). Learning, change, and power: Competing frames of technology and literacy. In J. Coiro, M. Knobel, C. Lankshear, & D.J. Leu (Eds.), Handbook of research on new literacies (pp. 215-240). New York: Lawrence Erlbaum Associat

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/18
Accepted on 31/12/18
Submitted on 31/12/18

Volume 27, Issue 1, 2019
DOI: 10.3916/C58-2019-04
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Views 2
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?