Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The present study analyzes the evolution of the concept of the digital gap with the elderly from the perspective of active ageing and in the context of the use of online social networks as a communication instrument. We consider that socio-demographic variables are not enough to explain the elderly’s use or non-use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). Psychological variables, such as cognitive age, technology anxiety and the level of adventurousness complement the former and can even explain more the elderly person’s behaviour regarding the use of online social networks. The results come from a sample of elderly people who are students of an Experience Classroom in a university. They allow us to confirm that our doubts about the stereotype of the elderly concerning the digital divide are correct and that the psychological variables serve to a greater extent to show the significant differences with respect to determining their profile. The elderly user of online social networks feels younger, experiences a lower level of technology anxiety and is more adventurous. In general, psychological characteristics therefore offer a more discriminant power than those that are socio-demographic. This is why we propose the concept of a psycho-digital divide.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD, 2001: 5) defined the digital divide as «the gap or division between people, homes and geographic and economic areas with different socio-economic levels regarding both their opportunities of accessing Information and Communication Technologies and the use of Internet for a wide variety of activities». According to this organization, the digital divide in families basically depends on two variables, income and education level, as well as other socio-demographic variables such as race, gender, family type, linguistic limitations and age.

With respect to the elderly, the World Health Organization (OMS, 2002) defines active ageing as «the process of optimizing health, participation and safety opportunities with the aim of improving people’s quality of life as they grow old». The term «active» suggests «a continuous participation in social, economic, cultural, spiritual and civic questions, not only the capacity of being physically active» (OMS, 2002: 79). In the current technological and globalized environment, Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have a fundamental role, as noted by the World Economic Forum (WEF, 2011: 109). With the aim of promoting active ageing and diagnosing the real situation of the elderly in Spain, the White Paper on Active Ageing (Imserso, 2011a) and a Work Program (Imserso, 2011b) were created. In them appear as challenges, on the one hand, the developing of models of co-existence based on the increase of personal contacts, social networks and the use of new technologies and the encouragement of inter-generational relationships and, on the other hand, an advance in the use of ICT by the elderly (Imserso, 2011b).

The use of ICT by the elderly is a complex subject. There is the stereotype that the elderly are cut off from new technologies. Many studies (Chua, Chen & Wong, 1999; Dyck & Smither, 1994) state that the age of an individual is a variable which conditions their use of ICT. Nevertheless, there is other research (Mathur, Sherman & Schiffman 1998; Ramón, Peral & Arenas, 2013) which reveals that this segment is very heterogeneous. Not only age, but sex, the education level and the socio-economic class influence explain the elderly’s digital behaviour. This is what we may call the socio-digital divide.

The aim of this work is to question the stereotype of the elderly regarding the digital divide. Its justification is determined by the heterogeneity of the elderly in their behaviour with new technologies. On the other hand, the traditional definition of the digital divide differentiates between users based on socio-demographic characteristics. However, the use of these variables may be insufficient to understand more thoroughly the motivations which lead the elderly to use ICT (Dabholkar & Bagozzi, 2002). We believe that the digital divide continues to exist, but it is evolving toward other aspects which are inherent to the individual. This is why we propose psychological criteria which better reveal the differences which exist among the elderly, specifically their influence on the use of social networks.

In a hyper-connected world, active ageing can be seen to be favoured by the use of social networks (WEF, 2011). Research on this topic has not yet been developed. Fritsch, Steinke and Silbermann (2013) in their bibliographical review, find only eight articles focused on people over 50 and social networks. The majority of these works are centred on safety and privacy as the main obstacles to using them. Others, such as Pfeil, Arjan and Zaphiris (2009), analyze the relationships built in social networks based on age, observing that the elderly have a greater diversity of ages among their contacts (despite their number being fewer), among which are included family members as opinion leaders in social networks. The work of Ji, Choi, and Lee (2010) proposes the identification of the profiles of elderly users and non-users of social networks and the differences in their behaviour. This leads us to consider possible segments of users who will more easily access other forms of online communication which are more oriented toward e-commerce and its different forms of social commerce (Liébana, Villarejo & Sánchez-Franco, 2014). Finally, the work of Curran and Lennon (2013) considers the influence of sociological variables, such as social influence and social tension, on the intention to use social networks among the elderly.

Psychological factors explain the development of expertise and skills in the elderly. These will favour the use of social networks and will enable the optimizing and prolonging of their use as they grow old. This is because they are an instrument of communication which will allow the achievement of levels of well-being and benefits for health care and the improvement of self-sufficiency (Leist, 2013). The social interaction that the elderly attain when they take part in social networks keeps them in communication, active and constantly learning. They thus solve technological challenges individually or supported by the advice of family members and younger friends who have a greater experience in the digital context (Braun, 2013).

In the analysis of individual differences, we consider those related to demographic characteristics, such as sex and age, and psychological characteristics. In our study, within the last of these we have gone deeply into the cognitive age, setting out from the works of Barak (Barak, 2009; Barak & Gould, 1985; Barak, Guiot, Mathur, Zhang & Lee, 2011), given that this is a variable that is habitually used in studies about the elderly and which reveals the existence of differences between chronological age and cognitive age. On the other hand, the other psychological variables proposed, technology anxiety and venturousness begin with the works of Meuter & al. (2003) and Niemelä (2007) which have been used in research on the acceptance and use of technology, such as Venkatesh & al. (2003).

The structure of the work begins with the bibliographical review of the defining psychological variables in the behaviour of the elderly in social networks: cognitive age, technology anxiety and adventurousness. As a result of the literature review we make a research proposition. In the second section we describe the material and methods used. We finish by analyzing the results obtained and summarizing the study’s main conclusions.

1.1. Cognitive age

Each person perceives his/her maturity based on the social and cultural stereotypes, of the social reality in which they live and their own psychological and physical changes which they have developed while getting older (Peters, 1971). The over-50s currently feel younger than their chronological age (Sherman, Schiffman & Mathur, 2001), rejecting descriptions such as aged or old (Mathur & al. 1998), as well as the image that advertising at times projects about them (Moschis & Mathur, 2006).

The term cognitive age appears in this context. This is part of the self-concept which people have of themselves. The perception of cognitive age is influenced by the chronological age but also by the life experiences and changes in social roles (Mathur & Moschis, 2005). This cognitive age positively influences self-esteem and confidence in the capabilities that one believes one has (Barak & Rahtz, 1990).

In this sense, cognitive age is a better criterion to segment the market (Barak & al., 2011; Mathur & Moschis, 2005; Reisenwitz & Iyer, 2007), as it enables a better understanding of the decisions of elderly users (Sudbury & Simcock, 2009a) and their responses to the stimuli of communication (Moschis & Mathur, 2006), given that it expresses better identity, perceptions and, therefore, the behaviour of each individual in the challenge of coping with the use of ICT.

As Barak and Gould (1985) point out, the cognitively young elderly are more adventurous, have greater self-confidence and are selective innovators, as they accept new practices and products when they feel that they are going to benefit from them. This is why a lower cognitive age may mean for the elderly an antecedent about the use and acceptance of technologies (Wei, 2005).

Hong, Lui, Hahn, Moon and Kim (2013) divide the elderly into two groups –those with a cognitive age the same as their chronological age and those with a cognitive age lower than their chronological age– to compare the influence of factors of acceptance of mobile data services. However, Szmigin and Carrigan (2000) indicate that the elderly feel increasingly happier and confident concerning their capabilities and do not need to feel or appear younger than their real age. Indeed, Teuscher (2009) finds that the differences between cognitive age and chronological age are fewer than those revealed in previous studies (an average of 5.6 compared to fifteen years). Nonetheless, we understand that the cognitive age and its difference with respect to the chronological age can help us to understand the variations which are produced in the acceptance and use of social networks.

1.2. Technology anxiety

The first research about anxiety was centred on that produced by computers (Meuter & al., 2003). This was considered to be an example of the state of anxiety (Chua & al., 1999), that is to say, a transitory state or condition which varies in intensity and fluctuates over time. Nevertheless, anxiety as a feature of an individual’s personality is a predisposition in their behaviour to perceive a set of objectively non-dangerous circumstances as a threat (Spielberger, 1966). In accordance with the classical theories about anxiety, it is considered that it induces negative impacts in the individual’s cognitive responses (Guo, Sun, Wang, Peng & Yan, 2013) and can mainly be modified by training and experience with computers.

A less studied concept is that of technology anxiety (Niemelä, 2007) derived from the former (Guo & al., 2013). The effects of technology anxiety are especially strong in the first phases of the process of adopting a new technology (Venkatesh, 2000), when people use it for the first time, and even before doing so and especially in public (Gelbrich & Sattler, 2014). Technology anxiety is the main determiner of the use of a technology at an individual level (Meuter & al., 2003). Furthermore, another of its consequences is resistance to change, given that those people with high levels of technology anxiety tend to be more worried about the unexpected mistakes caused by the technology, which is why they will try to maintain the initial status quo (Guo & al., 2013). Various studies (Dyck & Smither, 1994; Guo & al., 2013) have maintained the stereotype that the elderly have higher levels of technology anxiety and less self-confidence than younger people. Yet, Niemelä (2007) on the elderly belonging to the baby-boom generation does not agree with this idea. Given that nowadays the elderly have grown up with the birth of new technologies such as cell phones and Internet, they differ from previous generations in their experience with them. Their greater use and experience with technology enables the elderly of this generation (currently between 59 and 69 years old) to have lower levels of technology anxiety. Recent studies (Agudo, Pascual & Fombona, 2012) indicate that the elderly mainly use technologies with the aim of communicating, learning and facilitating their daily and leisure activities.

1.3. Venturousness

Adventurous people exhibit more daring behaviour but are aware that there is a risk involved in their decisions. The desire to try out new and exciting things is associated with the individual’s intrinsic motivations toward stimulation, knowledge and achievement (Clarke, 2004). Moreover, venturousness can be related to the locus of internal control (Chantal & Vallerand, 1996). That is to say, the subjects perceive that the facts which occur in their life are the effects and consequences of their decisions, so they like to face challenging experiences. As Rogers (2003) points out, venturousness is almost an obsession for innovators. Therefore, it is to be expected that the people who have this dimension of their personality will be involved in new and challenging activities, such as those related to technology.

There are few articles which relate venturousness with the acceptance or use of ICT, and less among the elderly. Siu and Cheng (2001) study the adoption of e-commerce considering different characteristics, finding that adopters reflect a greater level of venturousness than non-adopters, are more predisposed to taking risks, as well as being more interested in technological developments. Regarding the elderly, Sudbury and Simcock (2009b) carry out a segmentation of 650 British people between 50 and 79 years old, using behaviour variables to explain why elderly people show less innovative behaviour than younger people (Dean, 2008). The results indicate that an adventurous character enables differentiation among the elderly. Thus, the segment called positive pioneers has high levels of venturousness, as due to curiosity they like to buy and try out new things, they like to be the first to do so, to comment about it with their friends and to share information.

1.4. Research proposition

To sum up, we establish as a research proposition that the psychological characteristics of people –in this case the elderly– provide a better explanation of the digital divide than the traditional socio-demographic variables. Based on the review of the previous literature, it is expected that the elderly who use social networks more are not differentiated by their socio-demographic profile but are characterized by a lower cognitive age, as they have less technology anxiety and are more adventurous.

2. Material and methods

The sample used comes from students who had enrolled in the Experience Classroom of the University of Seville. Its aim is to give an opportunity to people over 50 who wish to access education and general culture, becoming a forum of socio-cultural coming together and encouragement. The data were gathered in November and December 2013 via a survey carried out during class hours. To eliminate possible ambiguities, the questionnaire was revised previously with seven voluntary students.

The refined questionnaire brought together the socio-demographic and descriptive variables of the use of technology and the measurement scales of the psychological variables used. The cognitive age and the desired age were measured with the scales of Barak and al. (2011). This is a scale expressed in decades that gathers four dimensions in which people indicate the age which they feel that they have, the age which they feel that they show, that which their actions reveal and that which their interests show. On the other hand, the desired age reflects what people aspire to be, their ideal self-conception that their dimensions are the same as the cognitive age, beginning with the conditional «I would like…». The average of each four values is what determines the cognitive age and the desired age.

On the other hand, the scale of Meuter & al. (2003) was used to identify venturousness. For technology anxiety we follow the scale proposed by Niemelä (2007), which identified two factors within this construct: the first categorised fear of technology and a second which gathers self-confidence in the use of technology. These three variables were measured via a seven-point Likert scale. To analyze if the variables linked to social networks are related with the individuals’ characteristics we carried out the appropriate statistical tests. Thus, we used a one-way ANOVA in the cases in which the variables to be analyzed were categorical (e.g., having or not having an account in social networks) and another in a scale (e.g., chronological age); Pearson’s correlation if the two variables were of a scale; and Cramer’s phi correlation in the case of two dichotomous variables.

3. Analysis and results

A total of 474 questionnaires were first obtained. These were refined by eliminating those which were not correctly filled out and 415 valid surveys were obtained. A study of the sample’s socio-demographic variables indicated that 62.5% were women, the average age was 63.6 and 57% of the respondents were married. The majority level of studies was secondary school (54.2%), followed by university (36.1%). The social class was mainly middle class (80.2%) and 78.4% of the sample were retired.

Regarding social networks, 51.2% of the sample’s elderly people had used one social network and 77.6% had created an account. 44.1% had an account in a single network, 14.2% in two and 5.1% in three. This explains that when adding up the use of social networks, the result is greater than 100: 93.1% used Facebook, 26.7% Twitter, 6.7% Tuenti and 22.7% used other social networks. The most frequent activities carried out in the networks were: making comments (64.6%); posting photographs (42.9%) and chatting (35.5%). These activities took place at least once a month.

The results (Table 1) comply with the pattern found by Barak (2009) in 18 countries, none of them Spanish-speaking, (desired age <cognitive age<chronological age), with a greater variation in the answers of the desired age. The average of the cognitive age and the desired age is less for women (48.66 and 39.04 years old for women and 53.57 and 42.38 for men, respectively), in a statistically significant manner (significance less than 0.05 of the t-test for differences in means for independent samples), as was found by Eastman and Iyer (2005) and Wei (2005).

The results (Table 2) do not support a relationship between the socio-demographic characteristics such as sex, social class, the education level or being retired or not and the use of social networks. The chronological age is, however, related to the use of social networks online and having an account, so that the younger elderly are the ones who use them more.

With respect to the cognitive age, only the number of social networks used is significant, showing that those who feel younger use a greater number of them. Nevertheless, we consider that the value of the cognitive age attains a greater significance when it is compared to the age that the person really has. This is why, following Hong & al. (2013), we divide the elderly into two groups: those with a cognitive age the same as the chronological age (people who feel they are their age) and those with a cognitive age lower than their chronological age (people who feel that they are younger). There were no people who felt that they were older than their chronological age. Having an account in a social network and using a greater number of social networks has a statistically significant relation with the fact of feeling younger.


Draft Content 991399977-36817-en029.jpg

To study the other three psychological characteristics, we analyzed the Cronbach alphas. In the three cases, we obtained values much higher than the required minimum of 0.7: 0.907, 0.95 and 0.97 for being adventurous, having self-confidence and technology fear, respectively. This confirms the reliability of the scales used.

The more adventurous elderly and those with a greater technology-related self-confidence are, in a statistically significant manner, those who use social networks, create accounts and are also in more than one social network. On the other hand, those elderly people who are more afraid when they use technology are those who use social networks less.

4. Discussion and conclusions

The results enable us to confirm that, as we proposed in the main aim of this work, our doubts about the stereotype of the elderly regarding the digital divide are correct. Though it is true that we have found differences among the elderly regarding the chronological age, doubtlessly due to the implications which it may have in other physical and cognitive aspects, we find empirical arguments to propose that the new digital divide is linked to psychological factors– what we have called the psycho-digital divide –especially if we analyze specific segments of the population, such as the elderly (Chua & al., 1999). If we were to analyze all the ages of the Spanish population, the contributions of socio-demographic variables could have more meaning.

Firstly, concerning the stereotype of the elderly, our results confirm in the Spanish society the findings of Mathur and al. (1998) and Schiffman and Sherman (1991) in the United States; Sudbury and Simcock (2009b) in the United Kingdom; and Hong and al. (2013) in Hong Kong. They found a high heterogeneity among the elderly. The image of the elderly is based on an obsolete prototype (Teuscher, 2009) which comes from that of previous generations concerning their forebears. The elderly are more to be found among the late adopters of a technology than in the segment of pioneers (Chen & Chan, 2014). Notwithstanding, the heterogeneity among the current elderly provides different archetypes, many of which of very far from the initial stereotype.

Secondly, concerning the definition of the digital divide, our results show that socio-demographic variables do not serve to differentiate among the elderly regarding their use of social networks. As we proposed, other characteristics, which are inherent to the individual, enable the identifying of differences in the use of social networks. We have identified that the profile of elderly users are those who feel younger, experience less fear, feel more confident and have a greater level of venturousness. Our results consolidate, and are in line with, those reached partially by other researchers in the last two decades. For instance, as a result of the use of the cognitive age in the case of the elderly, Mathur and al. (1998) find a group which they call «new age» elderly, characterized by their perception of being younger –at least ten years younger than their chronological age– and whose behaviour is in many ways similar to that of younger people. Indeed, they are convinced that age is a mental state which has little to do with the chronological age (Schiffman & Sherman, 1991). According to Barak and Gould (1985), these elderly people are more self-confident and are more adventurous. Furthermore, they exhibit behaviour which is oriented toward knowledge, as they reveal that they have recently acquired knowledge (Teuscher, 2009). Sudbury and Simcock (2009b) identify positive pioneers as being those who have a lower chronological and cognitive age, are those who perform more activities and have more social relationships, are more present on the Internet and, especially, are less concerned what others think about them. In the light of the results of other studies, we believe that this segment –adventurous, innovative, technology pioneers and inclined to share with friends, and whose difference between their chronological age and their cognitive age is greater– seems to be the segment given to using social networks. In our case, we have identified that 15.6% of our sample have used social networks, feel younger, are adventurous, are self-confident when they use technology and are not afraid to use it. 11.3% of the elderly fulfill these requirements and have accounts in social networks.

We indicate various implications from the practical point of view. Firstly, given that one of the main barriers continues being technology anxiety, and that this is a state, it can be overcome with the training and experience of the elderly. One way of tackling it is to do what some companies do, which is to allow their potential customers to experiment with new products (Gelbrich & Sattler, 2014), or, like McAfee, which offers its programme «Online Safety for Silver Surfers», an initiative with which their employees teach the elderly how to browse the Internet safely, protecting their data. Secondly, it is necessary to encourage self-confidence with technology and for the elderly to see themselves as capable of its daily use. Self-confidence is a decisive factor in the motivations and behaviours of people and reduces the anxiety related to using new technology (Zhao, Matilla & Tao, 2008). Thus, the Fundación Vodafone (Vodafone Foundation) points out that some elderly people state that they are strongly motivated to learn to function in social networks. Thirdly, it is necessary to promote the advantages of social networks for the elderly as a means of communication and social participation. In this way, the Ministry of Health, Social Services and Equality, and Imserso are reinforcing their presence in social networks via the implementation of Web 2.0 technologies which facilitate the participation of the elderly through these tools.


Draft Content 991399977-36817-en030.jpg

To finish off, we wish to highlight that the sample used in this work comes from an Experience Classroom, which may influence the bias of this sample. Nevertheless, we have found differences in the behaviour of the elderly regarding social networks. The choice of this population of university elderly people can be justified by its use in previous research related to the use of ICT (Martínez, Cabecinhas & Loscertales, 2011). To broaden the sample to other contexts would increase the heterogeneity of the people, which would strengthen the conclusions proposed.

Acknowledgements

This study has been financed by the Excellence Project of the Junta de Andalucía (Andalusian Regional Government) (Spain) P09-SEJ-4568.

References

Agudo, S., Pascual, M.A., & Fombona, J. (2012). Usos de las herramientas digitales entre las personas mayores. Comunicar, 39, XX, 193-201. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C39-2012-03-10

Barak, B. (2009). Age identity: A Cross-cultural Global Approach. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 33(1), 2-11. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0165025408099485

Barak, B., & Gould, S. (1985). Alternative Age Measures: A Research Agenda. In E.C. Hirschman, & M.B. Holbrook. (Eds.). Advances in Consumer Research. Provo, UT: Association for Consumer Research, 12, 53-58.

Barak, B., & Rahtz, D.R. (1990). Cognitive Age: Demographic and Psychographic Dimensions. Journal of Ambulatory Care Marketing, 3(2), 51-65. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J273v03n02_06

Barak, B., Guiot, D., Mathur, A., Zhang, Y., & Lee, K. (2011). An Empirical Assessment of Cross-Cultural Age Self-Construal Measurement: Evidence from Three Countries. Psychology & Marketing, 28(5), 479-495. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mar.20397

Braun, M.T. (2013). Obstacles to Social Networking Website Use among Older Adults. Computers in Human Behavior, 29(3), 673-680. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2012.12.004

Chantal, Y., & Vallerand, R.J. (1996). Skill versus Luck: A Motivational Analysis of Gambling Involvement. Journal of Gambling Studies, 12(4), 407-418.

Chen, K., & Chan, A.H. (2014). Predictors of Gerontechnology Acceptance by Older Hong Kong Chinese. Technovation, 34(2), 126-135. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.technovation.2013.09.010

Chua, S.L., Chen, D.-T. & Wong, A.F. (1999). Computer Anxiety and its Correlates: A Meta-analysis. Computers in Human Behavior, 15(5), 609-623. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0747-5632(99)00039-4

Clarke, D. (2004). Impulsiveness, Locus of Control, Motivation and Problem Gambling. Journal of Gambling Studies, 20(4), 319-345.

Curran, J.M., & Lennon, R. (2013). Comparing Younger an Older Social Network Users: An Examination of Attitudes and Intentions. The Journal of American Academy of Business, 19(1), 28-37.

Dabholkar, P.A., & Bagozzi, R.P. (2002). An Attitudinal Model of Technology-based Self-service: Moderating Effects of Consumer Traits and Situational Factors. Journal of the Academy Marketing Science, 30(3), 184-201. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0092070302303001

Dean, D.H. (2008). Shopper Age and the Use of Self-service Technologies. Managing Service Quality, 18(3), 225-238. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/09604520810871856

Dyck, J.L., & Smither, J.A. (1994). Age Differences in Computer Anxiety: The Role of Computer Experience, Gender and Education. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 10(3), 238-248. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2190/E79U-VCRC-EL4E-HRYV

Eastman, J.K., & Iyer, R. (2005). The Impact of Cognitive Age on Internet Use of the Elderly: An Introduction to the Public Policy Implications. International Journal of Consumer Studies, 29(2), 125-136. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1470-6431.2004.00424.x

Fritsch, T., Steinke, F. & Silbermann, L. (2013). Communication in Web 2.0: A Literature Review about Social Network Sites for Elderly People. Proceedings of the IADIS International Conference ICT, Society and Human. Beings 2013,

Gelbrich, K., & Sattler, B. (2014). Anxiety, Crowding, and Time Pressure in Public Self-service Technology Acceptance. Journal of Services Marketing, 28(1), 82-94. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSM-02-2012-0051

Guo, X., Sun, Y., Wang, N., Peng, Z., & Yan, Z. (2013). The Dark Side of Elderly Acceptance of Preventive Mobile Health Services in China. Electronic Markets, 23(1), 49-61. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12525-012-0112-4

Hong, S.J., Lui, C.S.M., Hahn, J., Moon, J.Y., & Kim. T.G. (2013). How Old Are You Really? Cognitive Age in Technology Acceptance. Decision Support Systems, 56, 122-130. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dss.2013.05.008

IMSERSO (Ed.) (2011a). Libro Blanco para el Envejecimiento Activo. Madrid: Instituto de Mayores y Servicios Sociales. (http://goo.gl/YuqDjh) (13-10-2014).

IMSERSO (Ed.) (2011b). Programa de Trabajo 2012, Año Europeo del Envejecimiento Activo y de la Solidaridad Intergeneracional. Madrid: Instituto de Mayores y Servicios Sociales. (http://goo.gl/9tyqmY) (13-10-2014).

Ji, Y.G., Choi, J., & al. (2010). Older Adults in an Aging Society and Social Computing: A Research Agenda. International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, 26, 11-12, 1122-1146. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10447318.2010.516728

Leist, A.K. (2013). Social Media Use of Older Adults: a Mini-Review. Gerontology, 59, 378-384. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000346818

Liébana, F., Villarejo, A.F., & Sánchez-Franco, M.J. (2014). Mobile Social Commerce Acceptance Model: Factors and Influences on Intention to Use S-Commerce. Congreso Marketing Aemark 2014. Madrid: ESIC.

Martínez, R., Cabecinhas, R., & Loscertales, F. (2011). Mayores universitarios en la Red. Comunicar, 37, XIX, 89-95. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C37-2011-02-09

Mathur, A., & Moschis, G.P. (2005). Antecedents of Cognitive Age: A Replication and Extension. Psychology & Marketing, 22, 969-994. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mar.20094

Mathur, A., Sherman, E., & Schiffman, L.G. (1998). Opportunities for Marketing Travel Services to New-Age Elderly. Journal of Services Marketing, 12, 4, 265-277. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/08876049810226946

Meuter, M.L., Ostrom, A.L., Bitner, M.J., & Roundtree, R. (2003). The Influence of Technology Anxiety on Consumer Use and Experiences with Self-service Technologies. Journal of Business Research, 56(11), 899-906. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0148-2963(01)00276-4

Moschis, G.P., & Mathur, A. (2006). Older Consumer Responses to Marketing Stimuli: The Power of Subjective Age. Journal of Advertising Research, 46(3), 339-346.

Niemelä, J. (2007). Baby Boom Consumers and Technology: Shoot

OECD (2001). Understanding the Digital Divide. París: Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. (http://goo.gl/BrF4zu) (22-01-2015).

OMS (Ed.) (2002). Active Ageing: A Policy Framework. Organización Mundial de la Salud. (http://goo.gl/oG5w8M) (13-10-2014).

Peters, G.R. (1971). Self-conceptions of the Aged, Age Identification, and Aging. The Gerontologist, 11(4 part. 2), 69-73. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/geront/11.4_Part_2.69

Pfeil, U., Arjan, R., & Zaphiris, P (2009). Age Differences in Online Social Networking – A Study of User Profiles and the Social Capital Divide among Teenagers and Older Users in MySpace. Computers in Human Behavior, 25, 643-654. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2008.08.015

Ramón, M.A., Peral, B., & Arenas, J. (2013). Elderly Persons and Internet Use. Social Science Computer Review, 31(4), 389-403. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0894439312473421

Reisenwitz, T., & Iyer, R. (2007). A Comparison of Younger and Older Baby Boomers: Investigating the Viability of Cohort Segmentation. Journal of Consumer Marketing, 24(4), 202-213. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/07363760710755995

Rogers, E.M. (2003). Diffusion of Innovations. New York: Free Press.

Schiffman, L.G., & Sherman, E. (1991). Value Orientations of New-age Elderly. The Coming of an Ageless Market. Journal of Business Research, 22(2), 187-194. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/01482963(91)90052-Y

Siu, N.Y-M., & Cheng, M.M-S. (2001). A Study of the Expected Adoption of Online Shopping. The Case of Hong Kong. Journal of International Consumer Marketing, 13(3), 87-106. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J046v13n03_06

Spielberger, C. (1966). Theory and Research on Anxiety. In Spielberger, C. (Ed.), Anxiety and Behavior. (pp. 3-20). New York, NY: Academic Press.

Sudbury, L., & Simcock, P. (2009a). Understanding Older Consumers through Cognitive Age and the List of Values: A U.K. based Perspective. Psychology and Marketing, 26(1), 22-38. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mar.20260

Sudbury, L., & Simcock, P. (2009b). A Multivariate Segmentation Model of Senior Consumers. Journal of Consumer Marketing, 26(4), 251-262. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/07363760910965855

Szmigin, I., & Carrigan, M. (2000). The Older Consumer as Innovator: Does Cognitive Age Hold the Key? Journal of Marketing Management, 16(5), 505-527. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1362/026725700785046038

Teuscher, U. (2009). Subjective age bias: A Motivational and Information Processing Approach. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 33(1), 22-31. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0165025408099487

Venkatesh, V. (2000). Determinants of Perceived Ease of Use: Integrating Control, Intrinsic Motivation, and Emotion into the Technology Acceptance Model. Information Systems Research, 11(4), 342-365.

Venkatesh, V., Morris, M.G., Davis, G.B., & Davis, F.D. (2003). User Acceptance of Information Technology: Toward a unified view. MIS Quarterly, 27(3), 425-478.

Wei, S.C. (2005). Consumer’s Demographic Characteristics, Cognitive Ages, and Innovativeness. Advances in Consumer Research, 32, 633-640.

World Economic Forum, WEF (2011). Global Population Ageing: Peril or Promise? Global Agenda Council on Ageing Society. (http://goo.gl/f65RVZ) (13-10-2014).

Zhao, X., Mattila, A.S., & Tao, L.-S.E. (2008). The Role of Post-training Self-efficacy in Customers’ use of Self-service Technologies. International Journal of Service Industry Management, 19(4), 492-505. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/09564230810891923



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

En el presente estudio analizamos la evolución del concepto de la brecha digital para los mayores desde la perspectiva del envejecimiento activo y en el contexto de la utilización de las redes sociales como instrumento de comunicación. Consideramos que las variables socio-demográficas no tienen suficiente poder para explicar la utilización o no de las tecnologías de la comunicación (TIC) por los mayores. Las variables de corte psicológico, como la edad cognitiva, la ansiedad tecnológica o el nivel de audacia complementan a las anteriores, e incluso, pueden ser más explicativas del comportamiento del mayor con relación a la utilización de redes sociales. Los resultados provenientes de una muestra de mayores, alumnos del Aula de Experiencia de una universidad, nos permiten confirmar que nuestras dudas acerca del estereotipo de los mayores respecto a la brecha digital son acertadas y que las variables psicológicas sirven, en mayor grado, para mostrar las diferencias significativas existentes entre usuarios y no usuarios de redes sociales en cuanto a la determinación del perfil de los mismos. El usuario mayor de redes sociales se siente más joven, experimenta un menor nivel de ansiedad tecnológica y es más audaz. En general, las características psicológicas ofrecen, por tanto, mayor poder discriminante que las socio-demográficas, por ello proponemos el concepto de brecha psico-digital.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

La Organización para la Cooperación y el Desarrollo Económico (OECD, 2001: 5) definió la brecha digital como «el desfase o división entre individuos, hogares, áreas económicas y geográficas con diferentes niveles socio-económicos con relación tanto a sus oportunidades de acceso a las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación, como al uso de Internet para una amplia variedad de actividades». Según esta organización, la brecha digital en las familias depende fundamentalmente de dos variables, ingresos y nivel educativo, así como de otras variables socio-demográficas como raza, género, tipo de familia, limitaciones lingüísticas y edad.

Respecto a los mayores, la Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS, 2002) define el envejecimiento activo como «el proceso de optimización de oportunidades de salud, participación y seguridad con el objetivo de mejorar la calidad de vida a medida que las personas envejecen». El término «activo» sugiere «una participación continua en las cuestiones sociales, económicas, culturales, espirituales y cívicas, no solo la capacidad de estar físicamente activo» (OMS, 2002: 79). En el actual entorno tecnológico y globalizado, como recoge el Foro Económico Mundial, las Tecnologías de la Información y la Comunicación (TIC) tienen un papel fundamental (WEF, 2011: 109). Con el objetivo de fomentar el envejecimiento activo y diagnosticar la situación real de los mayores en España, se crea el Libro Blanco sobre el Envejecimiento Activo (Imserso, 2011a) y un Programa de Trabajo (Imserso, 2011b). En ellos aparecen como retos, por un lado, desarrollar modelos de convivencia basados en el incremento de los contactos personales y de las redes sociales, incrementando el empleo de las nuevas tecnologías y fomentando las relaciones intergeneracionales, y por otro, que se avance en la utilización de las TIC por las personas mayores (Imserso, 2011b).

El empleo de las TIC por parte de las personas mayores es un tema complejo. Existe el estereotipo de que los mayores están alejados de las nuevas tecnologías. Numerosos estudios (Chua, Chen & Wong, 1999; Dyck & Smither, 1994) afirman que la edad del individuo es una variable que condiciona su uso. No obstante, existen otras investigaciones (Mathur, Sherman & Schiffman 1998; Ramón, Peral & Arenas, 2013) que revelan que este segmento es muy heterogéneo. No solo la edad, sino el sexo, el nivel formativo o la clase socio-económica, influyen y explican el comportamiento digital de los mayores. Es lo que podríamos denominar la brecha socio-digital.

El objetivo de este trabajo es cuestionarse el estereotipo de los mayores respecto a la brecha digital. Su justificación viene determinada por la heterogeneidad de los mayores en su comportamiento con las nuevas tecnologías. La definición tradicional de brecha digital diferencia a los usuarios en función de características socio-demográficas, sin embargo, la utilización de estas variables pueden ser insuficientes para entender en mayor profundidad las motivaciones que llevan a los mayores a utilizar las TIC (Dabholkar & Bagozzi, 2002). Creemos que la brecha digital sigue existiendo, pero evolucionando hacia otros aspectos más inherentes al individuo. Por ello, proponemos criterios psicológicos que revelen mejor las diferencias existentes entre los mayores, en concreto en la influencia sobre el empleo de las redes sociales.

En un mundo hiperconectado el envejecimiento activo puede verse favorecido por la utilización de las redes sociales (WEF, 2011). La investigación sobre este tópico está todavía por desarrollar. Fritsch, Steinke y Silbermann (2013) en su revisión bibliográfica, encuentran solo ocho artículos enfocados en mayores de 50 años y redes sociales. La mayoría de estos trabajos se centran en la seguridad y la privacidad como los principales obstáculos para usarlas. Otros, como Pfeil, Arjan y Zaphiris (2009), analizan las relaciones construidas en las redes sociales en función de la edad, observando que los mayores tienen mayor diversidad de edades entre sus contactos (a pesar de ser menor en número), entre los que incluyen a familiares más jóvenes que actúan como prescriptores de las redes sociales. El trabajo de Ji, Choi y otros (2010) propone la identificación de perfiles de mayores usuarios y no usuarios de redes sociales y las diferencias en su comportamiento, lo que nos lleva a considerar posibles segmentos de usuarios que accederán con mayor facilidad a otras formas de comunicación on-line más orientadas al comercio electrónico y sus diferentes formas de comercio social (Liébana, Villarejo & Sánchez-Franco, 2014). Finalmente, el trabajo de Curran y Lennon (2013) considera la influencia de variables sociológicas como la influencia social y la tensión social sobre la intención de uso de las redes sociales entre mayores.

Los factores psicológicos explican el desarrollo de competencias y habilidades en los mayores que favorecerá la utilización de las redes sociales, y que permitirá optimizar y prolongar su empleo a medida que envejecen, puesto que suponen un instrumento de comunicación que permitirá alcanzar niveles de bienestar y beneficios para el cuidado de la salud y mejora de la autosuficiencia (Leist, 2013). La interacción social que logran los mayores cuando participan en redes sociales los mantiene comunicados, activos y en constante aprendizaje para ir resolviendo retos tecnológicos, de manera individual, o apoyados en los consejos de familiares y amigos de menor edad, más experimentados en el contexto digital (Braun, 2013).

En el análisis de las diferencias individuales consideramos las relacionadas con características demográficas, como el sexo y la edad, y las características psicológicas. En nuestro estudio, dentro de estas últimas, hemos profundizado en la edad cognitiva, partiendo de los trabajos de Barak (Barak, 2009; Barak & Gould, 1985; Barak, Guiot, Mathur, Zhang & Lee, 2011), dado que es una variable habitualmente empleada en estudios sobre mayores y que revela la existencia de diferencias entre edad cronológica y cognitiva. Por otra parte, las otras variables psicológicas propuestas, ansiedad tecnológica y audacia, parten de los trabajos de Meuter y otros (2003) y Niemelä (2007) que han sido empleadas en investigaciones sobre la aceptación y el uso de la tecnología, como Venkatesh y otros (2003).

El trabajo se estructura inicialmente con la revisión bibliográfica de las variables psicológicas definitorias en el comportamiento de los mayores en las redes sociales: edad cognitiva, ansiedad tecnológica y audacia. Como resultado de la revisión de la literatura hacemos una proposición de investigación. En el segundo epígrafe describimos el material y métodos utilizados. Finalizamos analizando los resultados obtenidos y resumiendo las principales conclusiones alcanzadas con el estudio.

1.1. Edad cognitiva

Cada individuo percibe su madurez en función de los estereotipos sociales o culturales, de la realidad social en la que vive y de los cambios psicológicos y físicos propios que ha desarrollado a medida que cumple años (Peters, 1971). Actualmente, los mayores de 50 años se sienten más jóvenes que su edad cronológica (Sherman, Schiffman & Mathur, 2001), rechazando denominaciones como, ancianos o viejos (Mathur & al. 1998), así como la imagen que de ellos, en algunos casos, proyecta la publicidad (Moschis & Mathur, 2006).

En este contexto surge el término edad cognitiva, que forma parte del autoconcepto que las personas tienen de sí mismas. La percepción de la edad cognitiva está influida por la edad cronológica, pero también por las experiencias de la vida y por los cambios en los roles sociales (Mathur & Moschis, 2005). Dicha edad cognitiva influye positivamente en la autoestima y en la confianza en las capacidades que uno cree que tiene (Barak & Rahtz, 1990).

En este sentido, la edad cognitiva es un mejor criterio para segmentar el mercado (Barak & al., 2011; Mathur & Moschis, 2005; Reisenwitz & Iyer, 2007) ya que permite comprender mejor las decisiones de los usuarios mayores (Sudbury & Simcock, 2009a) y sus respuestas a los estímulos de comunicación (Moschis & Mathur, 2006), dado que expresa mejor la identidad, las percepciones, y por tanto, el comportamiento de cada individuo en el reto de afrontar el uso de las TIC.

Como señalan Barak y Gould (1985), los mayores cognitivamente jóvenes son más aventureros, confían más en sí mismos y son innovadores selectivos, ya que aceptan prácticas o productos nuevos cuando sienten que les va a beneficiar. Por ello, la menor edad cognitiva puede significar para los mayores un antecedente sobre la intención de uso y aceptación de tecnologías (Wei, 2005).

Hong, Lui, Hahn, Moon y Kim (2013) dividen a los mayores en dos grupos, aquellos con edad cognitiva igual a la cronológica y aquellos con edad cognitiva menor a la cronológica, para comparar la influencia de los factores de aceptación de servicios móviles de datos. Sin embargo, Szmigin y Carrigan (2000) indican que los mayores, cada vez más, se sienten felices y confiados en sus capacidades y no necesitan sentirse o parecer más jóvenes que su edad actual. De hecho, Teuscher (2009) encuentra que las diferencias entre edad cognitiva y cronológica son menores que las reveladas por estudios anteriores (una media de 5,6 frente a quince años). A pesar de todo, entendemos que la edad cognitiva y su diferencia con respecto a la edad cronológica pueden ayudarnos a entender las variaciones que se producen en la aceptación y uso de las redes sociales.

1.2. Ansiedad tecnológica

Las primeras investigaciones sobre ansiedad se centraron en la producida por los ordenadores (Meuter & al., 2003). Esta se considera un ejemplo del estado de ansiedad (Chua & al., 1999), es decir, un estado transitorio o condición variable en intensidad y que fluctúa con el tiempo. Sin embargo, como rasgo de la personalidad del individuo es una predisposición en el comportamiento a percibir un conjunto de circunstancias objetivamente no peligrosas como una amenaza (Spielberger, 1966). De acuerdo con las teorías clásicas sobre ansiedad, se considera que induce a impactos negativos en las respuestas cognoscitivas del individuo (Guo, Sun, Wang, Peng & Yan, 2013) y puede ser modificado, principalmente, mediante formación y experiencia con los ordenadores.

Un concepto menos estudiado es el de ansiedad tecnológica (Niemelä, 2007) derivado de la anterior (Guo & al., 2013). Sus efectos son especialmente fuertes en las primeras fases del proceso de adopción de una nueva tecnología (Venkatesh, 2000), cuando los individuos la usan por primera vez, o incluso antes de hacerlo y especialmente en público (Gelbrich & Sattler, 2014). La ansiedad tecnológica es el principal determinante a nivel individual del uso de una tecnología (Meuter & al., 2003). Además, otra de sus consecuencias es la resistencia al cambio, dado que aquellos individuos con altos niveles tienden a preocuparse más por los errores inesperados causados por la tecnología, por lo que intentarán mantener el statu quo inicial (Guo & al., 2013). Diversos estudios (Dyck & Smither, 1994; Guo & al., 2013) han mantenido el estereotipo que las personas mayores presentan niveles más elevados de ansiedad tecnológica y menor autoconfianza que las más jóvenes. Sin embargo, Niemelä (2007) sobre mayores pertenecientes a la generación del «Baby Boom», no coincide con esta idea. Dado que los que hoy son mayores han madurado con el nacimiento de las actuales tecnologías, como el teléfono móvil o Internet, difieren frente a otras generaciones anteriores en su experiencia con ellas. Su mayor utilización y experiencia con la tecnología permite a los mayores de esta generación (actualmente entre 59 y 69 años), tener menor ansiedad. Estudios recientes (Agudo, Pascual & Fombona, 2012) señalan que los mayores usan tecnologías principalmente con el objeto de comunicarse, aprender y facilitar sus actividades diarias y de ocio.

1.3. Audacia

Las personas audaces exhiben un comportamiento más atrevido, pero son conscientes de que hay un riesgo implicado en sus decisiones. El deseo de probar cosas nuevas y excitantes está asociado con las motivaciones intrínsecas del individuo hacia la estimulación, el conocimiento y el logro (Clarke, 2004). Además, la audacia puede estar relacionada con el «locus» de control interno (Chantal & Vallerand, 1996), es decir, el sujeto percibe que los hechos que ocurren en su vida son efectos y consecuencias de sus decisiones, de forma que les gusta enfrentarse con experiencias desafiantes. Como señala Rogers (2003), para los innovadores la audacia es casi una obsesión. Por tanto, cabe esperar que las personas que presenten esta dimensión de la personalidad se impliquen en actividades nuevas y desafiantes, como las relacionadas con la tecnología.

Son muy escasos los trabajos que relacionan la audacia con la aceptación o uso de las TIC, y menos entre mayores. Siu y Cheng (2001) estudian la adopción del comercio electrónico considerando diferentes características, encontrando que los adoptantes reflejan mayor nivel de audacia que los no adoptantes, están más predispuestos a correr riesgos, así como más interesados en los desarrollos tecnológicos. En cuanto a los mayores, Sudbury y Simcock (2009b) realizan una segmentación de 650 personas británicas de 50 a 79 años, utilizando variables comportamentales, para explicar por qué las personas mayores muestran comportamientos menos innovadores que los más jóvenes (Dean, 2008). Los resultados indican que el carácter audaz permite diferenciar entre los mayores. Así, el segmento denominado pioneros positivos presenta altos niveles de audacia, ya que les gusta comprar y probar cosas nuevas por curiosidad, les gusta ser los primeros en hacerlo, comentarlo con sus amigos y compartir información.

1.4. Proposición de investigación

En definitiva, establecemos como propuesta de investigación que las características psicológicas de los individuos, en este caso adultos mayores, proporcionan una mejor explicación de la brecha digital que las tradicionales variables socio-demográficas. Se espera, en función de la revisión de la literatura anterior, que las personas mayores que más usan las redes sociales no se diferencian por su perfil socio-demográfico, sino que se caracterizan por tener una menor edad cognitiva, por tener una menor ansiedad tecnológica y por ser más audaces.

2. Material y métodos

La muestra empleada proviene de alumnos matriculados en el Aula de la Experiencia de la Universidad de Sevilla. Su objetivo es dar una oportunidad a personas mayores de 50 años que deseen acceder a la formación y la cultura general, convirtiéndose en un foro de acercamiento y animación socio-cultural. Los datos fueron recogidos durante los meses de noviembre y diciembre de 2013 mediante una encuesta realizada durante las horas de clase. Previamente, para eliminar posibles ambigüedades en el cuestionario, se revisó con siete alumnos voluntarios.

El cuestionario depurado recogía las variables socio-demográficas y descriptivas del uso de la tecnología y las escalas de medida de las variables psicológicas empleadas. La edad cognitiva y deseada se midieron con las escalas de Barak y otros (2011). Se trata de una escala expresada en décadas de años, que recoge cuatro dimensiones en las que el individuo indica la edad que siente tener, la que cree que aparenta, la que revela las acciones que realiza y la que muestran sus intereses. Por su parte, la edad deseada refleja lo que una persona aspira a ser, su autoconcepción ideal y sus dimensiones son las mismas que la edad cognitiva, comenzando por el condicional «me gustaría&». La media de estos cuatro valores es lo que determina la edad cognitiva y la edad deseada.

Por otra parte, se empleó la escala de Meuter y otros (2003) para recoger la audacia. Para la ansiedad tecnológica seguimos la propuesta de Niemelä (2007), que identificó dos factores dentro de este constructo: el primero denominado miedo a la tecnología y un segundo que recogía la autoconfianza en el uso de la tecnología. Estas tres variables fueron medidas mediante una escala Likert de siete puntos. Para analizar si las variables vinculadas con las redes sociales están relacionadas con las características de los individuos, procedimos a realizar los test estadísticos adecuados. Así, empleamos ANOVA de un factor en los casos en que las variables a analizar fueran una categórica (ej. tener o no un perfil en redes sociales) y otra en escala (ej. edad cronológica); correlación de Pearson si las dos variables eran escala; y correlación phi de Cramer en el caso de dos variables dicotómicas.

3. Análisis y resultados

El total de cuestionarios obtenidos fue de 474, que fueron depurados eliminando aquellos no cumplimentados correctamente. El número de encuestas validas fue de 415. El estudio de las variables socio-demográficas de la muestra indicó que la proporción de mujeres fue del 62,5%, la edad media fue de 63,6 años y el 57% de los encuestados estaba casado. El nivel de estudios mayoritario de la muestra fue el de estudios secundarios (54,2%), seguido de universitarios (36,1%); la clase social era mayoritariamente clase media (80,2%) y el 78,4% de la muestra estaba jubilado.

Respecto a las redes sociales, el 51,2% de los mayores de la muestra había utilizado una red social, de los cuales, el 77,6% tenían creado un perfil. El 44,1% tenían perfil en una sola red, el 14,2% en dos y 5,1% en tres. Esto explica que al sumar la utilización de redes sociales, el resultado sea mayor a 100: el 93,1% usaba Facebook, el 26,7% Twitter, el 6,7% Tuenti y un 22,7% usaba otras redes sociales. Las actividades más frecuentes realizadas en las redes son: realizar comentarios (64,6%), colgar fotografías (42.9%) y chatear (35,5%). Estas actividades se realizaban, al menos, una vez al mes.

Los resultados (tabla 1) muestran que se cumple el patrón encontrado por Barak (2009) en 18 países, ninguno hispano-hablante, (edad deseada<edad cognitiva<edad cronológica), con una mayor variación en las respuestas de la edad deseada. La media de la edad cognitiva y deseada es menor para las mujeres (48,66 y 39,04 años para ellas, 53,57 y 42,38 para ellos, respectivamente), de forma estadísticamente significativa (significación menor a 0.05 de la prueba t para la igualdad de medias en el caso de muestras independientes), tal y como encuentran Eastman e Iyer (2005), y Wei (2005).

Los resultados (tabla 2) no muestran apoyo a la relación entre las características socio-demográficas como el sexo, la clase social, el nivel de estudios o estar jubilado o no, con la utilización de redes sociales. La edad cronológica, sin embargo, sí está relacionada con la utilización de redes y tener un perfil, de forma que los mayores más jóvenes son los que las utilizan más.

Respecto a la edad cognitiva, solo el número de redes utilizadas es significativo, mostrando que aquellos que se sienten más jóvenes emplean un mayor número de redes sociales. Sin embargo, consideramos que el valor de la edad cognitiva alcanza un significado mayor cuando se compara con la edad que realmente uno tiene. Por ello, siguiendo a Hong y otros (2013) dividimos a los mayores en dos grupos, aquellos con edad cognitiva igual a la cronológica (individuos que se sienten de su edad) y aquellos con edad cognitiva menor a la cronológica (individuos que se sienten más jóvenes). No se encontraron personas que se sintieran mayores de la edad cronológica actual. Tener perfil en una red social y utilizar un mayor número de redes sociales está relacionado de forma estadísticamente significativa con el hecho de sentirse más joven.


Draft Content 991399977-36817 ov-es029.jpg

Para estudiar las otras tres características psicológicas, procedimos a analizar el alpha de Cronbach. En los tres casos, obtuvimos valores muy superiores al mínimo exigido del 0.7: 0.907, 0.95 y 0.97 para ser audaz, tener confianza en uno mismo y tener miedo a enfrentarse con la tecnología, respectivamente, lo que confirma la fiabilidad de las escalas empleadas.

Los mayores más audaces y aquellos que confían más en sí mismos con relación a la tecnología, de forma estadísticamente significativa, son los que usan las redes sociales, crean perfiles y además están presentes en más de una red. Sin embargo, aquellos mayores con más miedo cuando usan la tecnología son los que menos usan las redes sociales.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Los resultados nos permiten confirmar que nuestras dudas acerca del estereotipo de los mayores respecto a la brecha digital son acertadas, como proponíamos en el objetivo principal de este trabajo. Si bien es cierto que hemos encontrado diferencias entre los mayores respecto a la edad cronológica, seguramente por las implicaciones que pueda tener en otros aspectos físicos y cognitivos, encontramos argumentos empíricos para proponer que la nueva brecha digital está unida a factores psicológicos lo que hemos denominado brecha psico-digital. Sobre todo, si analizamos segmentos concretos de la población, como son los mayores (Chua & al., 1999). Si analizásemos todas las edades de la población española, podría tener más sentido las aportaciones que realizan las variables socio-demográficas.

En primer lugar, sobre el estereotipo de los mayores, nuestros resultados confirman en la sociedad española los hallados por Mathur y otros (1998) y Schiffman y Sherman (1991) en Estados Unidos; Sudbury y Simcock (2009b) en Reino Unido; o Hong y otros (2013) en Hong-Kong, que encontraban una alta heterogeneidad entre los mayores. La imagen de los mayores se basa en un prototipo obsoleto (Teuscher, 2009), proporcionada por la que tenían generaciones anteriores sobre sus ascendientes. Los mayores se encuentran más entre los adoptantes tardíos de una tecnología que en el segmento de pioneros (Chen & Chan, 2014). Sin embargo, la heterogeneidad entre mayores actuales proporciona diversos arquetipos, muchos de ellos muy alejados del estereotipo inicial.

En segundo lugar, sobre la definición de la brecha digital, nuestros resultados muestran que las variables socio-demográficas no sirven para diferenciar entre los mayores con relación a la utilización de las redes sociales. Como proponíamos, otras características inherentes al individuo permiten identificar diferencias en el empleo de las redes sociales. Hemos identificado que el perfil de mayores usuarios son aquellos que se sienten más jóvenes, experimentan menos miedo y se sienten más confiados y tienen un mayor nivel de audacia. Nuestros resultados agrupan y están en la línea de los alcanzados de forma parcial por otras investigaciones en las dos últimas décadas. Por ejemplo, como resultado del empleo de la edad cognitiva en el caso de los mayores, Mathur y otros (1998) encuentran un grupo que denominan mayores «new age», caracterizado por que se perciben como más jóvenes �al menos diez años menos que la edad cronológica� y que su comportamiento es similar, en muchos aspectos, al de personas más jóvenes. De hecho, tienen la convicción de que la edad es un estado mental que poco tiene que ver con la edad cronológica (Schiffman & Sherman, 1991). Según Barak y Gould (1985), estos mayores confían más en sí mismos y son más audaces. Además tienen un comportamiento orientado al conocimiento, ya que revelan que han adquirido conocimientos recientemente (Teuscher, 2009). Sudbury & Simcock (2009b) identifican a los pioneros positivos como aquellos que tienen menor edad cronológica y cognitiva, son los que realizan más actividades y relaciones sociales, están más presentes en Internet y les importa especialmente lo que otros piensan de ellos.

A la vista de los resultados de estos estudios, creemos que este segmento, aventurero, innovador, pionero tecnológico y propenso a compartir con amigos, y cuya diferencia entre edad cronológica y cognitiva es mayor, parece el segmento más proclive a utilizar las redes sociales. En nuestro caso, hemos identificado que el 15,6% de nuestra muestra han usado redes sociales, se sienten más jóvenes, son audaces, confían en sí mismos cuando usan la tecnología y no tienen miedo a utilizarla. El porcentaje de mayores que cumplen estos requisitos y tienen perfiles en las redes sociales es de un 11,3%. Desde un punto de vista práctico señalamos varias implicaciones. En primer lugar, dado que una de las principales barreras sigue siendo la ansiedad hacia la tecnología, y esta resulta un estado, puede ser superada con formación y experiencia de los mayores. Una forma de abordarla es la que usan algunas compañías que permiten la experimentación de los nuevos productos a sus potenciales clientes (Gelbrich & Sattler, 2014), o como McAfee que propone su programa «Online Safety for Silver Surfers», una iniciativa donde sus empleados enseñan a las personas mayores de qué manera navegar por Internet de forma segura protegiendo sus datos. En segundo lugar, es necesario fomentar la seguridad en sí mismos con la tecnología, que se vean capacitados para su empleo cotidiano. La autoconfianza es un determinante de las motivaciones y comportamientos de los individuos y reduce la ansiedad relacionada con usar una nueva tecnología (Zhao, Matilla & Tao, 2008). Así, la Fundación Vodafone señala que algunos mayores declaran tener una fuerte motivación por aprender a desenvolverse en las redes sociales. En tercer lugar, es necesario promover las ventajas de las redes sociales para los mayores, como un medio de comunicación y participación social. Así, el Ministerio de Sanidad, Servicios Sociales e Igualdad y el Imserso están reforzando su presencia en redes sociales mediante la implantación de tecnologías Web 2.0 que facilitan la participación de los mayores a través de estas herramientas.


Draft Content 991399977-36817 ov-es030.jpg

Para finalizar, queremos resaltar que la muestra empleada en este trabajo proviene del Aula de la Experiencia, lo que puede influir en el sesgo de esta muestra. No obstante, encontramos diferencias en el comportamiento de los mayores respecto a las redes sociales. La elección de esta población de mayores universitarios puede justificarse por su uso en trabajos anteriores en relación al uso de las TIC (Martínez, Cabecinhas & Loscertales, 2011). Ampliar la muestra a otros contextos incrementaría la heterogeneidad de los individuos, lo que refuerza las conclusiones propuestas.

Agradecimientos

Este estudio ha sido financiado por el Proyecto de Excelencia de la Junta de Andalucía (España) P09-SEJ-4568.

Referencias

Agudo, S., Pascual, M.A., & Fombona, J. (2012). Usos de las herramientas digitales entre las personas mayores. Comunicar, 39, XX, 193-201. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C39-2012-03-10

Barak, B. (2009). Age identity: A Cross-cultural Global Approach. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 33(1), 2-11. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0165025408099485

Barak, B., & Gould, S. (1985). Alternative Age Measures: A Research Agenda. In E.C. Hirschman, & M.B. Holbrook. (Eds.). Advances in Consumer Research. Provo, UT: Association for Consumer Research, 12, 53-58.

Barak, B., & Rahtz, D.R. (1990). Cognitive Age: Demographic and Psychographic Dimensions. Journal of Ambulatory Care Marketing, 3(2), 51-65. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J273v03n02_06

Barak, B., Guiot, D., Mathur, A., Zhang, Y., & Lee, K. (2011). An Empirical Assessment of Cross-Cultural Age Self-Construal Measurement: Evidence from Three Countries. Psychology & Marketing, 28(5), 479-495. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mar.20397

Braun, M.T. (2013). Obstacles to Social Networking Website Use among Older Adults. Computers in Human Behavior, 29(3), 673-680. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2012.12.004

Chantal, Y., & Vallerand, R.J. (1996). Skill versus Luck: A Motivational Analysis of Gambling Involvement. Journal of Gambling Studies, 12(4), 407-418.

Chen, K., & Chan, A.H. (2014). Predictors of Gerontechnology Acceptance by Older Hong Kong Chinese. Technovation, 34(2), 126-135. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.technovation.2013.09.010

Chua, S.L., Chen, D.-T. & Wong, A.F. (1999). Computer Anxiety and its Correlates: A Meta-analysis. Computers in Human Behavior, 15(5), 609-623. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0747-5632(99)00039-4

Clarke, D. (2004). Impulsiveness, Locus of Control, Motivation and Problem Gambling. Journal of Gambling Studies, 20(4), 319-345.

Curran, J.M., & Lennon, R. (2013). Comparing Younger an Older Social Network Users: An Examination of Attitudes and Intentions. The Journal of American Academy of Business, 19(1), 28-37.

Dabholkar, P.A., & Bagozzi, R.P. (2002). An Attitudinal Model of Technology-based Self-service: Moderating Effects of Consumer Traits and Situational Factors. Journal of the Academy Marketing Science, 30(3), 184-201. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0092070302303001

Dean, D.H. (2008). Shopper Age and the Use of Self-service Technologies. Managing Service Quality, 18(3), 225-238. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/09604520810871856

Dyck, J.L., & Smither, J.A. (1994). Age Differences in Computer Anxiety: The Role of Computer Experience, Gender and Education. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 10(3), 238-248. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2190/E79U-VCRC-EL4E-HRYV

Eastman, J.K., & Iyer, R. (2005). The Impact of Cognitive Age on Internet Use of the Elderly: An Introduction to the Public Policy Implications. International Journal of Consumer Studies, 29(2), 125-136. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1470-6431.2004.00424.x

Fritsch, T., Steinke, F. & Silbermann, L. (2013). Communication in Web 2.0: A Literature Review about Social Network Sites for Elderly People. Proceedings of the IADIS International Conference ICT, Society and Human. Beings 2013,

Gelbrich, K., & Sattler, B. (2014). Anxiety, Crowding, and Time Pressure in Public Self-service Technology Acceptance. Journal of Services Marketing, 28(1), 82-94. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSM-02-2012-0051

Guo, X., Sun, Y., Wang, N., Peng, Z., & Yan, Z. (2013). The Dark Side of Elderly Acceptance of Preventive Mobile Health Services in China. Electronic Markets, 23(1), 49-61. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12525-012-0112-4

Hong, S.J., Lui, C.S.M., Hahn, J., Moon, J.Y., & Kim. T.G. (2013). How Old Are You Really? Cognitive Age in Technology Acceptance. Decision Support Systems, 56, 122-130. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dss.2013.05.008

IMSERSO (Ed.) (2011a). Libro Blanco para el Envejecimiento Activo. Madrid: Instituto de Mayores y Servicios Sociales. (http://goo.gl/YuqDjh) (13-10-2014).

IMSERSO (Ed.) (2011b). Programa de Trabajo 2012, Año Europeo del Envejecimiento Activo y de la Solidaridad Intergeneracional. Madrid: Instituto de Mayores y Servicios Sociales. (http://goo.gl/9tyqmY) (13-10-2014).

Ji, Y.G., Choi, J., & al. (2010). Older Adults in an Aging Society and Social Computing: A Research Agenda. International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, 26, 11-12, 1122-1146. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10447318.2010.516728

Leist, A.K. (2013). Social Media Use of Older Adults: a Mini-Review. Gerontology, 59, 378-384. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000346818

Liébana, F., Villarejo, A.F., & Sánchez-Franco, M.J. (2014). Mobile Social Commerce Acceptance Model: Factors and Influences on Intention to Use S-Commerce. Congreso Marketing Aemark 2014. Madrid: ESIC.

Martínez, R., Cabecinhas, R., & Loscertales, F. (2011). Mayores universitarios en la Red. Comunicar, 37, XIX, 89-95. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C37-2011-02-09

Mathur, A., & Moschis, G.P. (2005). Antecedents of Cognitive Age: A Replication and Extension. Psychology & Marketing, 22, 969-994. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mar.20094

Mathur, A., Sherman, E., & Schiffman, L.G. (1998). Opportunities for Marketing Travel Services to New-Age Elderly. Journal of Services Marketing, 12, 4, 265-277. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/08876049810226946

Meuter, M.L., Ostrom, A.L., Bitner, M.J., & Roundtree, R. (2003). The Influence of Technology Anxiety on Consumer Use and Experiences with Self-service Technologies. Journal of Business Research, 56(11), 899-906. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0148-2963(01)00276-4

Moschis, G.P., & Mathur, A. (2006). Older Consumer Responses to Marketing Stimuli: The Power of Subjective Age. Journal of Advertising Research, 46(3), 339-346.

Niemelä, J. (2007). Baby Boom Consumers and Technology: Shoot

OECD (2001). Understanding the Digital Divide. París: Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. (http://goo.gl/BrF4zu) (22-01-2015).

OMS (Ed.) (2002). Active Ageing: A Policy Framework. Organización Mundial de la Salud. (http://goo.gl/oG5w8M) (13-10-2014).

Peters, G.R. (1971). Self-conceptions of the Aged, Age Identification, and Aging. The Gerontologist, 11(4 part. 2), 69-73. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/geront/11.4_Part_2.69

Pfeil, U., Arjan, R., & Zaphiris, P (2009). Age Differences in Online Social Networking � A Study of User Profiles and the Social Capital Divide among Teenagers and Older Users in MySpace. Computers in Human Behavior, 25, 643-654. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2008.08.015

Ramón, M.A., Peral, B., & Arenas, J. (2013). Elderly Persons and Internet Use. Social Science Computer Review, 31(4), 389-403. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0894439312473421

Reisenwitz, T., & Iyer, R. (2007). A Comparison of Younger and Older Baby Boomers: Investigating the Viability of Cohort Segmentation. Journal of Consumer Marketing, 24(4), 202-213. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/07363760710755995

Rogers, E.M. (2003). Diffusion of Innovations. New York: Free Press.

Schiffman, L.G., & Sherman, E. (1991). Value Orientations of New-age Elderly. The Coming of an Ageless Market. Journal of Business Research, 22(2), 187-194. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/01482963(91)90052-Y

Siu, N.Y-M., & Cheng, M.M-S. (2001). A Study of the Expected Adoption of Online Shopping. The Case of Hong Kong. Journal of International Consumer Marketing, 13(3), 87-106. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J046v13n03_06

Spielberger, C. (1966). Theory and Research on Anxiety. In Spielberger, C. (Ed.), Anxiety and Behavior. (pp. 3-20). New York, NY: Academic Press.

Sudbury, L., & Simcock, P. (2009a). Understanding Older Consumers through Cognitive Age and the List of Values: A U.K. based Perspective. Psychology and Marketing, 26(1), 22-38. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mar.20260

Sudbury, L., & Simcock, P. (2009b). A Multivariate Segmentation Model of Senior Consumers. Journal of Consumer Marketing, 26(4), 251-262. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/07363760910965855

Szmigin, I., & Carrigan, M. (2000). The Older Consumer as Innovator: Does Cognitive Age Hold the Key? Journal of Marketing Management, 16(5), 505-527. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1362/026725700785046038

Teuscher, U. (2009). Subjective age bias: A Motivational and Information Processing Approach. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 33(1), 22-31. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0165025408099487

Venkatesh, V. (2000). Determinants of Perceived Ease of Use: Integrating Control, Intrinsic Motivation, and Emotion into the Technology Acceptance Model. Information Systems Research, 11(4), 342-365.

Venkatesh, V., Morris, M.G., Davis, G.B., & Davis, F.D. (2003). User Acceptance of Information Technology: Toward a unified view. MIS Quarterly, 27(3), 425-478.

Wei, S.C. (2005). Consumer�s Demographic Characteristics, Cognitive Ages, and Innovativeness. Advances in Consumer Research, 32, 633-640.

World Economic Forum, WEF (2011). Global Population Ageing: Peril or Promise? Global Agenda Council on Ageing Society. (http://goo.gl/f65RVZ) (13-10-2014).

Zhao, X., Mattila, A.S., & Tao, L.-S.E. (2008). The Role of Post-training Self-efficacy in Customers� use of Self-service Technologies. International Journal of Service Industry Management, 19(4), 492-505. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/09564230810891923

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/06/15
Accepted on 30/06/15
Submitted on 30/06/15

Volume 23, Issue 2, 2015
DOI: 10.3916/C45-2015-06
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 11
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?