Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The adaptation of traditional newspapers to new digital media and its interface, far from being a mere technical transformation, has contributed to a gradual change in the media themselves and their audiences. With a sample including the top general information pay newspaper in each of the 28 countries of the European Union, this research has carried out an analysis using 17 indicators divided in 4 categories. The aim is to identify the transformations that the implementation of digital media have brought to the top European newspapers. In general terms, the results show that most dailies have managed to keep their leadership also in online environment. Moreover, an emerging group of global media is growing up, based in preexisting national media. Digital and mobile media have contributed to the appearance of new consumption habits as well, where users read more superficially and sporadically. The audience uses several formats at a time, and digital devices already bring the biggest amount of users to many media. The Internet-created new information windows –search engines, social networks, etc. –are also contributing to the change in professional work routines.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction and state of affairs

Since the appearance of the first Internet media two decades ago, theoretical discourse about its development have ranged from technological determinism to constructivist approaches. In the first end (Mosco, 2004; Boczkowski, 2004), the media analysis focused on trying to anticipate the «communicative utopias» and the revolutionary changes that the development of the full potential of the Internet would produce in the communication system and journalism, on the basis that all technological innovation inevitably causes social change (Paul, 2005; Domingo, 2006). However, approaches centred on the way audiences and professional journalists’ routines have interacted with technical advances have offered a vision in which, far from pre-established developments, production practices, new formats and technological tools have opened the discussion and have shaped one another (Deuze, 2001; Schmitz & Domingo, 2010).

The emergence of Web 2.0 –focused on the development of applications and websites that allow users to create, distribute and share content– has contributed to the creation of what Jenkins (2006) calls a «culture of convergence», where the long separation between content creators and their audiences has begun to dilute, although, as concluded Steensen (2011), it may be considered that the traditional notion of «gatekeeping» is still in full force and assumed by the media.

Beyond the role of the audience, digitalization and leap to the web continue to lead profound changes in the media landscape, ranging from content production to work routines, media, distribution strategies and business models (Casero-Ripollés, 2012).

Faced with statements predicting the demise of paper as printed media (Martinez-Albertos, 1997; Meyer, 2004), newspapers have had to face a significant drop in advertising investments and dissemination, so digital media appears to be a great alternative for the future of print journalism (Armentia, 2011).

This necessary adaptation to the new digital media can be understood, on the one hand, from a purely technical aspect, which refers to the adequacy of editorial content of cyber media on new information devices (smartphones, tablets, etc.) (Meso, Larrondo, Peña, & Rivero, 2014). But this transition is not limited to a change in format, but rather has contributed to a deeper transformation in the configuration of the media.

Unlike print journalism, which has very definite design techniques result of technological and formal evolution of the medium itself over decades, digital newspapers were born with a very simple and vague visual composition, which has evolved into a certain visual uniqueness, far from the nuances of the daily paper (Lopez, 2012). As defined by Rodriguez-de-las-Heras (1991) –unlike paper– screen is not only a surface, but rather a place of contact between the two areas where the manner of working gives the interface as a result.

The screen is, in effect, a space that integrates the different types of information and a socialising forum where virtual communities are created. As Díaz-Noci (2009) notes, in new digital media both product media and the reading strategy are dynamic, and websites are representations and constructions of the information the reader, through active intervention, recovers in a certain way, making use of an interface. The reader develops reading strategies such as tracking, searching, exploring or wandering, and waiting for the search for information to establish a dialogue with other texts, thus going from hypertextuality to intertextuality.

2. Material and methods

This research aims to identify the main transformations that development and implementation of digital media has provoked in the top European newspapers. In relation to this general objective, the following hypotheses are specified:


Draft Content 952531094-44285-en001.jpg

Figure 1. Circulation and Internet audience of main European newspapers.

• H1: The main European media groups have succeeded in carrying over their leadership from print to screen, and they have also become noteworthy in diverse digital media.

• H2: Based on existing traditional newspapers, online newspapers have generated new consumer habits and new audiences.

• H3: The consumption of digital media shows a tendency towards a cross-media usage, in which now only a small proportion of the total audience comes from print editions.

• H4: The new digital media contain specific characteristics that have transformed the structure and the design of the media.

The sample utilised to carry out the study is comprised of the leading general information newspapers sold in each of the 28 countries of the European Union. For their identification, the broadcast data audited by the agencies belonging to the IFABC (International Federation of Audit Bureaux of Circulations) was used and have been completed with information provided by the European Journalism Centre and Eurotopics.

The final list of the media analysed, classified by order of greater to lesser circulation is the following: «Bild» (Germany), «The Sun» (United Kingdom), «Kronen Zeitung» (Austria), «Ouest-France» (France), «De Telegraaf» (The Netherlands), «Corriere della Sera» (Italy), «Fakt Gazeta Codzienna» (Poland), «Helsingin Sanomat» (Finland), «El País» (Spain), «Aftonbladet» (Sweden), «Blesk» (Czech Republic), «Slovenske Novice» (Slovenia), «Het Laatste Nieuws» (Belgium), «Blikk» (Hungary), «Click» (Romania), «Correio da Manhã» (Portugal), «Irish Independent» (Ireland), «24 Sata» (Croatia), «Nový Cas» (Slovakia), «Politiken» (Denmark), «Luxemburger Wort» (Luxemburg), «Trud» (Bulgaria), «Postimees» (Estonia), «Latvijas Avize» (Latvia), «Lietuvos Rytas» (Lithuania), «Ta Nea» (Greece), «Times of Malta» (Malta) and «Phileleftheros» (Cyprus).

Following to the proposed hypotheses, the following categories have been established in order to carry out a descriptive statistical analysis, in accordance with the cybermetrics guidelines described by Alonso, García & Zazo (2008) and Rodríguez, Codina & Pedraza (2010):

a) Popularity and area: number of visits (visitors in the past six months), position in the national ranking, percentage of national traffic and geographic distribution of visits.

b) Reading habits: average time per visit, pages visited and «bounce rate» (users who spend less than 30 seconds to visit the website).

c) Crossmedia : applications for mobile devices (Android and Apple).

d) Structure of consumption and design: direct access to the URL, access from links on other websites, search engines, social networks and number of followers in each (Facebook and Twitter), email and visits from sponsored links. For categories a), b) and d), data was used obtained through specialised websites Alexa and SimilarWeb in April 2015. The estimates provided are checked against the data audited by IFABC (2013), ComScore and OJD Interactive to ensure that, regardless of its accuracy, they have the validity needed to establish comparative studies. For the third category of analysis has been performed a quantitative analysis of the applications published by the publishers of newspapers in Google Play and App Store. Finally, in the fourth category of analysis, the data provided by social networks was incorporated (Facebook and Twitter).

3. Analysis and results

3.1. The online leadership of traditional European press

The study conducted supports the conclusion that the popularity and attractiveness of the traditional newspapers remains an important asset for the online media. Of the 28 newspapers analysed, all of them leaders in national circulation in their print edition, 18 (64.3%) also managed to make a place among the three most consulted media on the Internet in their respective countries. The consolidation of this leadership is even more remarkable considering that all of them must compete with media arriving from other formats (television, etc.) and also with native media created, in some cases, by large telecommunications companies. Therefore, the greatest weight in the consumption textual information on the Internet favours a predominance of printed media source in the panorama of European online media.

The list of the media that do not manage to transfer their position of dominance to the Internet (one in every three) also lends itself to some significant interpretations, as it includes some of the newspapers with the greatest print circulation figures in this study.

On the one hand, the sensationalist «The Sun» is an excellent example of the change in business model of digital newspapers, whereby the maximization of readership numbers is foregone in favour of constructing a community of digital subscribers (Arrese, 2015). Since the beginning of its adoption of a paywall, created in August 2013, «The Sun+» offers information packages at a price of two pounds Sterling per week, which give access to all the newspaper content and to specific mobile applications. With more than 225,000 subscribers, this business model –also used by «The Times»– is one of the most successful among communication companies.

The case of the French daily «Ouest-France», on the other hand, points to another change in the models of success among online newspapers. Sales of the print edition of this regional newspaper edited in Rennes – 733,000 copies daily in 2014 – double those of the main national newspaper, the conservative «Le Figaro» (OJD, 2014). However, the «Ouest-France»’s positive Internet data are not enough to assure its dominance, and its number of visitors hardly amounts to half of those achieved by nationwide publications like «Le Monde», «Le Figaro» itself, or the sports paper «L’Equipe». These differences worsen in the case of other newspapers in the booming regional French press, like «Sud-Ouest», «La Voix du Nord» or «Le Dauphiné Libéré», and are also extended to other markets, such as in Spain, where leading local and regional newspapers such as «La Voz de Galicia», or «El Correo» find that native web-based media of short lifespan such as «El Confidencial», «Libertad Digital» or «Público» manage to achieve comparable numbers of visits.

3.2. New habits, new audiences

The process of gradual expansion of the areas of circulation has also favoured the incipient appearance of new global communication media and new markets. Beyond the traditional boundaries of press circulation, the Internet has made it possible for the media to reach very considerable audiences in markets that were previously residual. Against an almost exclusively national consumption of their traditional media, the leading European newspapers receive 22.9% of their online visits from abroad.

Diverse factors influence the global consumption of media whose character is, at least initially, national, regional or local. Firstly, areas of linguistic influence mean that political borders can be overcome, which facilitates, for example, a significant number of visits to the sensationalist German «Bild» from other German-speaking countries, such as Austria or Switzerland where it numbers among the most visited media.

Digital media audiences also cause the cultural and historical links that blur political borders to flourish. As such, it is not surprising that the tabloid «Blesk», the Czech version of the Swiss tabloid «Blick», receives over 10% of its readers from neighbouring Slovakia, or that 8% of readers of the Estonian paper «Postimes» visit the site from Finland.

In addition, the impact of emigration is not to be ignored; in some cases emigrants can account for a significant number of visits to the important communication media of their home countries. Sizeable communities residing abroad explain, for example, why the Cypriot «Phileleftheros» receives almost 30% of its visits from Greece and the UK –principal destinations for its large emigrant community–, or why almost 20% of readers of «Irish Independent» come from the USA, and 13% from the UK.

These frequently overlapping linguistic, historical and migratory factors are contributing to the progressive dilution of the traditional correspondence between the politico-administrative borders and the distribution of communication media. As a result, this newfound audience profile is gradually giving rise to new global media.

Throughout history there has certainly been no lack of media of international vocation. The BBC, which currently provides information in 32 languages ??via its website, has been an excellent example for decades. The press has not been immune to these products, and the «International New York Times» (formerly the «International Herald Tribune») still sells 220,000 copies in 180 countries (The New York Times, 2014).

However, the Internet has meant that some media have transcended their national character to gradually become global media as a result of gradual internationalisation. An excellent example of this transformation is the centenary British tabloid «Daily Mail», whose online audience has little to do with what might be expected of a sensationalist and conservative British tabloid. On the contrary, the «MailOnline» has established itself as a genuine global medium, in which only 17.6% of its visits from the United Kingdom. Significantly, the newspaper founded by Alfred Harmsworth receives twice the number readers from the United States than from the UK (34.2%), and reaches on the other side of the Atlantic the second place between the most read traditional newspaper on the Internet, only behind the «The New York Times» and ahead of national newspapers like «USA Today», «The Washington Post» or «The Wall Street Journal». The newspaper also occupies a place of honour in countries like Australia, Canada, the Philippines, India, Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa and Singapore, among many others.

The case of the «Daily Mail» is probably one of the most striking, but not the only one. «The Guardian», for example, has also suffered an online transformation that is no less revealing. The 185,000 copies sold for the paper edition of this almost 200-year-old English newspaper do not allow it to take a place among the ten most popular newspapers in the UK press, dominated by the tabloids, while reference newspapers in the conservative court like «The Daily Telegraph» and «The Times» double its circulation. Online, however, it rises to second place among British newspapers though, as with the «Daily Mail», only one in five of its readers (19.4%) come from the islands. Its main market is also United States (33.9%) and it has a large number of readers in other English-speaking countries.

This growing internationalisation, which contributes to the creation of new global media from pre-existing national media, is not unique to the Anglo-Saxon field. In Spain, two leading Internet media sites, «El País» and «Marca», have one in three visitors from other countries, mainly in Latin America (35.9% and 34.4%, respectively). In the case of «El País», this transformation has led to a mutation in the identity of the medium itself, with the change in October 2007 from its original slogan «Independent morning newspaper» to «Global newspaper in Spanish». Since the inclusion in November 2013 of an online edition in Portuguese for Brazil –which added to the pre-existing generic for America– the caption was abbreviated to «Global newspaper».

3.3. Multi-format digital media consumption


Draft Content 952531094-44285-en002.jpg

Figure 2. Audience of British newspapers.

If the Internet has had a big impact when it comes to blurring the boundaries in the distribution of content and to creating new global media, the extended use of mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, and the mobile Internet broadcast signal, have meant that all media, and the major European newspapers by extension, have found powerful allies to increase their audiences in the new media, a «fourth screen», favouring a distribution alternative for their messages (Aguado & Martinez, 2009).

These formats, far from being a mere supplement to the audience of newspapers in their traditional medium, in some cases constitute the main source of influx of readers. The case in the UK is a clear example thereof. According to the latest data from the comprehensive National Readership Survey (2014)1, 62.6% of the readers from the eight major newspapers of the British press access newspaper information from their personal computers and mobile devices. Particularly significant is the case of «The Guardian», with a total audience of only 9% who read only the printed version, similar to the figures also shown by «The Daily Telegraph» or «The Independent». At the other end still remain «The Sun» and «The Times», whose rigid commitment to paywalls on the Internet and mobile devices causes four out of five of its readers only read print editions.

The analysis of data from British newspapers, similar to the report from the Pew Research Center (2015) providing data on the American press, clearly shows a gradual transformation of newspapers on multiplatform products, which are consumed together and interchangeably through various media (paper, computer, mobile devices).

This new source of influx of readers has promoted a tendency in favour of applications for mobile devices. Except for the Greek political newspaper «Ta Nea» and the Romanian tabloid «Click», all leading European newspapers have developed at least one specific application. By type, besides the obvious adaptations of information content of the web editions, complementary services for mobile devices include specialised applications for thematic sections (sports, etc.), special coverage of events or dates, or commercial content.

Overall, its success, however, can be described as relative. Even though all the newspapers analysed offer free downloads, according to data offered by Google Android Play, only three of them (10.7%) have achieved over one million downloads of their applications, compared to thirteen who have achieved less than one hundred thousand (46.4%).

Specific applications for mobile devices, in effect, add to difficulties in becoming new windows for the consumption of digital media among users. For one, its exclusive character, which requires a customised download, collides with the global kiosk that can be accessed through a browser screen. The constant changes in the media and the inevitable and constant application updates neither add fluency in use. In addition, the technical limitations cause that some of the contents can not be shown in the applications themselves, which also limits their possibilities. But above all, probably the main obstacle to their development is the generalisation of responsive web design, which allows the correct visualization of the contents of a page on any device, and causes in many cases that specific applications render superfluous.


Draft Content 952531094-44285-en003.jpg

Figure 3. Number of mobile apps developed by European newspapers.

For the media, meanwhile, the creation of multiplatform content does not imply an added difficulty in the production process, since the publication in increasingly varied formats and media is already developed in most newsrooms through fully integrated content management systems (CMS) (López-Torregrosa, 2013).

3.4. New windows of access to information

Traditionally, regardless of the format, the press has understood that the front pages of newspapers were the windows from which readers could peer into its contents. Its unique importance made them extremely synthetic and strongly hierarchical spaces, governed by stable conventions for decades.

The implementation of the media and digital formats has forced media to rethink this concept to a much greater extent based on the influence of consumption of their audience rather than purely technical criteria (Peña, Perez, & Genaut, 2010).

Front pages have become big display windows for all the contents in the newspaper, like products stacked up in the halls of a large bazaar. Even though the structure has been rationalised little by little, the information exuberance remains one of the hallmarks of European newspapers online, with front page surfaces on their web editions that increase the format and number of informative texts and images on the printed front page version tenfold.

There are several reasons for this change. For one thing, a lot of readers go over content superficially and sporadically (Milosevic, Chisholm, Kilman, & Henriksson, 2014). In terms of cybermetrics, the term «bounce rate» was coined to define the number of visitors who spend less than thirty seconds on the website before moving on to something different. In the case of European newspapers, the average of this «bounce rate» amounts to 50.21% of visits.

The analysis of other indicators applied to 28 major European newspapers corroborates this epidermal consumption trend of information in digital media, since the average page views per visitor amounts to 3.57 and the average length of the visit is something more than six minutes (361.46 seconds). Therefore, the main page takes on a special significance, not as the synthesis of a product to be consumed as a whole, as usually happens with newspapers or radio or television news, but as a product index trying to show everything it has to offer on a single page.

However, data on the origin of the access downplays the importance of the front pages as catalysts of consumption habits for digital readers. Currently, less than half of visits (44.6%) received by 28 newspapers analysed directly access the media website at its main URL (home).

Search engines, on the contrary, have become increasingly important as a gateway to informative products. In the case of top European newspapers, 19.6% of visitors access the media website through a search engine but, obviously, some of the top search terms are still the name of the newspaper itself.


Draft Content 952531094-44285-en004.jpg

Figure 4. Sources of access to European newspaper websites.

However, significant links between search engines and the flow of visitors to the newspapers also emerge. The search of «latest news» on Google Spain redirects to, in order, websites for «El País», «Europa Press», «20 Minutos» and «El Mundo». In the case of «The Sun», meanwhile, almost 10% of its hits from search engines come from the name of his iconic «Page 3». This source of visitors ranges from information sites to service web pages, which provide examples like the first result for «horoscope» in Google Spain redirects to the newspaper «ABC».

Positioning techniques, that is, the set of procedures that help to place a website or a web page in an optimal location between the results provided by a search engine, thus acquire a great importance in the media web page management (Alonso, Garcia, & Zazo, 2008). The ability to generate content that occupies privileged places in search results –for example, in the Google PageRank index– means considering not only traditional news and design criteria in development of information and services, but also the main basics of cybermetrics, such as the authority of the domain in which the site is located, thematic relevance of the pages from that link to it, the text and the link position, etc.

Thus, writing for digital media has incorporated the concern for the development of metadata, keywords and terms included in the title as the basis for better visibility of content published by newspapers. As the development of the news on paper does not stop with its writing, but in its integration into the newspaper design, the information on the website also incorporates the task of maximizing its ability to generate traffic, because unlike printed products, which are consumed as a whole, web pages can be consumed individually and in an unconnected way.


Draft Content 952531094-44285-en005.jpg

Figure 5. European newspapers on social networks.

The high volume of textual information stored by printed newspapers, their frequent updating, the thematic coherence of their content and the high number of visits that they are capable of generating help ensure that the authority of their websites is high and that their texts frequently appear among first search results. However, this trend also supposes a change in the deep structure of the conception of media in terms of access to information. They go from being homogeneous sets of content consumed in their entirety in agglomerations of information that are geared towards readers’ individual interests. In the information product’s conception for digital media, the news or services are gradually replacing printed newspaper as consumption unit.

Social networks –particularly Facebook and Twitter– have also become important sources of access to information in newspapers and, in the case of the top European newspapers, a source of 19.5% of visits. Their growing influence explains the increase in the media’s interest to create virtual communities around their news outlets, and also affects strengthening the news unit as the core of data consumption in digital formats. Their use as tools for promoting content, mainly in the case of Facebook, and with a more conversational profile in the case of Twitter, is highly valued by the media (Noguera, 2010; García-de-Torres & al., 2011).

Finally, European newspapers obtain 15.8% of visits through links on other websites –for example, from other media that belong to the same publishing company– and only 0.5% from the sponsored links in search engines.

4. Discussion and conclusions

The analysis of adaptation to screen interface and new digital formats of the top newspapers from 28 European countries leads to the following conclusions:

1) In general, two out of three newspapers have managed to shift their leadership in printed media to the Internet, mostly aided by textual weight of the consumption of information on the Internet. This success, however, is limited in the case of media that have opted for rigid paywalls or with a regional or local broadcast area.

2) The consumption of media in the digital formats is diluting the traditional correspondence between the political and administrative boundaries and areas of media dissemination for creating global audiences. The result is the emerging new global media from pre-existing national media, which have excellent examples in the British news outlets «Daily Mail» and «The Guardian».

3) The widespread use of mobile devices (smartphones and tablets) favours an alternative distribution of information that, far from being a complement to traditional editions, is in many cases the main source of influx of readership for media. The result of this trend is that European newspapers have a firm commitment to the creation of products on multiple platforms.

4) The incorporation of a new screen and interface for consumption of information has also led to a transformation in product structure and design, where sporadic and superficial reading of information favours the existence of highly saturated front pages. With a «bounce rate» of 50.21% and an average of 3.57 pages viewed per visit, websites have increased their reach significantly.

5) Digital formats have opened new windows of information access, which alter the way the media distribute their content and less than half of visits (44.6%) access the websites of the online Europeans newspapers directly through their URL. The growing importance of search engines (19.6%) promotes the incorporation of positioning techniques to the process of information development, which have replaced the product as a consumption unit online. Furthermore, social networks (19.5 %) are an important source of visitors for European newspapers’ digital formats, which have incorporated them as a source for redistribution of content.

Notes

1 Data from the National Readership Survey are obtained through a very large sample of telephone surveys. Data from the 2014 edition are based on 35,570 telephone interviews conducted between December 19, 2013 and December 1, 2014.

Support and thanks

This article is part of the research project «Active audiences and journalism: analysis of quality and regulation of content developed by users» (CSO2012-39518-C04-03), funded by the Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, and «Innovation in communication: the integration of citizen participation in the discourse of Basque media» (NUPV 13/07), funded by the University of the Basque Country.

References

Aguado, J.M., & Martínez, I. (2009). Construyendo la cuarta pantalla. Percepciones de los actores productivos del sector de las comunicaciones móviles. Telos, 83, 62-71.

Alexa (2015). The Top 500 Sites on the Web. (http://goo.gl/hso1bl) (03-04-2015).

Alonso, J.L., García, C., & Zazo, Á. (2008). Recuperación de información Web: 10 años de cibermetría. Ibersid, 2, 69-78.

Armentia, J.I. (2011). La difícil supervivencia de los diarios ante la agonía del soporte papel. Ámbitos, 20, 11-27.

Arrese, Á. (2015). From Gratis to Paywalls. A Brief History of a Retro-innovation in the Press’s Business. Journalism Studies. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1461670X.2015.1027788

Boczkowski, P.J. (2004). Digitizing the News: Innovation in On­line Newspapers. Cambridge: MIT Press.

Casero-Ripollés, A. (2012). Más allá de los diarios: el consumo de noticias de los jóvenes en la era digital. Comunicar, 20(39), 151-158. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C39-2012-03-05

Deuze, M. (2001). Online Journalism: Modelling the First Gene­ration of News Media on the World Wide. First Monday, 6(10). (http://goo.gl/slWLYU) (03-04-2015).

Díaz-Noci, J. (2009). Multimedia y modalidades de lectura: una aproximación al estado de la cuestión. Comunicar, 17(33), 213-219. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/c33-2009-03-013

Domingo, D. (2006). Inventing Online Journalism. Development of the Internet as a News Medium in Four Catalan Online News­rooms. Barcelona: Universidad Autónoma.

European Journalism Centre (2014). Media Landscapes. (http://goo.gl/xor6yP) (03-04-2015).

Eurotopics (2014). Media Index. (http://goo.gl/bVp1EF) (03-04-2015).

García-de-Torres, E. & al. (2011). Uso de Twitter y Facebook por los medios iberoamericanos. El Profesional de la Información, 20 (6), 611-620.

IFABC (2013). National Newspapers Data Reports. (http://goo.gl/­y45dmc) (03-04-2015).

Jenkins, H. (2006). Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide. New York: New York University Press.

López, J. (2012). Análisis comparativo de las cabeceras de los diarios digitales españoles respecto a los impresos. Anales de documentación, 15(2), 1-16. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.6018/analesdoc.15.2.­150831

López, J., & Torregrosa, J.F. (2013). Rutinas productivas de los diarios digitales españoles: caracterización y desarrollo en la dinámica de la convergencia. Ámbitos, 22. (http://goo.gl/TztFBd) (03-04-2015).

Martínez-Albertos, J.L. (1997). El ocaso del periodismo. Barcelona: CIMS.

Meso, K., Larrondo, A., Peña, S., & Rivero, D. (2014). Audiencias activas en el ecosistema móvil. Análisis de las opciones de interacción de los usuarios en los cibermedios españoles a través de la web, los teléfonos móviles y las tabletas. Hipertext.net, 12. (http://goo.gl/H823nx) (03-04-2015).

Meyer, P. (2004). The Vanishing Newspaper. Saving Journalism in the Information Age. Columbia: University of Missouri Press.

Milosevic, M., Chisholm, J., Kilman, L., & Henriksson, T. (2014). World Press Trends 2014. Paris: WAN-IFRA.

Mosco, V. (2004). The Digital Sublime: Myth, Power, and Cy­berspace. Cambridge: MIT Press.

National Readership Survey (2014). Newsbrands and Newspaper Supplements. (http://goo.gl/fjU07F) (03-04-2015).

Noguera, J.M. (2010). Redes sociales como paradigma periodístico. Revista Latina, 65, 176-186. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.4185/RL­CS-65-2010-891-176-186

OJD (2014). L’observatoire OJD. (http://goo.gl/hvVLma) (03-04-2015).

Paul, N. (2005). New News Retrospective: Is Online News Reaching its Potential? Online Journalism Review (http://goo.gl/­8Ax7p5) (03-04-2015).

Peña, S., Pérez, J.A., & Genaut, A. (2010). Tendencias en el diseño de los diarios vascos y navarros en Internet. Mediatika, 12, 105-137.

Pew Research Center (2015). State of the News Media 2015. (http://goo.gl/XVWgyX) (03-04-2015).

Rodríguez, R., Codina, L., & Pedraza, R. (2010). Cibermedios y Web 2.0: Modelo de análisis y resultados de aplicación. El Pro­fesional de la Información, 19(1), 35-44.

Rodríguez-de-las-Heras, A. (1991). Navegar por la información. Ma­drid: Fundesco.

Schmitz A., & Domingo, D. (2010). Innovation Processes in Online Newsrooms as Actor-networks and Communities of Practice. New Media and Society, 12(7), 1.156-1.171. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.­1177/1461444809360400

Similarweb (2015). Website Ranking. (http://goo.gl/Wa4TF8) (03-04-2015).

Steensen, S. (2011). Online Journalism and the Promises of New Technology. A Critical Review and Look Ahead. Journalism Studies, 12(3), 311-327. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1461670X­.2010.501151

The New York Times (2014). International Media Kit. (http://goo.gl/TUCHBc) (03-04-2015).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

La adaptación de los medios de comunicación tradicionales a los nuevos soportes digitales y su interfaz, lejos de constituir un mero ajuste técnico, ha contribuido a una paulatina transformación de los propios medios y sus audiencias. En una muestra integrada por los diarios de información general y de pago líderes en los 28 países de la UE, y mediante el análisis de 17 indicadores distribuidos en cuatro categorías, este artículo busca identificar las transformaciones que la implantación de los soportes digitales han provocado en las principales cabeceras de la prensa europea. En términos generales, los resultados de la investigación señalan que la mayoría de los diarios no sólo han logrado mantener su liderazgo en la Red, sino que en algunos casos también se está alumbrando un incipiente conjunto de medios globales a partir de medios nacionales preexistentes. Los soportes digitales y móviles también han favorecido la aparición de nuevos hábitos de consumo, caracterizados por una lectura más esporádica y superficial por parte de los usuarios, y han configurado una audiencia que ya en muchos casos es multisoporte, y donde los dispositivos digitales aportan ya la mayoría de lectores a muchos medios. Asimismo, las nuevas ventanas de acceso a la información –buscadores, redes sociales, etc.– generadas por Internet, también están contribuyendo decisivamente al cambio de las rutinas y las formas de trabajo de los propios medios.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

Desde la aparición de los primeros medios de comunicación en Internet hace dos décadas, los discursos teóricos sobre su desarrollo han oscilado entre el determinismo tecnológico y los enfoques más constructivistas. En el primer extremo (Mosco, 2004; Boczkowski, 2004), el análisis de los medios se centraba en tratar de anticipar las «utopías comunicativas» y los cambios revolucionarios que el desarrollo de todas las potencialidades de Internet iban a producir en el sistema comunicativo y el periodismo, sobre la base de que toda innovación tecnológica produce inevitablemente un cambio social (Paul, 2005; Domingo, 2006). Los enfoques centrados en el modo en el que han interactuado las audiencias y las rutinas profesionales de los periodistas con los adelantos técnicos, por el contrario, han ofrecido una visión en la que, lejos de desarrollos preestablecidos, las prácticas productivas, los nuevos formatos y las herramientas tecnológicas han dialogado y se han dado forma mutuamente (Deuze, 2001; Schmitz & Domingo, 2010).

La aparición de la denominada Web 2.0, centrada en el desarrollo de aplicaciones y websites que permiten a los usuarios crear, difundir y compartir contenidos, ha contribuido a la creación de lo que Jenkins (2006) denomina una «cultura de convergencia», en la que la larga separación entre los creadores de contenidos y sus audiencias se ha comenzado a diluir, a pesar de que, tal y como concluye Steensen (2011), pueda considerarse que la noción tradicional del «gatekeeping» continúa plenamente vigente y asumida por los medios.

Más allá del papel de las audiencias, la digitalización y el salto a la Red siguen propiciando profundos cambios en el panorama de los medios de comunicación, que abarcan desde la producción de contenidos, hasta las rutinas de trabajo, los soportes y las estrategias de distribución y los modelos de negocio (Casero-Ripollés, 2012).

Ante las afirmaciones que auguraban la desaparición del papel como soporte impreso (Martínez-Albertos, 1997; Meyer, 2004), los diarios han tenido que enfrentarse a un importante descenso de la inversión publicitaria y de la difusión, por lo que el soporte digital aparece como la gran alternativa de futuro para el periodismo escrito (Armentia, 2011).

Esa necesaria adaptación a los nuevos soportes digitales puede entenderse, por un lado, desde una vertiente puramente técnica, referida a la adecuación de los contenidos editoriales de los cibermedios a los nuevos soportes informativos (smartphones, tabletas, etc.) (Meso, Larrondo, Peña, & Rivero, 2014). Pero esta transición no se limita a un cambio de soporte, sino que ha contribuido a una transformación más profunda en la configuración de los propios medios.

A diferencia del periodismo impreso, que posee técnicas de confección regladas y muy definidas fruto de la evolución tecnológica y formal del propio medio a lo largo de décadas, los periódicos digitales nacieron con una conformación visual muy simple y poco precisa, que ha ido evolucionando hacia una cierta singularidad visual, lejos de los matices de los diarios de papel (López, 2012). Tal y como la define Rodríguez-de-las-Heras (1991), la pantalla –a diferencia del papel– no es sólo una superficie, sino una «interficie», un lugar de contacto entre los dos espacios donde la forma de trabajar da como resultado la interfaz.

La pantalla es, en efecto, un espacio que integra los diferentes tipos de información y un ágora socializadora donde pueden surgir comunidades virtuales. Como señala Díaz-Noci (2009), en los nuevos soportes digitales tanto el producto multimedia como la estrategia lectora son dinámicos, y las páginas web son representaciones y construcciones de la información que el lector, mediante su intervención activa, recupera de una determinada forma sirviéndose de una interfaz. El lector desarrolla estrategias de lectura como el rastreo, la búsqueda, la exploración o la divagación, y espera con la búsqueda de información establecer un diálogo con otros textos, yendo así de la hipertextualidad a la intertextualidad.

2. Material y métodos

Esta investigación busca identificar las principales transformaciones que el desarrollo y la implantación de los soportes digitales han provocado en las principales cabeceras de la prensa europea. Sobre este objetivo general, se han concretado las siguientes hipótesis:


Draft Content 952531094-44285 ov-es001.jpg

Figura 1. Difusión impresa y audiencia en Internet de los principales diarios europeos.

• H1: Los principales medios europeos han logrado trasladar su liderazgo del papel a la pantalla y se han convertido en medios de referencia también en los diversos soportes digitales.

• H2: Los diarios en Internet han generado a partir de las cabeceras tradicionales existentes nuevos hábitos de consumo y nuevos públicos.

• H3: El consumo de los medios digitales muestra una tendencia hacia un consumo multisoporte, en el que en la actualidad sólo una pequeña parte de la audiencia total procede de sus ediciones en papel.

• H4: Los nuevos soportes digitales contienen características específicas que han transformado la estructura y el diseño de los medios.

La muestra utilizada para realizar el estudio la han compuesto los diarios de información general de pago líderes en cada uno de los 28 países de la Unión Europea. Para identificarlos se han utilizado los datos de difusión auditados por las agencias pertenecientes a la IFABC (International Federation of Audit Bureaux of Circulations), que se han completado con la información proporcionada por el European Journalism Centre y Eurotopics (2014).

La relación final de los medios analizados, clasificados por orden de mayor a menor difusión, es la siguiente: «Bild» (Alemania), «The Sun» (Reino Unido), «Kronen Zeitung» (Austria), «Ouest-France» (Francia), «De Telegraaf» (Países Bajos), «Corriere della Sera» (Italia), «Fakt Gazeta Codzienna» (Polonia), «Helsingin Sanomat» (Finlandia), «El País» (España), «Aftonbladet» (Suecia), «Blesk» (República Checa), «Slovenske Novice» (Eslovenia), «Het Laatste Nieuws» (Bélgica), «Blikk» (Hungría), «Click» (Rumania), «Correio da Manhã» (Portugal), «Irish Independent» (Irlanda), «24 Sata» (Croacia), «Nový Cas» (Eslovaquia), «Politiken» (Dinamarca), «Luxemburger Wort» (Luxemburgo), «Trud» (Bulgaria), «Postimees» (Estonia), «Latvijas Avize» (Letonia), «Lietuvos Rytas» (Lituania), «Ta Nea» (Grecia), «Times of Malta» (Malta) y «Phileleftheros» (Chipre).

Siguiendo las hipótesis propuestas, se han establecido las siguientes categorías para realizar un análisis estadístico descriptivo, de acuerdo con las pautas de cibermetría descritas por Alonso, García y Zazo (2008) y Rodríguez, Codina y Pedraza (2010):

a) Popularidad y ámbito: número de visitas (visitantes durante los seis últimos meses), posición en el ranking nacional, porcentaje de tráfico nacional y distribución geográfica de las visitas.

b) Hábitos de lectura: tiempo medio de visita, promedio de páginas visitadas y «tasa de rebote» (usuarios que invierten menos de 30 segundos en visitar la página web).

c) Multisoporte: aplicaciones para dispositivos móviles (Android y Apple).

d) Estructura del consumo y diseño: accesos directos a la URL, accesos desde enlaces de otras páginas web, buscadores, redes sociales y número de seguidores en cada una de ellas (Facebook y Twitter), correo electrónico y accesos desde enlaces patrocinados. Para las categorías a), b) y d) se han utilizado los datos obtenidos a través de las páginas web especializadas Alexa y SimilarWeb en abril de 2015. Las estimaciones que ofrecen se han cotejado con los datos auditados por IFABC (2013), ComScore y OJD Interactiva para comprobar que, al margen de su exactitud, tengan la validez necesaria para poder establecer estudios comparativos. Para la tercera categoría de análisis se ha realizado un análisis cuantitativo de las aplicaciones publicadas por las empresas editoras de los diarios en Google Play y App Store. Finalmente, en la cuarta categoría de análisis se han incorporado los datos aportados por las propias redes sociales (Facebook y Twitter).

3. Análisis y resultados

3.1. El liderazgo on-line de la prensa tradicional europea

El estudio realizado permite concluir que la popularidad y capacidad de atracción de las cabeceras tradicionales continúa siendo un importante activo para los cibermedios. De los 28 diarios analizados, líderes todos ellos en difusión nacional en su edición impresa, 18 (64,3%) logran también hacerse un hueco entre los tres medios de comunicación más consultados en la Red en sus respectivos países. La consolidación de este liderazgo es aún más destacable si tenemos en cuenta que todos ellos deben competir con medios procedentes de otros soportes (televisión, etc.) y también con medios nativos creados en algunos casos al amparo de grandes compañías de telecomunicaciones. El mayor peso textual en el consumo de la información en Internet favorece, por tanto, un predominio de los medios de origen impreso en el panorama de los cibermedios europeos.

La lista de los medios que no logran trasladar su posición de dominio a Internet, uno de cada tres, también permite realizar interpretaciones significativas, pues incluye a algunos de los diarios de mayor difusión impresa incluidos en este estudio.

Por un lado, el diario sensacionalista «The Sun» constituye un excelente ejemplo del cambio en el modelo de negocio de los diarios digitales, en el que se renuncia a maximizar el número lectores a cambio de construir una comunidad de suscriptores digitales (Arrese, 2015). Desde el inicio de su apuesta por un muro de pago, iniciada en agosto de 2013, «The Sun+» ofrece paquetes de información por un precio de dos libras semanales que permiten el acceso a todas las informaciones del diario y a aplicaciones móviles específicas. Con más de 225.000 suscriptores, este modelo de negocio –también utilizado por «The Times»– es uno de los más exitosos entre las empresas de comunicación.

El caso del diario francés «Ouest-France», por su parte, apunta también a otro cambio en los modelos de éxito de los diarios en Internet. Las ventas de la edición impresa de este periódico regional editado en Rennes –733.000 ejemplares diarios en 2014– duplican a las del principal diario de difusión nacional, el conservador «Le Figaro» (OJD, 2014). Sin embargo, en Internet los buenos datos de «Ouest-France» no le bastan para revalidar su liderazgo y su número de visitantes apenas llega a la mitad de los que obtienen publicaciones de carácter nacional como «Le Monde», el propio «Le Figaro» o el deportivo «L’Equipe». Estas diferencias se agravan aún más en el caso de otros diarios de la pujante prensa regional francesa como «Sud-Ouest», «La Voix du Nord» o «Le Dauphiné Libéré», y se extienden también a otros mercados, como el español, donde diarios locales y regionales líderes como «La Voz de Galicia» o «El Correo» ven cómo medios nativos de corta trayectoria como «El Confidencial», «Libertad Digital» o «Público» logran equipararse a ellos en número de visitas.

3.2. Nuevos hábitos, nuevos públicos

El proceso de paulatina ampliación de las áreas de difusión también ha favorecido la incipiente aparición de nuevos medios de comunicación globales y nuevos mercados. Más allá de las tradicionales fronteras de difusión de la prensa, Internet ha permitido que los medios puedan lograr audiencias muy significativas en mercados que anteriormente resultaban residuales. Frente a un consumo casi exclusivamente nacional en sus soportes tradicionales, los principales diarios europeos en Internet reciben un 22,9% de sus visitas desde el extranjero.

En el consumo global de medios de carácter –al menos inicialmente– nacional, regional o local influyen diversos factores. En primer lugar, las áreas de influencia lingüística permiten sobrepasar las fronteras políticas, lo que favorece, por ejemplo, que el diario sensacionalista alemán «Bild» obtenga un significativo número de visitas desde otros países de lengua alemana como Austria o Suiza, donde también se sitúa como uno de los medios de comunicación más consultados.

Las audiencias de los medios digitales también hacen aflorar lazos culturales e históricos que difuminan las fronteras políticas. Así, no resulta sorprendente que el tabloide «Blesk», la versión checa del suizo «Blick», obtenga más de un 10% de sus lectores desde la vecina Eslovaquia, o que el 8% de los lectores del «Postimes» estonio realicen sus consultas desde Finlandia.

Asimismo, no es menos importante en algunos casos el peso de los emigrantes, que pueden contribuir con un número significativo de visitas a los principales medios de comunicación de sus países de origen. Las importantes comunidades en el extranjero explican, por ejemplo, que el chipriota «Phileleftheros» reciba casi el 30% de sus visitas desde Grecia y el Reino Unido –principales destinos de su amplia diáspora–, o que casi el 20% de lectores del «Irish Independent» proceda de Estados Unidos, y un 13% del Reino Unido.

Estos motivos lingüísticos, históricos y migratorios, habitualmente superpuestos, están contribuyendo a la progresiva dilución de la tradicional correspondencia entre las fronteras político-administrativas y la distribución de los medios de comunicación. Como resultado, esta novedosa configuración de sus audiencias está alumbrando de manera incipiente nuevos medios globales.

A lo largo de la historia no han faltado, desde luego, medios con clara vocación internacional. La BBC, que actualmente ofrece información en 32 idiomas a través de su página web, ha constituido durante décadas un excelente ejemplo de ello. La prensa tampoco ha sido ajena a estos productos, y el «International New York Times» –anteriormente «International Herald Tribune»– vende aún hoy 220.000 ejemplares en 180 países (The New York Times, 2014).

Sin embargo, Internet ha propiciado que algunos medios hayan trascendido su carácter nacional hasta convertirse paulatinamente en medios globales fruto de una progresiva internacionalización. Un excelente ejemplo de esta transformación es el centenario tabloide británico «Daily Mail», cuya audiencia en la Red poco tiene que ver con la que podría esperarse de un periódico de corte sensacionalista y conservador. Más bien al contrario, el «Mailonline» se ha constituido como un genuino medio global, en el que sólo un 17,6% de sus visitas procede del Reino Unido. De forma significativa, el diario fundado por Alfred Harmsworth recibe desde Estados Unidos el doble de lectores que desde el Reino Unido (34,2%), y ocupa al otro lado del Atlántico el segundo lugar entre los diarios tradicionales más leídos en Internet, sólo por detrás de «The New York Times», y por delante de cabeceras nacionales como el «USA Today», «The Washington Post» o «The Wall Street Journal». El diario también ocupa los puestos de honor en países como Australia, Canadá, Filipinas, India, Irlanda, Nueva Zelanda, Sudáfrica o Singapur, entre muchos otros.

El caso del «Daily Mail» es probablemente uno de los más llamativos, pero no el único. «The Guardian», por ejemplo, también ha sufrido en Internet una transformación no menos reveladora. Los 185.000 ejemplares vendidos por la edición en papel de este ya casi bicentenario diario inglés no le permiten hacerse con un lugar entre los diez diarios de mayor difusión en la prensa del Reino Unido, dominada por los diarios sensacionalistas, mientras que diarios de referencia de corte conservador como «The Daily Telegraph» o «The Times» duplican su tirada. En Internet, por el contrario, asciende hasta el segundo lugar entre los diarios británicos aunque, al igual que ocurre con el «Daily Mail», sólo uno de cada cinco de sus lectores (19,4%) proceda de las islas. Su principal mercado lo constituye también Estados Unidos (33,9%) y cuenta con un elevado número de lectores en otros países de habla inglesa.

Esta creciente internacionalización, que contribuye a la creación de nuevos medios globales a partir de medios nacionales preexistentes, no es exclusiva del ámbito anglosajón. En España, dos de los principales medios en Internet, «El País» y «Marca», reciben una de cada tres visitas desde otros países, principalmente latinoamericanos (35,9% y 34,4%, respectivamente). En el caso de «El País», esta transformación ha propiciado una mutación en la identidad del propio medio, con el cambio en octubre de 2007 de su lema original «Diario independiente de la mañana» por el de «El periódico global en español». Desde la inclusión en noviembre de 2013 de una edición on-line en portugués para Brasil –que se sumaba a la genérica ya existente para América– el subtítulo se abrevió a «El periódico global».

3.3. El consumo multisoporte de los medios digitales


Draft Content 952531094-44285 ov-es002.jpg

Figura 2. Audiencia de los diarios británicos.

Si Internet ha tenido un gran impacto a la hora de difuminar las fronteras en la distribución de los contenidos y de crear nuevos medios globales, la generalización de dispositivos móviles como los smartphones y las tabletas, y la difusión de la señal de Internet móvil, han propiciado que todos los medios de comunicación, y los principales diarios europeos por extensión, hayan encontrado en los nuevos soportes a poderosos aliados para incrementar sus audiencias, una «cuarta pantalla» que favorece una distribución alternativa de sus mensajes (Aguado & Martínez, 2009).

Estos soportes, lejos de ser un simple complemento para la audiencia de los diarios en sus formatos tradicionales, constituyen en algunos casos la principal fuente de afluencia de lectores. El caso del Reino Unido constituye un claro ejemplo de ello. Según los datos más recientes del exhaustivo National Readership Survey (2014)1, el 62,6% de los lectores de las ocho principales cabeceras de la prensa británica accede a las informaciones de los diarios desde ordenadores personales y dispositivos móviles. Resulta particularmente significativo el caso de «The Guardian», de cuya audiencia total sólo el 9% lee exclusivamente la edición en papel, unas cifras similares a las que también muestran «The Daily Telegraph» o «The Independent». En el otro extremo se mantienen aún «The Sun» y «The Times», cuya apuesta por muros de pago muy rígidos en Internet y los dispositivos móviles provocan que cuatro de cada cinco de sus lectores lean únicamente sus ediciones impresas.

El análisis de los datos de los diarios británicos, muy similares a los que el informe de Pew Research Center (2015) ofrece sobre la prensa estadounidense, muestra claramente una paulatina transformación de los diarios en productos multiplataforma, que se consumen indistintamente y de manera conjunta a través de varios soportes (papel, ordenador, dispositivos móviles).

Esta nueva fuente de afluencia de lectores ha promovido la apuesta en favor de las aplicaciones para los dispositivos móviles. Salvo el diario político griego «Ta Nea» y el tabloide rumano «Click», todos los diarios líderes europeos han desarrollado al menos una aplicación específica. Por tipología, además de las obvias adaptaciones de los contenidos informativos de las ediciones web, la oferta complementaria para los dispositivos móviles incluye aplicaciones especializadas por secciones temáticas (deportes, etc.), coberturas especiales de eventos o fechas señaladas, o contenidos de tipo comercial.

En términos generales, su éxito, por el contrario, puede calificarse de relativo. Aunque todos los diarios analizados ofrecen descargas gratuitas, según los datos para Android ofrecidos por Google Play, sólo tres de ellos (10,7%) han logrado más de un millón de descargas de sus aplicaciones, frente a trece que han logrado menos de cien mil (46,4%).

Las aplicaciones específicas para dispositivos móviles, en efecto, acumulan dificultades para poder constituirse en nuevas ventanas para el consumo de los medios digitales entre los usuarios. Por un lado, su carácter exclusivo, que obliga a una descarga individualizada, choca con el quiosco global al que puede accederse a través de la pantalla de un navegador. Tampoco los constantes cambios en los propios soportes y las inevitables y constantes actualizaciones de las aplicaciones añaden fluidez en su uso. Además, las limitaciones técnicas provocan que parte de los contenidos no se puedan mostrar en las propias aplicaciones, lo que también limita sus posibilidades. Pero, por encima de todos ellos, probablemente el principal obstáculo para su desarrollo sea la generalización del diseño web adaptable (Responsive Web Design), que permite la correcta visualización de los contenidos de una página en cualquier tipo de dispositivo, y que provoca en muchos casos que las aplicaciones específicas resulten superfluas.


Draft Content 952531094-44285 ov-es003.jpg

Figura 3. Nº de aplicaciones móviles desarrolladas por los diarios europeos.

Para los medios, por su parte, la creación de contenidos multisoporte y la apuesta por la difusión multiplataforma no supone una dificultad añadida en los procesos de producción, pues la publicación en formatos y soportes cada vez más variados se realiza ya en la mayoría de las redacciones a través de sistemas de gestión de contenidos (CMS) plenamente integrados (López & Torregrosa, 2013).

3.4. Las nuevas ventanas de acceso a la información

Tradicionalmente, e independientemente del soporte, la prensa ha entendido que las portadas de los diarios eran las ventanas desde las que los lectores podían asomarse a sus contenidos. Su singular relevancia las convertía en espacios enormemente sintéticos y fuertemente jerarquizados, gobernados por convenciones muy estables a lo largo de décadas.

La implantación de los medios y soportes digitales ha obligado a que los medios se hayan tenido que replantear este concepto, en mucha mayor medida por la influencia de los consumos que realizan las audiencias que por criterios puramente técnicos (Peña, Pérez, & Genaut, 2010).

Las portadas se han convertido en grandes escaparates de todos los contenidos que alberga el diario, como productos que se amontonan sobre los expositores de un gran bazar. Aunque poco a poco la estructura se haya ido racionalizando, la exuberancia informativa continúa siendo una de las señas de identidad de los diarios europeos en Internet, con superficies de portada en sus ediciones web que multiplican por diez el formato y el número de textos informativos e imágenes presentes en la portada del diario en papel.

Los motivos que explican esta transformación son varios. Por un lado, una gran parte de los lectores realiza una lectura superficial y esporádica de los contenidos (Milosevic, Chisholm, Kilman, & Henriksson, 2014). En términos de cibermetría, se ha acuñado el término «tasa de rebote» para definir el número de visitantes que invierten menos de treinta segundos en la web antes de pasar a otra diferente. En el caso de los diarios europeos, el promedio de esta «tasa de rebote» asciende al 50,21% de las visitas.

El análisis de otros indicadores aplicados a los 28 principales diarios europeos corrobora esta tendencia de consumo epidérmico de la información en los soportes digitales, pues el promedio de páginas vistas por cada visitante asciende a 3,57 y la duración media de la visita es de algo más de seis minutos (361,46 segundos). Por todo ello, la página principal adquiere una importancia singular, no como la síntesis de un producto que se va a consumir en su conjunto, tal y como ocurre habitualmente con los diarios o los informativos radiofónicos o televisivos, sino como el índice de un producto que trata de mostrar todo lo que puede ofrecer en una única página.

Con todo, los datos sobre la procedencia de los accesos relativiza la importancia de las portadas como dinamizadoras de los hábitos de consumo de los lectores digitales. En la actualidad, menos de la mitad de las visitas –un 44,6%– que reciben los 28 diarios analizados acceden directamente a la página web del medio a través de su URL principal (home).

Los buscadores, por el contrario, han adquirido una creciente importancia como vía de acceso a los productos informativos. En el caso de los diarios líderes europeos, el 19,6% de los visitantes accede a la página web del medio a través de un buscador aunque, como es obvio, algunos de los principales términos de búsqueda sigan siendo el nombre del propio diario.


Draft Content 952531094-44285 ov-es004.jpg

Figura 4. Fuentes de acceso a las páginas web de los diarios europeos.

Sin embargo, también afloran significativas vinculaciones entre los buscadores y los flujos de visitantes a los diarios. Así, la primera opción de Google en España para la búsqueda «últimas noticias» remite, por este orden, a las páginas de «El País», «Europa Press», «20 Minutos» y «El Mundo». En el caso de «The Sun», por su parte, casi un 10% de sus accesos a través de los buscadores lo hacen a través del nombre de su icónica «Página 3». Esta fuente de visitantes se extiende de las páginas informativas a las de servicios, que proporcionan ejemplos como que el primer resultado de «horóscopo» en Google España remita al diario «ABC».

Las técnicas de posicionamiento, es decir, el conjunto de procedimientos que permiten colocar un sitio o una página web en un lugar óptimo entre los resultados proporcionados por un motor de búsqueda, adquieren por tanto una gran importancia en la gestión de las páginas web de los medios (Alonso, García, & Zazo, 2008). La capacidad para generar contenidos que ocupen lugares de privilegio en los resultados de las búsquedas –por ejemplo en el índice PageRank de Google– supone considerar en la elaboración de las informaciones y los servicios no sólo los tradicionales criterios noticiosos y de diseño, sino también principios básicos de cibermetría, como la autoridad del dominio en el que se encuentra la página, la relevancia temática de las páginas desde las que se enlaza a ella, el texto y el lugar del enlace, etc.

Así, la redacción para los soportes digitales ha incorporado nuevos criterios de jerarquización como la preocupación por la elaboración de los metadatos, las palabras clave y los términos incluidos en el título como base para una mejor visibilización de los contenidos publicados por los diarios. Al igual que la elaboración de la noticia en formato papel no culminaba en su redacción, sino en su integración en el diseño del medio, las informaciones en la Red incorporan también la tarea de maximizar su capacidad de generar visitas pues, a diferencia de los productos impresos –que se consumen como un producto conjunto– las páginas web se pueden consumir individualmente y de forma inconexa.


Draft Content 952531094-44285 ov-es005.jpg

Figura 5. Los diarios europeos en las redes sociales.

El alto volumen de información textual almacenada por los diarios impresos, su frecuente actualización, la coherencia temática de sus contenidos y el elevado número de visitas que son capaces de generar favorecen que la autoridad de sus dominios sea elevada y que sus textos ocupen de manera recurrente las primeras posiciones de los resultados de búsqueda. Sin embargo, esta tendencia también supone un cambio en la estructura profunda de la concepción de los medios que, en términos de acceso a la información, pasan de ser conjuntos homogéneos de contenidos que se consumen de manera integral a aglomeraciones de informaciones que se disputan individualmente el interés de los lectores. En la concepción del producto informativo para los soportes digitales, la noticia o el servicio están sustituyendo paulatinamente al diario como unidad de consumo.

También las redes sociales –en particular Facebook y Twitter– se han constituido como importantes fuentes de acceso a las informaciones de los diarios y, en el caso de los diarios líderes europeos, el 19,5% de las visitas proviene de ellas. Su creciente influencia explica el aumento en el interés de los medios por crear comunidades virtuales alrededor de sus cabeceras, y repercute también en el refuerzo de la unidad informativa como núcleo de consumo de los medios de comunicación en los soportes digitales. Su uso como herramientas de promoción de contenidos, fundamentalmente en el caso de Facebook, y con un mayor perfil conversacional en el caso de Twitter, es altamente valorado por los medios (Noguera, 2010; García-de-Torres & al., 2011).

Finalmente, los diarios europeos obtienen un 15,8% de sus visitas a través de enlaces en otras páginas web –por ejemplo, a través de otros medios pertenecientes a la misma empresa editora– y sólo un 0,5% desde los enlaces patrocinados en los motores de búsqueda.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

El análisis de la adaptación al interfaz de pantalla y a los nuevos soportes digitales de los diarios líderes de 28 países europeos permite extraer las siguientes conclusiones:

1) Con carácter general, dos de cada tres diarios han conseguido trasladar a la Red su liderazgo en los soportes impresos, favorecidos por el mayor peso textual del consumo de la información en Internet. Este éxito, por el contrario, se limita en el caso de los medios que han apostado por muros de pago rígidos y por aquellos con un ámbito de difusión regional o local.

2) El consumo de los medios en los soportes digitales está diluyendo la tradicional correspondencia entre las fronteras político-administrativas y las áreas de difusión de los medios para crear públicos globales. El resultado es el incipiente alumbramiento de nuevos medios globales a partir de medios nacionales preexistentes, que tienen excelentes ejemplos en el «Daily Mail» y «The Guardian» británicos.

3) La generalización de los dispositivos móviles (smartphones y tabletas) está favoreciendo una distribución alternativa de la información que, lejos de ser un complemento de las ediciones tradicionales, constituye en muchos casos la principal fuente de afluencia de lectores a los medios. Fruto de esta tendencia, los diarios europeos han apostado decididamente por la creación de productos multisoporte.

4) La incorporación de una nueva pantalla e interfaz para el consumo de las informaciones ha supuesto también una transformación en el diseño y la estructura de los productos, en el que la lectura esporádica y superficial de las informaciones favorece la existencia de portadas-índice altamente saturadas. Con una «tasa de rebote» del 50,21% y un promedio de 3,57 páginas vistas por visita, las portadas web han incrementado su superficie de manera notable.

5) Los soportes digitales han abierto nuevas ventanas de acceso a la información, que alteran el modo en el que los medios distribuyen sus contenidos y menos de la mitad de las visitas (44,6%) accede a las páginas web de los diarios web europeos directamente a través de su URL. El creciente peso de los buscadores (19,6%) impulsa la incorporación de las técnicas de posicionamiento al mismo proceso de elaboración de las informaciones, que han sustituido al producto como unidad de consumo en la Red. También las redes sociales (19,5%) constituyen una fuente importante de visitas para los soportes digitales de los diarios europeos, que las han incorporado como fuente para la redistribución de sus contenidos.

Notas

1 Los datos del National Readership Survey se obtienen mediante una muy amplia muestra de encuestas telefónicas. Los datos de la edición 2014 se basan en 35.570 encuestas telefónicas realizadas entre el 19 de diciembre de 2013 y el 1 de diciembre de 2014.

Apoyos y agradecimientos

Este artículo forma parte de los proyectos de investigación «Audiencias activas y periodismo. Análisis de la calidad y regulación de los contenidos elaborados por los usuarios» (CSO2012-39518-C04-03), financiado por el Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad, e «Innovar en comunicación. La integración de la participación ciudadana en el discurso de los medios de comunicación vascos» (NUPV 13/07), financiado por la Universidad del País Vasco.

Referencias

Aguado, J.M., & Martínez, I. (2009). Construyendo la cuarta pantalla. Percepciones de los actores productivos del sector de las comunicaciones móviles. Telos, 83, 62-71.

Alexa (2015). The Top 500 Sites on the Web. (http://goo.gl/hso1bl) (03-04-2015).

Alonso, J.L., García, C., & Zazo, Á. (2008). Recuperación de información Web: 10 años de cibermetría. Ibersid, 2, 69-78.

Armentia, J.I. (2011). La difícil supervivencia de los diarios ante la agonía del soporte papel. Ámbitos, 20, 11-27.

Arrese, Á. (2015). From Gratis to Paywalls. A Brief History of a Retro-innovation in the Press’s Business. Journalism Studies. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1461670X.2015.1027788

Boczkowski, P.J. (2004). Digitizing the News: Innovation in On­line Newspapers. Cambridge: MIT Press.

Casero-Ripollés, A. (2012). Más allá de los diarios: el consumo de noticias de los jóvenes en la era digital. Comunicar, 20(39), 151-158. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C39-2012-03-05

Deuze, M. (2001). Online Journalism: Modelling the First Gene­ration of News Media on the World Wide. First Monday, 6(10). (http://goo.gl/slWLYU) (03-04-2015).

Díaz-Noci, J. (2009). Multimedia y modalidades de lectura: una aproximación al estado de la cuestión. Comunicar, 17(33), 213-219. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/c33-2009-03-013

Domingo, D. (2006). Inventing Online Journalism. Development of the Internet as a News Medium in Four Catalan Online News­rooms. Barcelona: Universidad Autónoma.

European Journalism Centre (2014). Media Landscapes. (http://goo.gl/xor6yP) (03-04-2015).

Eurotopics (2014). Media Index. (http://goo.gl/bVp1EF) (03-04-2015).

García-de-Torres, E. & al. (2011). Uso de Twitter y Facebook por los medios iberoamericanos. El Profesional de la Información, 20 (6), 611-620.

IFABC (2013). National Newspapers Data Reports. (http://goo.gl/­y45dmc) (03-04-2015).

Jenkins, H. (2006). Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide. New York: New York University Press.

López, J. (2012). Análisis comparativo de las cabeceras de los diarios digitales españoles respecto a los impresos. Anales de documentación, 15(2), 1-16. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.6018/analesdoc.15.2.­150831

López, J., & Torregrosa, J.F. (2013). Rutinas productivas de los diarios digitales españoles: caracterización y desarrollo en la dinámica de la convergencia. Ámbitos, 22. (http://goo.gl/TztFBd) (03-04-2015).

Martínez-Albertos, J.L. (1997). El ocaso del periodismo. Barcelona: CIMS.

Meso, K., Larrondo, A., Peña, S., & Rivero, D. (2014). Audiencias activas en el ecosistema móvil. Análisis de las opciones de interacción de los usuarios en los cibermedios españoles a través de la web, los teléfonos móviles y las tabletas. Hipertext.net, 12. (http://goo.gl/H823nx) (03-04-2015).

Meyer, P. (2004). The Vanishing Newspaper. Saving Journalism in the Information Age. Columbia: University of Missouri Press.

Milosevic, M., Chisholm, J., Kilman, L., & Henriksson, T. (2014). World Press Trends 2014. Paris: WAN-IFRA.

Mosco, V. (2004). The Digital Sublime: Myth, Power, and Cy­berspace. Cambridge: MIT Press.

National Readership Survey (2014). Newsbrands and Newspaper Supplements. (http://goo.gl/fjU07F) (03-04-2015).

Noguera, J.M. (2010). Redes sociales como paradigma periodístico. Revista Latina, 65, 176-186. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.4185/RL­CS-65-2010-891-176-186

OJD (2014). L’observatoire OJD. (http://goo.gl/hvVLma) (03-04-2015).

Paul, N. (2005). New News Retrospective: Is Online News Reaching its Potential? Online Journalism Review (http://goo.gl/­8Ax7p5) (03-04-2015).

Peña, S., Pérez, J.A., & Genaut, A. (2010). Tendencias en el diseño de los diarios vascos y navarros en Internet. Mediatika, 12, 105-137.

Pew Research Center (2015). State of the News Media 2015. (http://goo.gl/XVWgyX) (03-04-2015).

Rodríguez, R., Codina, L., & Pedraza, R. (2010). Cibermedios y Web 2.0: Modelo de análisis y resultados de aplicación. El Pro­fesional de la Información, 19(1), 35-44.

Rodríguez-de-las-Heras, A. (1991). Navegar por la información. Ma­drid: Fundesco.

Schmitz A., & Domingo, D. (2010). Innovation Processes in Online Newsrooms as Actor-networks and Communities of Practice. New Media and Society, 12(7), 1.156-1.171. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.­1177/1461444809360400

Similarweb (2015). Website Ranking. (http://goo.gl/Wa4TF8) (03-04-2015).

Steensen, S. (2011). Online Journalism and the Promises of New Technology. A Critical Review and Look Ahead. Journalism Studies, 12(3), 311-327. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1461670X­.2010.501151

The New York Times (2014). International Media Kit. (http://goo.gl/TUCHBc) (03-04-2015).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/15
Accepted on 31/12/15
Submitted on 31/12/15

Volume 24, Issue 1, 2016
DOI: 10.3916/C46-2016-03
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 12
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?