Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This article analyses the status of media literacy in Brazil from the perspective of non-formal education. It quantifies the situation through a sample of projects (N=240) and organizations (N=107) that develop media literacy activities according to the internationally recognized three dimensions of media education (access/use, critical understanding, and media content media production). These projects are aimed at different communities of citizens according to various levels of segmentation (age, location, social status, social groups, and professional fields). The analysis shows the preponderance of activities geared to the production of audiovisual content (65.4%) and to expanding the rights and communicative capabilities of certain communities, generally excluded from the traditional mass media (45.8%). Moreover, the majority of institutions have projects with a medium and high potential of empowerment (77.6%). Based on the literature review and the analysis conducted, the research presents a model that can be used for studying media education projects in the field of non-formal education. Thus, this article offers an initial look at non-formal media literacy in a country that, due to its size and large social differences, should take advantage of the complementarities that non-formal education provides to formal education, and its curriculum, regarding the development of media education and empowerment of citizens.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Concern regarding the need of establishing public policies related to media education is unanimous around the world. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) carried out several projects over the last decade, like “Media Education. A Kit for Teachers, Students, Parents and Professionals” (Frau-Meigs, 2006) and “Media and Information Literacy. Curriculum for Teachers” (Wilson, Grizzle, Tuazon, Akyempong, & Cheung, 2011). It is also important to emphasize the broad global mapping performed by UNESCO a few years ago, which analysed policies, views, programs, and goals regarding media literacy at a global level (Frau-Meigs &Torrent, 2009). Today, there are several countries, mainly in the Northern hemisphere, which not only include disciplines linked to media education in their mandatory curriculums, but also implement agencies and public councils to assist with this issue1.

In Latin America, however, initiatives regarding media literacy have taken another direction, more frequently being connected to non-formal education, popular education, and civil society, as has been pointed out by several specialists (Fantin, 2011; Girardello & Orofino, 2012; Soares, 2014). After they began in the sixties, with critical readings of cinema, they turned to the critical reading of media, during the military dictatorship, in 1970-1980, and were complemented by people movements for alternative communication and Christian or Catholic movements (Aguaded, 1995; Fantin, 2011).

When analysing Brazil from a concrete perspective, isolated initiatives carried out in the scope of formal education should be mentioned: 1) since 2004 a law from the city of São Paulo included activities linked to media education in schools; 2) as to the Brazilian Education Department, the programs “Mais Educação” (More Education) and “Mídias na Escola” (Media at School) work with media education2. In 2015, this Department has put into public debate the minimum bases of the curriculum for basic education in which, according to an analysis by Soares (2015), there are several curricular components related to media education, although how they would be included in school activities is not explained.

In non-formal education, however, the situation is totally different. Since the nineties, these projects for media education have been growing in Brazil, whether focusing on training critical reading or designing alternative contents to traditional media. It is important to emphasize the use of a concept of education put forward by authors such as Paulo Freire and Mario Kaplún, in which communication and education are not only seen as intimately connected, but also as having a liberating purpose.

Thus, this research has the goal of characterizing non-formal media literacy projects developed in Brazil by the civil society: non-governmental organisations (NGOs), public interest civil society organisations (PICSO), and foundations, among others. The research covers cultural empowerment (Kellner & Share, 2005), media citizenship and autonomy (Gozálvez & Aguaded, 2012), from a perspective in which citizens would be active subjects in processes of communication so as to exercise the rights expressed in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (O’Neill & Barnes, 2008).

The strong and historical connection between media education and empowerment is clear since the “Grunwald Declaration on Media Education” (UNESCO, 1982), also appearing in the “New Directions in Media Education” of Toulouse, which explicitly connects both areas (Thoman, 1990). Indeed, it is difficult to think of media education “unless it has a civic purpose, that is, it must be endowed with an ethical, social and democratic base that empowers citizens in their dealings with the media” (Gozálvez & Contreras-Pulido, 2014: 130).

The analysis also establishes links between the many types of complementarities: 1) Media education and media literacy (Buckingham, 2003); 2) Main dimensions of media literacy proposed by Buckingham (2005) and Ofcom3: access and use, critical comprehension, and production of communicational contents; 3) Production of media contents which are socially relevant and filled with critical comprehension about the media; 4) Community, democratic, and participatory communication developed by the civil society and the NGOs (Peruzzo, 2008, 2009); 5) New information and communications technologies (ICT) and their importance in poor areas (González, 2007).

This article proposes the following descriptive research question: “Which are the most important dimensions associated to non-formal media education in Brazil?”. The following work hypotheses are considered, related to media literacy projects developed by NGOs in Brazil:

• H1: The projects mainly focus on production of contents.

• H2: When the initiatives focus on ICT, they are usually not linked to other communicational aspects.

• H3: The projects are concerned with the empowerment of citizens and the roles of the actors involved in communication processes.

• H4: The initiatives are connected to community communication, with a tendency of offering permanent communication media as a result.

2. Material and methods

Considering the research goals, the first task (January-May, 2015) was to identify media education projects carried out in Brazil by civil non-profit organisations and outside the school environment. After a direct research through the records of several Brazilian congresses about communication, education, and citizenship, parameters were established regarding aspects such as training, education and communication, media, and ICT. Thus, all initiatives that focused exclusively on the use and maintenance of computers were excluded. 129 NGOs and civil institutions that worked with media education were found, and were then catalogued in a database that identified their characteristics by researching their websites and social networks. The location, starting date, goals, and the role played by communication and education were observed, as well as if the entity focused exclusively on media education activities.

Then came the second level of analysis (June-October, 2015), after the classification of 302 media literacy projects according to categories established from a bibliographic review on the subject:

• Dimensions: access/use, critical comprehension, and content production.

• Actors: receivers, professionals, associates, and sponsors.

• Communicationmedia : print (newspapers, magazines, newsletters, and others); audiovisual (cinema, video, TV, radio/audio, photography, and others); ICT (Internet, web design, apps, and others); digital media (websites, blogs, social networks, mobile media, and others); monitoring and follow-up of communication media (monitoring of themes related to the NGOs, production of alternative guidelines and news, training of journalists, and others).

• Digital technologies: level of importance of the ICT and emphasis on digital inclusion.

• Community communication: as a permanent vehicle and actors involved.

• Empowering: explicitly connected to media education, defense of rights, and role of citizens.

The third level of analysis was quantitative, which contrasted the quantitative information that was found and was performed following these procedures: i) codification of goals according to the keywords of the projects; and ii) elimination of 22 organisations that had little to do with the research or were not working with media education anymore.

Finally, questionnaires (and reminders) were sent (October-December, 2015) to the entities requesting that they confirm their descriptive data and asking for their opinion regarding certain aspects of the research such as the importance of digital inclusion or about empowerment of citizens. This information was obtained with multi-answer, open questions. 22 organisations answered within the delimited period. After cross checking the information following to the established parameters, 240 carried out by 107 organisations were identified and validated.

3. Results

3.1. Basic characteristics

The 107 non-governmental organisations studied here are spread throughout the more than 8.5 million square kilometers that compose Brazil, a Latin American country with more than 200 million inhabitants. Materially, 63 (58.9%) are entities from the Southeast region, the most developed one, while 27 (25.2%) are from the Northeast, the poorest region. The others are spread across different states. As to their time of activity, a small number began their activities before 1990 (15%); most of them began in the nineties (31.8%) and in the 21st century (53.2%).

Clearly, there are two great blocks of media education activities developed by NGOs in Brazil. On the one hand, 43 organisations (40.2% of the total) have communication as their main goal and their objectives are to give voice to recipients and to democratise the use of communication. They work with a public that is usually excluded not only from traditional media, but also from communicational processes of content production (homeless people, socially excluded people, inhabitants from poor communities or slums, etc.). On the other hand, 64 organisations (59.8%) are focused on the dissemination of social issues and the claim of rights (human, childhood, women’s, or black people’s rights), promoting these themes which are invisible in the media not only through propositions for alternative communication, but also with the training of journalists and the production of alternative guidelines for the media.

Thus, 22 projects (9.2%) have journalists and communication professionals as their recipients, focusing on educating them on the themes mentioned above, or observing the media regarding these issues. Half the projects (120) focus on childhood and youth, an aspect that must be emphasized, while only 4 projects focus on the elderly. It is also important to mention that 41 projects (17.1%) are connected to formal education, since they focus on teachers and students, mainly from public schools. As to the other actors, there is the support of certain foundations associated to big companies (for example, to the telecommunication company “Oi”; to the construction company “Camargo Correa”; to the state energy company “Petrobras”; or to the bank “Itaú”). There is also collaboration between NGOs and public institutions, resulting in a network of difficult connections that cannot be described in a simple manner.

3.2. Dimensions of media literacy


Draft Content 339739261-52764-en009.jpg

The main dimension observed in the 240 projects analysed here is content production: there are 157 workshops and courses (65.4%) inside this dimension, mixed or not with the other ones. We observed 120 initiatives related to critical comprehension, and 91 to the access and use of communication media, also combining more than one dimension. In this sense, it should also be mentioned that 70 projects are connected to critical comprehension and production content, among which 22 also focus on access and use of communication media. The predominance of content production can also be observed if we consider there are 71 projects focusing exclusively on production, while 33 initiatives focus solely on access and use, and 30 on critical comprehension. This confirms Hypothesis 1 proposed by this study.

It is important to emphasize that simple content production does not always result in empowerment for citizens, since it is possible for an activity to simply reproduce something that already exists in the media. Thus, for the development of communicational abilities it is essential that they be connected to critical comprehension.

As to the means or processes of communication emphasized by the 240 activities analysed here, most of them (99) are connected to audiovisual media (TV, video, radio, audio, and photography), while 41 emphasize digital media (web pages, blogs, social networks, etc.) and 37 use printed media. It should also be noted that 22 initiatives do not work with any real communication media, since they are more concerned with communicational processes and encouraging critical thinking.

From all the projects, only 61 talk about ICT explicitly (29 as the main focus and 32 by complementing them with other communication media). It is necessary to clarify, however, that in most initiatives the ICT are seen as auxiliary, since information and communications technologies are obviously used for the production and publishing of contents. As to the connections between this aspect and the dimensions associated to media literacy, the data show that the projects that use the ICT usually work with access and use: 40 focus on this dimension (17 exclusively, and the rest mixing it with other dimensions). This confirms the Hypothesis 2 of this study.

As to the 99 initiatives that focus on audiovisual media, 70 consider activities of production of contents and messages. Besides that, 46 of them target the youth, which shows that most of the initiatives analysed here combine audiovisual media, content production, and youth participation. However, it is interesting to note that cinema is kept alive in many of the initiatives: 33 of the 240 projects emphasize this medium by bringing it to poor communities and neighborhoods through cineclubs and public movie sessions.

In order to analyse the factors related to the empowerment of citizens, the proposals of the 107 NGOs were catalogued and classified into four great groups according to their objectives: 1) To democratise access to any of these aspects: communication, education, culture, and technologies; 2) To work for social change, changes in society, and social inclusion; 3) To help with the recipients’ social-economic insertion; and iv) to guarantee and fight for human rights, citizenship, and the rights of peoples in situations of risk of social exclusion.

Even though all the objectives are related to some type of citizen empowerment, it is the proposal (or combination of proposals) performed by the NGO that dictates if its media education activities are more or less effective in the task of empowering citizens as to their active part in communication. Thus, three great tendencies can be traced about the potential of the NGOs according to different, but complementary, goals. Graph 1 shows that 27 (25.2%) of the NGOs combine goals belonging to more than one group and work with objectives that are very meaningful for the empowerment of citizens through media education.

According to the analysis, 56 organisations (52.4%) focus solely on some goals which, even though they are important for exercising citizenship, do not seem to guarantee empowerment through media literacy, since they focus on goals in an exclusive manner, not a combined one. These institutions would have a moderate level of empowerment potential. Finally, the 24 remaining NGOs (22.4%) could be classified as institutions with a low level of empowerment through media education, because they work with more scattered objectives. It is necessary to emphasize, however, that this scenario of empowerment through media education is an observed tendency, and it would be necessary to study each case in particular to confirm it definitely. Still, it should be emphasized that practically half the projects –materially, 110 (45.8%) – have some type of connection with social groups at risk of social exclusion. This confirms the Hypothesis 3 of this study.


Draft Content 339739261-52764-en010.jpg

Figure 1 shows the synthetic and uniform distribution (Bastian, Heymann, & Jacomy, 2009) of the main interrelations between the non-formal media education projects analyzed in this project: the dimensions of media literacy, the recipients, and the different media used. The proximity between production activities aimed at young people and the connection between critical comprehension and audiovisual are clearly observable, as is the relationship between the dimension of access and use and the media associated with ICT. On the other hand, it was detected that digital media has not reached the impact one would imagine.

If we examine the projects in detail, one important aspect that should be considered is their connection to permanent community communication vehicles. The current scenario shows that this scope is still under developed, indicating a tendency correspondent to Hypothesis 4. From the 240 media education projects present in this study, only 52 (21.7%) are associated to the production of some type of community communication somewhat permanently: 15 are initiatives that produce television programs (aired on university or community channels) or videos; 14 are printed media (newspapers, magazines, and newsletters); 12 are radiophonic media; and 11 are online or digital platforms (blogs, web pages, etc.). The audiovisual media are predominant, but it is surprising that digital platforms and media are still used so little, which means that technologies are much more used as production tools than as channels to air contents.

4. Discussion and conclusions

4.1. Situation

Faced with the high number of media literacy projects that make up the sample, which in future studies has to be extended to other Latin American countries, it can be said that media education carried out by the Brazilian civil society is mainly focused on the content production and that it has gained increasing importance over the last decades. In general terms, this study confirmed that the projects developed in non-formal educational environments contribute to the development of the rights and freedoms of citizens with regard to access to information, freedom of expression, and the right to education, as established by UNESCO (2013).

Most of the cases studied here give voice to certain communities of people who are usually excluded from traditional mass media. This is particularly important when we consider the sociocultural context of Latin America, where people have almost always been unable to speak, and had to settle for a culture of silence (Freire, 1967, 1979). It is no coincidence, therefore, that the production of contents and messages be the dimensions that were more emphasized by the media literacy projects analysed in this study.

The emphasis on audiovisual indicated by the data is consistent with the context of contemporary society, in which it is possible to notice a fascination with audiovisual language, which creates an almost hypnotic power (Martin-Barbero, 2003: 47). Image ultimately prevails over other types of speech because it is “the main substrate of the rhetoric of the media of mass communication” (Rabadan, 2015: 33). Interestingly, cinema can still be found in several projects studied here. We cannot forget that film literacy is a deep-rooted tradition in many countries, mainly in Europe, and identified as vital by experts of contemporary media education, since “mastery of the language of the moving image becomes more, not less, important in an era of widespread access to digital technologies” (Reia-Baptista, Burn, Reid, & Cannon, 2014: 356).

The instrumental relationship of many NGOs with communication, pointed out by the research, confirms the aspects mentioned by Kaplún, who stated that “for the base movement, communication is not an end in itself, but a necessary tool for the organisation´s service and for popular education” (1983: 41).

The empowerment of citizens proposed by the projects analysed in this study exemplifies the idea that Rivoltella (2005) put forward on the relationship between media education and citizenship and that, for him, becomes a dual exercise of citizenship: belonging and instrumental. In this sense, media education would call the attention of the civil society and political powers to the values associated with citizenship and also contribute to its construction. The media autonomy achieved by the subjects involved should also be mentioned briefly (Gozálvez & Aguaded, 2012: 3).

On the other hand, the projects that work with digital inclusion are geared towards professional training and the acquisition of useful skills for the work environment, with no major concerns regarding media citizenship. Usually, technology is seen outside the scope of culture and seen only through its instrumental dimension (Martín-Barbero, 2003). However, this does not make it impossible to establish and require more connections between media and information literacy and its advantages for enterprises (Martínez-Cerdá & Torrent-Sellens, 2014), or in the scope of targeted actions, including to inmates (Neira Cruz, 2016).

Finally, it can be said that media education, mainly carried out by non-governmental organizations, can be a key tool for community development, since the creation of their own communication media can enhance and take advantage of the direct participation of citizens in the public sphere (Peruzzo, 1999). In fact, in countries like Argentina and Ecuador, one third of the electric radio spectrum is reserved to community media, which can be “a crucial tool for exerting social pressure on the traditional media powers and for empowering citizens and ensuring their active involvement in the public arena” (Cerbino & Belotti, 2016: 50).

The priority given to children and young people as recipients, and to content production, is observed internationally. In the United States, media literacy activities for young people also include aspects of participation, exercising citizenship, and prioritise the production of audiovisual media (Hobbs, Donnelly, Friesem & Moen, 2013; Martens & Hobbs, 2015).

4.2. Proposal for a model of description and analysis

The analysis shows that non-formal media education activities take into account interactions (learning), people (recipients), technologies (ICT and media) and places (rooms and community settings). And that is why it is important that they be regarded as integral work marks like the ones provided by social-technical systems (Leavitt, 1965), based on people (personal situations, etc.), structures (organisations, availability, etc.), tasks (use, communication, skills, etc.), and technologies (digital devices, social networks, etc.). Thus, this research also proposes a system model to describe and analyse media education projects in the field of non-formal education.

According to this model (figure 2), civil society’s media education initiatives are more complete and effective when they cover more dimensions (quantitative scope) and focus on content production that empowers citizens (qualitative scope). The model is based on the image of a trapezoid, which can act as a megaphone to a citizen located at its lower base. It is designed from a range of models of indicators and media literacy skills that must be acquired by citizens. Specifically, it is based on three integrator studies which indicate the main levels to be developed (Ferrés, 2006; Celot & Pérez-Tornero, 2009; Pérez-Rodríguez & Delgado-Ponce, 2012). The proposed model allows one to view the amplifier potential that media education gives to people, and takes into account a description and analysis of the projects from the perspective of non-formal education, from the parameters set by their goals, characteristics and dimensions:

Dimension 1: Access and use:

• Enables access to products, means and forms of communication.

• Helps with the use of basic tools or with the instrumental management of technologies and media.

Dimension 2: Analysis, assessment and critical comprehension:

• Deciphers communicational languages and their construction.

• Analyses and offers tools for studying and comprehending contents, production processes and the functioning of media and their ideological implications.

• Analyses and monitors hegemonic communicational contents, enabling the generation of alternative messages.

Dimension 3: Creation of content:

• Offers the necessary knowledge for understanding communication processes and creation of contents, messages and contributions for mass media communication, through contents generated by users.

• Creates mechanisms that enable the recipients to create channels for permanently generating contents (community media).

Besides showing the characteristics of the activities, the proposed design also shows possible examples in each level. The intention is to offer a tool with which it would be possible to have a holistic understanding of the media education activities, going beyond a proposal based on indicators used to assess a possible ranking of projects. It should be emphasized that usually a project does not perform activities in all and each one of the levels proposed in the model, since NGOs develop complementary projects among themselves. In some cases, inferior levels are omitted because the recipients already have basic knowledge of how to use technologies and media.

From the proposed model, we observe that the final goal of media education activities developed by the civil society could be the creation of permanent channels for community communication, with which the effective participation of citizens in social and communicational processes could be ensured.


Draft Content 339739261-52764-en011.jpg

4.3. Conclusions

In general, the scenario of media education in Latin America and in Brazil is very different from what is observed in Europe and North America. The initiatives from the North hemisphere are almost always linked to formal education, with activities that target students. While this can be found occasionally in Brazil, the great number of projects developed by NGOs seems to fill the gaps that exist in this type of public policy. From this perspective, the ideal situation for media education is to unify and seeks complementarities between formal public policies and initiatives developed in non-formal education, all of this in a context with great social differences.

Non-formal media education activities enable a higher development of certain social settings which are distant from formal education, like the empowerment of citizens throughout life, community development, and media citizenship and autonomy in a global society that is immersed in a communicative environment in which citizens need to act critically and creatively towards traditional and hegemonic media.

Non-formal media education actions also help to complement projects for professional capacitation with the goal of social-economic integration of recipients, as well as establishing a defense of their rights and capacitation, with the adoption of abilities and useful skills to develop themselves as citizens and rightful workers.

Now that the introduction of media education to the official curriculum of countries like Brazil is put in debate, with investments in corresponding public policies, it is necessary to think about the experiences that have existed for several decades outside formal education settings, with the goal of taking advantage of their benefits.

Indeed, it is not enough to promote public policies for media or digital literacy, which many times result in simply installing technological tools: it is necessary to transfer the philosophy of non-formal media education projects to all scopes, which means to say that the empowerment of subjects in communication processes must be considered to be intrinsic to media education.

Notes

1 For example: “Centre de Liaison de l’Enseignement et des Médias d’Information” (CLEMI), in France; “Conseil Supérieur de l’Education aux Medias”, in Belgium; “Department for Media Education and Audiovisual Media” (MEKU), in Finland; and “Mediawijzer”, in the Netherlands.

2 Details can be seen on: http://goo.gl/KNDFlh (2016-05-21).

3 Ofcom is a regulating agency that is independent from the communication industry in the UK. Among other tasks, it promotes and researches media literacy.

Supports and acknowledgements

Dr. Mônica Pegurer Caprino received support from the “Programa Nacional de Pós Doutorado/Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior” (PNPD/Capes) of the Brazilian Education Department (MEC). Juan-Francisco Martínez-Cerdá thanks the support of a doctoral grant from the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC).

References

Aguaded, I. (1995). La educación para la comunicación: la enseñanza de los medios en el ámbito hispanoamericano. In I. Aguaded & J. Cabero (Eds.), Educación y medios de comunicación en el contexto iberoamericano. Seminario Internacional sobre Educación y medios de comunicación en el contexto Iberoamericano (pp. 19-48). Huelva: Universidad Internacional de Andalucía, La Rábida. (https://goo.gl/UYM9rg) (2016-02-25).

Bastian, M., Heymann, S., & Jacomy, M. (2009). Gephi: An Open Source Software for Exploring and Manipulating Networks. In Third International AAAI Conference on Weblogs and Social Media (p. 9). San José, California: The AAAI Press. (http://goo.gl/OHlnj2) (2016-02-25).

Buckingham, D. (2003). Media Education: Literacy, Learning and Contemporary Culture. Cambridge: Polity Press. (http://goo.gl/ya2l32) (2016-05-25).

Buckingham, D. (2005). The Media Literacy of Children and Young People: A Review of the Research Literature on behalf of OFCOM. London: OFCOM. (http://goo.gl/aJkrnh) (2016-02-25).

Celot, P., & Pérez-Tornero, J.M. (2009). Study on Assessment Criteria for Media Literacy Levels. Brussels: European Association for Viewers’ Interests (EAVI). (http://goo.gl/wpzZnl) (2016-02-25).

Cerbino, M., & Belotti, F. (2016). Medios comunitarios como ejercicio de ciudadanía comunicativa: experiencias desde Argentina y Ecuador [Community Media as Exercise of Communicative Citizenship: Experiences from Argentina and Ecuador]. Comunicar, 24(47), 49-56. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C47-2016-05

Fantin, M. (2011). Mídia-educacão: aspectos históricos e teórico-metodológicos. Olhar de Professor, 14(1), 27-40. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5212/olharprofr.v.14i1.0002

Ferrés, J. (2006). La competencia en comunicación audiovisual: propuesta articulada de dimensiones e indicadores. Quaderns del CAC, 25, 9-17. (http://goo.gl/2tWKEb) (2016-02-25).

Frau-Meigs, D. (Ed.) (2006). Media Education: A Kit for Teachers, Students, Parents and Professionals. Paris: UNESCO. (http://goo.gl/S3zDWb) (2016-02-25).

Frau-Meigs, D., & Torrent, J. (Eds.). (2009). Mapping Media Education Policies in the World: Visions, Programmes and Challenges. New York: United Nations. Alliance of Civilizations. UNESCO. European Commission. Grupo Comunicar. (http://goo.gl/lkQ7xI) (2016-02-25).

Freire, P. (1967). Educação como prática da liberdade. Rio de Janeiro: Paz e Terra.

Freire, P. (1979). Conscientização. Teoria e prática da libertação. Uma introdução ao pensamento de Paulo Freire. São Paulo: Cortez & Morales.

Girardello, G.G., & Orofino, I. (2012). Crianças, cultura e participação: um olhar sobre a mídia-educação no Brasil. Comunicação Mídia e Consumo, 9(25), 73-90. (http://goo.gl/wVKMaa) (2016-02-25).

González, J. (2007). Cibercultur@ como estrategia de comunicación compleja desde la periferia. Información e Comunicación, 4, 31-48. (http://goo.gl/H3FNWa) (2016-02-25).

Gozálvez, V., & Aguaded, I. (2012). Educación para la autonomía en sociedades mediáticas. Anàlisi, (45), 1-14. (http://goo.gl/OATuUw) (2016-05-21).

Gozálvez, V., & Contreras-Pulido, P. (2014). Empoderar a la ciudadanía mediática desde la educomunicación [Empowering Media Citizenship through Educommunication]. Comunicar, 21(42), 129-136. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C42-2014-12

Hobbs, R., Donnelly, K., Friesem, J., & Moen, M. (2013). Learning to Engage: How Positive Attitudes about the News, Media Literacy, and Video Production Contribute to Adolescent Civic Engagement. Educational Media International, 50(4), 231-246. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09523987.2013.862364

Kaplún, M. (1983). La comunicación popular ¿alternativa válida? Chasqui, 7. (http://goo.gl/GWKi3o) (2016-05-21).

Kellner, D., & Share, J. (2005). Toward Critical Media Literacy: Core Concepts, Debates, Organizations, and Policy. Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, 26(3), 369-386. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01596300500200169

Leavitt, H.J. (1965). Applied Organizational Change in Industry: Structural, Technological and Humanistic approaches. In J.G. March (Ed.), Handbook of Organizations (pp. 1.144-1.170). Chicago: Rand McNally.

Martens, H., & Hobbs, R. (2015). How Media Literacy Supports Civic Engagement in a Digital Age. Atlantic Journal of Communication, 23(2), 120-137. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15456870.2014.961636

Martín-Barbero, J. (2003). La educación desde la comunicación. Bogotá: Norma. (https://goo.gl/c2LHS1) (2016-05-25).

Martínez-Cerdá, J.F., & Torrent-Sellens, J. (2014). Alfabetización mediática y co-innovación en la microempresa: primeras evidencias para España. El Profesional de la Información, 23(3), 288-299. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3145/epi.2014.may.09

Neira-Cruz, X.A. (2016). Alfabetización mediática e integración social de la población reclusa anciana. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 71, 197-210. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.4185/RLCS-2016-1091

O’Neill, B., & Barnes, C. (2008). Media Literacy and the Public Sphere: a Contextual Study for Public Media Literacy Promotion in Ireland (Reports) (p. 121). Dublin: Centre for Social and Educational Research. Dublin Institute of Technology. (http://goo.gl/mdnHYI) (2016-02-25).

Pérez-Rodríguez, M.A., & Delgado-Ponce, Á. (2012). De la competencia digital y audiovisual a la competencia mediática: dimensiones e indicadores [From Digital and Audiovisual Competence to Media Competence: Dimensions and Indicators]. Comunicar, 39, 25-34. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C39-2012-02-02

Peruzzo, C.M.K. (1999). Comunicação comunitária e educação para a cidadania. Comunicação & Informação, 2(2), 205-228. (https://goo.gl/g9wuDH) (2016-05-25).

Peruzzo, C.M.K. (2008). Conceitos de comunicação popular, alternativa e comunitária revisitados e as reelaborações no setor. Palabra Clave, 11(2), 367-379. (http://goo.gl/iPiz0Q) (2016-02-25).

Peruzzo, C.M.K. (2009). Movimentos sociais, cidadania e o direito à comunicação comunitária nas políticas públicas. Fronteiras-Estudos Midiáticos, 11(1), 33-43. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.4013/fem.2009.111.04

Rabadán, Á.V. (2015). Media Literacy through Photography and Participation. A Conceptual Approach. Journal of New Approaches in Educational Research, 4(1), 32-43. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7821/naer.2015.1.96

Reia-Baptista, V., Burn, A., Reid, M.A., & Cannon, M. (2014). Literacía cinematográfica: Reflexión sobre los modelos de educación cinematográfica en Europa. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 69, 6-14. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.4185/RLCS-2014-1015

Rivoltella, P.C. (2005). Media Education. Fondamenti didattici e prospettive di ricerca. Brescia: La Scuola. (http://goo.gl/l2lbiC) (2016-05-25).

Soares, I.O. (2014). Educomunicação e Educação Midiática: vertentes históricas de aproximação entre comunicação e educação. Comunicação & Educação, 19(2), 15-26. (http://goo.gl/HVo5JW) (2016-02-25).

Soares, I.O. (2015). Base Nacional Comum Curricular: Existe espaço para a Educomunicação e a Mídia-Educação no novo projeto do MEC? São Paulo: ABPEducom. (https://goo.gl/kTyO4s) (2016-02-25).

Thoman, E. (1990). New Directions in Media Education. Toulouse: International Media Literacy Conference in Toulouse/UNESCO. (http://goo.gl/r34UTQ) (2016-02-25).

UNESCO (1982). Grunwald Declaration on Media Education. Grunwald: International Symposium on Media Education. Paris: UNESCO. (http://goo.gl/sK9f5) (2016-02-25).

UNESCO (2013). Global Media and Information Literacy Assessment Framework: Country Readiness and Competencies. Paris: UNESCO. (http://goo.gl/WLqXHZ) (2016-02-25).

Wilson, C., Grizzle, A., Tuazon, R., Akyempong, K., & Cheung, C.K. (2011). Media and Information Literacy Curriculum for Teachers. Paris: UNESCO. (http://goo.gl/Bz9Ei8) (2016-02-25).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Este artículo analiza el estado actual de la alfabetización mediática existente en Brasil desde la perspectiva de la educación no formal. Cuantifica la situación mediante una muestra de proyectos (N=240) y de organizaciones (N=107) que desarrollan actividades conforme a las tres principales dimensiones de la educación mediática reconocidas internacionalmente (acceso/uso, comprensión crítica, y producción de contenidos mediáticos), y que están orientadas a diferentes comunidades de ciudadanos de acuerdo a diversos niveles de segmentación (edad, lugar, situación social, grupos sociales, y campos profesionales de aplicación). El análisis realizado muestra la preponderancia de actividades de producción de contenidos audiovisuales (65,4%) y de ampliación de derechos y capacidades comunicativas de ciertas comunidades de personas generalmente excluidas de los medios de comunicación tradicionales (45,8%). Además, la mayoría de las organizaciones trabajan con propuestas con un potencial medio y alto de empoderamiento (77,6%). Asimismo, y basándose en la literatura y el diagnóstico realizado, se propone un modelo con el que estudiar los proyectos de educación mediática desarrollados en el ámbito de la educación no formal. De este modo, la investigación presenta una primera imagen de la alfabetización mediática de carácter no formal existente en un país que, por sus dimensiones y grandes diferencias sociales, tiene que saber aprovechar las complementariedades que la educación no formal ofrece a la educación formal y al currículum educativo, respecto a desarrollar educación mediática y empoderar a la ciudadanía.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

La preocupación respecto a la necesidad de establecer políticas públicas relacionadas con la educación en medios es patente en el ámbito mundial. La propia Organización de las Naciones Unidas para la Educación, la Ciencia y la Cultura (UNESCO) ha realizado diversos proyectos durante la última década, como «Media Education. A Kit for Teachers, Students, Parents and Professionals» (Frau-Meigs, 2006) y «Media and Information Literacy. Curriculum for Teachers» (Wilson, Grizzle, Tuazon, Akyempong, & Cheung, 2011). Y es de destacar el amplio mapeo global que realizó hace pocos años, analizando políticas, visiones, programas y retos relacionados con la alfabetización mediática a nivel mundial (Frau-Meigs & Torrent, 2009). Actualmente, son numerosos los países, sobre todo del hemisferio norte, que están tanto incluyendo en sus currículos de educación obligatoria asignaturas vinculadas a la educomunicación como estableciendo agencias y consejos públicos en dicha materia1.

En Latinoamérica, no obstante, las iniciativas de alfabetización mediática mantienen otra perspectiva, más frecuentemente ligadas a la educación no formal, a la educación popular, y a la sociedad civil, conforme destacan diversos expertos (Fantin, 2011; Girardello & Orofino, 2012; Soares, 2014). Tras iniciarse en los años sesenta como actividades de lectura crítica de cine, durante las dictaduras militares del período 1970-1980 se orientaron hacia la lectura crítica de los medios de comunicación, y fueron complementándose por movimientos populares de comunicación alternativa y cristiano-católicos (Aguaded, 1995; Fantin, 2011).

Analizando concretamente Brasil, cabe reseñar algunas iniciativas aisladas llevadas a cabo desde la educación formal: 1) Desde 2004, una ley de la ciudad de São Paulo incluye actividades educomunicativas en las escuelas; 2) Desde el Ministerio de Educación, los programas «Mais Educação» (Más Educación) y «Mídias na Escola» (Medios en la escuela) trabajan con la educación en medios2. En 2015, dicho Ministerio puso a debate público las bases mínimas del currículo para la educación básica en las que, conforme al análisis de Soares (2015), se identifican diversos componentes curriculares relacionados con la educomunicación, pese a no explicitar cómo incluir actividades de formación docente.

No obstante, en la educación no formal existe un comportamiento totalmente diferente, ya que desde los años noventa estos proyectos educomunicativos se multiplican en Brasil, ya sean de capacitación para la lectura crítica o de producción de contenidos alternativos a los medios tradicionales. Hay que señalar la utilización de la concepción de la educación planteada por autores como Paulo Freire y Mario Kaplún, en la que no solamente comunicación y educación son vistas en íntima relación, sino con una finalidad libertadora.

Por ello, la presente investigación tiene como objetivo caracterizar proyectos de alfabetización mediática no formal desarrollados en Brasil por la sociedad civil: organizaciones no gubernamentales (ONGs), organizaciones de la sociedad civil de interés público (OSCIPS), y fundaciones, entre otras. Se investiga sobre empoderamiento cultural (Kellner & Share, 2005) y ciudadanía y autonomía mediática (Gozálvez & Aguaded, 2012), desde la perspectiva de hacer que los ciudadanos sean sujetos activos de procesos de comunicación como vía para el ejercicio de los derechos expresados en la Declaración Universal de los Derechos Humanos (O’Neill & Barnes, 2008).

La fuerte e histórica vinculación entre educomunicación y empoderamiento es patente desde la «Grunwald Declaration on Media Education» (UNESCO, 1982), así como en la declaración «New Directions in Media Education» de Toulouse, que relaciona explícitamente ambos ámbitos (Thoman, 1990). De hecho, es difícil pensar la educomunicación «sin su finalidad cívica, es decir, sin su trasfondo ético, social y democrático relacionado con el empoderamiento de la ciudadanía en cuestiones mediáticas» (Gozálvez & Contreras-Pulido, 2014: 130).

El análisis también establece puentes hacia numerosos tipos de complementariedades entre: 1) Educación mediática y alfabetización mediática (Buckingham, 2003); 2) Principales dimensiones para la alfabetización mediática planteadas por Buckingham (2005) y Ofcom3: acceso y uso, comprensión crítica, y producción de comunicaciones; 3) Producción de contenidos mediáticos socialmente relevantes y cargados de comprensión crítica respecto a los medios; 4) Comunicación comunitaria, democrática y participativa desarrollada por la sociedad civil y las ONGs (Peruzzo, 2008, 2009); 5) Nuevas tecnologías de la información y la comunicación (TIC) y su importancia en las llamadas zonas periféricas (González, 2007).

El artículo plantea la siguiente pregunta de investigación de ámbito descriptivo: «¿Cuáles son las dimensiones más importantes asociadas a la educación mediática no formal en Brasil?». Para la que se consideran las siguientes hipótesis de trabajo, relacionadas con los proyectos de alfabetización mediática desarrollados por ONGs en Brasil:

• H1: Los proyectos se orientan principalmente a la producción de contenidos.

• H2: Cuando las iniciativas dan importancia a las TIC, no suelen tener vinculación con otros aspectos comunicativos.

• H3: Los proyectos se preocupan por el empoderamiento de la ciudadanía y el protagonismo de los actores implicados en los procesos de comunicación.

• H4: Las iniciativas están vinculadas a la comunicación comunitaria, con una tendencia a ofrecer como resultado unos medios de comunicación permanentes.

2. Material y métodos

Considerando los objetivos de investigación, la primera tarea desarrollada (enero-mayo de 2015) fue la identificación de proyectos de educación mediática realizados en Brasil por organizaciones de ámbito civil sin fines lucrativos y externos al ámbito escolar. Mediante búsqueda directa en actas de diversos congresos brasileños relacionados con comunicación, educación y ciudadanía, se parametrizaron aspectos como formación, educación en comunicación y medios, y TIC. Así fueron descartadas iniciativas exclusivamente orientadas al uso y mantenimiento de ordenadores. Se identificaron 129 entidades, ONGs e instituciones civiles que trabajaban en educomunicación, y que fueron catalogadas en una base de datos que identificaba sus características mediante la consulta realizada a sus correspondientes websites y medios sociales. Se observó su localización, fecha de inicio de actividades, objetivos, y rol de la comunicación y la educación, así como si realizaban actividades educomunicativas exclusivamente.

Se continuó en segundo nivel de análisis (junio-octubre de 2015) mediante la clasificación de 302 proyectos de alfabetización mediática, conforme a categorías establecidas a partir de la revisión bibliográfica sobre el tema:

• Dimensiones: acceso/uso, comprensión crítica, y producción de contenidos.

• Actores: destinatarios, profesionales, socios, y patrocinadores.

• Medios de comunicación: impresos (periódicos, revistas, boletines, y otros); audiovisuales (cine, vídeo, TV, radio/audio, fotografía, y otros); TIC (Internet, diseño web, aplicaciones, y otros); medios digitales (websites, blogs, medios sociales, medios móviles, y otros); monitorización y seguimiento de los medios de comunicación (monitorización de temas relacionados con las ONGs, producción de pautas y noticias alternativas, formación de periodistas, y otros).

• Tecnologías digitales: nivel de importancia de las TIC, y énfasis en inclusión digital.

• Comunicación comunitaria: como vehículo permanente, y actores implicados.

• Empoderamiento: relación explícita, defensa de derechos, y protagonismo ciudadano.

El tercer nivel de análisis fue cualitativo, contrastando la información cuantitativa encontrada, y mediante dos procedimientos: 1) codificación de objetivos conforme a palabras clave de proyectos; 2) eliminación de 22 organizaciones poco vinculadas con la investigación o que ya no trabajaban en educomunicación.

Finalmente, se enviaron (octubre-diciembre de 2015) cuestionarios (y recordatorios) a 107 entidades solicitando confirmación de datos descriptivos recopilados y opinión respecto a aspectos de la investigación, como importancia de la inclusión digital o el empoderamiento ciudadano, todo ello mediante preguntas multirrespuesta y abiertas. 22 organizaciones contestaron en el período planificado. Cruzando la información conforme a los parámetros requeridos, 240 proyectos llevados a cabo por 107 organizaciones fueron identificados y finalmente validados.

3. Resultados

3.1. Características básicas

Las 107 organizaciones no gubernamentales estudiadas con detalle se encuentran distribuidas a lo largo de los más de 8,5 millones de kilómetros cuadrados que conforman Brasil, país latinoamericano con más de 200 millones de habitantes. Concretamente, 63 (58,9%) son entidades radicadas en la región Sudeste, la más desarrollada, mientras que 27 (25,2%) están en la zona Nordeste, la más pobre, estando el resto distribuidas en diferentes provincias. Respecto a su antigüedad, una minoría inició sus actividades antes de 1990 (15%), siendo mayoritariamente de la década de los noventa (31,8%) y del siglo XXI (53,2%).

Claramente, se distinguen dos grandes bloques de actividades educomunicativas desarrolladas por ONGs en Brasil. Por un lado, 43 organizaciones (un 40,2% del total) tienen a la comunicación como meta principal, y cuyos objetivos son los de dar voz a los destinatarios y democratizar el uso de la comunicación. Trabajan para un perfil de público normalmente excluido no solamente de los medios de comunicación tradicionales, sino también de los procesos comunicacionales de producción de contenido (ciudadanos sin techo, poblaciones en riesgo de exclusión social, habitantes de comunidades populares o de favelas, etc.). Por otro lado, 64 organizaciones (59,8%) se orientan hacia la divulgación de temas sociales y la reivindicación de derechos (derechos humanos, de la infancia, de las mujeres, o de la población de raza negra), promocionando estos temas invisibles en los medios no solo mediante propuestas alternativas de comunicación, sino también a través de la formación de periodistas y la producción de pautas alternativas para los medios.

Así, 22 proyectos (9,2%) tienen como destinatarios a periodistas o profesionales de la comunicación, ocupándose de su formación en cuanto a los temas mencionados, o haciendo el rol de observatorio de los medios con relación a estas cuestiones. La mitad de los proyectos (120) son dirigidos a la infancia y juventud, aspecto que hay que destacar como importante, mientras que solamente cuatro proyectos están destinados a personas mayores. Resulta destacable, también, que 41 proyectos (17,1%) están vinculados con la educación formal al estar destinados a profesores y estudiantes, sobre todo de escuelas públicas. Respecto a otros actores, se observa el apoyo de ciertas fundaciones asociadas a grandes empresas (por ejemplo, de la empresa de telecomunicaciones «Oi», de la gran constructora «Camargo Correa», de la empresa estatal de energía «Petrobras», o del banco «Itaú»). También existe colaboración entre ONGs e instituciones públicas, resultando un entramado de relaciones difícil de describir de un modo sencillo.

3.2. Dimensiones de la alfabetización mediática


Draft Content 339739261-52764 ov-es009.jpg

La principal dimensión observada en los 240 proyectos analizados es la de producción de contenidos: son 157 talleres y cursos (65,4%) alineados a este ámbito, mezclados o no con los demás. A continuación, observamos 120 iniciativas relacionadas con comprensión crítica, y 91 con acceso y uso de los medios de comunicación, combinando también más de una dimensión. En este sentido, también hay que resaltar que 70 proyectos tienen vinculación con comprensión crítica y producción de contenidos, entre los que 22 se orientan también hacia la dimensión de acceso y uso. La preponderancia de la producción también se desprende si consideramos que existen 71 proyectos asociados exclusivamente hacia producción, mientras que 33 iniciativas se destinan solamente al acceso/uso, y 30 propuestas únicamente a comprensión crítica. El panorama observado nos permite confirmar la hipótesis 1ª planteada en este artículo.

Es importante precisar que la mera producción de contenidos no siempre significa empoderamiento ciudadano, puesto que podría darse el caso de que una actividad simplemente reprodujese algo ya existente en los medios. Así, es fundamental que para desarrollar las habilidades comunicativas venga conjugada también la comprensión crítica.

Respecto a los medios o procesos de comunicación enfatizados por las 240 actividades analizadas, la mayoría (99) tiene relación con los medios audiovisuales (TV, video, radio, audio y fotografía), mientras que 41 enfatizan los medios digitales (páginas web, blogs, medios sociales, etc.) y 37 utilizan medios impresos. Conviene destacar también que 22 iniciativas no trabajan con ningún medio de comunicación en concreto, ya que están más preocupadas por los procesos comunicativos y el fomento del pensamiento crítico.

Del total de proyectos, solamente 61 abordan explícitamente las TIC (29 de un modo principal, y 32 complementando otros medios de comunicación). Hay que dejar claro, no obstante, que en la mayoría de las iniciativas las TIC aparecen de un modo auxiliar, puesto que se utilizan claramente tecnologías de la información y la comunicación para la producción y divulgación de contenidos. Respecto al cruce entre este aspecto y las dimensiones asociadas a la alfabetización mediática, los datos señalan que los proyectos que enfatizan las TIC normalmente se preocupan por la dimensión de acceso/uso: 40 enfatizan esta dimensión (17 de manera exclusiva, y el resto mezclando las otras dimensiones). En este sentido, queda comprobada también la hipótesis 2ª del estudio.

Con relación a las 99 iniciativas que enfatizan los medios audiovisuales, 70 consideran actividades de producción de contenidos y mensajes. Además, 46 son destinadas a jóvenes, por lo que la mayoría de las iniciativas analizadas tienen la combinación de audiovisuales, producción de contenidos, y protagonismo juvenil. No obstante, es interesante poner atención al hecho de que el cine siga vivo en muchas de las iniciativas estudiadas: 33 de las 240 prácticas dan énfasis a este medio, proporcionando a comunidades y barrios acceso por medio de cineclubs o exhibiciones en sitios públicos.

Para analizar los factores relacionados con el empoderamiento de la ciudadanía, se procedió a la catalogación de las propuestas de las 107 ONGs, clasificándolas en cuatro grandes grupos, según sus objetivos: 1) Democratizar el acceso a alguno de estos aspectos: comunicación, educación, cultura, y tecnologías; 2) Trabajar por el cambio social, la transformación de la sociedad, y la inclusión social; 3) Realizar la inserción socio-económica de los destinatarios; y iv) garantizar y luchar por los derechos humanos, la ciudadanía, y los derechos de poblaciones en riesgo de exclusión social.

Aunque todos los objetivos estén relacionados a algún tipo de empoderamiento del ciudadano, es la propuesta (o combinación de propuestas) que la ONG realice la que dicta si sus actividades de educación mediática son más o menos efectivas en la tarea de empoderar la ciudadanía, con relación a su papel activo frente a la comunicación. Así, se pueden trazar tres grandes tendencias sobre el potencial de las ONGs, según metas de naturaleza distinta, pero complementarias. En el gráfico 1 se observa que 27 (25,2%) de las ONGs combinan metas pertenecientes a más de un grupo y trabajan con objetivos muy significativos para el empoderamiento de la ciudadanía a través de la educación mediática.

Siguiendo con el análisis, 56 organizaciones (52,4%) se focalizan solamente en algunas metas que, aunque sean importantes para el ejercicio de la ciudadanía, no parecen garantizar el empoderamiento por medio de la alfabetización mediática, puesto que lo hacen de un modo exclusivo y no combinado. Estas instituciones tendrían un nivel medio de empoderamiento. Finalmente, las 24 restantes ONGs (22,4%) pueden ser clasificadas como entidades con un potencial bajo de empoderamiento mediante educomunicación, ya que trabajan con objetivos más dispersos. No obstante, hay que señalar que este escenario de empoderamiento educomunicativo es una tendencia observada, teniéndose que estudiar detenidamente cada caso en particular para su confirmación definitiva. Asimismo, subrayar que prácticamente la mitad de los proyectos, concretamente 110 (un 45,8%) tiene algún tipo de conexión con grupos sociales vinculados con riesgo de exclusión social. Esta situación nos permite confirmar la hipótesis 3 de la investigación.


Draft Content 339739261-52764 ov-es010.jpg

En la figura 1 se puede observar la distribución sintética y uniforme (Bastian, Heymann, & Jacomy, 2009) de las principales interrelaciones existentes entre los proyectos de educomunicación no formal analizados: las dimensiones de la alfabetización mediática, los destinatarios, y los diferentes medios de comunicación utilizados. Se aprecia claramente la proximidad de actividades de producción orientadas a jóvenes, la vinculación entre la comprensión crítica y los audiovisuales, así como la existente entre la dimensión de acceso y uso y los medios asociados a las TIC. Por otro lado, se detecta que los medios digitales todavía no han ganado la repercusión que se imagina.

Si vamos al detalle de proyectos, un aspecto importante a considerar es su relación con vehículos permanentes de comunicación comunitaria. El escenario que se observa muestra que este ámbito todavía está poco desarrollado, indicando la tendencia correspondiente a la hipótesis 4. De los 240 proyectos de educomunicación estudiados, solamente 52 (un 21,7%) resultan asociados a algún tipo de producción de comunicación comunitaria con cierto carácter permanente: 15 son iniciativas que hacen programas de televisión (vehiculados en canales universitarios o comunitarios) o vídeos, 14 en medios impresos (periódicos, revistas y boletines), 12 a través de medios radiofónicos, y 11 mediante plataformas digitales u online (blogs, páginas web, etc.). Los medios audiovisuales predominan, pero es sorprendente que las plataformas y medios digitales todavía estén tan poco difundidos, lo que viene a decir que las tecnologías están mucho más utilizadas como herramienta de producción que como canales para vehicular contenidos.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

4.1. Situación encontrada

Mediante el elevado número de proyectos de alfabetización mediática que conforman la muestra, que en posteriores trabajos tiene que ser ampliada a otros países latinoamericanos, se puede afirmar que la educación mediática llevada a cabo por la sociedad civil brasileña está principalmente focalizada en la producción de contenidos y que ha ido ganando cada vez más importancia durante las últimas décadas. A nivel general, se confirma que los proyectos desarrollados en entornos educativos no formales contribuyen al desarrollo de los derechos y libertades de los individuos, respecto al acceso a la información, la libertad de expresión y el derecho a la educación, conforme a lo planteado por la UNESCO (2013).

La mayoría de los casos estudiados dan voz a ciertas comunidades de personas generalmente excluidas de los tradicionales medios de comunicación de masas. Este aspecto es particularmente importante cuando pensamos en el contexto socio-cultural de Latinoamérica, donde la gente común ha sido casi siempre incapaz de hablar y ha tenido que conformarse con una cultura del silencio (Freire, 1967, 1979). No es coincidencia, por lo tanto, que la producción de contenidos y mensajes sea la dimensión más enfatizada por los proyectos de alfabetización mediática analizados.

El énfasis por lo audiovisual, indicado por los datos, es coherente con el contexto de la sociedad actual, en la que se puede percibir la fascinación que los lenguajes audiovisuales provocan, generando un poder casi hipnótico (Martín-Barbero, 2003: 47). La imagen acaba por prevalecer sobre los otros tipos de discurso pues «es el sustrato fundamental de la retórica de los medios de comunicación de masas» (Rabadán, 2015: 36). Es interesante observar que el cine permanece en diversos proyectos estudiados. No se puede olvidar que la alfabetización fílmica es una tradición arraigada en muchos países, principalmente en Europa, y señalada como vital por expertos de la educomunicación contemporánea, puesto que «el dominio del lenguaje del cine se hace más importante en una época de amplio acceso a las tecnologías digitales» (Reia-Baptista, Burn, Reid, & Cannon, 2014: 357).

La relación instrumental de muchas ONGs con la comunicación, apuntada por la investigación, confirma los aspectos mencionados por Kaplún, que ya había afirmado que «para el movimiento de base la comunicación no constituye un fin en sí, sino un instrumento necesario al servicio de la organización y la educación populares» (1983: 41).

El empoderamiento de la ciudadanía planteado por los proyectos analizados ejemplifica la idea que Rivoltella (2005) desarrolla sobre la relación entre educación mediática y ciudadanía y que, para él, viene a ser un doble ejercicio de ciudadanía: la de pertenencia y la instrumental. En este sentido, la educomunicación llamaría la atención de la sociedad civil y de los poderes políticos respecto a los valores asociados a la ciudadanía y contribuiría también en la construcción de dicha ciudadanía. Cabe destacar brevemente también la autonomía mediática lograda por los sujetos involucrados (Gozálvez & Aguaded, 2012: 3).

Por otro lado, los proyectos identificados en el ámbito de la inclusión digital tienen diseño orientado hacia la capacitación profesional y la adquisición de habilidades útiles para el mundo del trabajo, sin grandes preocupaciones con la ciudadanía mediática. Normalmente, la tecnología es vista fuera del ámbito de la cultura y encarada solamente desde su dimensión instrumental (Martín-Barbero, 2003). No obstante, ello no quita que se puedan establecer y exigir más relaciones entre la alfabetización mediática e informacional y sus ventajas a nivel empresarial (Martínez-Cerdá &Torrent-Sellens, 2014), o en el ámbito de la integración con acciones orientadas incluso a reclusos (Neira-Cruz, 2016).

Finalmente, se puede afirmar que la educación mediática, sobre todo la llevada a cabo por organizaciones no gubernamentales, puede ser un instrumento fundamental para el desarrollo comunitario, puesto que la creación de medios propios puede potenciar y aprovechar la participación directa de los ciudadanos en la esfera pública (Peruzzo, 1999). De hecho, en países como Argentina y Ecuador, un tercio del espectro radioeléctrico se reserva a medios de comunicación comunitarios, que pueden ser «una herramienta crítica para el control social de los poderes mediáticos tradicionales y para el empoderamiento ciudadano y la participación activa en la esfera pública» (Cerbino & Belotti, 2016: 50).

La prioridad dada a los niños y jóvenes, como destinatarios, y a la producción de contenidos se observa también a nivel internacional. En los Estados Unidos de América las actividades de alfabetización mediática dirigidas a los jóvenes también cubren aspectos de participación, ejercicio de la ciudadanía y priorización de la producción de audiovisuales (Hobbs, Donnelly, Friesem, & Moen, 2013; Martens & Hobbs, 2015).

4.2. Propuesta de modelo de descripción y análisis

El análisis realizado muestra que las actividades educomunicativas no formales tienen en cuenta interacciones (aprendizaje), personas (destinatarios), tecnologías (TIC y medios), y lugares (aulas y contextos comunitarios). Y es por ello que sería importante que fuesen consideradas dentro de marcos de trabajo integrales como los ofrecidos por los sistemas socio-técnicos (Leavitt, 1965), basados en personas (situaciones personales, etc.), estructuras (organizaciones, disponibilidad, etc.), tareas (uso, comunicación, competencias, etc.), y tecnologías (dispositivos digitales, medios sociales, etc.). Así, la presente investigación define también una propuesta de modelo sistémico para describir y analizar los proyectos de educación mediática en el ámbito de la educación no formal.

Conforme a dicho modelo (Figura 2), las iniciativas educomunicativas civiles son más completas y eficaces a medida que abarcan más dimensiones (ámbito cuantitativo) y se orientan hacia la producción de contenidos con los que empoderar a la ciudadanía (ámbito cualitativo). El modelo se basa en la figura de un trapecio, que puede actuar como megáfono para un ciudadano situado en su base inferior. Está elaborado a partir de varios modelos de indicadores y competencias de alfabetización mediática que tienen que ser adquiridas por los ciudadanos. Concretamente, se basa en tres estudios integradores que señalan los principales niveles que tienen que ser desarrollados (Ferrés, 2006; Celot & Pérez-Tornero, 2009; Pérez-Rodríguez & Delgado-Ponce, 2012). El modelo planteado permite visualizar el potencial amplificador que la educomunicación desarrolla en las personas, y tiene en consideración una descripción y análisis de los proyectos desde la perspectiva de la educación no formal, a partir de la parametrización de sus metas, características y dimensiones:

Dimensión 1. Acceso y uso:

• Posibilitan el acceso a productos, medios o formas de comunicación.

• Ayudan en el uso de herramientas básicas o en el manejo instrumental de las tecnologías y los medios.

Dimensión 2: Análisis, evaluación y comprensión crítica:

• Descifran lenguajes comunicacionales y su construcción.

• Analizan y ofrecen herramientas para estudiar y comprender los contenidos, y los procesos de producción y funcionamiento de los medios y sus implicaciones ideológicas.

• Analizan y monitorizan los contenidos comunicacionales hegemónicos, capacitando para la generación de mensajes alternativos.

Dimensión 3: Creación de contenidos:

• Ofrecen los conocimientos necesarios para la apropiación de procesos de comunicación, y creación de contenidos, mensajes y contribuciones en medios de comunicación de masas, a través de contenidos generados por los usuarios.

• Crean mecanismos que posibilitan que los destinatarios puedan concebir canales para la generación permanente de contenidos (medios de comunicación comunitarios).

Además de mostrar las características de las actividades, el diseño propuesto también muestra posibles ejemplos en cada nivel. La intención es ofrecer una herramienta con la que entender de un modo holístico las actividades de educación mediática, yendo más allá de una propuesta basada en indicadores con los que evaluar un posible ranking de proyectos. Hay que señalar que normalmente un proyecto no lleva a cabo actividades en todos y cada uno de los niveles planteados en el modelo, puesto que las ONGs desarrollan proyectos complementarios entre sí. En algunos casos, los niveles inferiores se omiten, puesto que los destinatarios ya poseen conocimientos básicos en el manejo de medios o tecnologías.

A partir del modelo propuesto, se observa que el objetivo final de las actividades de educación mediática de la sociedad civil puede ser la creación de canales permanentes de comunicación comunitaria con los que garantizar una efectiva participación de los ciudadanos en los procesos sociales y comunicacionales.


Draft Content 339739261-52764 ov-es011.jpg

4.3. Conclusiones

En general, el escenario de la educación en comunicación en Latinoamérica y Brasil es muy distinto del observado en Europa y Norteamérica. Las iniciativas del hemisferio norte casi siempre pasan por la educación formal con actividades dirigidas a estudiantes. Aunque esto se puede observar puntualmente en Brasil, el gran número de proyectos desarrollados en ONGs parece subsanar las lagunas existentes en este tipo de políticas públicas. Bajo esta perspectiva, la apuesta ideal educomunicativa pasa por aunar y buscar complementariedades entre políticas públicas formales de educación mediática e iniciativas desarrolladas mediante educación no formal, todo ello en un contexto real con grandes diferencias sociales.

Las actividades educomunicativas no formales permiten desarrollar en mayor grado ciertos ámbitos sociales alejados de la educación formal, como lo son el empoderamiento ciudadano a lo largo de la vida, el desarrollo comunitario, y la ciudadanía y autonomía mediática en una sociedad global siempre inmersa en un ambiente comunicativo en el que los ciudadanos necesitan actuar crítica y creativamente frente a los medios tradicionales y hegemónicos.

Las acciones de educación mediática en el ámbito no formal también ayudan a complementar acciones de capacitación profesional orientadas a la integración socioeconómica de los destinatarios, así como al establecimiento de la defensa de sus derechos y su capacitación, mediante la dotación de competencias, habilidades y destrezas útiles para poder desenvolverse como ciudadanos y trabajadores de pleno derecho.

Ahora que se debate la introducción de la educomunicación en el currículum oficial de países como Brasil, y se invierte en la elaboración de las políticas correspondientes, es necesario reflexionar sobre las experiencias existentes desde hace varias décadas fuera de la educación formal, al objeto de extraer sus bondades.

De hecho, no basta con promover políticas públicas de alfabetización mediática o digital que en numerosas ocasiones acaban en la mera implementación de herramientas tecnológicas: hay que trasladar la filosofía de los proyectos de educación mediática del ámbito no formal a todos los ámbitos, lo que equivale a decir que el empoderamiento y el protagonismo de los sujetos en los procesos de comunicación deben ser considerados como intrínsecos a la educación mediática.

Notas

1 Por ejemplo: «Le Centre de Liaison de l’Enseignement et des Médias d’Information» (CLEMI), en Francia; «Conseil Supérieur de l’Education aux Medias», en Bélgica; «Department for Media Education and Audiovisual Media» (MEKU), en Finlandia; y «Mediawijzer», en Holanda.

2 Detalles pueden ser vistos en: http://goo.gl/KNDFlh (2016-05-21).

3 Ofcom es una entidad reguladora independiente de la industria de la comunicación en el Reino Unido. Entre otras tareas, promueve e investiga sobre alfabetización mediática.

Apoyos y reconocimiento

Mônica Pegurer Caprino recibe el apoyo del «Programa Nacional de Pós Doutorado/Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior» (PNPD/Capes) del Ministério de Educación (MEC) de Brasil. Juan-Francisco Martínez-Cerdá agradece el soporte de una beca de doctorado de la Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) en Barcelona (España).

Referencias

Aguaded, I. (1995). La educación para la comunicación: la enseñanza de los medios en el ámbito hispanoamericano. In I. Aguaded & J. Cabero (Eds.), Educación y medios de comunicación en el contexto iberoamericano. Seminario Internacional sobre Educación y medios de comunicación en el contexto Iberoamericano (pp. 19-48). Huelva: Universidad Internacional de Andalucía, La Rábida. (https://goo.gl/UYM9rg) (2016-02-25).

Bastian, M., Heymann, S., & Jacomy, M. (2009). Gephi: An Open Source Software for Exploring and Manipulating Networks. In Third International AAAI Conference on Weblogs and Social Media (p. 9). San José, California: The AAAI Press. (http://goo.gl/OHlnj2) (2016-02-25).

Buckingham, D. (2003). Media Education: Literacy, Learning and Contemporary Culture. Cambridge: Polity Press. (http://goo.gl/ya2l32) (2016-05-25).

Buckingham, D. (2005). The Media Literacy of Children and Young People: A Review of the Research Literature on behalf of OFCOM. London: OFCOM. (http://goo.gl/aJkrnh) (2016-02-25).

Celot, P., & Pérez-Tornero, J.M. (2009). Study on Assessment Criteria for Media Literacy Levels. Brussels: European Association for Viewers’ Interests (EAVI). (http://goo.gl/wpzZnl) (2016-02-25).

Cerbino, M., & Belotti, F. (2016). Medios comunitarios como ejercicio de ciudadanía comunicativa: experiencias desde Argentina y Ecuador [Community Media as Exercise of Communicative Citizenship: Experiences from Argentina and Ecuador]. Comunicar, 24(47), 49-56. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C47-2016-05

Fantin, M. (2011). Mídia-educacão: aspectos históricos e teórico-metodológicos. Olhar de Professor, 14(1), 27-40. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5212/olharprofr.v.14i1.0002

Ferrés, J. (2006). La competencia en comunicación audiovisual: propuesta articulada de dimensiones e indicadores. Quaderns del CAC, 25, 9-17. (http://goo.gl/2tWKEb) (2016-02-25).

Frau-Meigs, D. (Ed.) (2006). Media Education: A Kit for Teachers, Students, Parents and Professionals. Paris: UNESCO. (http://goo.gl/S3zDWb) (2016-02-25).

Frau-Meigs, D., & Torrent, J. (Eds.). (2009). Mapping Media Education Policies in the World: Visions, Programmes and Challenges. New York: United Nations. Alliance of Civilizations. UNESCO. European Commission. Grupo Comunicar. (http://goo.gl/lkQ7xI) (2016-02-25).

Freire, P. (1967). Educação como prática da liberdade. Rio de Janeiro: Paz e Terra.

Freire, P. (1979). Conscientização. Teoria e prática da libertação. Uma introdução ao pensamento de Paulo Freire. São Paulo: Cortez & Morales.

Girardello, G.G., & Orofino, I. (2012). Crianças, cultura e participação: um olhar sobre a mídia-educação no Brasil. Comunicação Mídia e Consumo, 9(25), 73-90. (http://goo.gl/wVKMaa) (2016-02-25).

González, J. (2007). Cibercultur@ como estrategia de comunicación compleja desde la periferia. Información e Comunicación, 4, 31-48. (http://goo.gl/H3FNWa) (2016-02-25).

Gozálvez, V., & Aguaded, I. (2012). Educación para la autonomía en sociedades mediáticas. Anàlisi, (45), 1-14. (http://goo.gl/OATuUw) (2016-05-21).

Gozálvez, V., & Contreras-Pulido, P. (2014). Empoderar a la ciudadanía mediática desde la educomunicación [Empowering Media Citizenship through Educommunication]. Comunicar, 21(42), 129-136. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C42-2014-12

Hobbs, R., Donnelly, K., Friesem, J., & Moen, M. (2013). Learning to Engage: How Positive Attitudes about the News, Media Literacy, and Video Production Contribute to Adolescent Civic Engagement. Educational Media International, 50(4), 231-246. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09523987.2013.862364

Kaplún, M. (1983). La comunicación popular ¿alternativa válida? Chasqui, 7. (http://goo.gl/GWKi3o) (2016-05-21).

Kellner, D., & Share, J. (2005). Toward Critical Media Literacy: Core Concepts, Debates, Organizations, and Policy. Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, 26(3), 369-386. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01596300500200169

Leavitt, H.J. (1965). Applied Organizational Change in Industry: Structural, Technological and Humanistic approaches. In J.G. March (Ed.), Handbook of Organizations (pp. 1.144-1.170). Chicago: Rand McNally.

Martens, H., & Hobbs, R. (2015). How Media Literacy Supports Civic Engagement in a Digital Age. Atlantic Journal of Communication, 23(2), 120-137. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15456870.2014.961636

Martín-Barbero, J. (2003). La educación desde la comunicación. Bogotá: Norma. (https://goo.gl/c2LHS1) (2016-05-25).

Martínez-Cerdá, J.F., & Torrent-Sellens, J. (2014). Alfabetización mediática y co-innovación en la microempresa: primeras evidencias para España. El Profesional de la Información, 23(3), 288-299. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3145/epi.2014.may.09

Neira-Cruz, X.A. (2016). Alfabetización mediática e integración social de la población reclusa anciana. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 71, 197-210. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.4185/RLCS-2016-1091

O’Neill, B., & Barnes, C. (2008). Media Literacy and the Public Sphere: a Contextual Study for Public Media Literacy Promotion in Ireland (Reports) (p. 121). Dublin: Centre for Social and Educational Research. Dublin Institute of Technology. (http://goo.gl/mdnHYI) (2016-02-25).

Pérez-Rodríguez, M.A., & Delgado-Ponce, Á. (2012). De la competencia digital y audiovisual a la competencia mediática: dimensiones e indicadores [From Digital and Audiovisual Competence to Media Competence: Dimensions and Indicators]. Comunicar, 39, 25-34. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C39-2012-02-02

Peruzzo, C.M.K. (1999). Comunicação comunitária e educação para a cidadania. Comunicação & Informação, 2(2), 205-228. (https://goo.gl/g9wuDH) (2016-05-25).

Peruzzo, C.M.K. (2008). Conceitos de comunicação popular, alternativa e comunitária revisitados e as reelaborações no setor. Palabra Clave, 11(2), 367-379. (http://goo.gl/iPiz0Q) (2016-02-25).

Peruzzo, C.M.K. (2009). Movimentos sociais, cidadania e o direito à comunicação comunitária nas políticas públicas. Fronteiras-Estudos Midiáticos, 11(1), 33-43. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.4013/fem.2009.111.04

Rabadán, Á.V. (2015). Media Literacy through Photography and Participation. A Conceptual Approach. Journal of New Approaches in Educational Research, 4(1), 32-43. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7821/naer.2015.1.96

Reia-Baptista, V., Burn, A., Reid, M.A., & Cannon, M. (2014). Literacía cinematográfica: Reflexión sobre los modelos de educación cinematográfica en Europa. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 69, 6-14. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.4185/RLCS-2014-1015

Rivoltella, P.C. (2005). Media Education. Fondamenti didattici e prospettive di ricerca. Brescia: La Scuola. (http://goo.gl/l2lbiC) (2016-05-25).

Soares, I.O. (2014). Educomunicação e Educação Midiática: vertentes históricas de aproximação entre comunicação e educação. Comunicação & Educação, 19(2), 15-26. (http://goo.gl/HVo5JW) (2016-02-25).

Soares, I.O. (2015). Base Nacional Comum Curricular: Existe espaço para a Educomunicação e a Mídia-Educação no novo projeto do MEC? São Paulo: ABPEducom. (https://goo.gl/kTyO4s) (2016-02-25).

Thoman, E. (1990). New Directions in Media Education. Toulouse: International Media Literacy Conference in Toulouse/UNESCO. (http://goo.gl/r34UTQ) (2016-02-25).

UNESCO (1982). Grunwald Declaration on Media Education. Grunwald: International Symposium on Media Education. Paris: UNESCO. (http://goo.gl/sK9f5) (2016-02-25).

UNESCO (2013). Global Media and Information Literacy Assessment Framework: Country Readiness and Competencies. Paris: UNESCO. (http://goo.gl/WLqXHZ) (2016-02-25).

Wilson, C., Grizzle, A., Tuazon, R., Akyempong, K., & Cheung, C.K. (2011). Media and Information Literacy Curriculum for Teachers. Paris: UNESCO. (http://goo.gl/Bz9Ei8) (2016-02-25).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/09/16
Accepted on 30/09/16
Submitted on 30/09/16

Volume 24, Issue 2, 2016
DOI: 10.3916/C49-2016-04
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 7
Views 2
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?