Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This text is an approach on two leading topics: the changes emerging in the way audiences deal with new and old media, and, the multiple processes of reception and interaction occurring as a result of the information and communication systems. Audiences are seemingly devising new roles as creators and emitters of media products which they exchange through a variety of languages, formats and technologies. Significant differences are emerging between widespread consumption and connectivity, and the authentic, horizontal and creative participation of audiences. This paper also develops a proposal that is educational, communicative and pedagogical for this changing and polymorphous audience repositioning. This proposal is based on the tradition of the Latin American Critical Pedagogy of Communication course offered by the Communication Studies department of the University of Valladolid (UVa) in Segovia. The study of Communication, Education and Society in a Digital Context is part of the degree course in Communication at the UVa, which was established with the aim of developing and reinforcing the skills required to achieve a global dialogue in the field of communication and education. The main goal of communicative competence, media education, media literacy and digital literacy is to instruct on the techniques and skills needed to produce and explore the application of media contents. The increasing technical, communicative and cultural complexity of these and other pedagogical initiatives are fully discussed in this article.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

What is changing and what stays the same in audience and screen interaction? Are audiences a dying breed in the society of networks? Is the age of being mere passive receivers of media over, and with it the media’s traditional modes of educommuncating with their audiences? As social subjects on the move from one communicative form to another, are we now different from when we interacted with screens? What are the conditions that mark this new culture of dialogue? Now that we represent many different types of audience, does that change us as citizens and allow us to be more assertive and creative; are we empowered? How can educommunication respond to these challenges and be culturally, socially and politically relevant today?

We tackle these questions in order to respond to and reject certain implausible suppositions that these issues present, both in terms of the mass migration to the digital world and the use of social networks and the predicted «death» of television and other hegemonic mass media (Carlon & Escolari, 2009), as well as the culture of passivity or «spectatorship» that lives on in certain sectors of the audience and in many of their interactions with the Internet (White, 2006). We also contest other assumptions about the disappearance of this audience which seems to have cast off its status as receivers or spectators to become users, senders and receivers, «prosumers», or even fans within the new culture of interactivity and convergence (Jenkins, 2008).

We adopt Castells’ (2009: 105) expression «mass self-communication» as we believe it conveys the phenomenon we are experiencing in Latin America, of classic mass communication and its concomitant audience reception that is more or less passive operating alongside a gradual but still incomplete migration of sectors of this audience to the digital world and a more proactive and creative dialogue.

It is precisely horizontal dialogue and its modes (types, levels, styles) within interactivity which establish the conditions «sine qua non» that define new roles and identities for audiences within the contemporary communicational ecosystem (Jenkins, 2009). And it is these challenges that we aim to meet with educommunication strategies. However, for Ferrés there is an important nuance: «If up to now receivers have been referred to as the public or the audience, those who use the new screens are now called interlocutors. The arrival and acceptance of the term «prosumer» is probably the ultimate expression of this paradigm shift. Today’s consumer does not deny himself the opportunity to be a producer. He has all he needs to do so at hand» (Ferrés, 2010: 251-252).

2. Disillusionment with broadened connectivity

Following the widespread optimism at the possibilities offered by connection to the digital world and the potential for audiences to become producers, the euphoria over the advantages of the new technologies and social networks has been tempered by a check on reality, which lags behind desires and good intentions.

Firstly, the instrumental access of the social sectors to the technology is less than desirable. In Mexico for example (more or less as in the rest of Latin America), no more than 40% of the population, that is 45 million out of 110 million, has Internet access compared to 64.2% in Spain, according to recent surveys1.

Secondly, access to the digital culture that the technology seems to offer is still at a low level, although it is difficult to measure because it transcends basic access to digital devices and their occasional usage. Various studies across different countries have demonstrated that only small segments of those who are connected can really be identified as active and engaged communicators (Orozco, 2011).

The reasons behind this are many. History shows that although technology has an impact on society, the cultural change that this brings takes longer to materialize. Another factor to consider is that we are emerging from an age of authoritarianism and verticality in mass media mainly conveyed by television, which positioned audiences as passive and too timid to express opinions which had no resonance because there were no channels to argue against the mass messages, or opportunities for any real or symbolic interaction.

Latin America also has another communication-related problem in the decades-long educational imbalance in which schools have given greater priority to reading than writing, favoring reception over expression. If we consider Postman, «in a culture dominated by the printed word, the main feature of public discourse has been the orderly and coherent presentation of ideas, and the public is trained to understand this type of discourse» (Postman, 1991: 56), we see that this is not the case. In Latin America, there is an expressive deficit that seems to hold us back from being subjects who are fully capable of communicating, transmitting and producing within the new platforms of dialogue (Orozco, 2010).

And it is not as if being different types of audience (and being audiences many simultaneously), using new digital skills and expertise and possessing various communication devices is something that comes automatically or necessarily out of the effervescence of interactivity and convergence between screens. Neither is it something that is simply attained and which stays with us for always. Dimensions of interactivity are different from those of the complex and essentially cultural exchange which occurs beyond the mere mastery of digital devices, and assumes a degree of learning and entertainment, and explicit agencies and willpower on the part of the subjects who interact (Jensen, 2011).

Being an audience member means being able to use different modes of interaction, from the latent to the explicit, which do not necessarily qualify the audiences that use them as senders and producers. Much research into Latin America audiences (Jacks, 2011) concludes that one of the greatest challenges for the reception of old and new screens is to clarify where consumption ends and production begins for all communicators.

Not only in Latin America but worldwide, there is an illusion that participation, dialogue and creative production in audiences-communicators represent a broad, decentralized, deferred consumption controlled by the audiences themselves which, in the end, is still consumption. Controlling consumption or personalizing it does not make it a productive, innovatory and transcendent action, nor is it a mutation from consumer-receiver to sender-producer. We should not forget that «consumption can also make us think» (García Canclini, 1994).

The challenge of consumption is that it is more than just food for thought. It helps foment creativity and production, and situates the audience within a dimension of interlocution in which they exercise greater leadership capacity. The creative act itself provokes other communications in an ascending spiral of creativity and empowerment for all participants.

What has changed and will continue to change in the reception processes is the positioning of the audiences. As various studies have shown (Orozco, 2011) reception can be deferred, collective or personalized. A communication can be seen outside the screen for which it was originally produced and then transmitted on yet another. This is the case with TV programs that can be seen on the Internet, on a cell phone screen or on an iPod. This was the case with the cinema in which films, and now videos, can still be viewed on television, on the Internet or on any other screen. Essentially there is nothing new in this except a growing and often compulsive transmediality in the reception of audiovisual products.

The reception of television has come out of its historical closet: the space in the home where we watch TV can now take place anywhere (Repoll, 2010). Reception happens in places outside the home, in bars, markets, shopping centres, restaurants, on public transport, in shop windows, to name but a few of the scenarios where there is interaction with screens, as many studies have pointed out.

This transmediality of diffusion and reception, the increasing range of places where audiences are found and their hyperconnectivity all give the impression that media consumption automatically translates into something productive now that it is under the control of the consumer, the Net user, the videogame player, the film or TV watcher, etc., without realizing that the majority of consumer exchanges are reactive and unaccompanied by any type of premeditated reflection. The fact that they are deferred and transmedia in nature does not mean they contain a germ of creativity or a horizontal relationship.

The sensory spaces for reception are also undergoing important changes. Watching TV now not only takes place away from its traditional location and screen but also watching a film now longer means physically going to a cinema to sit and watch a movie. Young people have different reasons for going to the cinema, converting the experience into a sociocultural activity to be shared with those with whom they are developing important common reference points in their socio-affective relationships.

Likewise, the cell phone has completely revolutionized the traditional usage and reason for the telephone, now transcending verbal communication over distances to become a versatile device that is receives and transmits the voice, sounds and images personalized by the user throughout the day (Winocur, 2009). Screens and digital devices are now much more than mere instruments. They are complex machines that connect and locate, acting as a safe haven in a sea of uncertainty, and entertaining the user when bored, etc.

The diversification and the growing, simultaneous use of various languages and formats in intercultural communication enable the user to construct and send discourses in many different languages, similar to those transmitted by different channels or devices. This assumes that the audience’s communicative processes are increasingly participatory, creative, innovatory and more complex but we also see the challenge ahead for educommunication: to foment understanding of the multiple languages and channels, and the transmediality of the dialogues; to form subjects who engage and participate in communicative exchanges.

It is becoming increasingly clear from international studies that straddle various countries, such as the Pew Internet and American Life (2005) report, a study by Fundación Telefónica and Ariel (2008) and the Manifesto for Media Education (2011), that the concern is not about participation but about user reaction or passive connectivity, for it seems that only a small percentage of those who connect really participate.

When the complex relationship between channels and languages are taken into account the channels, changes in audience participation can be measured by their degree of interaction and dialogue. Participation of this type transcends technical competency with digital devices and instead responds to the meanings and pathways opened up by interacting with information on the screen.

If we believe that the whole is not the sum of its parts, then it follows that the usage of new screens does not reflect the mere sum of possibilities (react, download material, send material to others, simultaneously handle activities such as listening to music, chatting and playing videogames) and not just part of a sum, we can then start to believe, in the strictest sense, in the emergence of a different form of dialogue. Other types of interaction that are broad and diverse must be understood as a preamble or prerequisite for a different kind of dialogue. Supporting this transition is one of the most pressing issues for media education and educators.

As Jensen (2005) contends, interactivity is the dimension in which the audience’s sense of identity is modified because the audience who engages in interactive production is also, at the same time, the user. Being a user marks a qualitative difference in regard to the concept of audience. A user-producer means the audience becomes a critically autonomous agent. And agency, as Giddens (1996) stated, involves reflection not just action or reaction. It is precisely this dimension of cognitive, conscious production and decision that distinguishes interactivity from mere reaction to stimulus or to any behavioural of sensory change.

Various studies of cases of young people teaching themselves to read and write outside the school show how the critical point in their learning is reached when the subject reflects on and distances himself from these practices to assess their worth and then reinserts them in other contexts and scenarios.

Be this as it may, it does not rule out the possibility that in other moments or different digital practices or contexts, the audience will not behave as users-producers. That is, they will not make a coordinated media-based reflection or action via the real, material and significant transformation of the audiovisual reference.

In this age of revolutions fanned by the communication and mobilization made possible by social networks, it is more vital than ever to recover the «intelligent multitudes» concept coined by Rheingold. «Intelligent multitudes are groups of people who undertake collective mobilizations, be they political, social, financial, thanks to a new medium of communication that enables new forms of organization to be set up, different in scale, involving people who until then were unable to coordinate such movements» (Rheingold, 2002: 13).

The author’s oncept is particularly relevant today with the Indignant Ones, a protest movement led by young Spanish people that mobilized in the spring of 2011 (Movimiento del 15 M, Democracia Real, ya) and with the uprisings in countries in North Africa. This new form of interactivity was crucial in the latter case, in which a large number of citizens became both users and producers of communication by applying the new technologies of the social networks. What emerged was a form of organization based on the network concept, active participation and not just being an audience or taking part in varied consumption. For this reason the education of today’s users and producers, and especially of those university students studying Communication, must be toughened in two ways: as recipient and critical user of messages and as producer of information and communication. Media literacy needs to confront this seemingly contradictory perspective of citizens and the media, in which there is an audience which is more or less passive or there are critical users and producers, based on the experience and reflections of the producers-receivers themselves. This is the objective of «Communication, education and society in the digital context», a pioneering university degree course on offer in Spain, which takes media literacy content as the basis for the students’ learning process.

3. Communication, education and society in the digital context

In Spain, as in the majority of countries in Latin American, media education has never been a staple of the school curriculum. The LOGSE (General Organic Law of Education) created two optional subjects: Processes of Communication and Audiovisual Communication which both appeared then disappeared from the curriculum. Currently, the contents of any Education in Communication course can be found spread across various different curricular subjects.

As we have posited in other works, we must ask ourselves: «Which educational model do we want to promote in the 21st century? This question must incorporate the best of recent pedagogical trends that centre educational action on the process of the student’s work and which are able to adapt to a world of changing realities» (García Matilla, 2010: 164-165).

«Communication, education and society in the digital context» is a basic part of the degree course in Publicity and Public Relations at the University of Valladolid’s campus in the city of Segovia, which aims to prepare students to face the new challenges of communication in the 21st century. From the start, students learn how to become users-producers, creative producers and critical receivers of messages. They get to create their own self-portrait, which gives them the chance to talk about themselves to others and to exchange opinions with their fellow students through interviews. This task is completed at the end of the first year by a piece of creative work and the production of a micro-investigation in which students apply skills and expertise to frame questions, draw up hypotheses and choose suitable methodologies for research into specific communication-based themes. The process ranges from the most personal to the most instrumental, completing a cycle of critical reception and creative production. This process has included reflection and practice of artistic creativity as a basic instrument for media literacy in the digital context. Digital literacy in this case refers to an integral multimedia and audiovisual communication. It puts the students in touch with a new hypermedia world in which new and old media coalesce, and situates them where the changes and transformations are taking place that reflect the end of the analogical age and the beginning of the digital age.

The main objective of this subject is to provide basic theoretical-practical knowledge and a global framework for understanding the communicative processes in their many facets, and how they function in our society within the digitally globalized multimedia context. Coming at the start of the degree course, it also aims to give students a series of basic conceptual tools for understanding and assimilating contemporary communication processes, which the students study in greater depth later in the course. It also aims to provide students with the basic instruments for communicating through the written and spoken word («audio-scripto-visual» in the words of Jean Cloutier) and to instruct them how to analyze messages across different media and supports in the current digital environment.

The subject content is based on three pillars each with a different theme:

1) Introduction to media education: educommunication in the digital society. This first part of the course consists of an introduction to the concept of education in communication and to other fundamentals of the educommunication field (user-producer, interaction and interactivity) as well as to the work and research carried out by leading educommunicators. Basic notions of visual deconstruction and discourse analysis are discussed, and group work is promoted as an important factor in this early stage for boosting creativity and producing creative output and the development of critical thought; these are the basic working tools of the course. The objectives of this section are for the students to acquire a conceptual language for the understanding of and reflection on the communicative and information processes; students should be able to identify the main elements, actors and structures of the communicative processes, and know how to integrate the knowledge acquired in an interdisciplinary perspective.

2) Creative communication as an educational instrument of analysis. We designed the second part of the course around the idea that one of the deficiencies in educommunication has been its failure to integrate the teaching of the traditional arts or to underplay their importance as instruments for communication. In the same way, the teaching of art and culture at the basic educational level has failed to include the audiovisual arts and the new communication media as part of the understanding of our cultural heritage. This could be due to a deliberate separation or mutual incomprehension (which often occurs in practice) between communication and culture, between «new and old media» and «new and old media disciplines» (Navarro, 2008).

Today, with the application of audiovisual and digital communication technologies to art and communication and the creation of new genres, we can no longer talk of a clear-cut division between cultural media and communication media. Yet we need to understand the new forms of production and reception of media (communicative and cultural) in an intertextual and contextual way. The subject with the title «Communication, Education and Society» in the digital context aims to close this gap with experiences and proposals for research and action based on the creativity of the students themselves, starting from a review of key concepts such as culture, the media and the information and communication systems.

The students work on applying creativity to the analysis of the media, culture and their relation to the social context. To do this, the students must produce their own piece of creative work (individually or as part of a group), which consists of the creative reading of an urban space in Segovia. This activity is part of an artistic and educational research project called «the city’s footprint: an interdisciplinary project» in which professors and artists work in collaboration with the city’s «Esteban Vicente» museum of contemporary art. In this practice, an analysis is made of the actual processes that emerge from an idea in a script to final production, concluding with a reflection on how to make the best social, educational and cultural use of the media of creation and communication. The objectives are: to promote creativity as an instrument of personal and collective development, and to understand the importance of creativity for making the best social, educational and cultural use of information and communication systems.

3) Old and new media in the digital context. Genres, convergencies and discourses. The emergence of new technologies has brought about changes in communication, information and culture that not only affect production but also reception. In this context, one of the most important phenomena has been the transformation of receiver into producer of messages and content: the user-producer. This situation has given rise to a new value chain and the creation of new genres of digital communication: social networks, blogs, wikis, platforms such as YouTube, etc., but it has also affected the old forms of communication and expression. We believe it is vital to study and analyze these transformations, their nature and the repercussions on the way we communicate with each other, and that the students on this course reflect on this context based on their own experience as users-producers.

As a culminating experience, the students work under the supervision of a tutor to conduct deeper investigation into specific research topics from the course: educommunication and participative culture; the concept of public service in the digital industry’s new value chain; new participatory media in the network; new forms of providing information in the digital context; leisure in the digital culture: 3D animation and videogames. Their approach to these themes comes from the proactive audience perspective. The aims are to work with the fundamentals of educommunication that go beyond Web 2.0; to know and analyze the new communication and information platforms and to reflect on their reach and importance; to be able to identify the new value chain and the new genres of culture and information that come with the ICT; to know the potential of ICT for media education and the training of citizens to be more critical; and to come away with the ability to recognize and analyse new forms of creation and reception of cultural output.

This subject emphasizes the educational method based on the process, so the teaching strategies are specifically directed towards active student participation and group work. To meet this objective, we use the blog as a didactic instrument for sharing knowledge contributed by university teachers and students alike. This course has also generated complementary activities such as seminars, workshops and conferences that have enabled students to meet professionals working in the fields of culture and communication in their various facets.

4. Conclusion

The education of active audiences means that teaching-learning models need to be created and inserted into university curricula. These models should give students free rein to express themselves and they must reflect constantly on the new logic of interlocution. Neither the interactivity nor the technological possibilities offered to contemporary audiences are sufficient to develop a knowledge society; only an integrated form of education that makes best use of the immense potential of the new value chain that the current digital context provides can transform the new audiences into engaged producers and critical users of a communication that is truly global, participatory and integrated.

Notes

1 Indicators that track the information society. Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Commerce, Government of Spain, May 2011.

References

Carlon, M. & Scolari, C. (2009). El fin de los medios masivos. El comienzo de un debate. Buenos Aires: La Crujía.

Castells, M. (2009). Comunicación y poder. Madrid: Alianza.

Ferrés, J. (2010). Educomunicación y cultura participativa. In Aparici, R. (Coord.). Educomunicación: más allá del 2.0. Barcelona: Gedisa; 251-256.

Fundación Telefónica & Ariel (2008). La generación interactiva en Iberoamérica. Niños y adolescentes ante las pantallas. Barcelona: Ariel.

García Matilla, A. (2010). Publicitar la educomunicación en la universidad del siglo XXI. In Aparici, R. (Coord.) (2010). Educomunicación: más allá del 2.0. Barcelona: Gedisa.

García-Canclini, N. (1994). Consumidores y ciudadanos. Conflictos multiculturales de la globalización. México: Grijalbo.

Giddens, A. (1996). In Defense o Sociology. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Jacks, N. (Coord.) (2011). Análisis de Recepción en América Latina. Un recuento histórico con perspectivas al futuro. Quito: CIESPAL.

Jenkins, H. (2008). Convergence Culture. Where Are Old and New Media Collide. New York: New York Uni-versity Press.

Jenkins, H. (2009). Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture. Media Education fot the 21 st century. EUA: MacArthur Foundation.

Jenkins, H. (2011). From New Media Literacies to New Media Expertise: Confronting the Challenges of a Par-ticipatory Culture (www.manifestoformediaeducation.co.uk/2011/01/henryjenkins/) (11-01-2011).

Jensen, K. (2005). Who do You Think We Are? A Content Analysis of Websites as Participatory Resources for Politics, Bussines and Civil Society. In Jensen, K. (Ed.). Interface/Culture. Copenhagen: Nordicom.

Jensen, K. (2010). Media Convergence: The Three Degrees of Network, Mass and Interpersonal Communication. London: Routledge.

Manifesto for Media Education (2011). A Manifesto for Media Education (www.manifestoformediaedu-cation.co.uk) (10-02-2011).

Martín-Barbero, J. (2004). La educación desde la comunicación. Buenos Aires: Norma.

Navarro Martínez, E. (2008). Televisión y literatura. Afinidades, 1, invierno; 88-97.

Orozco, G. (2010). La condición comunicacional contemporánea: desafíos educativos para una cultural parti-cipativa de las audiencias. Barcelona: Congreso Anual del Observatorio Europeo de Televisión Infantil (OETI).

Orozco, G. (2011). Audiencias ¿siempre audiencias? El ser y el estar en la sociedad de la comunicación. México: AMIC, XXII Encuentro Nacional AMIC 2010.

Pew Internet and American Life (2005) (www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2005/How-the-internet--has-woven-itself-into-American-life.aspx) (10-11-2010).

Postman, N. (1991). Divertirse hasta morir. El discurso público en la era del Show Business. Barcelona: Tempes-tad.

Repoll, J. (2010). Arqueología de los estudios culturales de audiencias. México: UAM.

Rheingold, H. (2002). Multitudes inteligentes. La próxima revolución social. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Scolari, C. (2009). Hipermediaciones. Elementos para una teoría de la comunicación digital interactiva. Barce-lona: Gedisa.

White, M. (2006). The Body and the Screen. Theories of Internet Spectatorship. EUA: Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Winocur, R. (2009). Robinsoe Crusoe ya tiene celular. México: Siglo XXI.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

En este texto se abordan esencialmente dos temas. En primer lugar, los cambios emergentes en el estar como audiencias frente a nuevos y viejos medios y, en segundo lugar, los procesos múltiples de recepción e interlocución que hoy experimentan. Se argumenta que las audiencias sin perder siempre ese rol, están también asumiendo otros más activos e interactuando cada vez más como noveles productores y emisores de contenidos mediáticos, similares a los que intercambian a través de diversos lenguajes, formatos y dispositivos tecnológicos. Se destaca la necesidad de diferenciar el consumo amplificado y la gran conectividad existente, de una auténtica interlocución horizontal, creativa y propositiva de los interlocutores. Por otra parte, se presenta una propuesta educomunicativa acorde con esta realidad polimorfa y cambiante de las audiencias, que rescata la tradición pedagógico-crítica iberoamericana y que se desarrolla en la Universidad de Valladolid, Campus de Segovia. La asignatura «Comunicación, educación y sociedad en el contexto digital» se programa en los estudios de Comunicación de esta Universidad con el objetivo de desarrollar y fortalecer aquellas capacidades, destrezas y reflexiones apropiadas para una interlocución más integral en el mundo de la educomunicación. El principal objetivo de la educación en competencia comunicativa, educación en medios y alfabetización digital es educar en las técnicas y estrategias para el análisis y producción de contenidos en medios. En este artículo se subraya la gran complejidad comunicativa y cultural que conllevan los esfuerzos educativos en esta dirección.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

¿Qué está cambiando y qué permanece en las interacciones entre audiencias y pantallas? ¿Son las audiencias una estirpe en extinción en la sociedad de redes? ¿Se está acabando el tiempo de la recepción de medios y con él de los modos tradicionales de hacer educomunicación con sus audiencias? Al transitar como sujetos sociales a otras formas de estar en lo comunicativo, ¿empezamos a ser algo distinto de aquello que nos ha caracterizado en las interacciones con las pantallas?, ¿bajo qué condiciones entramos a una cultura de interlocución diferente? El estar como audiencias de muchas maneras, ¿nos lleva a ser ciudadanos distintos y a jugar roles más asertivos y creativos, a empoderarnos?, ¿cómo hacer una educomunicación que responda a estos desafíos y sea hoy en día cultural, social y políticamente relevante?

Abordamos estas preguntas para problematizar y disipar algunos supuestos poco sustentables que muchos pregonan, tanto sobre la entrada masiva al mundo digital y al usufructo de las redes sociales, como sobre la anunciada «muerte» de la televisión y otros medios masivos hegemónicos (Carlon & Escolari, 2009), y, con ellos, también la desaparición de la cultura de la pasividad o «espectatorship», que sigue vigente en sectores de las audiencias y en muchas de sus interacciones con Internet (White, 2006). También cuestionamos otros supuestos sobre la muerte de las mismas audiencias, que parecen haber abandonado su estatus de receptoras o espectadoras para convertirse en usuarios, emirecs o «prosumidores», y hasta en «fans», dentro de la nueva cultura de la interactividad y la convergencia (Jenkins, 2008).

Retomamos el término «Auto-comunicación masiva» propuesto por Castells (2009: 105) por considerar que expresa el fenómeno que estamos experimentando en el mundo iberoamericano, de una existencia simultánea de la clásica comunicación masiva y su concomitante recepción más o menos pasiva por las audiencias y la migración paulatina de sectores de esas audiencias al mundo digital y a una interlocución, aunque parcial, cada vez más proactiva y creativa.

Es justamente la interlocución horizontal y su modos (tipos, niveles, estilos) dentro de la interactividad la con-dición «sine qua non» que define un nuevo ser de las audiencias en el ecosistema comunicacional contemporáneo (Jenkins, 2009). Y son precisamente sus desafíos los que importa enfrentar con estrategias de educomunicación. Para Ferrés (2010: 251-252), existe no obstante un matiz importante «Si hasta ahora al conjunto de los receptores se los ha venido denominando público o audiencia, hoy a los que utilizan las nuevas pantallas se los denomina interlocutores. La aparición y consolidación del término «prosumer» (algunos hablan de «prosumidor») es probablemente la máxima expresión de este cambio de paradigma. Hoy al «consumer» no se le niega la posibilidad de ser también «producer». Lo tiene todo en su mano para poder serlo».

2. El desencanto con la conectividad amplificada

Después de un generalizado optimismo con las posibilidades de conexión que ofrece el mundo digital, y el potencial de las audiencias para ser precisamente «producers», los juicios sobre las bondades de las nuevas tecnologías y las redes sociales se han venido atemperando al constatar que la realidad va más lenta que los deseos y las buenas intenciones.

En primer lugar, el acceso instrumental a la tecnología de los sectores sociales está lejos de ser el deseable. En México por ejemplo (y pasa más o menos lo mismo en el resto de América Latina) apenas el 40% de la población –o sea 45 millones de un total de 110 millones en el caso mexicano– tiene acceso de algún tipo a Internet. En España, sin embargo, este porcentaje se eleva al 64,2% de la población, según los más recientes informes1.

En segundo lugar, el acceso a la cultura digital que la tecnología supone, si bien es difícil de calibrar porque trasciende el mero acceso instrumental, ocasional, es todavía de menores proporciones. Así lo demuestran distintos estudios realizados en diversos países, donde solo pequeñas porciones de los sectores conectados, son los que realmente se identifican como interlocutores plenamente (Orozco, 2011).

Las razones que podrían explicar lo anterior son varias. La historia ha mostrado que aunque la tecnología ejerza un impacto en la sociedad, el cambio cultural que eso conlleva requiere periodos largos para realizarse. Asimismo hay que tener presente que venimos de una época donde el autoritarismo y la verticalidad de la comunicación masiva a través sobre todo de la televisión, nos acostumbró a ser, y hasta nos posicionó, como audiencias pasivas, tímidas, para expresar nuestras reacciones que además no encontraban eco, ya que no ha habido canales de réplica ni posibilidades de una interacción real, no simbólica, con los mensajes masivos.

Vinculado a lo anterior, hay que reconocer que en el mundo iberoamericano hay un problema mayor que incide en lo comunicativo, pero lo trasciende, consistente en un desequilibrio educativo considerable a lo largo de muchas décadas, ya que la escuela históricamente ha enfatizado la lectura en detrimento de la escritura, o sea la recepción y no la expresión. Si seguimos a Postman, «en una cultura dominada por la imprenta, el discurso público tiende a ser caracterizado por una disposición coherente y ordenada de ideas. El público al que se dirige en general es competente para comprender tal discurso» (Postman, 1991: 56) vemos que no ha sido el caso. En Iberoamérica arrastramos un déficit expresivo que parece estar determinando la lentitud en incorporarnos cabalmente como sujetos comunicadores, emisores, productores dentro de las nuevas plataformas de interlocución existentes (Orozco, 2010).

Por otra parte, el «estar siendo» audiencias de otras maneras (de muchas a la vez) empleando nuevas destrezas y competencias digitales y teniendo diversos dispositivos para la comunicación, no es algo que resulta automática o necesariamente de la efervescente interactividad y convergencia entre pantallas. Ni mucho menos es algo que simplemente se alcanza y queda para siempre. La dimensión de la mera interactividad es distinta a la del intercambio complejo y esencialmente cultural que se realiza más allá de lo instrumental y supone aprendizajes y entrenamientos, también agencias y voluntades explícitas de los propios sujetos que interactúan.

En «el estar siendo audiencia» caben diversos modos de interacción, desde latente hasta explícita, que no nece-sariamente colocan a las audiencias que las realizan del lado de los emisores y productores. Varias de las inves-tigaciones realizadas en países latinoamericanos sobre las audiencias (Jacks, 2011) dan pie a pensar que uno de los desafíos mayores de la recepción de viejas y nuevas pantallas, es justamente esclarecer dónde terminan los consumos y dónde empieza la producción por parte de todos los «comunicantes».

No solo en Iberoamérica, sino en general, se aprecia una especie de espejismo, por el cual se ha querido ver participación, interlocución y producción creativa de las audiencias-comunicantes, donde lo que hay es un consumo amplificado, descentrado y diferido, eso sí y bajo el control de los mismos consumidores, pero al fin consumo. Hay que insistir que controlar el consumo o personalizarlo, no es necesariamente un acto productivo, innovador y trascendente, ni conlleva una mutación de consumidor-receptor, a productor-emisor. Esto sin olvidar nunca que el «consumo también sirve para pensar» (García Canclini, 1994).

El desafío con el consumo es que sirva más que para pensar. Que sirva para crear, para producir, para situarse como audiencias en una dimensión de interlocución con mayor liderazgo, donde la creación propia sea deto-nante de otras comunicaciones en una espiral ascendente de creatividad y empoderamiento de todos los par-ticipantes.

Lo que sí ha cambiado y sigue transformándose en los procesos de recepción es la ubicación de las audiencias. Como lo demuestran varios estudios (Orozco, 2011), la recepción se puede hacer diferida, colectiva o persona-lizada. Se puede ver en otra pantalla lo que ha sido originalmente producido y transmitido en una distinta. Este sería el caso de la programación televisiva que se puede ver en Internet o a través de la pantalla del teléfono móvil, o en el iPod. Y ha sido el caso del cine, donde las películas, y ahora también los vídeos, se pueden seguir viendo en el televisor y en Internet y en diversos dispositivos de visionado. En esencia nada nuevo al respecto, aunque sí una creciente y a veces hasta compulsiva transmedialidad en la recepción de productos audiovisuales.

La recepción televisiva ha salido de su claustro histórico: el cuarto de ver televisión en el hogar y cada vez más se ubica en cualquier parte (Repoll, 2010). La recepción se realiza en lugares distintos al hogar, como en los bares, en los mercados, en los centros comerciales, en los restaurantes, los transportes públicos, los escaparates de los comercios, por citar solo algunos nuevos escenarios de interacciones con pantallas, como se reporta en estudios recientes.

Esta «transmedialidad» de la difusión y recepción por una parte y por otra, la creciente ubicuidad de las au-diencias y su hiperconectividad, han reforzado la impresión de que el consumo mediático se ha vuelto au-tomáticamente productivo al quedar bajo el control de los consumidores, internautas, videojugadores, cinéfilos y/o televidentes, etc., sin advertir siempre que gran parte de los intercambios en el consumo son reactivos, sin que lleven aparejada una reflexión previa y que no solo por ser diferidos y transmediales presenten necesariamente un germen de creación y relación horizontal.

Los sentidos de la recepción también están sufriendo transformaciones importantes. No solo ver televisión se ha desplazado de sus clásicos escenarios y pantallas, sino también el ir al cine ha dejado de ser esencialmente para ir a ver el film que se exhiba en una determinada sala. Entre los jóvenes, sobre todo, ir al cine tiene muchas otras motivaciones y se va reconvirtiendo, por lo menos para esta franja etaria, en una actividad sociocultural compartida con seres queridos con los que se van construyendo referentes comunes importantes en sus relaciones socio-afectivas.

De la misma manera, el teléfono móvil hace estallar los motivos y usos clásicos telefónicos, trascendiendo la comunicación verbal a distancia, para convertirse en un dispositivo versátil: receptor, productor y transmisor a la vez de voz, sonidos, imágenes, que acompaña de manera cada vez más personalizada a su usuario a lo largo de la jornada diaria (Winocur, 2009). Todo lo cual hace que las diversas pantallas y artefactos digitales sean mucho más que solo instrumentos. Son dispositivos complejos que lo mismo conectan, que sirven de localizadores, calmantes en la incertidumbre, entretenimiento en los ratos de aburrimiento, etcétera.

Asimismo, la diversificación y uso creciente y simultáneo de varios lenguajes y formatos en la intercomunicación posibilita construir y enviar discursos multilingüísticos, parecidos a los que se transmiten por distintos canales o dispositivos. Todo lo cual da pie a pensar en procesos comunicativos cada vez más participativos, creativos e innovadores por parte de las audiencias y a la vez más complejos, pero al mismo tiempo permite ver el desafío educomunicacional para una comprensión del multilingüismo, del multicanal y de la transmedialidad de las interlocuciones. El desafío para ser emisores en los intercambios comunicativos.

Con todo, se va haciendo también cada vez más evidente a partir de estudios internacionales en diversos países, como el «Pew Internet and American Life» (2005) o el de la Fundación Telefónica y Ariel (2008) o el «Manifesto for Media Education» (2011) que ni todo lo que está en juego es participación, sino reacción o mera «conectividad», ni cuando, si la hay, eso que existe es algo generalizado como tendencia, ya que solo porcentajes muy inferiores al del número total de los «conectados» son los que realmente participan.

Aquí el punto clave para entender cuándo sí o cuándo no hay una participación sería si aparte de sumar canales y lenguajes, y de usar nuevas tecnologías de manera instrumental, ¿hay un cambio sustantivo en el ser de las audiencias? Planteado de otra manera, el desafío educomunicacional sería ¿hasta cuándo en el continuum de cambios en las interacciones entre audiencias y pantallas se consigue trascender la mera dimensión instrumental o de estricto dominio técnico y se entra en un intercambio que si bien lo supone, se dirige a los significados y sentidos de la información objeto de las interacciones?

Si se piensa que «el todo no es igual a la suma de sus partes», entonces, en la medida en que el uso de las nuevas pantallas rebase la mera suma de posibilidades (reaccionar, bajar material, enviar materiales a otros, hacerlo simultáneamente a otras actividades como escuchar música, chatear o videojugar), y que no solo sea parte de una suma, podría pensarse, «estricto sensu» en el surgimiento de un modo distinto de interlocución. En todo caso, otros tipos de interacción ampliada y diversa debieran entenderse como preámbulo o prerrequisito de una interlocución distinta. Y fortalecer ese tránsito es uno de los objetivos más urgentes de una estrategia de educomunicación.

Como sostiene Jensen (2005), es la interactividad la dimensión en la que se modifica el estar como audiencia, ya que justamente la audiencia en la interactividad se reconvierte en usuario. Pero ser usuario o emirec, hay que insistir, conlleva una diferencia cualitativa en relación con el solo ser audiencia. Ser usuario-emirec implica la agencia de la audiencia. Y agencia, como la pensó Giddens (1996), supone reflexión, no solo acción o reacción. Es justo esta dimensión de elaboración cognitiva consciente y de decisión, la que la distingue de la mera reacción a un estímulo o de cualquier modificación solo conductual o solo sensorial.

Diversas investigaciones sobre prácticas autodidácticas de alfabetismo entre jóvenes fuera de la escuela muestran cómo el punto crítico es justamente la reflexión y la toma de distancia de las mismas prácticas para evaluarlas y poder reinsertarlas en otros contextos y escenarios.

Si bien es así, esto no elimina la posibilidad de que en otros momentos, prácticas digitales o contextos diferentes, las audiencias no se comporten como usuarios-emirecs. Es decir que no ejerzan su reflexión y acción coordinadas para llegar a un fin a partir de los medios, vía la transformación real, material y significativa del referente audiovisual.

En esta época de revoluciones propiciadas por los apoyos de interconectividad, que facilitan las redes sociales es más importante que nunca recuperar el concepto de «multitudes inteligentes» que acuñara Rheingold. «Las multitudes inteligentes son grupos de personas que emprenden movilizaciones colectivas –políticas, sociales, económicas– gracias a que un nuevo medio de comunicación posibilita otros modos de organización, a una escala novedosa, entre personas que hasta entonces no podían coordinar tales movimientos» (Rheingold, 2002: 13). El concepto elaborado por este autor cobra máxima vigencia, por ejemplo, con los movimientos de los indignados jóvenes españoles acontecidos en la primavera de 2011 en España (Movimiento del 15 M, Democracia Real, Ya) y con las revoluciones acontecidas en los países del Norte de África. En este último caso ha jugado un papel crucial esa nueva forma de interactividad en la que gran número de ciudadanos son emirecs, gracias a las nuevas tecnologías y a las redes sociales. Lo que se ha visto es una manera de organización desde el concepto de red, participación activa y no de mera audiencia y consumos variados.

Por este motivo, la formación del emirec actual, y muy especialmente de los estudiantes de las facultades de comunicación, debe reforzarse desde los primeros cursos en una doble faceta: como perceptor y usuario crítico de mensajes y como productor de información y comunicación. En este panorama contradictorio sobre el papel de los ciudadanos ante los medios, bien como audiencias más o menos pasivas, o como usuarios críticos y productores, es necesario afrontar la educación mediática partiendo de la experiencia y la reflexión misma de los propios productores-receptores. Éste es el reto de «Comunicación, educación y sociedad en el contexto digital», una asignatura pionera en la universidad española, que introduce contenidos en educación mediática poniendo como eje del proceso de aprendizaje a los propios alumnos.

3. Comunicación, educación y sociedad en el contexto digital

En España –aunque lamentablemente tampoco en la mayoría de países latinoamericanos– la educación en comunicación nunca ha tenido carta de naturaleza como una materia reglada. La LOGSE, creó dos asignaturas optativas tituladas, respectivamente: «Procesos de comunicación» y «Comunicación audiovisual», que hace pocos años desaparecieron totalmente del currículo. En estos momentos los contenidos de la Educación en Comunicación se encuentran dispersos en muy diferentes materias curriculares.

Como ya hemos planteado en otros trabajos, debemos preguntarnos, «¿qué modelo de educación queremos promover a lo largo de este siglo XXI? Esa cuestión debería recuperar los mejores hallazgos realizados por las corrientes pedagógicas que centran la acción educativa en el proceso de trabajo del alumno y que son capaces de adaptarse a un mundo de realidades cambiantes» (García Matilla, 2010: 164-165).

«Comunicación, educación y sociedad en el contexto digital» es una asignatura de formación básica del Grado de Publicidad y Relaciones Públicas de la Universidad de Valladolid, Campus de Segovia, que pretende preparar a alumnos y alumnas para enfrentarse a los nuevos retos que nos plantea la comunicación en el siglo XXI. Con esta asignatura los estudiantes tienen la oportunidad de convertirse en emirecs, productores creativos y receptores críticos de mensajes desde el inicio de sus estudios de comunicación. La elaboración de su propio autorretrato les da la oportunidad de hablar de sí mismos. La asignatura invita a conocer a la otra persona, a que alumnos y alumnas se entrevisten y hablen de sus compañeros desde las primeras semanas del curso. La tarea se completa al final del curso con la realización de un trabajo creativo y la realización de una microinvestigación en la que aplican habilidades y destrezas para el enunciado de preguntas, la elaboración de hipótesis y la elección de metodologías de investigación elementales e idóneas para la resolución de los temas objeto de investigación. El proceso va de lo más personal a lo más instrumental, completando el ciclo de la recepción crítica a la producción creativa. En este proceso se ha incorporado, además, la reflexión y la práctica de la creatividad artística como un instrumento básico para la alfabetización mediática en el contexto digital. La alfabetización digital (digital literacy) implica en este caso una alfabetización integral en materia de comunicación, audiovisual y multimedia. Pone en contacto a los estudiantes con un nuevo mundo hipermedia en el que se dan cita viejos y nuevos medios, y los sitúa ante los cambios y transformaciones que supone el paso del mundo analógico al mundo digital.

El objetivo principal de esta asignatura es proporcionar un conocimiento teórico-práctico básico y un marco global para comprender los procesos comunicativos, en sus múltiples facetas, y su funcionamiento en nuestra sociedad en el contexto multimedia y digital globalizado. Asimismo, al estar ubicada al principio del grado, pretende, en primer lugar, facilitar a los estudiantes una serie de herramientas conceptuales básicas para abordar la comprensión y asimilación de los procesos de comunicación contemporáneos, sobre los que se irá pro-fundizando en los cursos posteriores; y, en segundo lugar, dotarlos de los instrumentos básicos para comunicarse a través de la expresión oral y escrita («audio-scripto-visual» en la terminología de Jean Cloutier) y aprender a analizar mensajes en diferentes medios y soportes dentro del actual entorno digital.

Los contenidos de la asignatura están divididos en tres bloques temáticos:

1) Introducción a la educación mediática: educomunicación en la sociedad digital. En este primer bloque se ofrece una introducción al concepto de educación en materia de comunicación y a otros fundamentales en el campo de la educomunicación (emirec, interacción e interactividad) al hilo de los trabajos y aportaciones de maestros educomunicadores. Asimismo se dan unas nociones básicas de lectura de la imagen y análisis del discurso. En esta fase se enfatiza en el método de trabajo que tiene como núcleo potenciar la creatividad, la consciencia de los procesos creativos y el desarrollo del pensamiento crítico, como herramientas de trabajo. Los objetivos de esta parte temática son: que los alumnos adquieran un lenguaje conceptual para la comprensión y reflexión sobre los procesos comunicativos e informativos; que sean capaces de identificar los principales elementos, actores, estructuras de los procesos comunicativos; y que sepan integrar los conocimientos adquiridos en una perspectiva interdisciplinar.

2) La comunicación creativa como instrumento educativo, formativo y de análisis. Para el diseño de este bloque temático partimos de la idea de que una de las carencias en el ámbito de la Educomunicación ha consistido en no acabar de integrar la enseñanza de las artes tradicionales, o no darles suficiente importancia como instrumentos para la comunicación. De igual forma, en la enseñanza del arte y la cultura, en general, en los niveles educativos básicos no se han incluido las artes audiovisuales y los nuevos medios de comunicación como parte de nuestro acervo cultural. Esto puede responder al divorcio o mutua incomprensión que ha existido tradicionalmente en el sistema educativo (y, a veces, en la propia práctica) entre comunicación y cultura, entre «nuevos y viejos medios» y entre «nuevas y viejas disciplinas» (Navarro, 2008).

En la época actual, con la incorporación de las tecnologías al arte y a la comunicación y la creación de nuevos géneros, no se puede hablar más de una división clara entre medios culturales y medios de comunicación, sino que es necesario entender las nuevas formas de producción y recepción de los medios (comunicativos y cultu-rales) de una forma intertextual y contextual. La asignatura «Comunicación, Educación y Sociedad», en el con-texto digital pretende salvar esta brecha con experiencias y propuestas de investigación-acción centradas en la creatividad de los propios alumnos, partiendo de una revisión de conceptos como el de cultura o el de medios y sistemas de información y comunicación.

En este eje, se trabaja en aplicar la creatividad al análisis de los medios, de la cultura y su relación con el con-texto social. Para llevar esto a cabo, los alumnos deben elaborar un trabajo creativo propio (individual o en grupo), que consiste en la lectura creativa de un espacio urbano de Segovia. Esta actividad se realiza en el marco del proyecto de investigación artística y educativa «Huellas de la ciudad: un proyecto interdisciplinar» en el que participan profesores y artistas en colaboración con el museo de arte contemporáneo «Esteban Vicente» de Segovia. En esta práctica se trabaja analizando los (propios) procesos que van de la idea al guión y del guión a la producción, finalizando con una reflexión para el aprovechamiento social, educativo y cultural de los medios de creación y comunicación. Los objetivos son: impulsar la creatividad como instrumento de desarrollo personal y colectivo y entender la importancia de la creatividad para el aprovechamiento social, educativo y cultural de los medios y de los sistemas de información y comunicación.

3) Viejos y nuevos medios en el contexto digital. Géneros, convergencias y discursos. La aparición de nuevas tecnologías ha producido cambios en la comunicación, la información y la cultura, que no solo afectan a la producción sino también a la recepción. En este contexto uno de los fenómenos más importantes ha sido la incorporación del receptor a la producción de mensajes y contenidos: el emirec. Esta situación no solo ha dado lugar a una nueva cadena de valor y a la creación de nuevos géneros de comunicación digital: redes sociales, blogs, wikis, plataformas como Youtube, etc., sino que ha afectado a las antiguas formas de comunicación y expresión. Consideramos imprescindible estudiar y analizar estas transformaciones, su carácter y repercusión en nuestra forma de comunicarnos y que los estudiantes reflexionen sobre este contexto, partiendo, además, de su propia experiencia como emirecs.

En este último bloque los alumnos trabajan en la investigación tutorizada de temas específicos introducidos previamente, tales como: educomunicación y cultura participativa; el concepto de servicio público en la nueva cadena de valor de la industria digital; nuevos medios de participación en la red; nuevas formas de ofrecer la información en el contexto digital; o, el ocio en la cultura digital: animación 3D y videojuegos. El enfoque de estos temas se orienta desde la perspectiva de audiencias proactivas. Los objetivos de este bloque son: trabajar con las bases de la educomunicación más allá de la Web 2.0; conocer y analizar las nuevas plataformas de comunicación e información, reflexionando sobre su alcance e importancia; ser capaces de distinguir la nueva cadena de valor, los nuevos géneros culturales y de información surgidos en el seno de las TIC; conocer la potencialidad de las TIC para la educación mediática y la formación de ciudadanos más críticos; y ser capaces de reconocer y analizar nuevas formas de creación y recepción de las producciones culturales.

Esta asignatura enfatiza el método educativo basado en el proceso, por eso las estrategias docentes empleadas están especialmente orientadas a favorecer la participación activa de los estudiantes y el trabajo en equipo. Para lograr este objetivo se ha recurrido al blog como herramienta didáctica que ha servido para compartir y poner en común conocimientos aportados tanto por los profesores como por los propios alumnos (http://educomunicar.wordpress.com). Desde la asignatura se han generado actividades complementarias: seminarios, jornadas talleres, congresos…, que han puesto al alumnado en contacto con el mundo profesional de la cultura y la comunicación en sus diferentes facetas.

4. Conclusión

La formación de audiencias activas implica la creación de modelos de enseñanza-aprendizaje, insertos en los currícula universitarios, que den protagonismo a la libre expresión de los estudiantes y a la reflexión permanente de las nuevas lógicas de interlocución. Ni la interactividad, ni las posibilidades tecnológicas que se les brindan a las actuales audiencias son suficientes para el desarrollo de una sociedad del conocimiento; solo una formación integral que aproveche las inmensas potencialidades de la nueva cadena de valor que ofrece el actual contexto digital podrá convertir a las nuevas audiencias en verdaderos emirecs y usuarios críticos de una comunicación auténticamente global e integradora.

Notas

1 Indicadores de seguimiento de la sociedad de la información. Ministerio de Industria, Turismo y Comercio, Gobierno de España. Mayo de 2011.

Referencias

Carlon, M. & Scolari, C. (2009). El fin de los medios masivos. El comienzo de un debate. Buenos Aires: La Crujía.

Castells, M. (2009). Comunicación y poder. Madrid: Alianza.

Ferrés, J. (2010). Educomunicación y cultura participativa. In Aparici, R. (Coord.). Educomunicación: más allá del 2.0. Barcelona: Gedisa; 251-256.

Fundación Telefónica & Ariel (2008). La generación interactiva en Iberoamérica. Niños y adolescentes ante las pantallas. Barcelona: Ariel.

García Matilla, A. (2010). Publicitar la educomunicación en la universidad del siglo XXI. In Aparici, R. (Coord.) (2010). Educomunicación: más allá del 2.0. Barcelona: Gedisa.

García-Canclini, N. (1994). Consumidores y ciudadanos. Conflictos multiculturales de la globalización. México: Grijalbo.

Giddens, A. (1996). In Defense o Sociology. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Jacks, N. (Coord.) (2011). Análisis de Recepción en América Latina. Un recuento histórico con perspectivas al futuro. Quito: CIESPAL.

Jenkins, H. (2008). Convergence Culture. Where Are Old and New Media Collide. New York: New York Uni-versity Press.

Jenkins, H. (2009). Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture. Media Education fot the 21 st century. EUA: MacArthur Foundation.

Jenkins, H. (2011). From New Media Literacies to New Media Expertise: Confronting the Challenges of a Par-ticipatory Culture (www.manifestoformediaeducation.co.uk/2011/01/henryjenkins/) (11-01-2011).

Jensen, K. (2005). Who do You Think We Are? A Content Analysis of Websites as Participatory Resources for Politics, Bussines and Civil Society. In Jensen, K. (Ed.). Interface/Culture. Copenhagen: Nordicom.

Jensen, K. (2010). Media Convergence: The Three Degrees of Network, Mass and Interpersonal Communication. London: Routledge.

Manifesto for Media Education (2011). A Manifesto for Media Education (www.manifestoformediaedu-cation.co.uk) (10-02-2011).

Martín-Barbero, J. (2004). La educación desde la comunicación. Buenos Aires: Norma.

Navarro Martínez, E. (2008). Televisión y literatura. Afinidades, 1, invierno; 88-97.

Orozco, G. (2010). La condición comunicacional contemporánea: desafíos educativos para una cultural parti-cipativa de las audiencias. Barcelona: Congreso Anual del Observatorio Europeo de Televisión Infantil (OETI).

Orozco, G. (2011). Audiencias ¿siempre audiencias? El ser y el estar en la sociedad de la comunicación. México: AMIC, XXII Encuentro Nacional AMIC 2010.

Pew Internet and American Life (2005) (www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2005/How-the-internet--has-woven-itself-into-American-life.aspx) (10-11-2010).

Postman, N. (1991). Divertirse hasta morir. El discurso público en la era del Show Business. Barcelona: Tempes-tad.

Repoll, J. (2010). Arqueología de los estudios culturales de audiencias. México: UAM.

Rheingold, H. (2002). Multitudes inteligentes. La próxima revolución social. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Scolari, C. (2009). Hipermediaciones. Elementos para una teoría de la comunicación digital interactiva. Barce-lona: Gedisa.

White, M. (2006). The Body and the Screen. Theories of Internet Spectatorship. EUA: Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Winocur, R. (2009). Robinsoe Crusoe ya tiene celular. México: Siglo XXI.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 29/02/12
Accepted on 29/02/12
Submitted on 29/02/12

Volume 20, Issue 1, 2012
DOI: 10.3916/C38-2012-02-07
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 14
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?