Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The main aim of this paper is to identify the values conveyed by «Operación Triunfo» and «Fama ¡a bailar!». Their popularity (especially among young people) and prescriptive nature (they convey life models by means of identifying problems and proposing objectives and solutions) make them relevant study objects. This paper focuses on how work and fame are depicted in «Operación Triunfo» and «Fama ¡a bailar!», two areas that have hardly been studied in Spain. In order to fulfil the objectives of this paper, these programmes were analysed using a methodology that combines narrative semiotics, audiovisual style and narrative form analysis, as well as ludology and game design theory. The analysis shows that these programmes depict professional success as personally and socioeconomically rewarding, although it is extremely difficult to achieve. To obtain this success, the contestants are transformed through education and celebritisation. Finally, in these programmes there is a conflict between talent and fame. This paper concludes that «Operación Triunfo» and «Fama ¡a bailar!» present fame as a life aspiration and also show the mechanisms used to produce it. The programmes depict modern society as meritocratic and evidence the importance of image in the modern workplace. Finally, they describe a «good worker» as someone passionate about their work, adaptable and capable of sacrificing his/her personal life.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction: study object and objectives

«Operación Triunfo» debuted in Spain in 2001, setting a new trend in «reality game shows»1 in this country. This format combines the characteristics of «Pop Idol» (United Kingdom, ITV, 2001) and «Big Brother». Like «Pop Idol» it is a contest in which young people who are unknown to the public and who can sing well compete with each other over several weeks for a recording contract, and in which the audience (after a pre-selection process by a panel of judges) chooses which contestants continue through each round until a winner is finally chosen. Like in «Big Brother», the contestants live together in a closed, isolated, purpose-built house full of cameras while they receive classes; the programme is organised into weekly shows in which the contestants are nominated or evicted, with daily summaries of the «everyday life» of the participants in the academy; and the content expands over different time slots and media following the logic of the «killer format» (Pérez Ornia, 2004: 81-84).

In Spain the «Operación Triunfo» format was emulated by other programmes following the innovation/repetition/saturation cycle characteristic of the media : «Academia de actores» (Antena 3, 2002); «Popstars» (Telecinco, 2002); «Supermodelo» (Cuatro, 2006-08); «Fama» ¡a bailar!» (Cuatro 2007-11); «Circus» (Cuatro, 2008) and «El aprendiz» (LaSexta, 2010). Of these, only «Fama ¡a bailar!» gained a certain degree of success and was broadcast for several seasons. In this reality TV show, young amateur dancers compete with each other for a study grant. The programme is based on the «Operación Triunfo» formula but includes some modifications: although it is an individual contest, the contestants compete in pairs; new contestants enter the programme after the weekly evictions; the teachers are also judges; the programme is broadcast daily, including performances, nominations and evictions; and the weekly shows only begin after a few weeks.

These programmes have had a strong impact on the Spanish television panorama and the social imaginary, especially in relation to the redefinition of fame and the way of understanding work. The aim of the present article, therefore, is to analyse the values conveyed by «Operación Triunfo» (henceforth «OT») and «Fama ¡a bailar!» (henceforth «Fama») in relation to these two areas.

In Spain «OT» has been analysed from different perspectives. Studies have been carried out on its interactivity and the role the audience plays (Selva, 2003-04; Castañares, 2006; Fouce, 2008), its multimedia expansion strategy (Cebrián, 2003) and the values it conveys (Cáceres, 2002; Sampedro, 2002, two analyses that are similar to the one proposed here). However, not very much theoretical attention has been paid to this programme’s discourse on fame (a perspective that can be revealing and productive, as shown by Holmes (2004a), Ouellette and Hay (2008) and Redden (2008), nor has the programme been related to other similar formats such as «Fama».

In this article we bring together the main research results and conclusions of a doctoral thesis that was presented at the Department of Communication of the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in September 2010 (Oliva, 2010), which analysed «Cambio Radical», «Desnudas», «Esta casa era una ruina», «Supernanny», «Hermano Mayor», «Ajuste de Cuentas», «Operación Triunfo» and «Fama ¡a bailar!». This article summarises the main results and conclusions of the chapters devoted to the last two formats.

2. Material and methods

To answer the main analysis question (What values do «OT» and «Fama» convey in relation to work and fame?) we used textual analysis (Casetti & Di Chio, 1999: 249-292), that is, a detailed study of the elements that make up the audiovisual work in order to understand its organisation and meaning. The text itself, regardless of the personal readings that can be made of it, is the base of the viewer’s interpretation, it is what centres and guides their reading. Therefore, although the viewer’s capacity to decode the text freely is important, we cannot forget the responsibility the text has in relation to the values conveyed and endorsed.

To carry out this study we have developed an analysis protocol2 that combines two consolidated perspectives of textual analysis that are not usually found together in the same study: narrative semiotics and the study of the narrative form and audiovisual style.

Narrative semiotics consists of analysing the story structure. First, we analysed which narrative roles the characters (applicants, contestants, teachers, judges and viewers) play in the story. The roles identified are: subject of doing (hero), subject of state (benefits from the actions of the subject of doing), object of value (that which is desired), sender and receiver of the contract (sets and receives a mission respectively), opponent (hinders the actions of the subject of doing), helper (helps the subject of doing), rival (wants the same object of value as the subject of doing), sender and receiver of sanction (gives and receives recognition or punishment respectively). Second, we analysed the states of the actants (initial and final states, states of conjunction or disjunction with respect to the object of value or competence of doing), their actions and the transformations of state as a consequence of these actions.

For the analysis we took into account the contributions of Greimas (1971) and Courtés (1980), founders of the discipline, as well as Ruiz Collantes (Ruiz Collantes, Ferrés & al., 2006; Ruiz Collantes, 2009), who adapted this methodology to the analysis of audiovisual texts. As Ruiz Collantes shows in his studies, systematically assigning certain roles and states to certain social groups has consequences in relation to how these collectives are represented. To these more abstract elements we have added the study of the characters’ traits (gender, age, social class, habitat, physical appearance) and the spaces the programmes are set in (structure and design of the environment in which the action takes place (Cassetti & Di Chio, 1999: 274-279). We completed the semio-narrative analysis by studying the narrative form and audiovisual style with the aim of identifying the meaning that emerges from «how» the story is told, how the text guides the viewer’s interpretation and how it constructs a model viewer (Eco, 1981)3. The audiovisual language has been analysed in detail (types of shots, camera angles and movements, sound and music, editing, computer graphics, lighting), as well as the narrative form: plot organisation (narrative acts, climaxes, turning points), time (order, duration and frequency), point of view (how the information is distributed between the viewer and the characters) and the presence of explicit narrators and narratees (receivers of the narration present in the text, for example, the on set audience). The analysis of the narrative form and audiovisual style was based on the contributions made by Bordwell and Thompson (1995); Gaudreault and Jost (1995); Kozloff (1992); Casetti and Di Chio (1999: 249-292); and Aranda and De Felipe (2006).

In addition, given that «OT» and «Fama» are contests, we have added a third analysis methodology to these first two that is less used for studying television: the analysis of the game rules. As Pérez Latorre (2010) shows, the rules of a game also convey meaning and values. The analysis protocol is based on the contributions of the canonical authors and works of ludology and game design theory (Egenfeldt-Nielsen, Heide Smith & Pajares Tosca, 2008; Juul, 2005; Salen & Zimmerman, 2003). We analysed the programmes’ explicit rules that organise how the contest functions, guide the actions of the contestants, teachers, judges and viewers (permitted actions, prohibited actions, compulsory actions), and determine the conditions of winning (how to win) and losing (how to lose) as well as the design of the contest difficulty.

This analysis protocol was applied to a corpus made up of audition episodes, daily programmes and weekly shows of «OT 2008» and «OT 2009» (Telecinco)4 and the first season of «Fama» (Cuatro)5.

3. Results

This section summarises the main results of the analysis of «OT» and «Fama» using the methodology outlined in the previous section. For reasons of clarity, the section has been arranged thematically, relating the results of the semio-narrative, formal (narrative form and audiovisual style) and ludic analyses.

3.1. Professional success as the object of value

In «OT» and «Fama» professional success is the object of value (main OV) pursued by the participants and prescribed to the viewers. Significantly, these programmes equate professional success with fame, that is, public recognition and renown. It is also represented as a form of personal fulfilment and as a way of rising socially and economically.

Therefore, the applicants/contestants are identified as incomplete characters because they have not yet achieved professional success (they cannot work as a professional singer/dancer and/or they are not famous). «OT» and «Fama» are presented as «institutions» able to give the contestants the necessary competencies for achieving it. Consequently, participating in the contest and winning it are the instrumental objects of value. However, in the programme’s discourse a direct relationship is established between achieving the instrumental and the main OV, so that the importance is transferred from the second to the first. This is made clear in the auditions, in which it is shown that for the applicants getting onto the programme (and winning it) is in itself a dream.

In the audition episodes, the long queues, the inclusion of applicants with no talent in the final editing and the diversity of applicants and contestants in relation to social class, education, habitat, sex, and, to a lesser degree, age6, conveys the idea of democratic and universal access to the opportunity of obtaining the instrumental (and main) OV. However, only a small number of applicants can become contestants and only one of them will win the contest. Therefore, while everyone has the opportunity, only the «best» can obtain the OV.

The audition episodes also legitimate the main, and especially, the instrumental OV and load them with positive connotations, which also helps to legitimate the actual programme. In order to do this the process for selecting the contestants is based on a ritualised structure of rounds, tests and verdicts that maximises the applicants’ emotional responses, which are emphasised in turn by the narrative form and audiovisual style: close ups, extradiegetic music, slow motion, internal focalisation with respect to the participants to generate intrigue, superimposed texts and narrative dilation.

3.2. Methods prescribed for obtaining the object of value

Once the contestants have been selected, their transformation process begins. This is carried out in two ways: training and education (improving their dancing and singing abilities), and «celebritisation» (their construction as stars to gain popularity and commercial value). These are the two «solutions» prescribed by these programmes for achieving professional success.

3.2.1. Training and education

«OT» and «Fama» are not just simple talent contests; their objective is to transform the participants through training and education. Significantly, both formats use a school-related vocabulary to name the spaces and the activities performed by the participants. Below we outline the values that guide this dimension of the programmes.

Firstly, effort and sacrifice. The design of the academy/ school is significant. In this space there is no strict separation between the spaces for the contestants’ personal life and those for their professional life. The extreme case is «Fama», in which any room can become a rehearsal area, which shows how the professional sphere expands and colonises the personal space. In addition, the contestants have to bear a large work load (especially in «Fama»), which is emphasised in the daily summaries thanks to their serial structure and a plot centred on classes and rehearsals. Finally, the isolation the participants are subjected to during the contest suggests the sacrifice of the personal and family life in favour of the quest for success.

Secondly, constant pressure. This is often disguised as the expectations the teachers place on the participants, so that disappointment is usually invoked when a contestant does not reach the required level. For example, in «Fama» this constant pressure is evidenced by the contest rules, which do not take into account the progressive increase in difficulty and are the cause of «the curse of the newcomers»7. At the same time this pressure provokes emotional responses in the participants (shown and emphasised by the narrative form and audiovisual style), which once again serve to show the importance that the instrumental (and main) OV have for them.

Finally, discipline is another characteristic element. The participants must obey the teachers’ orders and the judges’ comments (which are often humiliating) without questioning them, not even in private given that they are under constant video-surveillance and are also evaluated for the attitude they show in their «private life». In this way a strong inequality is established between the teachers/judges and the contestants, especially when the participants do not have any control over their own training process and their public image and identity as a dancer or singer. Both programmes impose on the contestants which pieces they will interpret, the attitude they should adopt on stage, how they should move and how they should dress.

This leads to an ambiguity in the roles assigned to the characters: although it could seem that in the plot of «OT» and «Fama» the contestants play the role of subject of doing (heroes)8, in reality these programmes focus their attention on «the hero’s journey» (which is a narrative subprogramme that tells how the contestants achieve the competences necessary for becoming the subject of doing), while the main narrative programme of the story (in which the contestants, transformed into heroes, obtain the main OV) is omitted. This also reinforces the confusion between the instrumental OV (winning the contest) and the main OV (becoming a star).

3.2.2. «Celebritisation»

As well as training, «Fama» and «OT» use another method for transforming the contestants: representing them as stars9 (celebritising them).

First, this means portraying them as extraordinary people worthy of admiration. For example, in «OT» this is done in the weekly shows, in which the contestants demonstrate their remarkable singing abilities that differentiate them from ordinary people. The contestants’ physical appearance and televisual representation are also exceptional: dressed up and made up like stars the contestants perform in a space designed to mimic a pop concert, with an elaborate and spectacular set design and visual aesthetics. This reference is not trivial, given that concerts are a ritual in which fans can show their commitment to the singer they admire, and the singer can establish a more direct and emotional relationship with their fans (Marshall, 1997: 158-159). Significantly, below the stage on which the contestants sing there is a large pit full of spectators standing up. Thanks to this stage design, the contestants are shown acting for an enthralled audience, who surround the stage and raise their hands towards them, which they also do when the contestants cross the bridge to the judges’ area. This is a way of representing the visibility gained by the contestants (we see them being watched and admired)10.

The weekly shows and live performances show the unique and extraordinary qualities of the contestants, but «OT» and «Fama» also include contents that try to answer the question of what the contestants/ stars are «really» like (Dyer, 1986: 8-18). Therefore, the contestants are also portrayed as «normal» people (constructing in this way the ordinary/extraordinary dialectic on which the discourses on stars are traditionally built (Dyer, 2001: 55-68; Marshall, 1997: 79-94).

This is done mainly through the daily programmes, which show the everyday life of the contestants in the house/school. In these programmes we see everything that is hidden behind the performances (rehearsals, suffering, nerves) with the aim of showing the hidden side of the participants in order to enrich the public image created in the weekly shows (they have an equivalent function to gossip magazines). In this sense, it is significant that the aesthetic conventions of «Big Brother» are used to emphasise the authenticity of the images and that the contestants’ feelings are revealed through confessions. Both in «Fama» (in the diary room) and «OT» (in the videoblogs on the programme’s website), the contestants express their feelings or they communicate with their fans through monologues, establishing an intimate relationship with the viewers based on the expression of «authentic» emotions (Aslama & Pantti, 2006).

Finally, another way of «celebritising» the contestants is to construct the model viewer as a fan. Firstly, this is done through the game rules: the voting is in favour of the contestants (to save them, not to evict them), and therefore appeals to their followers (this happens in «OT» throughout the entire programme and in «Fama» in the last part of the contest). Second, the structure of the programmes, with contents that spread over different time slots and the Web, constructs a model viewer that gathers information to create a consistent identity of the two sides of the contestant (on and off the stage). Finally, the repercussions the programmes have in the outside world are included in the text, showing images of fans that go to CD signings and performances, yelling, holding up signs and wearing T-shirts with supportive slogans. In this way the programmes try to go beyond the limits of the pure textuality on which the contestants are «celebritised».

3.2.3. The formula for success

These programmes establish a dialectic/tension between talent and popularity as the foundations of professional success (in this case of a singer/dancer). It is in the contest rules where these tensions are shown most clearly, specifically in the power shared by the judges/teachers (guarantors of talent) and the viewers (indications of popularity).

In «OT» there is a self-conscious and reflexive discourse on this dialectic, given that the programme’s rule design facilitates conflict between these two poles. The decision about the contestant’s future is shared by four groups of characters who use different criteria: the judges, the teachers, the contestants and the viewers. Consequently, disagreements are constantly arising between them. Therefore, although the characteristics that identify a good singer seem clear (be in tune, interpret correctly, vocalise, have a unique style, be versatile, have charisma), the balance that should be established between these is less obvious, especially in relation to the need to be competent at the vocal level and have the «x factor» necessary for generating fans (which is not necessarily linked to the first). It is through the game rules that «OT» tips the balance in favour of this second element: although mechanisms are established so that the judges and teachers can safeguard talent, the rules give more power to the audience, for example, through the figure of the public’s «favourite», who cannot be nominated by the judges, or the system for choosing the finalists and the winner, in which the judges have no power at all. A good example of this is Virginia, who won «OT 2008» after overcoming numerous nominations and the explicit opposition of the teachers and some of the judges.

However, in «Fama» there is an attempt to present talent and popularity as causal: popularity is a direct consequence of talent and work. In this programme the teachers are also judges and have a lot of power (they can nominate and evict contestants), while the viewers vote to evict contestants, which makes it easier for the worst dancers to be eliminated. Only in the last week is all the power given to the audience to choose their favourite dancer. However, this does not prevent disruptions and conflicts from arising within the programme; an example is Paula and Jandro, who reached the final thanks to the audience vote although their dance technique was not as good as the rest of the finalists.

4. Discussion

In «OT» and «Fama» professional success is directly related to public recognition, and anonymity is represented as a problem that needs to be solved. Therefore, fame is prescribed as a life aspiration and the programmes legitimise the idea that «being famous appears to offer enormous material, economic, social and psychic rewards» and that stars are at the «centre» of things, so that «if you are not famous then you exist at the periphery of the power networks that circulate in and through the popular media» (Holmes & Redmond, 2006: 2).

The two programmes tell the story of the metamorphosis of ordinary young people into stars, and apparently they both enter completely into the debate on the democratisation of fame implied by reality TV (Holmes, 2004a, 2004b, 2006; Bennett & Holmes, 2010; Turner, 2004: 71-86). Although the traditional definition of a «star» is based on a combination of talent, hard work and luck, programmes like «Big Brother» disassociate fame from work and talent (Biressi & Nunn, 2005: 144-155). However, «Fama» and «OT» are based on this conventional definition and this is, perhaps, one of the reasons behind the great acceptance of this format (Cáceres, 2002).

The fact that the reality TV shows analysed adopt the traditional definition of fame leads us to identify two more values. First, the representation of a meritocratic society, in which there is an equal access to opportunities but an unequal result in function of talent and effort. That is, anyone, thanks to luck, talent and hard work, can be a star, but at the same time the need to have talent limits the possibilities of success (Marshall, 1997: 79-94). Second (and linked to the meritocracy), stars are paradigms of the individualism on which capitalist societies are based: they are individuals with power and freedom who have arrived to where their talent and work has taken them independently of their origins.

However, in «OT» and «Fama» this emphasis on meritocracy and individualism is made compatible with the subordination of the participants: they have little power within the plot (remember that they are still not «heroes») and a strong inequality is established between them and the other characters of the programme (teachers, judges and viewers). In conclusion, these programmes do not value the individual entrepreneur as much as the «good worker» who is capable of adapting without complaining to the demands of a changing work environment, which calls for constant updating and reinvention (Ouellette & Hay, 2008: 99-133). Therefore, although the programmes promote the idea that each participant needs the «x factor» which marks them out from the rest, their objective is to model the contestants. Therefore, these programmes enter the debate on authenticity and artifice that hangs over the concept of stardom (Marshall, 1997: 150-184; Gamson, 1994: 40-54).

In fact, both «OT» and «Fama» are complex and contradictory texts. On one hand, they convey and legitimise a naïve definition of fame: stars as unique individuals, chosen by the public for their talent and effort. And on the other hand, they reveal the mechanisms involved in the manufacture of fame (following the current trend in the media identified by Gamson, 1994: 40-54). Thus, these programmes allow a distanced reading of fame and its generation process and, at the same time, they can create stars.

In relation to work, as well as being an opportunity for social mobility (which is also related to fame), work is represented as a means to self-fulfilment, and the programmes suggest that to be successful you must devote all your energy and sacrifice your personal life. In fact, the two programmes analysed propose a «return to authority», where discipline is the best way of achieving professional goals11. Although the emphasis on effort and discipline can be viewed positively, we can also identify a danger: the approach to work prescribed is that of the romantic ideal of the artist, which «provides an ideal rationale for encouraging labour without compensation» (Hendershot, 2009: 249-250), so that «the passion of work is presented as substitute for material compensation, security, pension plans, and so on» (Ouellette & Hay, 2008: 130)12.

Finally, in both programmes analysed, success does not only depend on talent and effort, it is also a question of appearances (physical appearance and the way of dressing and speaking). Therefore, we can relate «OT» and «Fama» to the concept of «phantasmagoric labour» (Sternberg, 1998), that is, the importance of appearances in the current work environment and the need to apply «branding» strategies to individuals (Ouellette & Hay, 2008: 99-13; Hearn, 2006). The two programmes analysed go into this aspect in depth: the participants are stars because they look like stars. This emphasis on the construction of a marketable image is directly related to the adaptability of the «good worker» mentioned above: it is in the area of appearances where this continual renewal can take place more easily.

In summary, «OT» and «Fama» reveal some of the tensions involved in the current work market. First, work is represented as a form of personal fulfilment and a way of moving up the socioeconomic ladder, and fame is a measure of success and a life aspiration. Second, these programmes convey a meritocratic vision of society in which each individual’s destiny is determined by their talent and effort; however, they also advocate the importance of constructing an image that could compensate for the lack of these. Finally, they define obedience and adaptability as desirable qualities in the workplace, while at the same time promoting the pursuit of uniqueness and individuality.

Notes

1 Reality TV shows that combine the features of documentaries, TV series and contests. The subgenre was born at the end of the 90s with «Expedition: Robinson» (Sweden, SVT, 1997) and «Big Brother» (Netherlands, Veronica, 1999).

2 The analysis protocol can be consulted in Oliva (2010: 183-191).

3 The model viewer is the viewer planned and created by the text: «A text is a product whose interpretation should form a part of its own generative mechanism: to generate a text means applying a strategy that includes the forecasts of the movements of the other» (Eco, 1981: 79). Obviously, an empirical viewer could interpret a text in different ways to the one proposed, but this type of interpretation is not considered in the present study.

4 «OT 2008»: weekly show 8 (03.06.2008), 11 (24.06.2008) and final show (22.07.2008). «OT 2009»: «El casting» (19.04.2009 and 26.04.2009), weekly show 0 (29.04.2009), 1 (06.05.2009) and the daily summaries of the third week (14.05.2009-20.05.2009). The rest of the weekly shows of the two editions have also been viewed.

5 Audition episodes: Madrid (26.12.2007), Valencia (01.01.2008) and Final audition (06.01.2008). Daily programmes: week 1-2 (07.01.2008-16.01.2008); week 9-10 (05.03.2008-11.03.2008) and the last week (21.04.2008-25.04.2008). Weekly shows: show 2 (30.03.2008), semifinal (27.04.2008) and final (28.04.2008). The rest of the shows of the first season have also been viewed.

6 Although only young people can participate in these programmes, the audition episodes include adult applicants.

7 The new couples that join the programme cannot keep up with the imposed rhythm and are eliminated, with few exceptions, a week after entering the programme.

8 See Cáceres (2002), an article that analyses «OT» as the story of a «quest».

9 It is important to remember that the present analysis is confined to the limits of the text, and does not analyse the effects the programmes have in the real world (that is, fame as the effect of media representation).

10 Part of the importance and significance of this set is constructed by the long path the contestants in the auditions need to follow, which portrays the story of the journey from anonymity (invisibility) to popularity (visibility).

11 The legitimation of authority and discipline is also a fundamental aspect of other contemporary reality TV shows like «Supernanny», «Hermano Mayor», «Ajuste de Cuentas» and «Cambio Radical». See Oliva (2010).

12 This can be related to the labour exploitation allegations made by Víctor Sampedro (2002) in relation to these programmes.

References

Aranda, D. & De Felipe, F. (2006). Guión audiovisual. Barcelona: UOC.

Aslama, M. & Pantti, M. (2006). Talking Alone. Reality TV, Emotions and Authenticity. European Journal of Cultural Studies, 9(2), 167-184.

Bennett, J. & Holmes, S. (2010). The «Place» of Television in Celebrity Studies. Celebrity Studies, 1, 1, 65-80.

Biressi, A. & Nunn, H. (2005). Reality TV. Realism and revelation. London: Wallflower Press.

Bordwell, D. & Thompson, C. (1995). El arte cinematográfico. Barcelona: Paidós.

Cáceres, M.D. (2002). «Operación Triunfo» o el restablecimiento del orden social. Zer, 13.

Casetti, F. & Di Chio, F. (1999). Análisis de la televisión. Bar celona: Paidós.

Castañares, W. (2006). La televisión moralista. Valores y sentimientos en el discurso televisivo. Madrid: Fragua.

Cebrián, M. (2003). Estrategia multimedia de la televisión en «Ope ración Triunfo». Madrid: Ciencia 3.

Courtés, J. (1980). Introducción a la semiótica narrativa y discursiva. Buenos Aires: Hachette.

Dyer, R. (1986). Heavently Bodies. Film Stars and Society. Lon don: MacMillan Press.

Dyer, R. (2001). Las estrellas cinematográficas. Historia, ideología, estética. Barcelona: Paidós.

Eco, U. (1981). Lector in fabula. Barcelona: Lumen.

Egenfeldt-Nielsen, S., Heide Smith, J. & Pajares Tosca, S. (2008), Understanding Video Games. London: Routledge.

Fouce, H. (2008). No es lo mismo. Audiencias activas y públicos masivos en la era de la música digital. In M. De Aguilera, J.E. Adell & A. Sedeño (Eds.), Comunicación y música II. Tecnología y audiencias (pp. 111-134). Barcelona: UOC Press.

Gamson, J. (1994). Claims to Fame. Celebrity in Contemporary America. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Gaudreault, A. & Jost, F. (1995). El relato cinematográfico. Ci ne y narratología. Barcelona: Paidós.

Greimas, A.J. (1971). Semántica estructural. Investigación metodológica. Madrid: Gredos.

Hearn, A. (2006). John, a 20-year-old Boston Native with a Great Sense of Humor. On the Spectacularization of the «Self» and the Incorporation of Identity in the Age of Reality Television. In P.D. Mar shall (Ed.). The Celebrity Culture Reader (pp. 618-633). Lon don: Routledge.

Hendershot, H. (2009). Belabored Reality. Making it Work on The Simple Life and Project Runway. In S. Murray & L. Ouelle tte (Eds.), Reality TV. Remaking Television Culture (pp. 243-259). New York: New York University Press.

Holmes, S. & Redmon, S. (2006). Introduction. Understanding Ce lebrity Culture. In S. Holmes & S. Redmon (Eds.), Framing Ce le brity. New Directions in Celebrity Culture (pp. 1-16). London: Routledge.

Holmes, S. (2004a). «Reality Goes Pop!». Reality TV, Popular Music, and Narratives of Stardom in Pop Idol. Television & New Media, 5, 2, 147-172.

Holmes, S. (2004b). All You’ve Got to Worry about is the Task, Having a Cup of Tea, and Doing a bit of Sunbathing. Approaching Celebrity in Big Brother. In S. Holmes & D. Jermyn (Eds.), Un der standing Reality Television (pp. 111-135). London: Routled ge.

Juul, J. (2005). Half-Real. Videogames between Real Rules and Fictional Worlds. Cambridge, London: MIT Press.

Kozloff, S. (1992). Narrative Theory and Television. In Allen, R.C. (Ed.), Channels of Discourse, Reassembled. Television and Con temporary Criticism (pp. 67-100). London: Routledge.

Marshall, P.D. (1997). Celebrity and Power. Fame in Contem po rary Culture. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Oliva, M. (2010). Disciplinar la realitat. Narratives, models i va lors dels «realities» de transformació. Barcelona: Tesis doctoral, Uni versitat Pompeu Fabra. (www.tdx.cat/handle/10803/7272) (22- 06-2011).

Ouellette, L. & Hay, J. (2008). Better Living through Reality TV. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing.

Pérez-Latorre, O. (2010). Análisis de la significación del video jue go. Fundamentos teóricos del juego, el mundo narrativo y la enunciación interactiva como perspectivas de estudio del discurso. Barcelona: Tesis doctoral, Universitat Pompeu Fabra. (www.tesis en red.net/handle/10803/7273) (22-06-2011).

Pérez-Ornia, J.R. (2004). El anuario de la televisión 2004. Ma drid: GECA.

Redden, G. (2008). Making over the Talent Show. In G. Palmer (Ed.), Exposing Lifestyle Television. The Big Reveal (pp. 129-143). Aldershot: Ashgate.

Ruiz-Collantes, X. (2009). Anexo. Aportaciones metodológicas. Parrillas de análisis: estructuras narrativas, estructuras enunciativas. Questiones Publicitarias, 3, 294-329.

Ruiz-Collantes, X., Ferrés, J. & al. (2006). La imatge pública de la immigració en les sèries de televisió. Quaderns del CAC, 23-24, 103-126.

Salen, K. & Zimmerman, E. (2003). Rules of Play. Game Design Fundamentals. Cambridge, London: MIT Press.

Sampedro, V. (2002). Telebasura. Mctele y ETT. Zer, 13, 29-45.

Selva, D. (2003/04). El televoto como fórmula comercial. El caso de «Operación Triunfo». Comunicación, 2, 129-144.

Sternberg, E. (1998). Phantasmagoric Labor. The New Eco no mics of Self-presentation. Futures, 30(1), 3-28.

Turner, G. (2004). Understanding Celebrity. London: Routledge.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

El presente artículo tiene como objetivo analizar los valores vehiculados por «Operación Triunfo» y «Fama ¡a bailar!». Su relevancia como objeto de estudio reside en su popularidad (especialmente entre los jóvenes) y su carácter prescriptivo (transmiten modelos de vida a partir de la identificación de problemas y la propuesta de objetivos y soluciones). Este artículo explora cómo representan el ámbito profesional y el concepto de la fama «Operación Triunfo» y «Fama ¡a bailar!», dos temas poco analizados hasta ahora en España. Para ello, se propone una metodología que combina la semiótica narrativa, el análisis de la enunciación audiovisual y el estudio de las reglas del concurso. El análisis revela que en estos programas se representan el éxito profesional como gratificante a nivel personal y socioeconómico, aunque también muy difícil de conseguir. Para alcanzarlo, los concursantes son transformados mediante el aprendizaje y la «celebritización». Finalmente, hay en estos programas una fuerte tensión entre el talento y la popularidad como formas de llegar al éxito. El artículo concluye que «Operación Triunfo» y «Fama ¡a bailar!» son programas que prescriben la fama como aspiración vital y reflexionan sobre su proceso de producción; transmiten una visión meritocrática de la sociedad actual; ponen en escena la importancia de la imagen en el entorno laboral y definen un buen profesional como alguien apasionado, maleable y capaz de sacrificar su vida personal.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción: objeto de estudio y objetivos

En 2001 se estrenó en España «Operación Triunfo», programa que inauguró una nueva tendencia dentro de los «reality game shows»1 en nuestro país. Se trataba de un formato que aunaba las características de «Pop Idol» (Reino Unido, ITV, 2001) y «Gran Hermano». Como «Pop Idol», es un concurso en el que jóvenes desconocidos y con capacidades para cantar, compiten entre ellos a lo largo de varias semanas para conseguir un contrato discográfico, y en el que la audiencia (en base a una preselección propuesta por un jurado) elige qué concursantes pasan cada fase hasta ganar. Como en «Gran Hermano», los concursantes conviven en un espacio cerrado, aislado y lleno de cámaras mientras reciben clases; el programa se organiza a partir de galas semanales de nominación/expulsión y resúmenes diarios de la «cotidianidad» de los jóvenes en la academia; los contenidos se expanden a lo largo de distintas franjas horarias y medios siguiendo la lógica del «killer format» (Pérez Ornia, 2004: 81-84).

En España la fórmula de «Operación Triunfo» fue emulada por otros programas, siguiendo el ciclo de innovación/repetición/saturación característico de los medios de comunicación: «Academia de actores» (Antena 3, 2002); «Popstars» (Telecinco, 2002); «Supermodelo» (Cuatro, 2006-2008); «Fama» ¡a bailar!» (Cuatro 2007-11); «Circus» (Cuatro, 2008) y «El aprendiz» (LaSexta, 2010). De éstos, solamente «Fama ¡a bailar!» ha tenido cierto éxito y varias ediciones. En este «reality», jóvenes bailarines no profesionales compiten entre ellos para conseguir una beca de estudios. El programa parte de la fórmula de «Operación Triunfo», pero incluye algunas modificaciones: aunque es un concurso individual, los concursantes compiten en parejas; se introducen nuevos concursantes tras las expulsiones semanales; los profesores son también jurado; y el programa se basa en emisiones diarias que incluyen actuaciones, nominaciones y expulsiones y sólo al cabo de unas semanas se incorporan las galas semanales.

Estos programas han tenido un fuerte impacto en el panorama televisivo español y en el imaginario social, especialmente en relación a la redefinición de la fama y la forma de entender el ámbito laboral. Es por ello que el presente artículo tiene como objetivo analizar los valores vehiculados por «Operación Triunfo» –«OT», de aquí en adelante– y «Fama ¡a bailar!» –«Fama», de aquí en adelante– en relación a estos dos ámbitos.

En España «OT» ha sido analizado desde distintas perspectivas, entre las que destacan los estudios sobre su carácter interactivo y el papel reservado a la audiencia (Selva, 2003/04; Castañares 2006; Fouce, 2008), su estrategia multimedia de expansión (Cebrián, 2003) y también los valores vehiculados (Cáceres, 2002; Sampedro, 2002, dos análisis próximos al que se propone aquí). Ahora bien, no se ha prestado demasiada atención teórica al discurso de este programa sobre la fama (perspectiva que puede ser reveladora y productiva, tal como demuestran Holmes (2004a), Ouellette y Hay (2008) y Redden (2008), ni se ha relacionado el programa con otros formatos similares, como «Fama».

Este artículo se enmarca en una investigación más amplia que se presentó como tesis doctoral en la Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Oliva, 2010), en la que se analizaba «Cambio Radical», «Desnudas», «Esta casa era una ruina», «Supernanny», «Hermano Mayor», «Ajuste de Cuentas», «Operación Triunfo» y «Fama ¡a bailar!». En este artículo se sintetizan los principales resultados y conclusiones de los capítulos dedicados a los dos últimos formatos.

2. Material y métodos

Para responder a la pregunta principal de análisis –¿qué valores vehiculan «OT» y «Fama» en relación al trabajo y la fama?– se ha utilizado el análisis textual (Casetti & Di Chio, 1999: 249-292), es decir, el estudio detallado de los elementos que forman parte de una obra audiovisual para entender su funcionamiento y significación. El texto en sí, independientemente de las lecturas personales que se puedan hacer de él, es la base de la interpretación del espectador, aquello que centra y guía su lectura. Así, aunque el receptor tiene un importante poder en la descodificación, no podemos olvidar la responsabilidad del texto en relación a los valores vehiculados y prescritos.

Para llevar a cabo este estudio se ha construido un protocolo de análisis2 que une dos perspectivas del análisis textual consolidadas, pero que no es habitual encontrar combinadas en una misma investigación: la semiótica narrativa y el estudio de la enunciación audiovisual.

La semiótica narrativa consiste en el análisis de la estructura de los relatos. En primer lugar, se analiza qué roles narrativos ejercen dentro de la historia los personajes (aspirantes, concursantes, profesores, jurado y espectadores). Los roles identificados son: sujeto de acción (héroe), sujeto de estado (padece las acciones del sujeto de acción), objeto de valor (aquello deseado), destinador y destinatario del contrato (encarga y recibe, respectivamente, una misión), oponente (obstaculiza las acciones del sujeto de acción), adyuvante (ayuda al sujeto de acción), rival (ansía el mismo objeto de valor que el sujeto de acción), destinador y destinatario de la sanción (da y recibe, respectivamente, reconocimiento o castigo). En segundo lugar, se analizan los estados de los actantes (iniciales y finales, de conjunción o disjunción respecto el objeto de valor o competencias de acción), las acciones y las transformaciones de estado consecuencia de éstas.

Para elaborar la parrilla de análisis se han tenido en cuenta las aportaciones de Greimas (1971) y Courtés (1980), autores fundadores de la disciplina, así otros trabajos (Ruiz-Collantes, Ferrés & al., 2006; Ruiz-Collantes, 2009), que ha adaptado esta metodología al análisis de textos audiovisuales. Tal como demuestran las investigaciones de Ruiz-Collantes, la asignación sistemática de roles y estados a determinados grupos sociales tiene una gran importancia en relación a la representación de estos colectivos.

A estos elementos más abstractos se les ha sumado el estudio de las características de los personajes (género, edad, clase social, hábitat, aspecto físico) y los espacios: estructura y diseño del entorno en el que se desarrollan las acciones (Cassetti & Di Chio, 1999: 274-279).

El análisis del enunciado se ha completado con el análisis de la enunciación audiovisual, cuyo objetivo es identificar la significación que se desprende de «cómo» es relatada una historia y cómo el texto guía la interpretación del espectador y construye a un espectador modelo (Eco, 1981)3. Se han analizado detalladamente el lenguaje audiovisual (planos y movimientos de cámara, sonido y música, edición, infografía, iluminación) y los recursos narrativos del relato: organización (en actos narrativos, clímax, puntos de giro), temporalidad (orden, duración y frecuencia), punto de vista (cómo se distribuye la información entre espectador y personajes) y presencia de narradores explícitos y narratarios (receptores de la narración presentes en el texto, por ejemplo, el público de plató). La parrilla de análisis de los recursos de la enunciación se ha elaborado a partir de las aportaciones de: Bordwell y Thompson (1995); Gaudreault y Jost (1995); Kozloff (1992); Casetti y Di Chio (1999: 249-292); Aranda y De Felipe (2006). Además, puesto que «OT» y «Fama» son concursos, a estas dos metodologías se ha sumado una tercera, menos utilizada en el ámbito televisivo: el análisis de las reglas de juego. Tal como demuestra Pérez-Latorre (2010), las reglas de un juego vehiculan también significación y valores. Para elaborar el protocolo de análisis se ha partido de aportaciones de la ludología y la teoría de los juegos ya canónicas (Egenfeldt-Nielsen, Heide-Smith & Pajares-Tosca 2008; Juul, 2005; Salen & Zimmerman, 2003). Se han analizado las reglas explicitadas en el programa que organizan el funcionamiento del concurso y guían las acciones de concursantes, profesores, jurado y espectadores (acciones permitidas, acciones prohibidas, acciones obligatorias), las condiciones de victoria (cómo se gana) y derrota (cómo se pierde) y el diseño de la dificultad del concurso. Este protocolo de análisis se ha aplicado a un corpus formado por castings, programas diarios y galas de «OT 2008» y «OT 2009» (Telecinco)4 y la primera temporada de «Fama» (Cuatro)5.

3. Resultados

Este apartado sintetiza los principales resultados del análisis de «OT» y «Fama» a través de la metodología explicada en el apartado anterior. Para una mayor claridad, este apartado se ha organizado temáticamente, poniendo en relación los resultados del análisis semio-narrativo, enunciativo y lúdico de la muestra.

3.1. El éxito profesional como objeto de valor

En «OT» y «Fama» el éxito profesional es el objeto de valor (OV principal) perseguido por los participantes y prescrito a los espectadores. Significativamente, el éxito profesional se equipara en estos programas con la fama, es decir, el reconocimiento público y la notoriedad. Además, también se identifica como una forma de realización personal y como medio para ascender social y económicamente.

Así pues, los aspirantes/concursantes son identificados como personajes incompletos ya que no han conseguido este éxito profesional aún (no pueden dedicarse profesionalmente a lo que quieren y/o no son famosos). «OT» y «Fama» se presentan como «instituciones» capaces de dar a los concursantes las competencias necesarias para conseguirlo. En consecuencia, participar en el concurso y ganarlo serán OV instrumentales, aunque en el discurso del programa se establece una relación directa entre conseguir el OV instrumental y el principal, de manera que se transfiere la importancia del segundo al primero. Esto queda claro en los castings, en los que se pone en escena que para los aspirantes entrar en el programa (y ganarlo) es en sí mismo un sueño.

En los programas de casting, las largas colas, la inclusión de aspirantes sin ningún tipo de talento en el montaje final y la diversidad de los aspirantes y concursantes en relación a la clase social, formación, hábitat, género y, en menor medida, edad6, transmiten la idea de un acceso democrático y universal a la oportunidad de conseguir el OV instrumental (y principal). Ahora bien, sólo un pequeño número podrá convertirse en concursantes y solamente uno de ellos ganará el concurso. Así pues, aunque cualquiera tiene la oportunidad, solamente los «mejores» podrán conseguir el OV.

En los programas de casting también se legitima y carga de connotaciones positivas el OV principal y, sobre todo, el instrumental (cosa que ayuda a legitimar el propio programa). Para ello el proceso de selección de los concursantes está construido sobre una estructura ritualizada de fases, pruebas y veredictos que maximiza las reacciones emotivas de los aspirantes, enfatizadas a su vez por los recursos enunciativos: primeros planos, música extradiegética, cámara lenta, focalización interna respecto los participantes para generar intriga, rótulos sobreimpresos y dilatación temporal.

3.2. Métodos de consecución prescritos

Una vez los concursantes han sido seleccionados empieza su proceso de transformación. Éste se basa en dos pilares: el aprendizaje –la mejora de sus cualidades vocales/físicas– y la «celebritización» –su construcción como estrellas para ganar popularidad y valor comercial–, dos «soluciones» prescritas por estos programas para alcanzar el éxito profesional.

3.2.1. Aprendizaje

«OT» y «Fama» no son simples concursos de talentos, sino que tienen como objetivo transformar a los participantes a través de la enseñanza. Significativamente los dos formatos utilizan el símil de la escuela para designar los espacios y actividades que llevan a cabo los participantes. A continuación se van a reseguir los valores que guían esta dimensión del programa.

En primer lugar, el esfuerzo y sacrificio. Es significativo el diseño del espacio de la academia/escuela. En este entorno no hay una separación estricta entre los espacios de la vida personal y profesional. El caso extremo es «Fama», en el que cualquier habitación se convierte en sala de ensayo, reflejo de cómo la esfera profesional se expande y coloniza el espacio personal. Además, los concursantes tienen que soportar una importante carga de trabajo (sobre todo en «Fama»), que se enfatiza en los resúmenes diarios gracias a la estructura serial y a un relato organizado a partir de las clases y los ensayos. Finalmente, el aislamiento al que son sometidos los participantes durante el concurso prescribe el sacrificio de la vida personal y familiar en favor de la búsqueda del éxito.

En segundo lugar, la exigencia. Ésta muchas veces está disfrazada de expectativas depositadas en los participantes por parte de los profesores, de manera que la decepción es habitualmente invocada cuando un concursante no llega al nivel requerido. Por ejemplo, en «Fama» esta exigencia desmedida se pone en escena a través de unas reglas de juego que no tienen en cuenta el aumento progresivo de la dificultad y que son la causa de la «maldición de los nuevos»7. La presión consigue, al mismo tiempo, reacciones emotivas por parte de los participantes (mostradas y enfatizadas a través de los recursos de la enunciación audiovisual), que otra vez sirven para mostrar la importancia que el OV instrumental –y principal– tiene para ellos.

Finalmente, la disciplina es otro elemento característico. Los participantes deben subordinarse a las órdenes de los profesores y a los comentarios del jurado (muchas veces humillantes), sin poder ponerlas en duda ni siquiera en la intimidad, puesto que están sometidos a videovigilancia y son valorados también por la actitud demostrada en su «vida privada». Se establece así una fuerte desigualdad entre profesores/jurado y concursantes, más aún cuando los participantes no tienen ningún control sobre su proceso de formación y su identidad/imagen pública como bailarín o cantante. En los dos programas se impone a los jóvenes qué piezas deben interpretar, qué actitud deben adoptar en el escenario, cómo deben moverse, cómo deben vestirse.

Esto lleva a una ambigüedad en los roles asignados a los personajes: aunque pueda parecer que en el relato de «OT» y «Fama» los participantes tienen el rol de sujetos de acción (héroes)8, en realidad estos programas centran su atención en «la forja del héroe» (es decir, un subprograma narrativo que relata cómo los concursantes ganan las competencias necesarias para convertirse en sujeto de acción), mientras que el programa narrativo principal de la historia (en el que los concursantes, convertidos en héroes, adquieren por sí mismos el OV principal) es eludido. Esto también refuerza la confusión del OV instrumental (ganar el concurso) con el principal (convertirse en estrellas).

3.2.2. «Celebritización»

Además de ofrecer clases, «Fama» y «OT» utilizan otro método para transformar a los concursantes: representarlos como estrellas9 («celebritizarlos»).

En primer lugar, esto implica identificarlos como personas extraordinarias a las que admirar. Por ejemplo, en «OT» esto se hace en las galas semanales. En éstas los concursantes demuestran sus capacidades vocales (aquello que los identifica como alguien «fuera de lo común»). Pero también su aspecto físico y representación es excepcional: vestidos y maquillados como estrellas actúan en un espacio cuyo diseño remite a un concierto de música pop, con una escenografía y realización cuidada y espectacular. Este referente no es banal, ya que los conciertos son un ritual en el que los fans demuestran su compromiso con el cantante al que admiran y éste puede establecer una relación más directa y afectiva con los fans (Marshall, 1997: 158-159). Significativamente, bajo el escenario en el que actúan los concursantes se extiende un gran foso lleno de espectadores de pie. Gracias a este diseño del espacio durante las actuaciones es posible mostrar a los concursantes actuando para un público entregado, que rodea el escenario y levanta las manos hacia ellos, gesto que repiten cuando cruzan la pasarela hacia la zona del jurado. Se representa así la visibilidad ganada por los concursantes (les vemos ser mirados y admirados)10.

Si las galas y actuaciones en directo muestran aquello que los concursantes tienen de extraordinario y único, en «OT» y «Fama» también se incorpora en el programa contenidos que intentan responder la pregunta de cómo son «realmente» los concursantes/estrellas (Dyer, 1986: 8-18). De esta forma se representa también a los concursantes como personas «normales» (construyendo así la dialéctica ordinario/extraordinario sobre la que se construyen tradicionalmente los discursos sobre las estrellas (Dyer, 2001: 55-68; Marshall, 1997: 79-94).

Esto se hace principalmente a través de los programas diarios, que muestran la cotidianidad de los concursantes en la casa/escuela. En estos programas vemos todo lo que se oculta detrás de las actuaciones (los ensayos, el sufrimiento, los nervios) y su objetivo es mostrar la cara oculta de los participantes para así enriquecer la imagen pública creada en las galas (un equivalente a la función de las revistas del corazón). En este sentido, es importante el uso de las convenciones estéticas de «Gran Hermano», que enfatizan la autenticidad de estas imágenes, así como la representación de los sentimientos de los participantes a través de la confesión. Tanto en «Fama» (en el confesionario) como en «OT» (en los videoblogs de la web), los concursantes expresan mediante monólogos sus sentimientos y sensaciones o se comunican con sus fans, estableciendo una relación íntima con los espectadores a partir de la expresión de emociones «auténticas» (Aslama & Pantti, 2006).

Finalmente, otra forma de «celebritizar» a los concursantes es construir al espectador modelo como fan. En primer lugar, esto se hace mediante las reglas de juego: las votaciones son a favor de los concursantes (para salvar, no para expulsar), apelando así a los seguidores –esto pasa en «OT» a lo largo de todo el programa y en «Fama» en el tramo final del concurso–. En segundo lugar, la estructura de los programas, con contenidos que se expanden a lo largo de la parrilla televisiva y la web, construye a un espectador modelo que recopila información para crear una identidad coherente de las dos caras del concursante (delante y detrás del escenario). Finalmente, se incorpora en el texto la repercusión que tiene el programa en el mundo exterior, mostrando imágenes de fans que acuden a las firmas de discos y las actuaciones, gritando y llevando carteles y camisetas de apoyo. De esta forma el programa intenta romper los límites de la pura textualidad sobre la que se «celebritiza» a los concursantes.

3.2.3. La fórmula del éxito

En estos programas se establece una dialéctica/tensión entre el talento y la popularidad como la base del éxito profesional (en este caso, de un cantante/bailarín). Es en las reglas del concurso donde se muestra más claramente estas tensiones, concretamente en el poder que comparten jurado/profesores (garantes del talento) y espectadores (índices de la popularidad).

En «OT» hay un discurso autoconsciente y reflexivo respecto a esta dialéctica, ya que el diseño de las reglas facilita el conflicto entre estos dos polos. Así, la decisión sobre el futuro de los concursantes es compartida por cuatro grupos de personajes que utilizan criterios distintos: el jurado, los profesores, los concursantes y los espectadores. Consecuentemente, se generan continuos desacuerdos entre ellos. Así pues, aunque los valores que permiten identificar a un buen cantante parecen claros –afinar, interpretar correctamente, vocalizar, tener un estilo propio, ser versátil y tener carisma–, cuál es el equilibrio que se tiene que establecer entre éstos no lo es tanto, especialmente en relación a la necesidad de ser competente a nivel vocal y tener el «factor x» necesario para generar fans (y que no va necesariamente ligado al primero). Es a través de las reglas de juego que «OT» decanta la balanza a favor de este segundo elemento: aunque se establecen mecanismos para que el jurado y los profesores puedan salvaguardar el talento, las reglas dan un mayor poder a la audiencia, por ejemplo, a través de la figura del «favorito» del público, que se salva de las nominaciones, o el sistema de elección de los finalistas y ganadores, en el que el jurado ya no tiene ningún poder. Un buen ejemplo de esto es el caso de Virginia, que ganó «OT 2008» después de superar numerosas nominaciones y la oposición explícita de profesores y parte del jurado.

En cambio, en «Fama» se intenta presentar el talento y la popularidad como causales: la popularidad es una consecuencia directa del talento y el trabajo. Así, en este programa los profesores son también jurado y tienen mucho poder (nominan y expulsan), mientras que los espectadores votan para expulsar, facilitando que los peores bailarines sean eliminados. Solamente en la última semana se da todo el poder a la audiencia para elegir a su bailarín favorito. Ahora bien, esto no evita que se puedan producir desajustes y conflictos en el interior del programa, por ejemplo, Paula y Jandro, que llegaron a la final gracias al voto del público aunque su nivel técnico era inferior al del resto de finalistas.

4. Discusión

En «OT» y «Fama» el éxito profesional se relaciona directamente con el reconocimiento público y se representa el anonimato como problema que necesita solucionarse. Así pues, prescriben la popularidad como aspiración vital y legitiman la idea de que «ser famoso ofrece grandes recompensas a nivel material, económico, social y psicológico» y que las estrellas están en el «centro» de las cosas de manera que «si no eres famoso, entonces existes en la periferia de las redes del poder que circulan a través de los medios» (Holmes & Redmond, 2006: 2). En su relato de la transformación de jóvenes anónimos en estrellas, los dos programas analizados aparentemente entran de lleno en el debate sobre la democratización de la fama que implica la tele-realidad (Holmes, 2004a, 2004b, 2006; Bennett & Holmes, 2010; Turner, 2004: 71-86). A diferencia de la definición tradicional de «estrella», que se basa en la combinación de talento, trabajo duro y suerte, programas como «Gran Hermano» desligan la fama del trabajo y el talento (Biressi & Nunn, 2005: 144-155). Ahora bien, «Fama» y «OT» sí se basan en esta concepción legitimada de estrella y esto es, quizá, una de las razones que explica la gran aceptación que ha tenido el formato (Cáceres, 2002).

Esta adscripción de los «realities» analizados a la definición tradicional de fama nos lleva a identificar dos valores más. En primer lugar, una representación meritocrática de la sociedad, en la que hay una igualdad de acceso a las oportunidades pero un resultado desigual en función del talento y el esfuerzo. Es decir, cualquiera gracias a la suerte, el talento y el trabajo duro puede ser una estrella, pero al mismo tiempo la necesidad de tener talento limita la posibilidad de éxito (Marshall, 1997: 79-94). En segundo lugar (y ligado a la meritocracia), las estrellas son paradigmas del individualismo sobre el que se basa la sociedad capitalista: individuos con poder y libertad que han llegado hasta donde su talento y trabajo les ha llevado, independientemente de sus orígenes. Ahora bien, en «OT» y «Fama» se compatibiliza este énfasis en la meritocracia y el individualismo con la subordinación de los participantes: tienen poco poder dentro del relato (recordemos que aún no son «héroes») y se establece una fuerte desigualdad entre ellos y los otros personajes del programa (profesores, jurado y espectadores).

En conclusión, en estos programas no se valora tanto el individuo emprendedor como el «buen trabajador» que es capaz de amoldarse sin quejarse a las demandas de un entorno laboral cambiante, que pide una constante actualización y reinvención (Ouellette & Hay, 2008: 99-133). Así, aunque se defiende la necesidad que cada participante tenga un «factor x» que lo distinga de los demás, el programa tiene como objetivo moldearlos. De esta forma, estos programas se adentran en el debate sobre autenticidad y artificio que planea sobre el mismo concepto de estrella (Marshall, 1997:150-184; Gamson, 1994: 40-54).

De hecho, tanto «OT» como «Fama» son textos complejos y contradictorios. Por un lado, ponen en escena y legitiman una definición ingenua de la fama: las estrellas como individuos únicos, elegidos por el público por su talento y esfuerzo. Por otro, ponen de relieve los resortes de la manufactura de la fama (siguiendo la tendencia actual de los medios identificada por Gamson, 1994: 40-54). De esta forma, estos textos permiten una lectura distanciada de la fama y su proceso de generación y, al mismo tiempo, pueden crear estrellas.

En relación al ámbito laboral, además de ser una oportunidad de movilidad social (aspecto relacionado también con la fama), el trabajo se representa como un medio de realización y se prescribe la entrega total y el sacrificio de la vida personal como forma de alcanzar el éxito. De hecho, los dos programas analizados propugnan un «retorno a la autoridad», en el que la disciplina es la forma de mejorar y alcanzar las propias metas11.

Aunque se puede valorar positivamente el énfasis en el esfuerzo y la disciplina, también podemos identificar un peligro: se prescribe una aproximación al trabajo siguiendo el ideal romántico del artista, cosa que «proporciona una lógica que fomenta el trabajo sin compensación económica» (Hendershot, 2009: 249-250), de manera que se presenta «la pasión por el trabajo como un sustituto de la compensación económica, la seguridad, los planes de pensiones, etcétera» (Ouellette & Hay, 2008: 130)12.

Finalmente, en los dos programas analizados el triunfo no solamente depende del talento y el esfuerzo, también es una cuestión de apariencias (aspecto físico, vestuario, forma de hablar…). Así pues, podemos relacionar «OT» y «Fama» con el concepto de trabajo fantasmagórico (Sternberg, 1998), es decir, la importancia de las apariencias en el entorno laboral actual y la necesidad de aplicar estrategias de «branding» a los individuos (Ouellette & Hay, 2008: 99-13; Hearn, 2006). Y es que los dos programas analizados trabajan a fondo este aspecto: de alguna forma los participantes son estrellas porque parecen estrellas. Este énfasis en la construcción de la propia imagen está directamente relacionado con la maleabilidad del «buen profesional» a la que nos referíamos: es en el ámbito de las apariencias donde esta continua renovación puede llevarse a cabo más fácilmente.

En resumen, encontramos en «OT» y «Fama» algunas de las tensiones del entorno laboral actual. En primer lugar, prescriben el trabajo como forma de realización personal y de ascensión socioeconómica, proponiendo la fama como medida del éxito y aspiración vital. En segundo lugar, transmiten una visión meritocrática de la sociedad en la que el destino de cada individuo lo determina su talento y esfuerzo, pero también defienden la importancia de construirse una imagen que pueda suplir la falta de éstos. Finalmente, definen la obediencia y maleabilidad como cualidades en el ámbito laboral, a la vez que defienden la búsqueda de la singularidad e individualidad.

Notas

1 Programas de tele-realidad que combinan las características de los documentales, la ficción seriada y los concursos. El subgénero nació a finales de los 90 con «Expedition: Robinson» (Suecia, SVT, 1997) y «Big Brother» (Holanda, Veronica, 1999).

2 Se puede consultar la parrilla de análisis construida para esta investigación en Oliva (2010: 183-191).

3 El espectador modelo es el espectador previsto y construido por el texto: «Un texto es un producto cuya suerte interpretativa debe formar parte de su propio mecanismo generativo: generar un texto significa aplicar una estrategia que incluye las previsiones de los movimientos del otro.» (Eco, 1981: 79). Obviamente, un espectador empírico podrá interpretar un texto de formas distintas a las propuestas por éste, pero este tipo de lecturas quedan fuera de los límites de la presente investigación.

4 «OT 2008»: Gala 8 (03.06.2008), 11 (24.06.2008) y la gala final (22.07.2008). «OT 2009»: «El casting» (19.04.2009 y 26.04.2009), la gala 0 (29.04.2009), 1 (06.05.2009) y los resúmenes diarios de la tercera semana (14.05.2009-20.05.2009). También se ha visionado el resto de galas de las dos ediciones.

5 Castings: Madrid (26.12.2007), Valencia (01.01.2008) y Casting final (06.01.2008). Programas diarios: semana 1-2 (07.01.2008-16.01.2008); Semana 9-10 (05.03.2008-11.03.2008) y la última semana (21.04.2008-25.04.2008). Galas semanales: Gala 2 (30.03.2008), semifinal (27.04.2008) y final (28.04.2008). También se ha visionado el resto de capítulos de la primera temporada.

6 Aunque solamente los jóvenes pueden participar en estos programas, en los castings se incluyen aspirantes adultos.

7 Las nuevas parejas que se incorporan al programa no pueden seguir el ritmo impuesto y son eliminadas, excepto contadas excepciones, una semana después de entrar.

8 Ver Cáceres (2002), artículo en el que se analiza «OT» como el relato de una «gesta».

9 Es importante recordar que el presente análisis se circunscribe a los límites del texto, quedando fuera de éste los efectos que tengan los programas analizados en el mundo real (es decir, la fama como efecto de la exposición mediática).

10 Parte de la importancia y significación que tiene este plató se construye mediante el largo camino que deben recorrer los concursantes en el casting, que constituye el relato de un viaje desde el anonimato (invisibilidad) a la popularidad (visibilidad).

11 La legitimación de la autoridad y la disciplina es también un aspecto fundamental de otros «realities» contemporáneos como «Supernanny», «Hermano Mayor», «Ajuste de Cuentas» o «Cambio Radical» (Oliva, 2010).

12 Esto se puede relacionar con las acusaciones de explotación laboral hechas por Víctor Sampedro (2002) en relación a estos programas.

Referencias

Aranda, D. & De Felipe, F. (2006). Guión audiovisual. Barcelona: UOC.

Aslama, M. & Pantti, M. (2006). Talking Alone. Reality TV, Emotions and Authenticity. European Journal of Cultural Studies, 9(2), 167-184.

Bennett, J. & Holmes, S. (2010). The «Place» of Television in Celebrity Studies. Celebrity Studies, 1, 1, 65-80.

Biressi, A. & Nunn, H. (2005). Reality TV. Realism and revelation. London: Wallflower Press.

Bordwell, D. & Thompson, C. (1995). El arte cinematográfico. Barcelona: Paidós.

Cáceres, M.D. (2002). «Operación Triunfo» o el restablecimiento del orden social. Zer, 13.

Casetti, F. & Di Chio, F. (1999). Análisis de la televisión. Bar celona: Paidós.

Castañares, W. (2006). La televisión moralista. Valores y sentimientos en el discurso televisivo. Madrid: Fragua.

Cebrián, M. (2003). Estrategia multimedia de la televisión en «Ope ración Triunfo». Madrid: Ciencia 3.

Courtés, J. (1980). Introducción a la semiótica narrativa y discursiva. Buenos Aires: Hachette.

Dyer, R. (1986). Heavently Bodies. Film Stars and Society. Lon don: MacMillan Press.

Dyer, R. (2001). Las estrellas cinematográficas. Historia, ideología, estética. Barcelona: Paidós.

Eco, U. (1981). Lector in fabula. Barcelona: Lumen.

Egenfeldt-Nielsen, S., Heide Smith, J. & Pajares Tosca, S. (2008), Understanding Video Games. London: Routledge.

Fouce, H. (2008). No es lo mismo. Audiencias activas y públicos masivos en la era de la música digital. In M. De Aguilera, J.E. Adell & A. Sedeño (Eds.), Comunicación y música II. Tecnología y audiencias (pp. 111-134). Barcelona: UOC Press.

Gamson, J. (1994). Claims to Fame. Celebrity in Contemporary America. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Gaudreault, A. & Jost, F. (1995). El relato cinematográfico. Ci ne y narratología. Barcelona: Paidós.

Greimas, A.J. (1971). Semántica estructural. Investigación metodológica. Madrid: Gredos.

Hearn, A. (2006). John, a 20-year-old Boston Native with a Great Sense of Humor. On the Spectacularization of the «Self» and the Incorporation of Identity in the Age of Reality Television. In P.D. Mar shall (Ed.). The Celebrity Culture Reader (pp. 618-633). Lon don: Routledge.

Hendershot, H. (2009). Belabored Reality. Making it Work on The Simple Life and Project Runway. In S. Murray & L. Ouelle tte (Eds.), Reality TV. Remaking Television Culture (pp. 243-259). New York: New York University Press.

Holmes, S. & Redmon, S. (2006). Introduction. Understanding Ce lebrity Culture. In S. Holmes & S. Redmon (Eds.), Framing Ce le brity. New Directions in Celebrity Culture (pp. 1-16). London: Routledge.

Holmes, S. (2004a). «Reality Goes Pop!». Reality TV, Popular Music, and Narratives of Stardom in Pop Idol. Television & New Media, 5, 2, 147-172.

Holmes, S. (2004b). All You’ve Got to Worry about is the Task, Having a Cup of Tea, and Doing a bit of Sunbathing. Approaching Celebrity in Big Brother. In S. Holmes & D. Jermyn (Eds.), Un der standing Reality Television (pp. 111-135). London: Routled ge.

Juul, J. (2005). Half-Real. Videogames between Real Rules and Fictional Worlds. Cambridge, London: MIT Press.

Kozloff, S. (1992). Narrative Theory and Television. In Allen, R.C. (Ed.), Channels of Discourse, Reassembled. Television and Con temporary Criticism (pp. 67-100). London: Routledge.

Marshall, P.D. (1997). Celebrity and Power. Fame in Contem po rary Culture. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Oliva, M. (2010). Disciplinar la realitat. Narratives, models i va lors dels «realities» de transformació. Barcelona: Tesis doctoral, Uni versitat Pompeu Fabra. (www.tdx.cat/handle/10803/7272) (22- 06-2011).

Ouellette, L. & Hay, J. (2008). Better Living through Reality TV. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing.

Pérez-Latorre, O. (2010). Análisis de la significación del video jue go. Fundamentos teóricos del juego, el mundo narrativo y la enunciación interactiva como perspectivas de estudio del discurso. Barcelona: Tesis doctoral, Universitat Pompeu Fabra. (www.tesis en red.net/handle/10803/7273) (22-06-2011).

Pérez-Ornia, J.R. (2004). El anuario de la televisión 2004. Ma drid: GECA.

Redden, G. (2008). Making over the Talent Show. In G. Palmer (Ed.), Exposing Lifestyle Television. The Big Reveal (pp. 129-143). Aldershot: Ashgate.

Ruiz-Collantes, X. (2009). Anexo. Aportaciones metodológicas. Parrillas de análisis: estructuras narrativas, estructuras enunciativas. Questiones Publicitarias, 3, 294-329.

Ruiz-Collantes, X., Ferrés, J. & al. (2006). La imatge pública de la immigració en les sèries de televisió. Quaderns del CAC, 23-24, 103-126.

Salen, K. & Zimmerman, E. (2003). Rules of Play. Game Design Fundamentals. Cambridge, London: MIT Press.

Sampedro, V. (2002). Telebasura. Mctele y ETT. Zer, 13, 29-45.

Selva, D. (2003/04). El televoto como fórmula comercial. El caso de «Operación Triunfo». Comunicación, 2, 129-144.

Sternberg, E. (1998). Phantasmagoric Labor. The New Eco no mics of Self-presentation. Futures, 30(1), 3-28.

Turner, G. (2004). Understanding Celebrity. London: Routledge.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/09/12
Accepted on 30/09/12
Submitted on 30/09/12

Volume 20, Issue 2, 2012
DOI: 10.3916/C39-2012-03-09
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 4
Views 1
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?