Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The construction of a connective brain begins at the earliest ages of human development. However, knowledge about individual and collective brains provided so far by research has been rarely incorporated into Maths in Early Childhood classrooms. In spite of that, it is obvious that it is at these ages when the learning of mathematics acts as a nuclear element for decision- making, problem -solving, data- processing and the understanding of the world. From that perspective, this research aims to analyse the mathematics teaching-learning process at early ages based on connectionism, with the specific objectives being, on the one hand, to determine the features of mathematics practices which promote connections and, on the other hand, to identify different types of mathematics connections to enhance connective intelligence. The research was carried out over two consecutive academic years under an interpretative paradigm with a methodological approach combining Action Research and Grounded Theory. The results obtained allow the characterization of a prototype of a didactic sequence that promotes three types of mathematics connections for the development of connective intelligence in young children: conceptual, giving rise to links between mathematics concepts; teaching, linking mathematics concepts through an active methodology, and practical ones connecting maths with the environment.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

The classic definition of ecosystem establishes the importance of the harmonious combination of the environment and the community of living beings, as well as the relations between these beings and between them and their environment. From a social point of view, we are part of an enormous ecosystem whose balance is complex and highly dependent on the decisions made by those who live within it, which are influenced more and more by their capacity to access and interpret the vast quantity of information that is added to the realm of social communications on a daily basis. This information is catalysed by the intense barrage of information and communication technologies (ICT), whose capacity for evolution and metamorphosis is several degrees greater in magnitude than that which the human brain can accommodate. Given these conditions, theories are emerging from the field of neuroscience, focusing attention on collective intelligence and consciousness, which are also presented as connected (Pitt et al., 2013). Within this framework, connections not only help to maintain balance in an ecosystem exhausted by the dizzying social and informational changes mentioned above, but also act as drivers to change and transform the ecosystems themselves towards more sustainable and –why not?– more fair realities.

Concerning our interpersonal connections, and beyond the obviousness of the global communication that the Internet and social networks facilitate, we know that we are indeed connected as suggested by the curious “six degrees of separation” theory, which states that, even if they do not know each other, any two people could send each other a personal message through a chain of contacts of no more than five links. This theory, proposed in 1929 by Frigyes Karinthy through a story called “Chains”, has also been subsequently considered and analysed by sociologists and mathematicians (Watts, 2004), who have aimed to demonstrate the theory and to endow it with logical rigour. That said, these kinds of connections only allow for the classic form of communication between transmitter and receiver through the establishing of suitable and reliable channels. The question lies more in the extent to which this apparent structure of online social connectivity can be exploited in order to make shared decisions which are good for the collective, and to drive forward and enrich a collective intelligence that manages this decision-making appropriately, that encourages the critical participation of citizens, and that is protected from the manipulations of small groups pursuing their own vested interests as opposed to the social good.

The construction of a connective brain starts in the early ages of human development, in which infants are still protected, to a large extent, from the barrage of messages sent by the media, with the exception, possibly, of television (Santonja, 2005), and the impact of ICT as an additional element of social communication. It is in this point that education plays a particularly relevant role, especially if we attend to the question of how the knowledge we already have about individual and collective brains may be incorporated into early childhood classrooms and, specifically, in the area of mathematical thinking, in which core elements start to emerge in relation to decision-making, problem-solving, data handling and understanding the environment. It was not in vain that Van-Overwalle (2011) highlighted the evidence indicating that many judgements and biases in social cognition can be understood from a connectionist perspective. Furthermore, he also pointed out that said judgements are underpinned by basic associative learning processes, often centred on an error minimisation algorithm. In relation to teaching, these ideas are already reflected in studies from the 90s, such as that of Askew, Brown, Rhodes, Wiliam and Johnson (1997), in which the connectionist teacher is characterised from the perspective of maths education.

1.1. Connectionism and learning

The learner and education are situated in live and dynamic contexts. Throughout history, different theories have emerged providing frameworks that aim to link research with educational reality. Some of the main theories of human learning started to be disseminated during an era in which technological resources were of little importance in people's lives. However, from the Second World War onwards, with the arrival of the technological revolution, psychological research resumed its interest in the human mind as an object of study and the computer began to acquire importance (Martorell & Prieto, 2002). As indicated by Caparrós (1980), dissatisfaction with the different versions of behavioursm led to an increase in new theoretical models that aimed to express human cognitive processes. Miller, Galanter and Pribram (1983) provide an overview of the works that constitute the beginning of the cognitive paradigm that attempts to explain how information is made available in the mind, through the elaboration of theoretical models that are subsequently validated through experimental techniques, computer simulations, or a combination of both, in order to describe knowledge. On the other hand, in constructivism, students are active since they organise their understanding by comprehending their experiences (Driscoll, 2005).

Given this dichotomy, the appearance of connectionism resulted in a revitalisation of cognitive psychology and, as an educational approach, also generated considerable interest among researchers (Siemens, 2004; Downes, 2008; Bell, 2011), offering advancements which are potentially applicable in the field of mathematics education.

Since cognitivism is the most significant precursor to connectionism, it is worth highlighting the differences and similarities between both theories, which are summarised in Figure 1.

The architecture of the connectionist mind is based on artificial neural networks which are more or less complicated systems, made up of simple processing units. These units play a role analogous to neurones and relate to each other through connections of specific weights (different strengths) and generate complex systems of parallel computing (Crespo, 2007).


Draft Content 580105839-58983-en012.jpg

In these models, a minimum number of processing units allows different types of knowledge and the relations between them to be represented, whereby the loss of some units does not necessarily lead to the loss of information. Once trained in a particular task, these connectionist networks are resistant to contamination and enable the brain to acquire the learning of concepts, while also executing processes that, in line with McLeod, Plunkeett and Rolls (1998), tend to appear as mental processes in connectionist models. Namely:

• The combination of neural information is produced in parallel, even though the neurones are made up of different types. A large number of neurones are activated at the same time to complete the information by working together.

• The transmission of information is obtained through the relation between some neurones with others, in which the activation of processing units occurs as a result of different perceptions.

• The neurones are distributed in strata or independent cerebral layers and information is transmitted from one layer to the other or between different layers.

• Changes produced depend on the weight and strength of connection of the neurones, which are established through relations between responses or output units and transmitter or input units.

• Neurones constantly receive external stimuli which they process and modify. As a result, learning occurs thanks to changes in the weights and strengths of the connections between such units, which are determined by perceptions.

According to Cobos (2005), the result of this is that the information received is coded through the neurones in a distributed manner, since various neurones are needed for us to be able to represent an object and, moreover, these neurones are an integral part of the representation of others.

This focus allows us to consider connectionism as a new bridge between cognitive science and neuroscience (Caño & Luque, 1995), and invites us to analyse its repercussion on learning.

1.2. Connectionism and early childhood mathematics education

According to Merzenich and Syka (2005), one of the most relevant factors in the achievement of effective learning and the development of memory is attention, understood as “the main process involved in the control and execution of action” (Llorente, Oca, & Solana, 2012: 47). Accordingly, this is the faculty of choosing notifications out of the different senses that people perceive in the successive moments of their lives and of driving cerebral processes (López, Ortiz, & López, 1999). Thus, in order to be able to process information, children must be attentive, but it is also important that the processes used to develop learning are suitable.

In this sense, connectionism is adopted as a teaching model and as a model for the analysis of mathematics learning in Early Childhood Education, taking into account that the capacity to connect, associate and recreate are the identifying traits of this theory (Siemens, 2004).

Returning to the questions related to mental processes that tend to appear in connectionist models, the following analogies are established to work on mathematics at early ages:

• Neurones are related to each other in parallel to develop information: mathematics activities should not be presented in a linear manner given that different factors intervene when concepts are being evoked. As a result, it is vital to touch and see different material, but not in isolation.

• Neural information reaches the brain through perceptions: the visual, auditory, tactile, and olfactory stimuli that come from the external world are vital in attracting the child's attention and interpretations of these stimuli play a very important role in learning.

• In the same way that the information of cerebral layers is transmitted from one layer to another, mathematics concepts are built on each other, progressing gradually from the simplest to the most complicated one (Skemp, 1980).

• The more connections, the greater the evocative capacity, and as a result, concepts are fixed more strongly in the memory, are remembered with greater clarity, and at the same time, conceptual relations are recuperated better since different connections participate in our memory footprints, with each of these supporting numerous different footprints (Rumelhart & McClelland, 1992).

From this perspective, connectionism advocates a holistic form of education in which the development of contents following a temporal sequence is replaced by global development. According to this view, concepts are presented at the same time so that, on invoking some of them, not only are specific storage units activated, but also the units that save the mental images of related concepts, thus improving the evocation conditions. Specifically, early childhood mathematics education should be a coherent system which prioritises the mental construction aspect of the elaboration of an internal framework, in which different concepts are developed at the same time, leading to the subsequent creation of new concepts and mathematical processes.

This approach has already been discussed to some degree by different organisations and authors. From the approach of Realistic Mathematics Education (RME), Freudenthal (1991) proposes the beginnings of interconnection, according to which the blocks of maths content should be connected to each other. The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics of the United States (NCTM, 2000) considers connections as one of the five fundamental mathematical processes that should be worked on at all ages: Teaching programmes at all ages should equip students to: recognise and use connections between mathematical ideas, understand how mathematical ideas are interconnected and built on top of each other to produce a coherent whole, and recognise and apply mathematics in non-mathematical contexts (NCTM, 2000: 68).

On the basis of these ideas, Alsina (2012) outlines different types of connections and numerous Early Childhood Education mathematics teaching-learning contexts. Specifically, he presents two main types of connections: a) connections between the different blocks of mathematics content and between mathematical contents and processes (intradisciplinary connections), b) mathematical connections with other areas of knowledge and with the environment (interdisciplinary connections).

Some preliminary studies have provided evidence concerning the positive effects of working on different concepts at the same time (Ortega & Ortiz, 2003; Vicario-Solorzano, Gómez, & Olivares-Ceja, 2014). But as far as the authors are aware, no research has been carried out in early childhood mathematics education which are based on connectionism. To advance in this direction, this study analyses the process of teaching-learning mathematics in Early Childhood Education on the bases of connectionism, with the specific objectives being, on the one hand, to determine the characteristics of a mathematical practice which promotes connections, and, on the other hand, to identify the different types of mathematics connections required to foster connective intelligence.

2. Material and method

The study presented here has been carried out under an interpretative paradigm. From the perspective of research into mathematics education, it is understood that this paradigm focuses on describing the personal significance of facts, the analysis of relations between people and their environment, as well as the cognitive and attitudinal aspects of the participants (Godino, 1993). From this research perspective, and in line with the objectives proposed, a qualitative methodology has been applied to obtain data (Pérez, 1994). Specifically, two methods have been used: a) the Action-Research method (AR) (Kemmis & McTaggart, 1992), comprising six cycles which will be specified below, and b) Grounded Theory (Strauss & Corbin, 1998), to analyse the data obtained in each of the AR cycles and to obtain categories.

2.1. Participants

The study has been carried out in the Early Childhood and Primary School known as “Federico García Lorca” in Valladolid (Spain), considering the mathematical activities of two consecutive years carried out with 271 children of the different levels of Early Childhood Education (3-6 years old), having previously obtained the necessary informed consent of their parents. The study has been conducted with the participation of six teachers with considerable professional experience, who are also active in ongoing educational innovation processes, which they provided information on for each six-month period in which the study was carried out. In addition, the study also counted on the participation of an external agent, a support teacher from the school with thirty years' teaching experience in Early Childhood education, specialised in mathematics education at this level.

2.2. Design and procedure

In the first instance, different meetings were planned with the researchers and the Early Childhood Education teachers. In the first meeting, connectionism was presented as well as its teaching potentiality. Subsequent meetings discussed ways in which mathematical activities could be carried out from this perspective and debates were set up aimed at clarifying how to collect the data.

The six participating teachers elaborated documents in which they reflected on all the activities carried out on a daily basis and during the different periods of the study, outlining the concepts worked on in a connected way, as well as their observations and the results of the activities. In addition to these reports, other six were obtained in which the external observer commented on her reflections of the teaching during each experimental period and the degree of satisfaction of the teachers.

The periods in which the reports were elaborated corresponded with the months of November, February and May of each academic year, resulting in the six cycles of AR. In a complementary manner, video recordings were carried out during maths dictations (blank sheets of paper with maths instructions duly sequenced and adapted to their level) in the first year of the study and in the second year to test the children's progress in the development of logical mathematical reasoning.

In summary, each AR cycle takes into account the following aspects:

• Reports of the six participating teachers: they record the content worked on during the term corresponding to each educational level in a coded format that records the day, month, academic year, educational level, group and connection of concepts. For example, code 2N11B (2, 3) corresponds to the activity carried out on November 2nd of the first year of the study, in class Year 1 B, with the concepts worked on at the same time indicated in parenthesis. The organisation of the data is structured in tables with the following headings: code of the activity, observations and possible categories.

• External observer’s report: reports on the most noteworthy aspects of the teaching with absolute freedom, without any influence from the research team. Specifically, the protocol followed comprises seven items with different sub-sections: 1) the child and aspects of logic, 2) the child and quantity, 3) the child and geometrical and topological aspects, 4) the child and aspects of measurement, 5) the child and stories, games and problematic situations, 6) teacher's level of satisfaction, 7) other observations of interest.

• Video recordings: video recordings are made to be able to observe the children in action. Recording times oscillate between approximately 10 and 30 minutes.

• Evaluation of the activities: a count of the positive responses made by the child in relation to the connected activities they have carried out in each working day.

• Establishing of categories: the data collected in the reports, the video analyses and the tables are compared in order to establish emerging categories.


Draft Content 580105839-58983-en013.jpg

The flow diagram shown in Figure 2 summarises the followed procedure.

• The “Constant Comparison Method” of Grounded Theory (Strauss & Corbin, 1998) has been used to obtain the categories. The following levels of analysis have been considered: First level of analysis: the first steps consisted in reading and re-reading the information obtained through the different research instruments, in order to become familiar with the content and to develop a first impression. Following this, the information was segmented into fragments according to the ideas contained, identifying those expressing similar or related ideas through a common denominator. At this first level, the information received is organised by fragmenting or segmenting it into units: as the information is read, the different mathematical connections detected are highlighted and noted. In other words, the “raw data” (original material) starts to be transformed into “useful data” through initial coding and classification.

• Second level of analysis: on the basis of this first coding and classifying of the information obtained through the different instruments, group categories are established, such as “connections between different mathematical content” or “connections between mathematics and other disciplines”, among others. In this sense, the coding and categorising process involves the triangulation of comparing, ordering and structuring to establish categories that enable the data to be compared (Gibbs, 2012).

• Third level of analysis: the categories are renamed, using the “Constant Comparison Method” described by Strauss and Corbin (1998), which includes the comparisons carried out in relation to the similarities, differences and connections of and between the data. The units capture and encapsulate meanings and actions. Thus, as relations are created and units compared in order to forge a preliminary analysis of the ideas, the names and content of the units also change, highlighting new relations and possible interpretations between categories. In this way, units are renamed, eliminated, compared, etc. and attention is focused on discovering them.

3. Analysis and results

In the first place, an example of an activity carried out with 23 three-year-old students at the end of the third term of the first year of the study is shown, and, in the second place, the qualitative analysis of the activity is presented to establish a prototype of connectionist mathematical practice and the system of categories obtained from it.

3.1. Description of connectionist mathematical practice

The main objective of the activity presented is that the three-year-old children understand some basic aspects of the relativity of mathematical concepts.

Before starting the activity, and in order to contextualise the situation, the children had worked on the red and blue colours of the long and short rods as an introduction to measuring, and had played freely with the material used previously. When the activity in question starts, the children are seated in a circle and the teacher places different materials in the centre (Figure 3), such as a box of different sized ropes, some Cuisenaire rods and a worksheet.


Draft Content 580105839-58983-en014.jpg

With regard to the sequencing of the activity, it is presented in four different parts: 1) the comparison of the length of different ropes from the box is worked on through observation, 2) the children are asked to measure two ropes laid out along the floor with the number 2 rod and the number 9 one, and they are asked which rope they put more rods next to (the difference must be significant for them to say that there are a lot next to one and only a few next to the other), 3) the rods used to measure each rope are put into different piles to be able to see the difference more clearly and, one by one, the children are asked to turn around and estimate which is short and which is long through touching them, 4) individual work is carried out on a worksheet, colouring two hosepipes –one short and one long– following the code indicated by the mascot on the worksheet, who points to a short red rod and to another long blue one.

Throughout the didactic sequence, the teacher asks different questions to guide the students in the process of discovering the reason for the relativity of some concepts. An extract of the transcription of the activity is provided below by way of illustration:

– Teacher: “Today we've brought in a very special box”.

– Maria 1, smiling: “What's this box called?”

– Everyone: “The box of rope”.

One of the girls remembers the special name they gave to the box.

– Maria 2: “The box of mice”.

– Teacher: “The box of mice because we have mice tails inside. And if we pull the mouse's tail and it says 'ouch', it's because there's a mouse inside. Is there a mouse?”

– Everyone: “Yes! It's inside”.

The teacher takes the “mouse box”.

– Teacher: “Let's see if there's a mouse inside. Let's see, let's see... let's see if it comes out”.

The teacher shakes the box and pretends to play with the mice, putting her hand inside.

– Teacher: “Let's see. Keep still little mouse. Will you keep still, please?! It can't wait to get out! My oh my. Let's close the box or it will escape”.

The teacher shows the ropes (which represent the mice tails) as she takes them out of the box.

– Teacher: “Ok. Let's see if there are a lot of mice or just a few. How many do you think there are? A lot? Or just a few?

– Everyone: “Looooooots”.


Draft Content 580105839-58983-en015.jpg

3.2. Results extracted from the qualitative analysis

On the one hand, the detailed analysis of the teaching activities of the six AR cycles has led to the establishment of a basic mathematical practice prototype for teaching-learning mathematics in Early Childhood Education and, on the other hand, to the establishment of a system of categories.

3.2.1 Prototype of connectionist mathematical practice

A teaching sequence following a connectionist approach should follow the guidelines provided below:

• Organisation and group presentation of the different didactic material.

• Asking the students well-formulated questions one by one to help them start to discover the different mathematical content.

• Presentation of the content involved in the activity to help the children understand it.

• Repetition of the activity so that the children can practice all the content worked on.

• New period of dialogue through “mathematical conversations” about their experiences to increase the force of the connections made between content.

• Asking of new questions to help the children internalise the connections.

• The need to bring collective experiences to the level of personal experience by representing on paper to help memorise the contents worked on.

3.2.2 System of categories

As a result of the process of constantly comparing the data, three categories have been obtained which represent the baseline upon which the subsequent theory has been delimited:

• Conceptual connections: responsible for producing links between different mathematical content.

• Teaching connections: responsible for establishing links between different mathematical concepts through an active methodology and by working with mathematical experiences linked to other areas.

• Practical connections: establish relations between mathematics and the environment.

At the same time, these categories are interconnected, forming a neural network which has enabled us to estabish which type of connections appear in each of them with more precision (Figure 4):


Draft Content 580105839-58983-en016.jpg

• Conceptual connections: the identification of sensorial qualities, of quantities of a numerical series, of forms of spatial situations, of aspects of measurement, of similarities and differences between scenes; grouped according to the following criteria; association of number and quantity; discrimination of quantities, of forms, of aspects of measurement; different relations, such as the pairing of the same objects, classifications, series, sorting, comparing objects; simple graphic representations; and starting to use mathematical language.

• Teaching connections: active methodology, holistic teaching, evaluation and assessment.

• Practical connections: mathematics in the environment, as well as stories, games and didactic material.

It is important to highlight the relevance of the practical categories of connection in relation to the objectives of this study, since these connections are needed if children in schools are to carry out activities in which logic, numbers, information handling, geometry and measurements appear in a connected way, both in relation to their daily lives and with the use of different teaching-learning resources (stories, proverbs, poems, didactic material, etc.).

4. Discussion and conclusions

This article presents some advances concerning the role of mathematics education in the construction of connective intelligence in the early ages of human development, assuming that mathematical thinking plays an important role in the individual's capacity to make decisions, solve problems, process data and understand their social environment.

While traditional channels of access to mathematics knowledge were based on the transmission of information in a sequential and linear manner, our study has explored the elements that should be taken into consideration in education in general, and in teaching in particular, to promote a new approach to the teaching-learning of mathematics which takes into account and fosters connections between different knowledge, as an essential element in developing citizens with the skills needed to manage decision-making tasks in a critical way. In this sense, in the field of mathematics education, over recent decades different organisations and authors have been advocating the importance of presenting mathematics knowledge in a connected way from early ages (Freudenthal, 1991; NCTM, 2000; Alsina, 2012). Despite this, research into early childhood mathematics education has not provided findings that offer specific guidelines for teachers to foster connective intelligence. In order to develop this specific line of enquiry, a study has been carried out over two consecutive years which has enabled us to establish a prototype of activity or set of activities, in the form of a didactic sequence that promotes connections between contents. Up to the time of this study, some authors in the field of Early Childhood mathematics education have contributed data on learning trajectories in order to sequence (and be able to connect in a suitable way) mathematics contents of the same block (Clements & Sarama, 2009), or have explored the phases that should be taken into account in the design, management and evaluation of competency-based mathematical activities that include connections, among other processes (Alsina, 2016). However, no prior studies are available on the specific elements that should be considered in order to carry out mathematical practices from a connectionist perspective. The establishment of a prototype of connectionist activity thus represents an innovation in education, which is the result of specific research in this area, in the sense advocated by Llinares (2013).

Another important contribution of the study lies in the establishment of different kinds of connections. The interpretation of the results offers a body of central connections, with all the potential relations that exist between the different categories of each group, and which also depend on and interrelate with other groups, thus configuring a new way of working on the development of mathematical thinking in Early Childhood Education.

In order to promote connective intelligence in the classroom from early ages of human development, it seems more than apparent that the formats derived from education or, in other words, training models, should aim to provide teachers with in-depth knowledge of these different types of connections and the ways to develop them in their students, considering the features of a connectionist teacher as proposed by Askew and his colleagues (1997).

In summary, considering the objectives of our study, the main conclusions are as follows:

• Mathematics education can play an important role in the construction of a connective brain from early ages of human development, considering its role in relation to decision-making, problem-solving, data processing and understanding the social environment.

• The promotion of connectionism in early childhood mathematical practices requires a didactic itinerary characterised by a planning and management process including six phases: the use of didactic material for working in groups, asking the students' questions, group discussion, subsequent mathematical conversations, the asking of new questions and the individual representation on paper of the knowledge acquired.

• Connectionist practices present three main types of connections: conceptual, teaching and practical.

• Practical connections have particular relevance since they are responsible for connecting knowledge related to everyday life.

• Teachers should have in-depth knowledge of the different types of connections and the ways of developing them with their students.

In this regard, some of the main limitations of this study have been the fact that no prior analysis was carried out of the participating teachers' knowledge of connectionism, and the fact that no comparison was made of the students' mathematics learning in relation to other groups of students who have not learned mathematics in this way. Future studies will therefore be needed which use a specific model to explore mathematics teachers’ knowledge, such as Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching (MKT) by Hill, Rowan and Ball (2005) and Hill, Ball and Schilling (2008), or the Didactic-Mathematical Knowledge Model (CDM) of Godino (2009), and Godino, Ake?, Gonzato and Wilhelmi (2014), in order to conduct a more precise analysis of Early Childhood teachers' knowledge of connectionism and ways of implementing it in mathematics practice. Likewise, in order to validate the classroom application of this teaching model, whose goal is to foster connective intelligence, new quasi-experimental quantitative studies should be designed to compare the performance of students who learn with a connectionist approach with others learning with more traditional methods that do not take into account connections.

A more precise diagnosis of the question will thus help to establish a set of lines of practice which are much more appropriate in relation to both pre-service and in-service teacher training, given the increasing importance of fostering the connective intelligence of our students, considering the contributions of Neuroscience and other related sciences, which propose radical changes to the way in which individuals access knowledge.

References

Alsina, Á. (2012). Hacia un enfoque globalizado de la educación matemática en las primeras edades. Números, 80, 7-24. (https://goo.gl/RYiaZ4) (2016-10-10).

Alsina, Á. (2016). Diseño, gestión y evaluación de actividades matemáticas competenciales en el aula. Épsilon, 33(1), 92, 7-29. (https://goo.gl/TOLyQM) (2016-09-10).

Askew, M., Brown, M., Rhodes, V., Wiliam, D., & Johnson, D. (1997). Effective Teachers of Numeracy in Primary Schools: Teachers' Beliefs, Practices and Pupils' Learning. (https://goo.gl/ZzQo1y) (2016-07-30).

Bell, F. (2011). Connectivism: Its Place in Theory-informed Research and Innovation in Technology-enabled Learning. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 12(3), 98-118. (https://goo.gl/adhO30) (2016-09-11).

Caño, A., & Luque, J.L. (1995). El conexionismo: un nexo entre las neurociencias y las ciencias cognitivas. Filosofía y Ciencias Cognitivas, 3, 37-49. (https://goo.gl/txFtVw) (2016-09-15).

Caparrós, A. (1980). Los paradigmas en psicología. Sus alternativas y sus crisis. Barcelona: Horsori.

Clements, D.H., & Sarama, J. (2009). Learning and Teaching Early math: The Learning Trajectories Approach. Nueva York: Routledge.

Cobos, P.L (2005). Conexionismo y cognición. Madrid: Pirámide.

Crespo, A. (2007). Cognición humana: mente, ordenadores y neuronas. Madrid: Ramón Areces.

Downes, G. (2008). Places to Go: Connectivism & Connective Knowledge. Innovate: Journal of Online Education, 5(1), 6. (https://goo.gl/71UdUt) (2016-09-10).

Driscoll, M.P. (2005). Psychology of Learning for Instruction. New York: Allin & Bacon.

Freudenthal, H. (1991). Revisiting Mathematics Education. Dordrectht: Kluwer Academic.

Gibbs, G.R. (2012). El análisis de los datos cualitativos en investigación cualitativa. Madrid: Morata.

Godino J.D. (2009). Categori?as de ana?lisis de los conocimientos del profesor de matema?ticas. Unión, 20, 13-31. (https://goo.gl/AnNICA) (2016-10-10).

Godino, J. (1993). Paradigmas, problemas y metodologías de investigación en didáctica de la matemática. Quadrante, 2(1), 9-22.

Godino, J.D., Ake?, L., Gonzato, M., & Wilhelmi, M.R. (2014). Niveles de algebrizacio?n de la actividad matema?tica escolar. Implicaciones para la formacio?n de maestros. Ensen?anza de las Ciencias, 32(1), 199-219. https://doi.org/10.5565/rev/ensciencias.965

Hill, H.C., Ball, D.L., & Schilling, S.G. (2008). Unpacking Pedagogical Content Knowledge: Conceptualizing and Measuring Teachers’ Topic-specified Knowledge of Students. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 39(4), 372-400. (https://goo.gl/q8Usti) (2016-09-11).

Hill, H.C., Rowan, B, & Ball, D. L. (2005). Effects of Teachers’ Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching on Student Achievement. American Educational Research Journal, 42 (2), 371-406. (https://goo.gl/xg5juF) (2016-09-30).

Karinthy, F. (1929). Chain-Links: Everything is Different. (https://goo.gl/jwtmHJ) (2016-07-28).

Kemmis, S., & McTaggart, R. (1992). Cómo planificar la investigación-acción. Barcelona: Laertes.

Llinares, S. (2013). Innovación en la educación matemática: más allá de la tecnología. Modelling in Science Education and Learning, 6(1), 7-19. https://doi.org/10.4995/msel.2013.1819

Llorente, C., Oca, J., & Solana, A. (2012). Mejora de la atención y de áreas cerebrales asociadas en niños de edad escolar a través de un programa neurocognitivo. Participación Educativa, 1(1), 47-59. (https://goo.gl/1AoG5C) (2016-09-10).

López, J.J., Ortiz, T., & López, M.I. (1999). Lecciones de Psicología Médica. Barcelona: Masson.

Martorell, J.L., & Prieto, J.L. (2002). Fundamentos de Psicología. Madrid: Centro de Estudios Ramón Areces.

McLeod, P., Plunkeett, K., & Rolls, E.T. (1998). Introduction to Connectionist Modelling of Cognitive Processes. New York: Oxford University Press.

Merzenich, M.M., & Syka, J. (2005). Plasticity and Signal Representation in the Auditory System. New York: Springer.

Miller, G.A., Galanter, E., & Pribram, K.H. (1983). Planes y estructura de conducta. Madrid: Debate.

NCTM (2000). Principles and Standards for School Mathematics. Reston, VA: NCTM

Ortega, T., & Ortiz, M. (2003). Niveles de dominio de los conceptos básicos de educación infantil. Cálculo mental. GEPEM, 43, 49-78.

Pérez, G. (1994). Investigación cualitativa. Retos e interrogantes. I. Métodos. Madrid: La Muralla.

Pitt, J., Bourazeri, A., Nowak, A., Roszczynska-Kurasinska, M., Rychwalska, A., Santiago, I.R.,... & Sanduleac, M. (2013). Transforming Big Data into Collective Awareness. Computer, 46(6), 40-45. https://doi.org/10.1109/MC.2013.153

Rumelhart, D.E., & McClelland, J.L. (1992). Introducción al Procesamiento Distribuido en Paralelo. Madrid: Alianza.

Santonja, J.M. (2005). 25² líneas: las matemáticas en la televisión. [25² Lines: Mathematics on Television]. Comunicar, 25. (https://goo.gl/mj7QwV) (2016-10-28).

Siemens, G. (2004). Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the Digital Age. (https://goo.gl/A1IDDl) (2016-08-12).

Skemp, R. (1980). Psicología del aprendizaje de las matemáticas. Madrid: Morata.

Strauss, A., & Corbin, J. (1998). Basics of Qualitative Research: Techniques and Procedures for Developing Grounded Theory. US: Sage.

Van-Overwalle, F. (2011). Social Learning and Connectionism. In T.R. Schachtman, & S. Reilly (Eds.), Associative Learning and Conditioning Theory: Human and Non-Human Applications (pp. 345-375). New York: Oxford University Press.

Vicario-Solorzano, C. M., Gómez, P., & Olivares-Ceja, J. M. (2014). Mejorando el aprendizaje de matemáticas en educación básica mediante conexionismo y tecnología táctil. In J. Asenjo, Ó. Macías, & J.C. Toscano (Eds.), Memorias del Congreso Iberoamericano de Ciencia, Tecnología, Innovación y Educación (Artículo 1028). Buenos Aires: OEI. (https://goo.gl/BvbLg7) (2017-03-14).

Watts, D.J. (2004). Six Degrees: The Science of a Connected Age. WW Norton & Company.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

La construcción de un cerebro conectivo comienza en las edades más tempranas del desarrollo humano. Sin embargo, el conocimiento que ya se tiene sobre los cerebros individual y colectivo apenas se ha incorporado en el desarrollo del pensamiento matemático en Educación Infantil, donde comienzan a gestarse elementos clave para tomar decisiones, resolver problemas de la vida cotidiana, tratar con datos y comprender el entorno. Desde esta perspectiva la presente investigación marca como objetivo general analizar el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje de las matemáticas en Educación Infantil a partir del conexionismo, considerando como objetivos específicos, por un lado, determinar las características de una práctica matemática que promueva las conexiones y, por otro lado, identificar los distintos tipos de conexiones matemáticas para fomentar la inteligencia conectiva. La investigación se lleva a cabo a lo largo de dos años consecutivos bajo un paradigma interpretativo con un enfoque metodológico basado en el uso combinado de Investigación-Acción y Teoría Fundamentada. Los resultados han permitido concretar un prototipo de actividad o conjunto de actividades que, en forma de secuencia didáctica, promueve tres tipos de conexiones matemáticas para desarrollar la inteligencia conectiva en Educación Infantil: conceptuales, que producen nexos entre contenidos matemáticos diversos; docentes, que vinculan diversos conceptos matemáticos a través de una metodología activa y de vivenciar las experiencias matemáticas con otras materias; y prácticas, que relacionan las matemáticas con el entorno.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

La definición clásica de ecosistema establece la conjunción armónica de entorno y comunidad de seres vivos así como las relaciones entre estos y de estos con el entorno. Desde un punto de vista social formamos parte de un enorme ecosistema cuyo equilibrio es complejo y altamente dependiente de las decisiones que sus individuos toman, basadas cada vez más en su capacidad para acceder e interpretar la ingente cantidad de información introducida a diario en la comunicación social. Esta información está catalizada por la potente irrupción de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación (TIC), cuya capacidad de evolución y metamorfosis es varios grados de magnitud superior a la que aparentemente puede soportar el propio cerebro. En estas condiciones surgen teorías que emergen del ámbito de las neurociencias y que centran su atención en inteligencias y conciencias colectivas que, además, se presentan como conectadas (Pitt & al., 2013). Las conexiones, en este marco, no solo permiten mantener en equilibrio un ecosistema exhausto por los vertiginosos cambios sociales e informacionales mencionados, sino también generar fuerzas de cambio y transformación de los propios ecosistemas hacia realidades sostenibles y, ¿por qué no?, más justas.

En relación con nuestras conexiones interpersonales, y más allá de la obviedad de la comunicación global que Internet y las redes sociales facilitan, sabemos que estamos ciertamente conectados de acuerdo con la curiosa teoría de los «seis grados de separación», la cual afirma que dos personas, cualesquiera, pueden hacerse llegar un mensaje personal, aun no conociéndose, a través de una cadena de conocidos que no tendría más de cinco eslabones. Esta teoría, propuesta en 1929 por Frigyes Karinthy a través de un cuento llamado «Chains», ha sido también considerada y analizada posteriormente por sociólogos y matemáticos (Watts, 2004), tratando estos últimos de dotar de rigor lógico a la afirmación y demostrarla. Ahora bien, este tipo de conexiones solo permiten la comunicación clásica entre emisor y receptor mediante el establecimiento de adecuados canales de confianza. La cuestión radica más bien en si es posible aprovechar esta aparente estructura de conectividad social en red para la toma de decisiones conjuntas buenas para la colectividad, así como impulsar y enriquecer una inteligencia conectiva que gestione adecuadamente la toma de decisiones, que aliente la participación crítica de la ciudadanía y que quede protegida de manipulaciones interesadas de grupos reducidos que en ningún caso persiguen el bienestar social.

La construcción de un cerebro conectivo comienza en las primeras edades del desarrollo humano, ajenas aún en gran medida a la avalancha de mensajes de los medios de comunicación, salvo quizás la televisión (Santonja, 2005), y al impacto de las TIC como elementos también de comunicación social. Es en este punto en el que la educación juega un papel especialmente relevante, sobre todo si tratamos de responder a la pregunta sobre cómo el conocimiento que ya se tiene sobre los cerebros individual y colectivo puede incorporarse en las aulas de Educación Infantil y, específicamente, en el ámbito del pensamiento matemático, donde comienzan a gestarse elementos nucleares para la toma de decisiones, la resolución de problemas, el tratamiento de datos y la comprensión del entorno. No en vano, Van-Overwalle (2011) ya apuntaba no solo a la evidencia de que muchos de los juicios y sesgos en la cognición social pueden ser entendidos desde una perspectiva conexionista, sino también al hecho de que tales juicios vienen dirigidos por procesos de aprendizaje asociativos básicos, centrados a menudo en un algoritmo de minimización de errores. Estas ideas, trasladadas a la docencia, se reflejan ya en estudios de los años 90 como el de Askew, Brown, Rhodes, Wilian y Johnson (1997) en el que se caracteriza al docente conexionista desde la perspectiva de la educación matemática.

1.1. Conexionismo y aprendizaje

El aprendizaje y la educación caminan en contextos vivos y dinámicos. A lo largo de la historia han surgido distintas teorías que brindan marcos de referencia para relacionar la investigación con la realidad educativa. Algunas de las principales teorías del aprendizaje humano se empezaron a difundir en una etapa en la que los medios tecnológicos no eran demasiado importantes para la vida de las personas pero, a partir de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, con el surgimiento de la revolución tecnológica, las investigaciones psicológicas retomaron la mente humana como objeto de estudio y el ordenador comenzó a tener importancia (Martorell & Prieto, 2002). Como indica Caparrós (1980), la insatisfacción de las distintas versiones del conductismo encaminó al auge de nuevos modelos teóricos que pretendían expresar los procesos cognoscitivos humanos. Miller, Galanter y Pribram (1983) recogen los trabajos que marcan el comienzo del paradigma cognitivo, que trata de explicar cómo la información se dispone en la mente mediante la elaboración de modelos teóricos que, posteriormente, son validados mediante técnicas experimentales, simulación por ordenador o ambas, buscando de esta forma describir el conocimiento. Por otro lado, en el constructivismo los estudiantes son activos ya que organizan su entendimiento a través de la comprensión de sus experiencias (Driscoll, 2005).

Ante esta disyuntiva, la aparición del conexionismo supuso una revitalización de la psicología cognitiva y, como planteamiento educativo, ha suscitado gran interés entre numerosos investigadores (Siemens, 2004; Downes, 2008; Bell, 2011), ofreciendo aportaciones potencialmente aplicables en el campo de la educación matemática.

Siendo el cognitivismo el antecedente más significativo del conexionismo, conviene señalar diferencias y semejanzas entre ambas teorías, recogidas de forma sintética en la Figura 1.

La arquitectura de la mente conexionista se basa en redes neuronales artificiales, que son sistemas más o menos complicados formados por unidades simples de procesamiento. Estas unidades desempeñan una función análoga a las neuronas y se relacionan entre sí mediante conexiones, que tienen unos pesos determinados (distinta fuerza) y generan complejos sistemas de computación en paralelo (Crespo, 2007).


Draft Content 580105839-58983 ov-es012.jpg

En estos modelos un número mínimo de unidades de procesamiento permite representar diversos tipos de conocimiento y relaciones entre ellos, donde la pérdida de algunas unidades no tiene por qué suponer la pérdida de la información. Estas redes conexionistas, una vez entrenadas en una determinada tarea, son resistentes a la contaminación y permiten al cerebro adquirir el aprendizaje de conceptos, al tiempo que ejecutan procesos que, de acuerdo con McLeod, Plunkeett y Rolls (1998), suelen aparecer como procesos mentales en los modelos conexionistas, a saber:

• La combinación de la información neuronal se produce en paralelo, aunque las neuronas sean de distintos tipos. Un gran número de neuronas se activan a la vez para completar la información, trabajando simultáneamente.

• La transmisión de información se obtiene a través de la relación de unas neuronas con otras, en las que la activación en las unidades de procesamiento viene dada como resultado de las distintas percepciones.

• Las neuronas están distribuidas en estratos, o capas cerebrales, independientes y la información se transmite de una capa a la siguiente o entre varias capas.

• Los cambios producidos dependen del peso y de la fuerza de conexión de las neuronas, establecidas mediante relaciones entre las respuestas o unidades de salida y las unidades emisoras o de entrada.

• Las neuronas reciben continuamente estímulos del exterior que se van procesando y modificando y, por tanto, el aprendizaje se produce gracias a cambios de los pesos y la fuerza de las conexiones entre dichas unidades, que vienen determinados por percepciones.

Según Cobos (2005), la conclusión es que la información recibida se codifica a través de las neuronas de forma distribuida, ya que se necesitan varias neuronas para que seamos capaces de representar un objeto y, además, esas neuronas sirven para formar parte de la representación de otros.

Este enfoque permite considerar el conexionismo como un nuevo puente entre las llamadas ciencias cognitivas y las neurociencias (Caño & Luque, 1995), que invita a analizar su repercusión en el aprendizaje.

1.2. Conexionismo y educación matemática infantil

Según Merzenich y Syka (2005), uno de los factores más relevantes en la consecución de aprendizajes eficaces y en el desarrollo de la memoria es la atención, entendida como «el proceso central implicado en el control y la ejecución de la acción» (Llorente, Oca, & Solana, 2012: 47) y, por ende, es la facultad de elegir la notificación de los distintos sentidos que perciben las personas en los instantes sucesivos de su vida y de conducir los procesos cerebrales (López, Ortiz, & López, 1999). Así, pues, para procesar la información los niños deben estar atentos, pero además es necesario que los procesos para el desarrollo del aprendizaje sean los adecuados.

En este sentido, se asume el conexionismo como modelo de enseñanza y de análisis de los aprendizajes matemáticos en Educación Infantil, teniendo presente que la capacidad de conectar, asociar y recrear son las señas de identidad de esta teoría (Siemens, 2004).

Retomando las cuestiones relacionadas con los procesos mentales que suelen aparecer en los modelos conexionistas, se establecen las siguientes analogías para trabajar las matemáticas en las primeras edades:

• Las neuronas se relacionan unas con otras en paralelo para desarrollar la información: las actividades matemáticas no deben proponerse de forma lineal ya que para conseguir la evocación de los conceptos intervienen diversos factores y es indispensable tocar los distintos materiales, verlos… pero no aisladamente.

• A través de las percepciones la información neuronal llega al cerebro: los estímulos visuales, sonoros, táctiles, olfativos… que vienen del mundo exterior son imprescindibles para llamar la atención del niño y la interpretación de estas juega un papel muy importante en el aprendizaje.

• Así como las informaciones de las capas cerebrales van transmitiéndose de una capa a la siguiente, los conceptos matemáticos se sustentan unos sobre otros, pasando, poco a poco, de los más sencillos a los más complicados (Skemp, 1980).

• Una mayor conexión provoca mayor capacidad evocadora y, por tanto, los conceptos se fijan mejor en la memoria, se recuerdan con mayor nitidez y, a su vez, se recuperan mejor las relaciones conceptuales ya que en nuestras huellas de memoria participan diversas conexiones y cada una apoya a numerosas huellas diferentes (Rumelhart & McClelland, 1992).

Desde este enfoque, el conexionismo preconiza una enseñanza global en la que se sustituye el desarrollo de contenidos siguiendo una secuencia temporal por un desarrollo global. Desde este prisma, los conceptos se presentan a la vez para que, al invocar algunos de ellos, no solo se activen las unidades de almacenamiento específico, sino también las unidades que guardan imágenes mentales de conceptos que están relacionados y, así, mejorar las condiciones de evocación. En concreto, la educación matemática infantil debe ser un sistema coherente, donde predomine el aspecto de construcción mental de elaboración de un marco de referencia interno en el que se vayan desarrollando los conceptos de forma conjunta y se dé paso a la creación de nuevos conceptos y procesos matemáticos.

Este planteamiento ya ha sido abordado parcialmente por diversos organismos y autores. Freudenthal (1991), desde la Educación Matemática Realista (EMR), plantea el principio de interconexión, según el cual los bloques de contenido matemático se han de conectar unos con otros. El Consejo Nacional de Profesores de Matemáticas de Estados Unidos (NCTM, 2000) considera las conexiones como uno de los cinco procesos matemáticos fundamentales que deberían trabajarse en todas las edades. Los programas de enseñanza de todas las etapas deberían capacitar a los estudiantes para: reconocer y usar las conexiones entre ideas matemáticas; comprender cómo las ideas matemáticas se interconectan y construyen unas sobre otras para producir un todo coherente; reconocer y aplicar las matemáticas en contextos no matemáticos (NCTM, 2000: 68).

A partir de estas ideas, Alsina (2012) esboza diversos tipos de conexiones y numerosos contextos de enseñanza-aprendizaje de las matemáticas en Educación Infantil. En concreto, presenta dos tipos principales de conexiones: a) las conexiones entre los diferentes bloques de contenido matemático y entre contenidos y procesos matemáticos (conexiones intradisciplinares); b) las conexiones de las matemáticas con otras áreas de conocimiento y con el entorno (conexiones interdisciplinares).

Algunos estudios preliminares han aportado ciertas evidencias sobre los efectos positivos que comporta trabajar diversos conceptos a la vez (Ortega & Ortiz, 2003; Vicario-Solorzano, Gómez, & Olivares-Ceja, 2014), pero hasta donde conocen los investigadores no hay trabajos de investigación en educación matemática infantil fundamentados en el conexionismo. Para avanzar en esta dirección, en este estudio se analiza el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje de las matemáticas en Educación Infantil a partir del conexionismo, considerando como objetivos específicos, por un lado, determinar las características de una práctica matemática que promueva las conexiones y, por otro lado, identificar los distintos tipos de conexiones matemáticas para fomentar la inteligencia conectiva.

2. Materiales y métodos

El estudio que se presenta se ha llevado a cabo bajo el paradigma interpretativo. Desde la perspectiva de la investigación en educación matemática, se asume que este paradigma se centra en la descripción del significado personal de los hechos, el análisis de las relaciones entre las personas y el entorno, así como los aspectos cognitivos y actitudinales de los participantes (Godino, 1993). Desde este enfoque investigativo, y de acuerdo con los objetivos planteados, se ha aplicado una metodología cualitativa para la obtención de datos (Pérez, 1994). En concreto, se han integrado dos métodos: a) la Investigación-Acción (I-A) (Kemmis & McTaggart, 1992), compuesta por seis ciclos que se concretarán posteriormente; y b) la Teoría Fundamentada (Strauss & Corbin, 1998), para analizar los datos obtenidos en cada uno de los ciclos de I-A y obtener categorías.

2.1. Participantes

El estudio se ha realizado en el Colegio de Enseñanza Infantil y Primaria: «Federico García Lorca» de Valladolid (España), recogiendo actividades matemáticas de dos cursos consecutivos, realizadas con 271 niños de los distintos niveles de Educación Infantil (3-6 años), una vez obtenido el consentimiento informado necesario. Por una parte, han participado seis maestras con dilatada experiencia profesional e implicadas en procesos continuos de innovación educativa, las cuales informaron por escrito de cada uno de los seis periodos en los que se ha llevado a cabo la investigación y, por otro lado, como agente externo una maestra de apoyo, también del centro, con treinta años de dedicación en la enseñanza en Infantil especializada en educación matemática.

2.2. Diseño y procedimiento

En primer lugar se prepararon diferentes reuniones entre los investigadores y las maestras de Educación Infantil. En la primera reunión se presentó el conexionismo y sus potencialidades didácticas. En reuniones posteriores se abordó la forma de realizar actividades matemáticas desde esta perspectiva y se establecieron debates orientados a esclarecer cómo realizar la recogida de datos.

Las seis maestras que han formado parte del estudio elaboraron documentos en los que, día a día, iban reflejando todas las actividades desarrolladas en los distintos periodos del estudio, recogiendo los conceptos que se trabajaban de forma conectada, así como las observaciones y los resultados de las actividades. Además de estos informes, se obtuvieron otros seis en los que la observadora externa reflejaba sus apreciaciones sobre la docencia de cada periodo experimental y el grado de satisfacción de las maestras.

Los periodos de elaboración de los informes se corresponden con los meses de noviembre, febrero y mayo de cada curso académico dando lugar a los seis ciclos de I-A. De forma complementaria se realizaron grabaciones en vídeo durante el primer año del estudio y dictados matemáticos (hojas en blanco con consignas matemáticas debidamente secuenciadas y adaptadas al nivel) en el segundo año para comprobar el progreso de los niños en el desarrollo de su razonamiento lógico-matemático. En síntesis, pues, cada ciclo de I-A contempla los aspectos siguientes:

• Informes de las seis profesoras participantes: registran los contenidos que se trabajan durante el trimestre correspondiente de cada nivel educativo en un formato codificado que recoge el día, mes, curso académico, nivel educativo, grupo y conexión de conceptos. Por ejemplo, el código 2N11B (2, 3) corresponde a la actividad realizada el día 2 de noviembre del primer año del estudio en primero B y entre paréntesis aparecen los conceptos que se trabajan a la vez. La organización de los datos se estructura en tablas con los siguientes epígrafes: código de la actividad, observaciones y posibles categorías.

• Informe de la observadora externa: anota con absoluta libertad, sin ninguna influencia por parte del equipo investigador, los aspectos más destacables de la docencia. En concreto el protocolo está formado por siete ítems, cada uno de ellos con varios sub-apartados: 1) el niño y los aspectos lógicos; 2) el niño y la cantidad; 3) el niño y los aspectos geométricos y topológicos; 4) el niño y los aspectos de medida; 5) el niño y los cuentos, juegos y situaciones problemáticas; 6) satisfacción de las profesoras; 7) otras observaciones que resulten interesantes.

• Grabaciones en vídeo: se realizan grabaciones en vídeo para poder observar a los niños en acción. Los tiempos de grabación oscilan entre los 10 y los 30 minutos aproximadamente.

• Evaluación de las actividades: se realiza un recuento de respuestas positivas de los niños sobre las actividades conexionadas que han realizado en cada día de trabajo.

• Establecimiento de categorías: a partir de la comparación de los datos recogidos en los informes, el análisis de los vídeos y las tablas, se establecen categorías emergentes.

En el diagrama de flujo de la Figura 2 (página anterior) se sintetiza el procedimiento seguido.


Draft Content 580105839-58983 ov-es013.jpg

Para la obtención de las categorías se ha utilizado el «método de comparaciones constantes» de la Teoría Fundamentada (Strauss & Corbin, 1998). Se han contemplado los siguientes niveles de análisis:

• Primer nivel de análisis: los primeros pasos han consistido en leer y releer la información obtenida a través de los distintos instrumentos de investigación hasta que su contenido fuera familiar, facilitando la formación de una primera impresión. A continuación se ha segmentado en fragmentos según las ideas que contienen, y se han identificado aquellos que expresan ideas similares o relacionadas, a través de una denominación común. En este primer nivel, pues, se ordena la información recibida a través de la fragmentación o segmentación en unidades: a medida que se van leyendo dichas informaciones, se señalan y anotan las diferentes conexiones matemáticas detectadas. Dicho de otra manera, se empiezan a transformar los «datos brutos» (material original) en «datos útiles» mediante una primera codificación y clasificación.

• Segundo nivel de análisis: a partir de esta primera codificación y clasificación de la información obtenida mediante los diferentes instrumentos usados, se han establecido categorías grupales como, por ejemplo, «conexiones entre diversos contenidos matemáticos» o bien «conexiones de las matemáticas con otras disciplinas», entre otras. En este sentido, la codificación y categorización se triangulan comparando, ordenando y estructurando para establecer categorías que permiten comparar datos (Gibbs, 2012).

• Tercer nivel de análisis: se renombran las categorías a partir de la utilización del «método de comparaciones constantes» descrito por Strauss y Corbin (1998), que incluye comparaciones realizadas entre las similitudes, diferencias y conexiones de los datos. Las unidades capturan y condensan significados y acciones. Por eso, a medida que se van creando relaciones, comparando unidades, forjando un análisis preliminar de ideas, los nombres y contenido de las unidades van cambiando, mostrando nuevas relaciones y posibles interpretaciones entre categorías. Así, se renombran, eliminan, relacionan, etc. unidades y la atención se centra en descubrirlas.

3. Análisis y resultados

Se muestra, en primer lugar, un ejemplo de una actividad llevada a cabo con 23 alumnos de tres años a finales del tercer trimestre del primer año del estudio, y en segundo lugar se presenta el análisis cualitativo para determinar el prototipo de una práctica matemática conexionista y el sistema de categorías obtenido.

3.1. Descripción de una práctica matemática conexionista

La actividad que se presenta tiene como objetivo fundamental que los niños de tres años entiendan algunos aspectos básicos de la relatividad de conceptos matemáticos.

Antes de iniciar la actividad, como contexto situacional de partida, los niños han trabajado con los colores rojo y azul de las regletas larga y corta para iniciarse en la medida y han jugado libremente con el material usado a posteriori. Cuando empieza la actividad propiamente, los niños están sentados en la asamblea formando un corro y la maestra coloca en el centro distintos materiales (Figura 3) como una caja con cuerdas de distintos tamaños, algunas regletas de Cuisenaire y una ficha.


Draft Content 580105839-58983 ov-es014.jpg

En cuanto a la secuenciación de la actividad, se presenta dividida en cuatro partes diferenciadas: 1) se trabaja la comparación de la longitud de diversas cuerdas de la caja por observación; 2) se solicita a los niños que midan dos cuerdas a ras de suelo con las regletas del 2 y del 9 y se les pregunta en cuál han puesto más regletas (la diferencia ha de ser significativa, para que digan que en una hay muchas y en otra pocas); 3) se dejan las regletas con las que se mide cada cuerda en un montón diferente, para que se perciba bien la diferencia, y se pide a los niños que, por turnos, se giren y estimen a través del tacto cuál es corta y cuál es larga; 4) se realiza un trabajo individual sobre el papel, coloreando dos mangueras, una corta y una larga, siguiendo el código que les indica una mascota en la misma ficha: una varita apunta a una regleta corta de color rojo y por otra larga de color azul.

A lo largo de la secuencia didáctica la maestra plantea diversas preguntas con el fin de guiar al alumnado en el desarrollo investigativo del porqué de la relatividad de algunos conceptos. A continuación se muestra un extracto de la transcripción de la actividad a modo ilustrativo:

– Maestra: «Hoy hemos traído una cajita muy especial».

– María 1, sonríe: «¿Cómo se llama esta cajita?»

– Todos: «Caja de cuerdas».

Hay una niña que recuerda un nombre especial para la caja:

– María 2: «La caja de los ratones».

– Maestra: «La caja de los ratones porque tenemos colitas de ratón, si tiramos de la colita del ratón y dice ¡ay! porque… está dentro el ratón, ¿Está dentro?».

– Todos: «Sí, está dentro».

La maestra coge la «caja de los ratones».

– Maestra: «Vamos a ver si está dentro el ratón, a ver, a ver, a ver… a ver si sale».

La profesora agita la caja y simula jugar con los ratones, metiendo la mano dentro.

– Maestra: «A ver, quieto, quieto ratón, quieto, por favor, tiene unas ganas de salir, bueno, bueno, bueno,… Vamos a cerrar porque si no se nos escapa».

La maestra muestra los cordones que salen de la caja (se supone que son las colitas de los ratones).

– Maestra: «Vamos a ver, a ver si hay muchos ratones o pocos ratones, ¿cuántos creéis que hay muchos o pocos?»

– Todos: «Muchoooos».


Draft Content 580105839-58983 ov-es015.jpg

3.2. Resultados extraídos del análisis cualitativo

El análisis pormenorizado de las actividades docentes de los seis ciclos de I-A ha dado lugar, por un lado, a un prototipo de práctica matemática básica para la enseñanza-aprendizaje de las matemáticas en Educación Infantil y, por otra parte, al establecimiento de un sistema de categorías.

3.2.1. Prototipo de práctica matemática conexionista

Una secuencia de intervención acorde al conexionismo debe seguir las pautas que se reseñan a continuación:

• Organización y presentación en grupo de los diversos materiales didácticos.

• Planteamiento de buenas preguntas, por turnos, para fomentar que los niños empiecen a descubrir los diferentes contenidos matemáticos.

• Exposición de los contenidos involucrados en la actividad para favorecer su comprensión.

• Repetición de la actividad para que los niños puedan experimentar todos los contenidos trabajados.

• Nuevo periodo de diálogo a través de «conversaciones matemáticas» sobre las experiencias vividas, para aumentar la fuerza de las conexiones entre los contenidos.

• Planteamiento de nuevos interrogantes para ayudar a los niños a ir interiorizando dichas conexiones.

• Necesidad de llevar las experiencias colectivas a la experiencia personal a través de la representación en el papel, para fijar mejor en la memoria todos los contenidos trabajados.

3.2.2. Sistema de categorías

Como resultado del proceso de comparación constante de datos se han obtenido tres categorías que son el punto de partida para poder delimitar posteriormente la teoría:

• Conexiones conceptuales: son las encargadas de producir nexos entre contenidos matemáticos diversos.

• Conexiones docentes: son las encargadas de establecer vínculos entre diversos conceptos matemáticos a través de una metodología activa y de vivenciar las experiencias matemáticas vinculadas con otras materias.

• Conexiones prácticas: establecen relaciones entre las matemáticas y el entorno.

Estas categorías están a su vez interconectadas formando una red neuronal, lo que ha permitido establecer con más precisión qué tipo de conexiones aparecen en cada una de ellas (Figura 4):


Draft Content 580105839-58983 ov-es016.jpg

• Conexiones conceptuales: identificaciones de cualidades sensoriales, de cantidades de la serie numérica, de formas de situaciones espaciales, de aspectos de medida, de semejanzas y diferencias entre escenas; agrupaciones según un criterio; asociación de número y cantidad; discriminaciones de cantidades, de formas, de aspectos de medida; relaciones diversas como emparejamientos de objetos iguales, clasificaciones, seriaciones, ordenaciones, comparaciones de objetos; representaciones gráficas sencillas; e iniciación al lenguaje matemático…

• Conexiones docentes: una metodología activa, globalización, evaluación y valoración.

• Conexiones prácticas: matemáticas en el entorno, y cuentos, juegos y materiales didácticos.

Es importante destacar la relevancia de las categorías prácticas de conexión para los propósitos de esta investigación dado que son conexiones necesarias para que los niños en la escuela practiquen actividades en las que aparecen de forma conectada la lógica, los números, el tratamiento de la información, la geometría, la medida…, tanto en su vida diaria como a partir del uso de distintos recursos de enseñanza-aprendizaje (cuentos, refranes, poesías, material didáctico, etc.).

4. Discusión y conclusiones

En este artículo se aportan algunos avances acerca del papel de la educación matemática para la construcción de una inteligencia conectiva en las primeras edades del desarrollo humano, asumiendo que el pensamiento matemático tiene un peso importante en la capacidad de los individuos para tomar decisiones, resolver problemas, procesar datos y comprender el entorno social.

Mientras que los canales tradicionales de acceso al conocimiento matemático se fundamentaban en la transmisión de información de forma secuencial y lineal, nuestra investigación ha indagado acerca de los elementos que deberían considerarse en el ámbito educativo en general, y en la práctica docente en particular, para promover una nueva visión acerca de la enseñanza-aprendizaje de las matemáticas, que considere y fomente las conexiones entre los conocimientos como elemento imprescindible para formar a ciudadanos con habilidades para gestionar de forma crítica la toma de decisiones. En este sentido, en el ámbito de la educación matemática, diversos organismos y autores vienen preconizando desde hace algunas décadas la importancia de presentar el conocimiento matemático de forma conectada desde los primeros niveles (Freudenthal, 1991; NCTM, 2000; Alsina, 2012). Sin embargo, la investigación en educación matemática infantil no ha aportado hallazgos que ofrezcan orientaciones concretas al profesorado para fomentar una inteligencia conectiva. Con el objeto de avanzar en esta dirección, se ha llevado a cabo un estudio durante dos años consecutivos que ha permitido concretar un prototipo de actividad o conjunto de actividades que, en forma de secuencia didáctica, promueva las conexiones entre los contenidos. Hasta el momento presente, algunos autores del ámbito de la educación matemática infantil han aportado datos sobre trayectorias de aprendizaje para secuenciar (y poder conectar adecuadamente) los contenidos matemáticos de un mismo bloque (Clements & Sarama, 2009) o bien han indagado acerca de las fases que se deberían contemplar para el diseño, la gestión y la evaluación de actividades matemáticas competenciales que tengan en cuenta, entre otros procesos matemáticos, las conexiones (Alsina, 2016). Sin embargo, no existen datos previos sobre los elementos específicos que deben considerarse para llevar a cabo prácticas matemáticas desde la perspectiva del conexionismo, por lo que la concreción de un prototipo de actividad conexionista supone una innovación en educación matemática que deriva de la investigación en este campo, en el sentido planteado por Llinares (2013).

Otra aportación novedosa de esta investigación es la concreción de conexiones de distinta naturaleza. La interpretación de los resultados aporta un cuerpo de conexiones central con todas las posibles relaciones que existen entre las distintas categorías de cada grupo y que, además, dependen y se interrelacionan unas con otras completando una nueva forma de trabajar el desarrollo del pensamiento matemático en Educación Infantil.

Para promover una inteligencia conectiva en el aula desde los primeros niveles del desarrollo humano parece evidente que los formatos derivados en la educación o, en otras palabras, los modelos de formación, deberían contemplar que el profesorado conozca a fondo estos distintos tipos de conexiones y las formas de desarrollarlas en sus alumnos, considerando los rasgos del docente conexionista planteados por Askew y colaboradores (1997).

En síntesis, pues, considerando los objetivos de nuestro estudio, las principales conclusiones son las siguientes:

• La educación matemática puede desempeñar un papel relevante en la construcción de un cerebro conectivo desde las primeras edades del desarrollo humano, considerando su papel en el marco de la toma de decisiones, la resolución de problemas, el procesamiento de datos y la comprensión del entorno social.

• La promoción del conexionismo en las prácticas matemáticas infantiles requiere un itinerario didáctico caracterizado por una planificación y gestión que contempla seis fases: el uso de materiales didácticos en grupo, el planteamiento de preguntas, la exposición colectiva, las conversaciones matemáticas posteriores, el planteamiento de nuevos interrogantes y la representación individual en el papel del conocimiento adquirido.

• Las prácticas conexionadas presentan tres grandes tipos de conexiones: conceptuales, docentes y prácticas.

• Las conexiones prácticas tienen una relevancia especial dado que son las responsables de conectar los conocimientos con la vida cotidiana.

• El profesorado debe conocer a fondo los distintos tipos de conexiones y las formas de desarrollarlas en sus alumnos.

En este sentido, algunas de las principales limitaciones de nuestro estudio han sido no haber analizado a priori los conocimientos sobre el conexionismo del profesorado que ha participado en el estudio ni haber podido comparar el aprendizaje matemático de los alumnos en relación con otros grupos de alumnos que no han aprendido matemáticas desde esta perspectiva. Así, pues, será necesario realizar nuevos estudios en el futuro que, a partir de un modelo concreto sobre los conocimientos del profesorado de matemáticas como, por ejemplo, el «Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching» (MKT) de Hill, Rowan y Ball (2005) y Hill, Ball y Schilling (2008) o el Modelo del Conocimiento Didáctico-Matemático (CDM) de Godino (2009). Según Godino, Ake?, Gonzato y Wilhelmi (2014), será necesario que se analicen con mayor precisión los conocimientos del profesorado de Educación Infantil sobre el conexionismo y la forma de implementarlo en las prácticas matemáticas. Asimismo, para validar la aplicación en el aula de este modelo de formación cuya meta es fomentar la inteligencia conectiva, será necesario diseñar nuevos estudios cuantitativos que, con diseños cuasi-experimentales, permitan comparar los rendimientos matemáticos de alumnos que aprenden bajo una perspectiva conexionista con alumnos que aprenden con otros modelos más tradicionales que no consideren las conexiones.

Un diagnóstico más preciso va a permitir, en definitiva, establecer un conjunto de líneas de intervención mucho más ajustadas tanto en la formación inicial como permanente del profesorado puesto que hoy, más que nunca, hay que apostar por potenciar la inteligencia conectiva de nuestros alumnos, considerando las aportaciones de las Neurociencias y otras ciencias afines que plantean una cambio radical en la forma cómo las personas acceden al conocimiento.

Referencias

Alsina, Á. (2012). Hacia un enfoque globalizado de la educación matemática en las primeras edades. Números, 80, 7-24. (https://goo.gl/RYiaZ4) (2016-10-10).

Alsina, Á. (2016). Diseño, gestión y evaluación de actividades matemáticas competenciales en el aula. Épsilon, 33(1), 92, 7-29. (https://goo.gl/TOLyQM) (2016-09-10).

Askew, M., Brown, M., Rhodes, V., Wiliam, D., & Johnson, D. (1997). Effective Teachers of Numeracy in Primary Schools: Teachers' Beliefs, Practices and Pupils' Learning. (https://goo.gl/ZzQo1y) (2016-07-30).

Bell, F. (2011). Connectivism: Its Place in Theory-informed Research and Innovation in Technology-enabled Learning. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 12(3), 98-118. (https://goo.gl/adhO30) (2016-09-11).

Caño, A., & Luque, J.L. (1995). El conexionismo: un nexo entre las neurociencias y las ciencias cognitivas. Filosofía y Ciencias Cognitivas, 3, 37-49. (https://goo.gl/txFtVw) (2016-09-15).

Caparrós, A. (1980). Los paradigmas en psicología. Sus alternativas y sus crisis. Barcelona: Horsori.

Clements, D.H., & Sarama, J. (2009). Learning and Teaching Early math: The Learning Trajectories Approach. Nueva York: Routledge.

Cobos, P.L (2005). Conexionismo y cognición. Madrid: Pirámide.

Crespo, A. (2007). Cognición humana: mente, ordenadores y neuronas. Madrid: Ramón Areces.

Downes, G. (2008). Places to Go: Connectivism & Connective Knowledge. Innovate: Journal of Online Education, 5(1), 6. (https://goo.gl/71UdUt) (2016-09-10).

Driscoll, M.P. (2005). Psychology of Learning for Instruction. New York: Allin & Bacon.

Freudenthal, H. (1991). Revisiting Mathematics Education. Dordrectht: Kluwer Academic.

Gibbs, G.R. (2012). El análisis de los datos cualitativos en investigación cualitativa. Madrid: Morata.

Godino J.D. (2009). Categori?as de ana?lisis de los conocimientos del profesor de matema?ticas. Unión, 20, 13-31. (https://goo.gl/AnNICA) (2016-10-10).

Godino, J. (1993). Paradigmas, problemas y metodologías de investigación en didáctica de la matemática. Quadrante, 2(1), 9-22.

Godino, J.D., Ake?, L., Gonzato, M., & Wilhelmi, M.R. (2014). Niveles de algebrizacio?n de la actividad matema?tica escolar. Implicaciones para la formacio?n de maestros. Ensen?anza de las Ciencias, 32(1), 199-219. https://doi.org/10.5565/rev/ensciencias.965

Hill, H.C., Ball, D.L., & Schilling, S.G. (2008). Unpacking Pedagogical Content Knowledge: Conceptualizing and Measuring Teachers’ Topic-specified Knowledge of Students. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 39(4), 372-400. (https://goo.gl/q8Usti) (2016-09-11).

Hill, H.C., Rowan, B, & Ball, D. L. (2005). Effects of Teachers’ Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching on Student Achievement. American Educational Research Journal, 42 (2), 371-406. (https://goo.gl/xg5juF) (2016-09-30).

Karinthy, F. (1929). Chain-Links: Everything is Different. (https://goo.gl/jwtmHJ) (2016-07-28).

Kemmis, S., & McTaggart, R. (1992). Cómo planificar la investigación-acción. Barcelona: Laertes.

Llinares, S. (2013). Innovación en la educación matemática: más allá de la tecnología. Modelling in Science Education and Learning, 6(1), 7-19. https://doi.org/10.4995/msel.2013.1819

Llorente, C., Oca, J., & Solana, A. (2012). Mejora de la atención y de áreas cerebrales asociadas en niños de edad escolar a través de un programa neurocognitivo. Participación Educativa, 1(1), 47-59. (https://goo.gl/1AoG5C) (2016-09-10).

López, J.J., Ortiz, T., & López, M.I. (1999). Lecciones de Psicología Médica. Barcelona: Masson.

Martorell, J.L., & Prieto, J.L. (2002). Fundamentos de Psicología. Madrid: Centro de Estudios Ramón Areces.

McLeod, P., Plunkeett, K., & Rolls, E.T. (1998). Introduction to Connectionist Modelling of Cognitive Processes. New York: Oxford University Press.

Merzenich, M.M., & Syka, J. (2005). Plasticity and Signal Representation in the Auditory System. New York: Springer.

Miller, G.A., Galanter, E., & Pribram, K.H. (1983). Planes y estructura de conducta. Madrid: Debate.

NCTM (2000). Principles and Standards for School Mathematics. Reston, VA: NCTM

Ortega, T., & Ortiz, M. (2003). Niveles de dominio de los conceptos básicos de educación infantil. Cálculo mental. GEPEM, 43, 49-78.

Pérez, G. (1994). Investigación cualitativa. Retos e interrogantes. I. Métodos. Madrid: La Muralla.

Pitt, J., Bourazeri, A., Nowak, A., Roszczynska-Kurasinska, M., Rychwalska, A., Santiago, I.R.,... & Sanduleac, M. (2013). Transforming Big Data into Collective Awareness. Computer, 46(6), 40-45. https://doi.org/10.1109/MC.2013.153

Rumelhart, D.E., & McClelland, J.L. (1992). Introducción al Procesamiento Distribuido en Paralelo. Madrid: Alianza.

Santonja, J.M. (2005). 25² líneas: las matemáticas en la televisión. [25² Lines: Mathematics on Television]. Comunicar, 25. (https://goo.gl/mj7QwV) (2016-10-28).

Siemens, G. (2004). Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the Digital Age. (https://goo.gl/A1IDDl) (2016-08-12).

Skemp, R. (1980). Psicología del aprendizaje de las matemáticas. Madrid: Morata.

Strauss, A., & Corbin, J. (1998). Basics of Qualitative Research: Techniques and Procedures for Developing Grounded Theory. US: Sage.

Van-Overwalle, F. (2011). Social Learning and Connectionism. In T.R. Schachtman, & S. Reilly (Eds.), Associative Learning and Conditioning Theory: Human and Non-Human Applications (pp. 345-375). New York: Oxford University Press.

Vicario-Solorzano, C. M., Gómez, P., & Olivares-Ceja, J. M. (2014). Mejorando el aprendizaje de matemáticas en educación básica mediante conexionismo y tecnología táctil. In J. Asenjo, Ó. Macías, & J.C. Toscano (Eds.), Memorias del Congreso Iberoamericano de Ciencia, Tecnología, Innovación y Educación (Artículo 1028). Buenos Aires: OEI. (https://goo.gl/BvbLg7) (2017-03-14).

Watts, D.J. (2004). Six Degrees: The Science of a Connected Age. WW Norton & Company.

Back to Top
GET PDF

Document information

Published on 30/06/17
Accepted on 30/06/17
Submitted on 30/06/17

Volume 25, Issue 2, 2017
DOI: 10.3916/C52-2017-03
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 3
Views 28
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?