Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The media in general, and advertising in particular, are considered as important agents of socialization, including genderrelated issues. Thus the legislator has focused on the regulation of the images of women and men in advertisements. However, regulations prohibiting sexist advertising in Spain pay specific attention to audiovisual media. The objective of this study is to check whether this unequal interest also takes place in academic research. This paper analyzes the differences in the scientific literature (national and international) on the sexism in advertising depending on the media. Specifically we examine the methodology, techniques and ways to measure concepts. In order to do this, we conduct a systematic review of studies on gender and advertising published in Spanish or English between 1988 and 2010 in seven databases Spanish (Dialnet, Compludoc, ISOC), or international (Scopus, Sociological Abstracts, PubMed and Eric).The main results of the 175 texts analyzed show that, unlike legislative controls, the academy has studied mainly sexism in advertising in print media, although interest by analysis of the treatment of gender in the discourse of advertising audiovisual seems to be increasing.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

The media are considered to be important agents of socialisation (Dietz, 1998: 428; Messineo, 2008: 752) capable of influencing the ideas, values, attitudes and social and cultural beliefs of their audiences (Ibroscheva, 2007: 409). As such, the «mass media» are deemed to transmit ways of living and patterns of behaviour (Casado, 2005: 2). In particular, it has been suggested that advertising –also an important agent of socialisation (Tsai, 2010: 423)– can disseminate cultural values (Kalliny & Gentry, 2007: 17) and can come to reinforce certain lifestyles and stereotypes (Royo, Aldás & al., 2005: 114). It is also understood that, within industrialised societies, the influence of commercial communication on men and women is on the rise (Díaz, Muñiz & Cáceres, 2009: 222). More specifically, and bearing in mind that advertisers frequently employ gender stereotypes (Zhang, Srisupandit & Cartwright, 2009: 684), advertisements’ portrayals of women and men are perceived by audiences to be the standard images of both sexes (Zhou & Chen, 1997: 485). In effect, masculinity and femininity are conditioned by the cultural environment and not by nature or biology (Feasey, 2009: 358), so that femininity (and also masculinity) is transmitted through the media and varies from culture to culture (Frith, Shaw & Cheng, 2005: 56).

Based on these premises, it is not surprising that, while not all of the gender stereotypes used are sexist1 (Jones & Reid, 2009: 20), there are nevertheless so many regulations governing the portrayal of men and women in advertising2. In Spain, there have been various regulatory changes since the beginning of this century which have been aimed at improving representations of gender in adverts. So it is that, following various amendments (and notably those introduced by Spain’s 2004 Law Against Gender-Based Violence [the Ley Orgánica de Medidas de Protección Integral contra la Violencia de Género]), the country’s General Advertising Act of 1988 (the Ley General de Publicidad) deems the discriminatory or degrading representation of women within commercial communication to be against the law when a) their bodies, or parts of their bodies, are used directly or specifically as simple objects with no relation to the product being advertised; b) their image is used in relation to stereotyped behaviours that encourage gender-based violence (Ley General de Publicidad, 1988).

In addition, Spain's Equal Opportunities Act of 2007 (the Ley Orgánica para la Igualdad Efectiva de Mujeres y Hombres) establishes that advertising which encourages discriminatory conduct as defined within this Act will be deemed unlawful advertising in accordance with the provisions of general and institutional advertising and communication legislation (2007: 12.619).

But aside from these regulations, which refer to the portrayal of both sexes in advertising generically, Spain’s legal framework establishes differences between how sexism in advertising is policed in the various media3, with specific regulations for the broadcast media.

In effect, since the so-called Television Without Borders Act in 1994 (the Ley de televisión sin fronteras [1994: 22.346] through which the European Council Directive 89/552/CEE on the Coordination of Certain Provisions Laid Down by Law, Regulation or Administrative Action in Member States Concerning the Pursuit of Television Broadcasting Activities was incorporated into the Spanish Law) –an Law currently repealed by the General Audiovisual Communication Law (the Ley General de la Comunicación Audiovisual [2010: 30.204]– advertising which is broadcast on television and which shows discrimination based, among other things, on gender has been considered unlawful advertising. Law of 2010, due to the General Audiovisual Communication Law (2010: 30.174), this is now valid for all broadcast media : radio and television.

Thus this Act –an incorporation into the Spanish Law of the Audiovisual Communication Services Directive (Directiva de Servicios de Comunicación Audiovisual), which modifies the abovementioned 89/552/CEE European Council Directive of 2007– focuses specifically on advertising broadcast through audiovisual media (radio and television) and prohibits advertising which, among other things, offends people’s dignity, promotes sexism or uses female images in a discriminatory or degrading way. It also deems it to be a serious offence to broadcast content which clearly encourages gender-related contempt, hatred or discrimination, among other things (General Audiovisual Communication Law, 2010: 30.195). Similarly, it stipulates that subscriber broadcasting services must not incite hatred or discrimination based on gender or any other personal or social circumstance and must respect human dignity and constitutional values, taking special care to eradicate conduct which fosters female inequality (General Audiovisual Communication Law, 2010: 30.167).

In contrast to this reinforced control of sexism on radio and television, the press world is characterised by a lack of regulatory standards within the sector (Salvador, 2008: 189) and must therefore defer to generic laws regarding the portrayal of women within commercial communication (the 2004 Law Against Gender-Based Violence; the 2007 Equal Opportunities Act; and the 1988 General Advertising Act).

European legislators in general –and Spanish legislators in particular– appear to have paid unequal attention to the various media in which advertisements are run, resulting in prevention within the broadcast media but not within the press. There has traditionally been a process to bring television broadcasting regulations up to a stricter and higher standard than other media such as the press (Ariño, 2007: 13); a situation due, among other things, to the potential influence that the dominant medium –television– can have on individuals (Ariño, 2007: 13).

The lack of equal regulation across all media leads us to wonder whether this imbalance is due to scientific reasons and is reproduced within the research. Our question is whether sexism in advertising, which has been a topic of interest since the 1960s (Eisend, 2010: 418), has been studied differently in the printed press than in television, a medium which has aroused interest as to its effects (Furnham & Paltezer, 2010: 223).

Within such a context, this paper aims to round up the scientific literature on sexism in advertising within the different media, and specifically assess disparities in the following areas:

• The production of articles by year, publication, geographical location, language, gender of main author, authors and institution.

• Objects of study (the people observed and subject analysed).

• The concepts and terms used.

• Methodology, techniques and the precise way of measuring the concept (operationalisation).

2. Material and methods

To attain the aforementioned objectives we conducted a systematic review of texts relating to gender and advertising in the print media and television4.

The scope of study comprised all the articles relating to the topic of research which were published in English or Spanish between 1988 (year of the General Advertising Law)5 and 2010 (the data having been gathered in the first quarter of 2011) in scientific journals indexed on multidisciplinary databases in Spain (Dialnet, Compludoc and Isoc) and abroad (Scopus) and on specialist sociology (Sociological Abstracts), education (Eric) and medical (PubMed) databases6.

The main search strategy was to locate the following keywords in the title and/or abstract of the documents: «advertising and woman», «advertising and gender», «sexist advertising», «advertising and sexism», «advertising and stereotypes», «gender stereotypes and advertising», «advertising and gender discrimination», «advertising and sex discrimination», «advertising and discrimination» and «advertising and gender bias» on Sociological Abstracts, PubMed, Eric and Scopus. The same keywords, but in Spanish, were searched for on Dialnet, Compludoc and Isoc, resulting in English-language documents from the former group of databases and Spanish-language documents from the latter.

The second search strategy depended on the functionalities available on the various databases. Thus on Dialnet, which took the keywords from any part of the article, it was necessary to locate the keywords in the title and/or abstract individually. On Compludoc two searches were conducted: one to locate the concepts in the title, and the other to locate those in the abstract. On Isoc the subject areas were analysed collectively through a search by field, which meant that, like in the previous case, all the keywords were returned twice. On PubMed, Eric, Sociological Abstracts and Scopus the keywords in the title and the abstract were located directly. Where the database permitted, the searches were refined by date, language and type of document. Otherwise they were sorted manually.

Having located the texts, we selected only those works which met certain criteria for inclusion: empirical articles published in scientific journals which analysed either the portrayal of men and/or women in advertisements in the print media or on television; the public’s perception of gender in advertising messages in the aforementioned media; or the situation of men and women in advertising agencies with reference to the print media or television. Literature reviews were thereby eliminated.

The choice of which works to analyse was made independently by two researchers in accordance with the aforementioned criteria (Deeks, 1998: 703, 708). Of the total documents found on the databases consulted, and based on a reading of the title, abstract or text, 175 articles were deemed to have met the inclusion criteria. Then, to examine these articles, it was necessary to retrieve and analyse the complete texts7. Half of these final items were found on Scopus, 22.7% on Sociological Abstracts, 8.3% on Dialnet, 6.4% on Isoc, 5.3% on PubMed, 3.8% on Eric and 3.4% on Compludoc. In terms of overlap (i.e. the same article appearing on different databases), it is worth mentioning that of the 175 documents examined, 97 were found on the same database, 67 were found on two and 11 were found on database.

Once the complete texts had been gathered, they were then classified using a protocol with three categories: a) characteristics of the work, b) authors and organisations, and c) content of the texts. Two people spent three months classifying the selected works, obtaining between them a mean Kappa index of 0.88. To analyse the available information, a database was created in SPSS 15, with use thus made of Pearson’s chi-squared tests8, contingency tables, multiple response tables, line graphs and frequencies.

3. Analysis and results

3.1. Productivity

A quick glance at figure 1, which shows the scientific literature on sexism in advertising broken down by medium, immediately reveals two things: firstly, that throughout the 22 years in question there has been greater interest in analysing the print media than the broadcast media (although the differences are not statistically significant); and secondly, that while increasing attention has been paid to the print media, there appears to have been a reversal of this trend in recent years (as of 2008), with more academics beginning to analyse the broadcast media and fewer studies being conducted on sexism and the press.


Draft Content 427912049-26784-en052.jpg

The 175 documents analysed were published across a range of 125 journals, making for a variety of publications featuring texts related to the topic of study and a low concentration of journals specialising in the subject (since the vast majority –102– published just a single article).

The publication with the greatest number of articles is Sex Roles: A Journal of Research, which featured 19 works (11 relating to the print media and 8 to television), followed by the Journal of Advertising with 7 (5 on the printed mass media and 2 on the broadcast media) and then Comunicar with 4 (all of which focused on television). It should thus be noted that none of the three abovementioned journals featured research which analysed both types of media together.

Of the articles selected, 46.9% were taken from journals indexed on the JCR database in the year in which they published the paper under analysis. However, not one of these texts was written in Spanish or came from a Spanish-language journal (see table 1). In terms of the quartile for these publications, which is available from 2003 and which has been calculated for each of the subject categories into which the journal falls, it should be noted that, of the 88 situations it has been possible to examine, only 9.1% form part of Q1, with 28.4% in Q2, 42% in Q3 and 20.5% in Q4.


Draft Content 427912049-26784-en053.jpg

With regard to the 125 texts which were published in or after 1999, the year in which SCImago Journal & Country Rank (SJR, a portal which analyses the scientific literature retrieved by Scopus) became available, 98 were among the journals considered by SJR in the year in which they published the article under examination. Only 9 of these 125 documents were written in Spanish, with 7 belonging to Spanish journals, as opposed to the 46 from the United States.

In terms of the geographical zone, in general and taking account of total production, differences can be observed in the interest in the various mass media, in that there are more articles focusing on the print media than on television, and these differences in volume are significant in Spain (x2=7.407; p=0.025) (48% versus 36%) and in the rest of Europe in particular (x2=9.813; p=0.007) (83.1% versus 8.5%). Looking at the relative attention paid to each medium according to geographical zone, we can see that interest in the print media is greater in Europe (83.1%) and the rest of the world (81.8%) than in the US (66.3%) and Spain, where fewer than half of the published articles focused exclusively on print media (48%). Spain pays relatively more attention to television (36%) than do the US (28.8%), Europe (8.5%) and the rest of the world (18.2%). But Spain also produces relatively more multimedia research (with press and television) into sexism than the other zones analysed (16% versus 8.5% in Europe and 5% in the US) (see table 2).


Draft Content 427912049-26784-en054.jpg

In all cases the articles are predominantly in English (83.4% of the total) rather than Spanish (16.6% of the total), although this tendency –in keeping with the point made above– is particularly striking for studies of the printed media (87% versus 13%). For the texts written in Spanish, the difference between the media is considerably less marked than the difference for those written in English (24.2 points versus 52.8 points), meaning that when you take the percentage of documents in each language into account, you are more likely to find works based on the medium of television in Spanish than in English (31% versus 20.5%).

Women tend to be credited as the main author more often than men (65.1% of the total versus 33.7%). Women wrote 79 documents on the print media, 27 on television and 8 relating to both media, as opposed to 42, 12 and 5 for men respectively. There are no statistically significant differences by gender in the attention given to the print media and to the broadcast media.

In terms of authorship, 44% of the articles were written by one author, 50.3% by between two and three, and just 5.7% were written by more than three authors, with no statistically significant differences by the medium analysed.

In the Spanish journals, the people who published the most documents –four, to be precise– were Paloma Díaz (studying the print media) and Marcelo Royo. The latter, writing alongside María José Miquel and Eva Caplliure, was part of the most prolific group, which published three works: one focused on analysing the print media and the other two works combining their interest in television and the print media.

With regard to the remaining publications, Elianne Riska has four articles to her name, each co-written and with a focus on magazines. Only one group of authors –Katherine Toland Frith, Hong Cheng and Ping Shaw– appears together on more than one occasion (twice, to be precise), and they also studied magazines.

Inter-institutional works are infrequent among the documents analysed, with most articles (64.6% of the total) written by a single organisation, 22.3% by two organisations and only 5.7% by three or more. These differences are not, however, statistically significant.

The institutions appearing most frequently in the Spanish journals (in precisely four articles) are the Complutense University of Madrid, the University of Valencia, and Rey Juan Carlos University. Within the rest of the publications, meanwhile, the University of California is the most prolific organisation. Between them, these four institutions have published articles on the print media and on television, and have published both individually and alongside other institutions.

3.2. Characteristics of the articles

When the articles examine the people portrayed in advertisements and they specify the ages they are looking at, the most studied age group is young people, followed by adults, the elderly, adolescents and children. This remains the order when studying the print media. However, when television is analysed exclusively, children and adolescents are researched on the same percentage of occasions, whereas these two age groups are not considered in any of the articles which focus on the print media and television together. The only statistically significant differences are produced with reference to children (x2=7.16; p=0.028), in that their presence is greater when television is analysed than when the print media are analysed (66.7% versus 33.3%).

When the articles study people’s (or age groups’) perception of adverts (principally through discussion groups, interviews or questionnaires), it should be noted that children are never questioned: it is young people who are paid the most attention, followed by adults, adolescents and, finally, the elderly. In effect, young people and adults are the groups of people most consulted in all situations and, what’s more, the documents which focus exclusively on the broadcast media do not consult adolescents or the elderly at any time.

While the main subject of this research is women and advertising, some articles also turn their attention to men. Thus when examining the gender of the people analysed in the discourses, as shown in table 3, men are researched in 41.4% of the documents studying the print media, in 47.3% of those focusing on television, and in 40% of those looking at both types of media, as opposed to 58.6%, 52.7% and 60% respectively which examine women. Notwithstanding this generality, there are statistically significant differences (x2=7.704; p=0.021) in the case of men, making it more common for men to be examined in texts based on the print media (66.1%) than in works looking at television (27.6%) or both types of media (6.3%).


Draft Content 427912049-26784-en055.jpg

When the works refer to the populace, a situation arises very similar to that described above: it is predominantly the female population which is analysed by the articles examining the print media (58.6% versus 41.4%) and television (66.7% versus 33.3%). Yet when the documents examine both media, they do so equitably (50%). On this occasion, the differences shown are not statistically significant.

Bearing in mind that only articles focusing on the printed mass media and/or television were selected for conducting this study, as to be expected, no articles were found analysing men and/or women in advertising agencies that referred specifically to these media. Meanwhile, articles studying the presentation of men and women within commercial communication were more frequent than those studying people’s perception of this portrayal for all media : 85.9% versus 14.1% for the press; 85.7% versus 14.3% for television; and 76.9% versus 23.1% for both. These differences are not, however, statistically significant.

3.3. Keywords

While all the keywords brought up articles relating to the print media, four of the concepts used –«advertising and gender bias», «advertising and discrimination», «advertising and gender-based discrimination» and «advertising and sexual discrimination»– returned no results for television or the two media together. «Advertising and women» and «advertising and gender» were the two combinations that returned the most results, without any differences by medium. Only «advertising and stereotypes» returned statistically significant differences by medium (x2=15.739; p=0.000), reporting a greater number of articles relating to the printed mass media (46.5%).

3.4. Gender Indicators, operationalisation and sexism

While there are no statistically significant differences between them, quantitative methodology is employed more frequently than qualitative methodology within the texts analysing the print media (61% versus 39%) and in works focusing on television (71.4% versus 28.6%). However, when the two are studied together, both methodologies are employed equally (50%).

The majority of articles tend to realise and identify –albeit only partially– the operationalisation effected for analysing sexist advertising. The works on the print media featured this information 85.4% of the time, texts on television 89.7% of the time and those on both 76.9% of the time, with no statistically significant differences. It is worth noting, however, that information on this subject is missing from 12% of the total texts.

The research uses scales to measure sexism in advertising in 67.4% of all the cases (67.5% for the print media, 71.8% for television and 53.8% for both). Subject categories are employed to evaluate the existence of sexist advertising in 24.6% of the articles, with no statistically significant differences according to medium.

Only 8.6% of the documents conclude that the advertising is not sexist or that the representations of gender featured in the advertisements cannot be described as traditional. Nevertheless, not one of these articles deals exclusively with television. In other words, not one of the academic texts selected concludes that television advertising is healthy in terms of gender. There are thus statistically significant differences by medium (x2=11.852; p=0.003), as 73.3% of these studies focus on the press.

4. Discussion and conclusions

The data obtained indicate that, in general, and especially in the international arena, there is more research into sexism and gender-based discrimination by and within advertising in the print media than on television. There is a practical reason for this tendency: it is more difficult to analyse content on television. It could thus be considered that the reason why researchers do not focus their interest on television is related, according to Pérez (2009: 105), to the fact that the ephemeral nature of the broadcast advertising media brings an added difficulty to its analysis. Pérez also states that the broad possibilities in terms of production and the language used in television spots have made it difficult to establish a strict methodology that enables television to be analysed within scientific parameters (Pérez, 2009: 105). Researchers have thus resorted to the print media for ease of study despite the fact that, as this paper shows, there are no relevant differences in the methodologies chosen to analyse biases in the various media.

Considering the works as a whole, meanwhile, it is rather complex to ascertain whether sexism exists within the media under consideration, as academics tend not to adopt a position in this respect. So in the (principally descriptive) articles, one will most frequently find an inventory of the image of women and men, without it being specified whether this image could be deemed discriminatory or not. The lack of delimitation and operationalisation of concepts makes it difficult to assess the validity of these works with regard to the treatment of gender in the media, and difficult to make a comparison with the legal application. In this sense, various authors (Furnham & Paltzer, 2010: 223; Paek, Nelson & Vilela, 2011: 193) all declare that the research on the subject matter lacks a theoretical framework.

The analysis of gender biases in advertising discourse is subtly different in the Spanish case, in terms of medium. In Spain, there is a greater fondness for observing television, either on academic grounds – television is the medium which reaches the highest percentage of individuals (Spanish Association for Media Research, 2012), enjoys the greatest investment in advertising9 and is the most influential medium in terms of gender socialisation (Espinar, 2006)– or due to the influence of the legal framework.

In effect, over the past 15-plus years in Spain (since the incorporation of European Council Directive 89/552/CEE on the Coordination of Certain Provisions Laid Down by Law, Regulation or Administrative Action in Member States Concerning the Pursuit of Television Broadcasting Activities was incorporated into Spanish Law in 1994), the government regulations which restrict sexual discrimination in advertising generically (the 1988 General Advertising Act, the 2004 Law Against Gender-Based Violence, and the 2007 Equal Opportunities Act) have existed alongside specific legislation which holds television broadcasters jointly responsible for the broadcasting of illegal content.

Specifically, it is our belief that it is the establishment of a series of regulations and controls in various spheres (such as the climate of social awareness of the importance of the media in building up sexual equality) which has paved the way for studies evaluating the application of the regulations in Spain.

Finally, it should be noted that the principal limitation of this study is the selection of only scientific articles for analysis, which has meant the rejection of other important sources of information. Despite this restriction, and with a focus on gender, this paper contributes to broadening scientific knowledge regarding differences in the study of press advertising and television advertising. While the data handled may not have enabled the establishment of a causal relation, future studies might wish to question whether these peculiarities have been favoured by Spain’s specific legal framework and/or vice versa. It would also be interesting to explore whether the same perception of sexism in advertising exists among viewers, academics and the judges responsible for deciding whether or not an advertisement contains sexual discrimination.

Notes

1 Sexism is the portrayal of men and women in a manner inferior to their abilities and potential (Plakoyiannaki & Zotos, 2009: 1.411).

2 A summary of the principal regulations governing this subject at national (constitutions, national legislation, regional law), European (community directives) and international level (Declaration of Athens, Beijing Conference and the Conference of New Delhi) can be found in Balaguer (2008).

3 The Spanish Law of Information Society Services and Electronic Commerce (Ley de Servicios de la Sociedad de la Información y de Comercio Electrónico) (2002: 25.391) has been omitted from this analysis as it only makes one reference to sexual discrimination with regard to the provision of information society services in general and not to advertising in particular, and is closer to the principles of the Spanish Constitution than to the General Advertising Act in its call for respect for personal dignity and for the principle of non-discrimination on the grounds of race, gender, religion, opinion, nationality, disability or any other personal or social circumstance.

4 The print media have been bundled together as one entity due to the lack of information provided by a large part of the documents analysed. In terms of the broadcast mass media, only television has been taken into account, as only one work was found that dealt with film and three with radio. The Internet, meanwhile, has its own regulations which were not considered in this study.

5 The passing of this Act was the first time that sexist advertisements were considered illegal in Spain, as the Act ruled that advertising which offends personal dignity or undermines the values and rights recognised in the Constitution, especially with regard to children, young people and women were outlawed (General Advertising Act, 1988: 32.465).

6 To select the multidisciplinary and international database, exploratory searches were made of the two leading databases: Web Of Science and Scopus. The number of articles retrieved from the former was 936, while the latter returned 1,339 articles from the fields of Medicine (640), Social Sciences (383), Psychology (210), Business, Administration and Accounting (201), Nursing (74), Arts and Humanities (60), Economics, Econometrics and Finance (59), Agriculture and Biological Sciences (56), Healthcare Professions (48), Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology (29), Neuroscience (22), Materials Sciences (21), Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmacy (17), Engineering (16), Computer Sciences (14), Environmental Sciences (10), Immunology and Microbiology (8), Earth and Planetary Sciences (5), Chemical Engineering (4), Decision Sciences (4), Dentistry (2), Physics and Astronomy (2) and Mathematics (2), plus 2 multidisciplinary texts and 101 which were not classified. The decision was made to use Scopus not only for quantitative reasons but also for its qualitative features. While Web of Science contains leading journals with the highest quality and impact factor, with regard to our topic of study it suffers from biases in terms of geography (focusing on the USA) and subjects (gathering mostly journals relating to the Sciences). The Social Sciences are modestly represented on Scopus so, to get around this problem, we included the Sociological Abstract database. PubMed was used due to the large number of medical-related articles found on Scopus and we resorted to Eric with the aim of observing the studies conducted from the field of Education, since the Spanish Equal Opportunities Act (2007) lends great importance to this field. Dialnet, Compludoc and Isoc, meanwhile, were selected to index the academic literature published in Spanish.

7 When the complete text was not available on a database, it was searched for via the University of Alicante’s print and electronic subscriptions (journals, abstracts and databases). If the text was not found using this method, an email requesting the text was sent to the authors themselves, with the final option being inter-library lending.

8 We consider differences to be statistically significant when p<0.05.

9 Of all the conventional media, television is the mass media with the greatest volume of advertising sales (Sánchez, 2012: 8).

Support and Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank the Regional Government of Valencia (Generalitat Valenciana) for the award of the FPI research grant, the authors who have collaborated by providing their articles and the University of Alicante’s library user information point (Punto BIU) for its support.

References

Ariño, M. (2007). Contenido de vídeo en línea: ¿Regulación 2.0? Un análisis en el contexto de la nueva Directiva de servicios de medios audiovisuales. Quaderns del CAC, 29, 3-17.

Asociación para la Investigación de Medios de Comunicación (2012). Resumen General EGM. Madrid: Asociación para la Investigación de Medios de Comunicación. (www.aimc.es/-Datos-EGM-Resumen-General-.html).

Balaguer, M.L. (2008). Género y regulación de la publicidad en el ordenamiento jurídico. La imagen de la mujer. Revista Latina, 63, 382-391. (DOI:10.4185/RLCS-63-2008-775-382-391).

Casado, F. (2005). La realidad televisiva como modelo de comportamiento social: Una propuesta didáctica. Comunicar, 13(25). (www.revistacomunicar.com/index.php?contenido=detalles&numero=25&articulo=25-2005-196).

Deeks, J.J. (1998). Systematic Reviews of Published Evidence: Miracles or Minefields? Annals of Oncology, 9(7), 703-709.

Díaz, P., Muñiz, C. & Cáceres, D. (2009). Consumo de revistas de moda y efectos en la autopercepción del cuerpo de mujeres: Un estudio comparado entre España y México desde la tercera persona. Comunicación y Sociedad, 22(2), 221-242.

Dietz, T.L. (1998). An Examination of Violence and Gender Role Portrayals in Video Games: Implications for Gender Socialization and Aggressive Behaviour. Sex Roles, 38(5-6), 425-442. (DOI:10.1023/A:1018709905920).

Directiva 2007/65/CE del Parlamento Europeo y del Consejo de 11-12-2007 por la que se Modifica la Directiva 89/552/CEE del Consejo sobre la Coordinación de Determinadas Disposiciones Legales, Reglamentarias y Administrativas de los Estados Miembros Relativas al Ejercicio de Actividades de Radiodifusión Televisiva. Diario Oficial de la Unión Europea, 18-12-2007, Serie L, 332, 27-45.

Eisend, M. (2010). A Meta-analysis of Gender Roles in Advertising. Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 38(4), 418-440. (DOI:10.1007/s11747-009-0181-x).

Espinar, E. (2006). Imágenes y estereotipos de género en la programación y en la publicidad infantil. Análisis cuantitativo. Revista Latina, 61. (www.revistalatinacs.org/200614EspinarRuiz.htm).

Feasey, R. (2009). Spray More, Get More: Masculinity, Television Advertising and the Lynx Effect. Journal of Gender Studies, 18(4), 357-368. (DOI:10.1080/095892309032-60027).

Frith, K., Shaw, P. & Cheng, H, (2005). The Construction of Beauty: A Cross-cultural Analysis of Women’s Magazine Advertising. Journal of Communication, 55(1), 56-70. (DOI:10.1111/j.1460-2466.2005.tb02658.x).

Furnham, A. & Paltzer, S. (2010). The Portrayal of Men and Women in Television Advertisements: An Updated Review of 30 Studies Published since 2000. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 51(3), 216-236. (DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9450.2009.00772.x).

Ibroscheva, E. (2007). Caught between East and West? Portrayals of Gender in Bulgarian Television Advertisements. Sex Roles, 57(5-6), 409-418. (DOI:10.1007/s11199-007-9261-x).

Jones, S.C. & Reid, A. (2010). The Use of Female Sexuality in Australian Alcohol Advertising: Public Policy Implications of Young Adults’ Reactions to Stereotypes. Journal of Public Affairs, 10(1-2), 19-35. (DOI:10.1002/pa.339).

Kalliny, M. & Gentry, L. (2007). Cultural Values Reflected in Arab and American Television Advertising. Journal of Current Issues and Research in Advertising, 29(1), 15-32. (DOI:10.1080/10641734.2007.10505205).

Ley 25/1994, de 12-07-1994, por la que se Incorpora al Ordenamiento Jurídico Español la Directiva 89/552/CEE, sobre la Coordinación de Disposiciones Legales, Reglamentarias y Administrativas de los Estados Miembros Relativas al Ejercicio de Actividades de Radiodifusión Televisiva. Boletín Oficial del Estado, 13-07-1994, 166, 22342-22348.

Ley 34/1988, de 11-11-1988, General de Publicidad. Boletín Oficial del Estado, 15-11-1988, 274, 32464-32467.

Ley 34/2002, de 11-07-2002, de Servicios de la Sociedad de la Información y de Comercio Electrónico. Boletín Oficial del Estado, 12-07-2002, 166, 25388-25403.

Ley 7/2010, de 31-03-2010, General de la Comunicación Audiovisual. Boletín Oficial del Estado, 01-04-2010, 79, 30157-30209.

Ley Orgánica 1/2004, de 28-12-2004, de Medidas de Protección Integral contra la Vio-lencia de Género. Boletín Oficial del Estado, 29-12-2004, 313, 42166-42197.

Ley Orgánica 3/2007, de 22-03-207, para la Igualdad Efectiva de Mujeres y Hombres. Boletín Oficial del Estado, 23-03-2007, 71, 12.611-12.645.

Messineo, M. (2008). Does Advertising on Black Entertainment Television Portray more Positive Gender Representations Compared to Broadcast Networks? Sex Roles, 59(9-10), 752–764. (DOI:10.1007/s11199-008-9470-y).

Paek, H., Nelson, M.R. & Vilela, A.M. (2011). Examination of Gender-role Portrayals in Television Advertising across Seven Countries. Sex Roles, 64(3-4), 192-207. (DOI:10.1007/s11199-010-9850-y).

Pérez, J.P. (2009). El ritmo del spot de televisión actual. Narrativa audiovisual y categorías temporales en el palmarés del Festival Cannes Lions 2007. Zer, 14(27), 103-124.

Plakoyiannaki, E. & Zotos, Y. (2009). Female Role Stereotypes in Print Advertising. Identifying Associations with Magazine and Product Categories. European Journal of Marketing, 43(11-12), 1411-1434. (DOI:10.1108/03090560910989966).

Royo, M., Aldás, J., Küster, I. & Vila, N. (2005). Roles de género y sexismo en la publicidad de las revistas españolas: un análisis de las tres últimas décadas del siglo XX. Comunicación y Sociedad, 18(1), 113-152.

Salvador, M. (2008). La imagen de la mujer en los medios. Exigencias del principio de igualdad. Feminismo/s, 12, 185-202.

Sánchez, M.A. (2012). Estudio Infoadex de la inversión publicitaria en España 2012. Madrid: Infoadex.

Tsai, S.W. (2010). Family Man in Advertising? A Content Analysis of Male Domesticity and Fatherhood in Taiwanese Commercials. Asian Journal of Communication, 20(4), 423-439. (DOI:10.1080/01292986.2010.496860).

Zhang, L., Srisupandit, P. T. & Cartwright, D. (2009). A Comparison of Gender Role Portrayals in Magazine Advertising. The United States, China and Thailand. Management Research News, 32(7), 683-700. (DOI:10.1108/01409170910965279).

Zhou, N. & Chen, M.Y.T. (1997). A Content Analysis of Men and Women in Canadian Consumer Magazine Advertising: Today's Portrayal, Yesterday's Image? Journal of Business Ethics, 16(5), 485-495.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Los medios de comunicación en general, y la publicidad en particular, son considerados importantes agentes de socialización, incluso en temas relacionados con el género. No en vano el legislador se ha preocupado por la regulación de las imágenes de mujeres y hombres trasmitidas en los anuncios. Sin embargo, las normativas que prohíben la publicidad sexista en España prestan específica atención a los medios audiovisuales en detrimento del resto. En este escenario, el objetivo del presente trabajo es comprobar si este dispar interés según soporte se reproduce en la investigación. Así, se consideran las diferencias en la producción científica (nacional e internacional) sobre el sexismo publicitario en función del medio de comunicación observando específicamente la metodología, las técnicas y la forma concreta de medir este concepto en los artículos. Para ello se realiza una revisión sistemática de los estudios sobre publicidad y género publicados en español o en inglés entre 1988 y 2010 indexados en siete importantes bases de datos españolas (Dialnet, Compludoc, Isoc) e internacionales (Scopus, Sociological Abstracts, PubMed y Eric). A partir del análisis de los 175 textos seleccionados, los resultados apuntan que, a diferencia de los controles legislativos, la academia ha estudiado mayoritariamente el sexismo publicitario en los medios impresos, aunque el interés por el análisis del tratamiento de género en los discursos publicitarios audiovisuales parece irse acrecentando.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Los medios de comunicación son considerados como importantes agentes de socialización (Dietz, 1998: 428; Messineo, 2008: 752) capaces de influir en las ideas, en los valores, en las actitudes y en las creencias sociales y culturales de sus audiencias (Ibroscheva, 2007: 409). Así, se supone que los «mass media» trasmiten formas de vivir y patrones de comportamiento (Casado, 2005: 2). De manera específica se ha planteado que la publicidad, también como un importante agente de socialización (Tsai, 2010: 423), puede difundir valores culturales (Kalliny & Gentry, 2007: 17) y «llegar a reforzar determinados estilos de vida y estereotipos» (Royo, Aldás & al., 2005: 114). Asimismo se entiende que, en las sociedades industrializadas, la influencia de la comunicación comercial en hombres y mujeres es cada vez mayor (Díaz, Muñiz & Cáceres, 2009: 222). En concreto, y al tener en cuenta que los anunciantes utilizan con frecuencia estereotipos de género (Zhang, Srisupandit & Cartwright, 2009: 684), las representaciones que hacen los anuncios de mujeres y hombres son percibidas por las audiencias como las imágenes habituales de ambos sexos (Zhou & Chen, 1997: 485). En efecto, la masculinidad y la feminidad están condicionados por el entorno cultural y no por la naturaleza o la biología (Feasey, 2009: 358), de forma que la feminidad (y también la masculinidad) se trasmiten a través de los medios de comunicación y difieren en función de la cultura considerada (Frith, Shaw & Cheng, 2005: 56).

Bajo estas premisas, aunque no todos los estereotipos de género utilizados son sexistas1 (Jones & Reid, 2009: 20), no es de extrañar la proliferación de normativas que regulan la representación de los hombres y mujeres en la publicidad2. En el caso español, desde comienzos de este siglo se han producido diversos cambios regulatorios orientados a mejorar las representaciones de género en los anuncios. Así, la Ley General de Publicidad (1988), tras diversas modificaciones –entre las que destaca la aportada por la publicación de la Ley Orgánica de Medidas de Protección Integral contra la Violencia de Género (2004)–, considera ilícita la representación discriminatoria o vejatoria de las mujeres en la comunicación comercial cuando: a) Se usa directa o particularmente su cuerpo, o partes de éste, como simple objeto sin vinculación con el producto anunciado; b) Se utiliza su imagen relacionada con comportamientos estereotipados que coadyuven a generar violencia de género (Ley General de Publicidad, 1988).

Adicionalmente, la Ley Orgánica para la Igualdad Efectiva de Mujeres y Hombres (2007: 12.619) establece que «la publicidad que comporte una conducta discriminatoria de acuerdo con esta Ley se considerará publicidad ilícita, de conformidad con lo previsto en la legislación general de publicidad, y de publicidad y comunicación institucional».

Pero al margen de estas normas, referidas a la representación publicitaria de ambos sexos de forma genérica, nuestro marco jurídico establece diferencias para el control del sexismo publicitario en función del medio de comunicación3, de forma que existe regulación específica en los medios audiovisuales.

En efecto, desde 1994 y a través de la Ley de Televisión sin Fronteras (Ley por la que se Incorpora al Ordenamiento Jurídico Español la Directiva 89/552/ CEE, sobre la Coordinación de Disposiciones Legales, Reglamentarias y Administrativas de los Estados Miembros Relativas al Ejercicio de Actividades de Radiodifusión Televisiva, 1994: 22.346), actualmente derogada por la Ley General de la Comunicación Audiovisual (2010: 30.204), se considera publicidad ilícita aquella que se trasmite por televisión y muestra discriminación, entre otras cuestiones, por razón de sexo. A partir de 2010, y con la entrada en vigor de la Ley General de la Comunicación Audiovisual (2010: 30.174), esta consideración pasa a ser válida para los medios audiovisuales (radio y televisión).

Así, esta Ley –transposición de la Directiva de Servicios de Comunicación Audiovisual (Directiva por la que se Modifica la Directiva 89/552/CEE del Consejo sobre la Coordinación de Determinadas Disposiciones Legales, Reglamentarias y Administrativas de los Estados Miembros Relativas al Ejercicio de Actividades de Radiodifusión Televisiva, 2007)–, que se centra específicamente en la publicidad emitida en medios audiovisuales (radio y televisión), prohíbe, entre otras, la publicidad que atente contra la dignidad de las personas, la que promueva el sexismo o la que use la imagen de la mujer de forma discriminatoria o vejatoria. Además, considera como una grave infracción emitir contenidos que de manera manifiesta impulsen el desprecio, el odio o la discriminación, entre otras cuestiones, en función del sexo (Ley General de la Comunicación Audiovisual, 2010: 30.195). A su vez, establece que los servicios audiovisuales de pago no podrán «incitar al odio o a la discriminación por razón de género o cualquier circunstancia personal o social y debe ser respetuosa con la dignidad humana y los valores constitucionales, con especial atención a la erradicación de conductas favorecedoras de situaciones de desigualdad de las mujeres» (Ley General de la Comunicación Audiovisual, 2010: 30.167).

Frente a este control reforzado contra el sexismo en radio y televisión, «el ámbito de la prensa se caracteriza por la ausencia de normas reguladoras del sector» (Salvador, 2008: 189), y por eso es necesario recurrir a las leyes que tienen en cuenta la presentación de la imagen de las mujeres en la comunicación comercial de forma genérica (Ley Orgánica de Medidas de Protección Integral contra la Violencia de Género, 2004; Ley Orgánica para la Igualdad Efectiva de Mujeres y Hombres, 2007; Ley General de Publicidad, 1988).

El legislador europeo en general, y el español en concreto, parecen haber prestado una atención dispar a los distintos medios en los que se inserta la publicidad, redundando en la prevención en los audiovisuales frente a los escritos. Tradicionalmente ha existido un proceso para «incrementar la regulación de la radiodifusión televisiva hacia un estándar más estricto y más elevado que en otros medios de comunicación como la prensa» (Ariño, 2007: 13). Esta situación se debe, entre otras cuestiones, a la posible influencia del medio rey sobre los individuos.

La desemejanza de controles en función del medio nos lleva a analizar si el desequilibrio responde a una razón científica y se reproduce en la investigación. Nuestra pregunta es si el sexismo publicitario, objeto de interés desde los años sesenta (Eisend, 2010: 418), ha sido estudiado de manera distinta en la prensa escrita que en la televisión, medio que ha suscitado interés en torno a sus efectos (Furnham & Paltezer, 2010: 223).

El objetivo de este trabajo es en este contexto sintetizar la producción científica sobre el sexismo publicitario en función del medio de comunicación valorando de manera específica las disparidades en:

• La producción de artículos por años, revistas, zonas geográficas, idiomas, sexo del autor principal, autores e instituciones.

• Los objetos de estudio (personajes observados y tema analizado).

• Los conceptos y términos utilizados.

• La metodología, las técnicas y la forma concreta de medir (operacionalización) el concepto.

2. Material y métodos

Para alcanzar los objetivos anteriormente propuestos hemos realizado una revisión sistemática de textos vinculados con el género y la publicidad en los medios impresos y en la televisión4.

El universo de estudio ha estado formado por la totalidad de los artículos relacionados con el tema de la investigación divulgados en inglés o en español entre 1988 –año en el que se publica la Ley General de Publicidad5– y 2010 –la recogida de datos ha tenido lu-gar el primer trimestre de 2011– en revistas científicas indexadas en bases de datos multidisciplinares –nacionales (Dialnet, Compludoc e Isoc) e internacionales (Scopus)– y en bases de datos especializadas en sociología (Sociological Abstracts), educación (Eric) y medicina (PubMed)6.

La estrategia de búsqueda principal ha consistido en la localización, en el título y/o en el resumen de los documentos, de las siguientes palabras clave: «publicidad y mujer», «publicidad y género», «publicidad sexista», «publicidad y sexismo», «publicidad y estereotipos», «estereotipos de género y publicidad», «publicidad y discriminación por género», «publicidad y discriminación por sexo», «publicidad y discriminación» y «publicidad y sesgo de género» en Dialnet, Compludoc e Isoc. Por su parte, los mismos términos clave, pero en lengua inglesa, han sido buscados en Sociological Abstracts, PubMed, Eric y Scopus. De esta forma, del primer grupo de bases de datos se han seleccionado los documentos realizados en español y del segundo, los publicados en inglés.

La segunda estrategia de búsqueda ha dependido de las posibilidades que ofrecen las diversas bases de datos. Así, en Dialnet se han rastreado los términos clave en cualquier parte del artículo, por lo que la localización de las palabras clave en el título y/o en el resumen se ha efectuado de manera manual. En Compludoc se han realizado dos búsquedas, una para localizar los conceptos en el título y otra en el resumen. En Isoc se han analizado las áreas temáticas de forma conjunta a través de la búsqueda por campos, de manera que se han rastreado todas las palabras clave, al igual que en el caso anterior, en dos ocasiones. En PubMed, Eric, Sociological Abstracts y Scopus se han localizado directamente los términos clave en el título y en el resumen. Cuando la base de datos lo ha permitido se ha acotado el periodo temporal, la lengua y el tipo de documento, en el resto de ocasiones estas delimitaciones se efectuaron manualmente.

Después de localizar los textos se han seleccionado únicamente aquellos trabajos que cumplen ciertos criterios de inclusión: artículos empíricos publicados en revistas científicas que analizan bien la representación del hombre y/o de la mujer en la publicidad insertada en medios impresos o en la televisión, bien la percepción de la población sobre el género en los manifiestos publicitarios de los medios señalados o bien la situación del hombre y de la mujer en las agencias de publicidad que haga referencia a los medios de comunicación impresos o la televisión. Por tanto, se han eliminado las revisiones de la literatura.

La elección de los escritos a analizar ha sido efectuada de forma independiente por dos investigadores en función de los criterios establecidos y definidos con anterioridad (Deeks, 1998: 703, 708). Del total de documentos encontrados en las bases de datos consideradas, y a partir de la lectura del título, del resumen o del texto, se ha considerado que han cumplido los criterios de inclusión 175 artículos que, para ser examinados ha sido necesario recuperar y analizar el texto completo7. La mitad de estos ítems finales estaban recogidos en Scopus, un 22,7% en Sociological Abstracts, un 8,3% en Dialnet, un 6,4% en Isoc, un 5,3% en PubMed, un 3,8% en Eric y un 3,4% en Compludoc. Al considerar el tema del solapamiento, es decir, la presencia de los artículos en las diversas bases de datos, cabe destacar que de los 175 documentos examinados, 97 han sido hallados en una única base de datos, 67 en dos y 11 en tres.

Una vez recopilados los textos completos se ha procedido a su codificación a partir de un protocolo con tres categorías: a) características del escrito, b) autores y organizaciones y c) contenido de los textos. Dos personas han trabajado durante tres meses en la codificación de los escritos seleccionados y entre ellos han obtenido un índice medio de Kappa del 0,88. Para analizar la información disponible se ha realizado una base de datos en SPSS 15. De esta forma, se han utilizado los test de Chi-cuadrado de Pearson8, las tablas de contingencia, las tablas de respuesta múltiple, los gráficos de líneas y las frecuencias.

3. Análisis y resultados

3.1. Productividad

La figura 1, que representa la producción científica sobre sexismo publicitario en función del medio de comunicación, da cuenta, a primera vista, de dos cuestiones. En primer lugar, a lo largo de estos veintidós años, ha habido más interés por analizar los medios impresos que los audiovisuales (aunque las diferencias no son estadísticamente significativas). En segundo lugar, aunque la atención por los primeros ha sido creciente, en los últimos años (a partir de 2008) aparece una inversión de tendencias: los académicos comienzan a analizar con más fuerza lo audiovisual al tiempo que los estudios sobre sexismo y prensa disminuyen.


Draft Content 427912049-26784 ov-es052.jpg

Los 175 documentos analizados se encuentran distribuidos en 125 revistas, lo que traduce la variedad de publicaciones que incluyen textos vinculados con el tema de estudio y la escasa concentración de revistas especializadas sobre el asunto (pues la gran mayoría, 102, publican únicamente un escrito).

La publicación que reporta mayor número de artículos es «Sex Roles: A Journal of Research» con 19 trabajos (11 relacionados con los medios impresos y 8 con la televisión), seguido de «Journal of Advertising» con siete (cinco vinculados con los «mass media» impresos y dos con el audiovisual) y de «Comunicar» con cuatro (todos referentes a la televisión). Así, cabe destacar que en ninguna de las tres revistas señaladas aparecen investigaciones que analizan de forma conjunta ambos tipos de medios.

El 46,9% de los artículos seleccionados pertenece a revistas que estaban indexadas en la base de datos JCR en el año en el que publicaron el documento analizado; sin embargo, ni uno solo de estos textos está redactado en español o pertenece a revistas españolas (ver tabla 1). Con referencia al cuartil de estas publicaciones, que se encuentra disponible a partir de 2003 y que se calcula para cada una de las categorías temáticas en las que se inserta la revista, cabe destacar que de las 88 situaciones que se han podido examinar, únicamente el 9,1% forma parte del Q1, de manera que el 28,4% se ubican en el Q2, el 42% en el Q3 y el 20,5% en el Q4.


Draft Content 427912049-26784 ov-es053.jpg

Por su parte, de los 125 textos que fueron publicados a partir de 1999, año desde el que se encuentra disponible «SCImago Journal & Country Rank» (SJR) –portal que analiza la producción científica recuperada por Scopus–, 98 forman parte de las revistas consideradas por SJR en el año en el que publicaron el artículo examinado. Solamente nueve de estos 125 documentos están escritos en español y siete pertenecen a revistas españolas, frente a las 46 de Estados Unidos.

Con referencia a la zona geográfica, en general y teniendo en cuenta la producción total, se observan disimilitudes en el interés hacia los distintos «mass media», de forma que hay más artículos centrados en medios impresos que la televisión y estas diferencias de volumen son significativas en España (x2=7,407; p= 0,025) (48% vs. 36%), pero especialmente en el resto de Europa (x2=9,813; p=0,007) (83,1% frente a 8,5%). Atendiendo a la atención relativa otorgada a cada medio en función de la zona geográfica, vemos que el interés por los medios impresos es más importante en Europa (83,1%) y el resto del mundo (81,8%) que en USA (66,3%) y España, donde menos de la mitad de los artículos publicados se centran en exclusiva en este medio (48%). Nuestro país presta relativamente más atención a la televisión (36%) que lo que lo hace USA (28,8%), Europa (8,5%) y el resto del mundo (18,2%). Pero, además, España produce relativamente más investigación multimedia (con prensa y televisión) sobre el sexismo que el resto de zonas analizadas (16% frente a 8,5% en Europa y 5% en USA) (ver tabla 2 en la página siguiente).


Draft Content 427912049-26784 ov-es054.jpg

En todos los casos predomina la publicación de artículos en lengua inglesa (83,4% del total) frente al español (16,6% del global), aunque esta tendencia, y en consonancia con el punto anterior, es especialmente llamativa en el estudio de los medios escritos (87% frente a 13%). En el caso de los textos realizados en español la diferencia entre medios es considerablemente inferior que la existente en las investigaciones de lengua inglesa (24,2 puntos frente a 52,8 puntos), de forma que al considerar el porcentaje del idioma del documento es más habitual encontrar trabajos basados en el medio televisivo en español que en inglés (31% vs. 20,5%).

La mujer suele aparecer como la principal firmante en mayor número de ocasiones que los varones (65,1% del total frente a 33,7%). Así, las féminas rubrican 79 documentos relacionados con los medios impresos, 27 referentes a la televisión y ocho vinculados con ambos tipos de medios, contra los 42, 12 y 5 de los hombres respectivamente. No hay diferencias estadísticamente significativas en función de sexo a la atención prestada al medio impreso y al audiovisual.

El 44% de los artículos cuenta con un único signatario, el 50,3% entre dos y tres y solamente el 5,7% está firmado por más de tres autores, sin diferencias estadísticamente significativas por el medio de comunicación analizado.

En revistas españolas, las personas que publican un mayor número de documentos, concretamente cuatro, son Paloma Díaz (estudia los medios impresos) y Marcelo Royo. Así, este último autor junto a Mª José Miquel y Eva Caplliure forman el grupo más fructífero al publicar tres trabajos, uno centrado en analizar los medios impresos y los otros dos combinando su interés entre la televisión y los «media» escritos.

En el resto de publicaciones destaca la presencia de Elianne Riska, que posee cuatro artículos, siempre en coautoría y con análisis centrados en las revistas. Únicamente existe un grupo de firmantes que de forma conjunta aparece en más de una ocasión, concretamente en dos, Katherine Toland Frith, Hong Cheng y Ping Shaw que también estudian las revistas.

En los documentos analizados es poco frecuente la existencia de relaciones institucionales, así, predomina que los artículos estén realizados únicamente por una organización, ya que su presencia supone el 64,6% del total, los trabajos vinculados a dos entidades alcanzan el 22,3% y los escritos con un mayor número de organismos poseen únicamente el 5,7% del global. Pese a estas disimilitudes, las diferencias halladas no son estadísticamente significativas.

Las instituciones que aparecen en más ocasiones en revistas españolas, concretamente en cuatro artículos, son la Universidad Complutense de Madrid, la Universidad de Valencia y la Universidad Rey Juan Carlos. Por su parte, y con referencia al resto de publicaciones, la Universidad de California es la organización más fructífera. Así, estas cuatro organizaciones cuentan con artículos referentes a los medios impresos y a la televisión y poseen textos de forma individual y junto a otras instituciones.

3.2. Características de los artículos

Cuando los artículos observan a los personajes representados en la publicidad y especifican la edad examinada, el grupo poblacional más estudiado es el de jóvenes, seguido de adultos, ancianos, adolescentes y niños. En el caso de los medios impresos se sigue este mismo orden. No obstante, cuando se analiza la televisión de forma exclusiva, los niños y los adolescentes se investigan en el mismo porcentaje de ocasiones, y estos dos grupos de edad no son tenidos en cuenta en ninguno de los artículos que se centran de forma conjunta en los medios impresos y la televisión. Únicamente se producen diferencias estadísticamente significativas con referencia a los niños (x2=7,16; p=0,028), de forma que su presencia es superior cuando se analiza el medio televisivo que el impreso (66,7% vs. 33,3%).

Cuando lo que estudian los artículos es la percepción que la población (o grupos de edad de la población) tiene sobre los anuncios (principalmente a través de grupos de discusión, entrevistas o cuestionarios), cabe destacar que los niños no son preguntados en ninguna ocasión. Es a los jóvenes a los que se les presta más atención, seguido de los adultos, los adolescentes y, por último, los ancianos. En efecto, los jóvenes y los adultos son los grupos poblacionales más consultados en todas las situaciones, es más, los documentos que se centran en los medios audiovisuales de forma exclusiva no recurren en ninguna ocasión a los adolescentes ni a los ancianos.

A pesar de que el tema central de esta investigación es la mujer y la publicidad, existen artículos que también prestan atención al hombre. De esta forma, al tener en cuenta el sexo de los personajes analizados en los discursos, como muestra la tabla 3, el varón es investigado en el 41,4% de los documentos que estudian medios impresos, en el 47,3% de los que se centran en la televisión y el 40% de aquéllos que observan ambos tipos de medios, frente al 58,6%, al 52,7% y al 60% respectivamente que examinan a la mujer. No obstante en esta generalidad existen diferencias estadísticamente significativas (x2=7,704; p=0,021) en el caso de los varones, de forma que es más frecuente que éstos sean examinados en los textos que se basan en los medios escritos (66,1%) que en los trabajos que consideran la televisión (27,6%) o ambos tipos de medios (6,3%).


Draft Content 427912049-26784 ov-es055.jpg

Cuando los trabajos recurren a la población se produce una situación muy similar a la descrita anteriormente, es decir, predomina el análisis de la población femenina en los artículos que escrutan los medios impresos (58,6% vs. 41,4%) y en los que se tiene en cuenta la televisión (66,7% frente a 33,3%). Sin embargo, cuando los documentos inspeccionan ambos medios lo hacen de forma equitativa (50%). En esta ocasión, las diferencias señaladas no son estadísticamente significativas.

Al tener en cuenta que para la realización de este estudio únicamente se han seleccionado aquellos artículos que se centran en los «mass media» escritos y/o en la televisión, como era de esperar, no se ha encontrado ningún artículo que analice al hombre y/o a la mujer en las agencias de publicidad que haga referencia de forma específica a estos medios de comunicación. Por su parte, es más frecuente estudiar la presentación de la imagen de hombres y mujeres en la comunicación comercial que la percepción que posee la población acerca de esta representación para todos los medios: 85,9% frente a 14,1% al observar la prensa, 85,7% vs. 14,3% al examinar la televisión, y 76,9% contra 23,1% al considerar ambos, aunque estas diferencias no son estadísticamente significativas.

3.3. Término clave

Pese a que todos los términos clave han reportado artículos relacionados con los medios impresos, cuatro de los conceptos utilizados –«publicidad y sesgo de género», «publicidad y discriminación», «publicidad y discriminación por género» y «publicidad y discriminación por sexo»– no ofrecen resultados en el resto de supuestos. «Publicidad y mujer» y «publicidad y género» son las combinaciones que más resultados proporcionan, sin diferencias por medio. Únicamente «publicidad y estereotipos» arroja diferencias estadísticamente significativas por medio (x2=15,739; p=0,000), de forma que reporta un mayor número de artículos relacionados con los «mass media» impresos (46,5%).

3.4. Indicadores de género, operacionalización y sexismo

Pese a no existir diferencias estadísticamente significativas, la metodología cuantitativa es utilizada con mayor frecuencia que la cualitativa en los textos que analizan los medios escritos (61% vs. 39%) y en los trabajos centrados en la televisión (71,4% frente a 28,6%), no obstante, cuando se estudian los dos medios de manera conjunta se recurre a ambas metodologías de forma equitativa (50%).

La mayoría de los artículos suelen realizar e identificar, aunque sea de forma únicamente parcial, la operacionalización efectuada para analizar la publicidad sexista. Así, los trabajos relacionados con los medios escritos muestran esta información en el 85,4% de las ocasiones, los textos vinculados con la televisión en el 89,7% y los documentos que tienen en cuenta ambos tipos de medios en el 76,9% de los casos, sin diferencias estadísticamente significativas. Por su parte, cabe descartar que no se ofrece información referente a esta temática en el 12% del total.

Las investigaciones utilizan escalas para medir el sexismo publicitario en el 67,4% del global (67,5% para medios impresos, 71,8% en el caso de la televisión y 53,8% para ambos tipos de medios). Las categorías temáticas son empleadas en el 24,6% de los artículos para valorar la existencia de publicidad sexista sin diferencias estadísticamente significativas en función del «mass media» observado.

Únicamente en el 8,6% de los documentos se llega a la conclusión de que la publicidad no es sexista o de que las representaciones de género mostradas en los anuncios no pueden ser calificadas como tradicionales. Sin embargo, ni uno solo de estos artículos trata en exclusiva la televisión. Es decir, ninguno de los textos académicos recopilados concluye la salubridad, en términos de género, de la publicidad televisiva, de forma que existen diferencias estadísticamente significativas en función del medio (x2=11,852; p=0,003), ya que el 73,3% de estos estudios se centran en la prensa.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Los datos obtenidos señalan que, en general, y especialmente en el ámbito internacional, hay más investigación sobre sexismo y discriminación en función del género en la publicidad en prensa que en televisión. Hay una razón operativa para esta tendencia: analizar el contenido de este último soporte es más difícil. Así, podría considerarse que el motivo de los investigadores para no centrar su interés en la televisión se relaciona, según Pérez (2009: 105), con que «el carácter efímero de los formatos audiovisuales publicitarios supone pues una dificultad añadida para su análisis», además, este autor (Pérez, 2009: 105) señala que las amplias posibilidades en la realización y en el lenguaje utilizado en los «spots» de televisión «han dificultado el establecimiento de una metodología estricta que permita su análisis desde parámetros científicos». Por tanto, se ha recurrido a los medios impresos por su facilidad de estudio pese a que como señala el presente trabajo las metodologías escogidas para analizar los sesgos en los distintos medios no muestran diferencias relevantes.

Por otra parte, y con relación al conjunto de trabajos, resulta realmente complejo conocer la existencia de sexismo en los medios de comunicación considerados, pues la academia no suele posicionarse al respecto. Así, en los artículos, principalmente descriptivos, lo más frecuente es encontrar un inventario de la imagen de mujeres y hombres, de forma que no se especifica si ésta puede ser considerada como discriminatoria. La falta de delimitación y operacionalización de los conceptos dificulta valorar la validez de estos trabajos con relación al tratamiento del género en los medios y hacer una comparación con la aplicación legal. En este sentido, diversos autores (Furnham & Paltzer, 2010: 223; Paek, Nelson & Vilela, 2011: 193) coinciden en afirmar que las investigaciones vinculadas con el tema de estudio carecen de marco teórico.

El análisis de los sesgos de género en el discurso publicitario, en función del medio, se diferencia sutilmente en el caso español. Nuestro país tiene una mayor querencia relativa a observar la televisión, bien por presunciones académicas –el medio audiovisual como el que posee mayor porcentaje de penetración en los individuos (Asociación para la Investigación de Medios de Comunicación, 2012), el que cuenta con la más elevada inversión publicitaria9 y el que es más influyente en términos de socialización de género (Espinar, 2006)– bien por la influencia del marco legal.

En efecto, en España, desde hace más de 15 años (Ley por la que se Incorpora al Ordenamiento Jurídico Español la Directiva 89/552/CEE, sobre la Coordinación de Disposiciones Legales, Reglamentarias y Administrativas de los Estados Miembros Relativas al Ejercicio de Actividades de Radiodifusión Televisiva, 1994) las normativas públicas que delimitan la discriminación por sexo en los anuncios de manera genérica (Ley Orgánica de Medidas de Protección Integral contra la Violencia de Género, 2004; Ley Orgánica para la Igualdad Efectiva de Mujeres y Hombres, 2007; Ley General de Publicidad, 1988) conviven con una legislación específica que hace corresponsable al operador de televisión de la difusión de contenidos atentatorios.

Precisamente nuestra tesis es que ha sido el establecimiento de una serie de normas y controles en diversos ámbitos (así como el clima de sensibilidad social hacia la importancia de los medios audiovisuales en la construcción de la igualdad de género) el hecho que ha podido impulsar estudios de evaluación de la aplicación de las normas en nuestro país.

Finalmente, cabe señalar como principal limitación el haber analizado únicamente artículos científicos, lo que implica rechazar otras importantes fuentes de información. Pese a esta restricción, y con enfoque de género, la presente investigación contribuye a ampliar el conocimiento científico relacionado con las diferencias en el estudio de la publicidad impresa y televisiva. Sin que los datos manejados permitan establecer una relación causal, cabría plantearse en trabajos futuros si estas peculiaridades habrían estado propiciadas por nuestro específico marco legal y/o viceversa. También sería interesante comprobar si la percepción de sexismo publicitario coincide entre la audiencia, la academia y los jueces encargados de decidir la presencia o ausencia de discriminación por sexo en los anuncios.

Notas

1 El sexismo es la representación de hombres y mujeres de manera inferior a sus capacidades y a su potencial (Plakoyiannaki & Zotos, 2009: 1.411).

2 Un resumen de las principales normativas estatales (Constitución, legislación nacional y derecho autonómico), europeas (directivas comunitarias) e internacionales (Declaración de Atenas, Conferencia de Pekín y Conferencia de Nueva Delhi) relacionadas con esta temática se encuentra disponible en Balaguer (2008).

3 Se descarta de este análisis la Ley de Servicios de la Sociedad de la Información y de Comercio Electrónico (2002: 25.391) por hacer una única referencia a la discriminación por sexo relacionada con la prestación de servicios de la sociedad de la información de forma general y no con la publicidad de manera particular, que, además, está más cercana a los principios constitucionales que a la Ley General de Publicidad, pues establece «el respeto a la dignidad de la persona y al principio de no discriminación por motivos de raza, sexo, religión, opinión, nacionalidad, discapacidad o cualquier otra circunstancia personal o social».

4 Los medios impresos han sido englobados en un mismo conjunto debido a la falta de información ofrecida por gran parte de los documentos analizados. Con referencia a los «mass media» audiovisuales únicamente se ha tenido en cuenta la televisión, ya que solamente se ha encontrado un trabajo referente al cine y tres a la radio. Por su parte, el medio Internet posee su propia normativa no considerada en este estudio.

5 La promulgación de esta Ley supone considerar por primera vez en España como ilegal los anuncios sexistas, ya que se establece como ilícita «la publicidad que atente contra la dignidad de la persona o vulnere los valores y derechos reconocidos en la Constitución, especialmente en lo que se refiere a la infancia, la juventud y la mujer» (Ley General de Publicidad, 1988: 32.465).

6 Para seleccionar la base de datos multidisciplinar e internacional se realizó una búsqueda exploratoria tanto en Web of Science como en Scopus, las dos bases de datos de referencia. El número de artículos recuperados para el primer caso fue 936, mientras que en el segundo esta cifra se incrementó a 1.339 artículos que pertenecían a las áreas de Medicina (640), Ciencias Sociales (383), Psicología (210), Negocios, Administración y Contabilidad (201), Enfermería (74), Artes y Humanidades (60), Economía, Econometría y Finanzas (59), Agricultura y Ciencias Biológicas (56), Profesiones de la Salud (48), Bioquímica, Genética y Biología Molecular (29), Neurociencia (22), Ciencias de los Materiales (21), Farmacología, Toxicología y Farmacia (17), Ingeniería (16), Ciencias de la Computación (14), Ciencias Ambientales (10), Inmunología y Microbiología (8), Tierra y Ciencias Planetarias (5), Ingeniería Química (4), Ciencias de la Decisión (4), Odontología (2), Física y Astronomía (2) y Matemáticas (2), además, dos textos eran multidisciplinares y 101 no estaban clasificados. Se decidió utilizar Scopus no solo por el dato cuantitativo, sino también por las características cualitativas. Aunque Web of Science recoge las revistas de referencia de mayor calidad e índice de impacto, con relación a nuestro tema de estudio, adolece de sesgos geográficos (se centra en USA) y temáticos (recoge principalmente revistas vinculadas a las Ciencias). En Scopus la representación de las Ciencias Sociales es modesta, de forma que para solventar este problema se incluyó la base de datos Sociological Abstract. Se utilizó PubMed debido al amplio número de artículos hallados en Scopus referentes al área de medicina y se recurrió a Eric con el propósito de observar los estudios realizados desde el campo de la educación, pues la Ley Orgánica para la Igualdad Efectiva de Mujeres y Hombres (2007) otorga gran importancia a este ámbito. Por su parte, Dialnet, Compludoc e Isoc fueron seleccionadas por indexar literatura académica realizada en español.

7 En el caso de que la base de datos no ofreciera el escrito completo éste se buscó a través de las suscripciones impresas y electrónicas de la Universidad de Alicante (revistas, sumarios y bases de datos). Si el artículo no se localizó a través de esta alternativa, se solicitó el texto a los propios autores por correo electrónico y, como última opción, se recurrió al préstamo interbibliotecario.

8 Consideramos que las diferencias son estadísticamente significativas cuando p<0,05.

9 La televisión, dentro del conjunto de los medios convencionales, es el «mass media» con mayor volumen de negocio publicitario (Sánchez, 2012: 8).

Apoyos y agradecimientos

Las autoras agradecen a la Generalitat Valenciana la concesión de la Beca FPI, la colaboración de aquellos autores que les han facilitados sus artículos y el apoyo del Punto Bibliotecario de Información al Usuario (Punto BIU) de la Universidad de Alicante.

Referencias

Ariño, M. (2007). Contenido de vídeo en línea: ¿Regulación 2.0? Un análisis en el contexto de la nueva Directiva de servicios de medios audiovisuales. Quaderns del CAC, 29, 3-17.

Asociación para la Investigación de Medios de Comunicación (2012). Resumen General EGM. Madrid: Asociación para la Investigación de Medios de Comunicación. (www.aimc.es/-Datos-EGM-Resumen-General-.html).

Balaguer, M.L. (2008). Género y regulación de la publicidad en el ordenamiento jurídico. La imagen de la mujer. Revista Latina, 63, 382-391. (DOI:10.4185/RLCS-63-2008-775-382-391).

Casado, F. (2005). La realidad televisiva como modelo de comportamiento social: Una propuesta didáctica. Comunicar, 13(25). (www.revistacomunicar.com/index.php?contenido=detalles&numero=25&articulo=25-2005-196).

Deeks, J.J. (1998). Systematic Reviews of Published Evidence: Miracles or Minefields? Annals of Oncology, 9(7), 703-709.

Díaz, P., Muñiz, C. & Cáceres, D. (2009). Consumo de revistas de moda y efectos en la autopercepción del cuerpo de mujeres: Un estudio comparado entre España y México desde la tercera persona. Comunicación y Sociedad, 22(2), 221-242.

Dietz, T.L. (1998). An Examination of Violence and Gender Role Portrayals in Video Games: Implications for Gender Socialization and Aggressive Behaviour. Sex Roles, 38(5-6), 425-442. (DOI:10.1023/A:1018709905920).

Directiva 2007/65/CE del Parlamento Europeo y del Consejo de 11-12-2007 por la que se Modifica la Directiva 89/552/CEE del Consejo sobre la Coordinación de Determinadas Disposiciones Legales, Reglamentarias y Administrativas de los Estados Miembros Relativas al Ejercicio de Actividades de Radiodifusión Televisiva. Diario Oficial de la Unión Europea, 18-12-2007, Serie L, 332, 27-45.

Eisend, M. (2010). A Meta-analysis of Gender Roles in Advertising. Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 38(4), 418-440. (DOI:10.1007/s11747-009-0181-x).

Espinar, E. (2006). Imágenes y estereotipos de género en la programación y en la publicidad infantil. Análisis cuantitativo. Revista Latina, 61. (www.revistalatinacs.org/200614EspinarRuiz.htm).

Feasey, R. (2009). Spray More, Get More: Masculinity, Television Advertising and the Lynx Effect. Journal of Gender Studies, 18(4), 357-368. (DOI:10.1080/095892309032-60027).

Frith, K., Shaw, P. & Cheng, H, (2005). The Construction of Beauty: A Cross-cultural Analysis of Women’s Magazine Advertising. Journal of Communication, 55(1), 56-70. (DOI:10.1111/j.1460-2466.2005.tb02658.x).

Furnham, A. & Paltzer, S. (2010). The Portrayal of Men and Women in Television Advertisements: An Updated Review of 30 Studies Published since 2000. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 51(3), 216-236. (DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9450.2009.00772.x).

Ibroscheva, E. (2007). Caught between East and West? Portrayals of Gender in Bulgarian Television Advertisements. Sex Roles, 57(5-6), 409-418. (DOI:10.1007/s11199-007-9261-x).

Jones, S.C. & Reid, A. (2010). The Use of Female Sexuality in Australian Alcohol Advertising: Public Policy Implications of Young Adults’ Reactions to Stereotypes. Journal of Public Affairs, 10(1-2), 19-35. (DOI:10.1002/pa.339).

Kalliny, M. & Gentry, L. (2007). Cultural Values Reflected in Arab and American Television Advertising. Journal of Current Issues and Research in Advertising, 29(1), 15-32. (DOI:10.1080/10641734.2007.10505205).

Ley 25/1994, de 12-07-1994, por la que se Incorpora al Ordenamiento Jurídico Español la Directiva 89/552/CEE, sobre la Coordinación de Disposiciones Legales, Reglamentarias y Administrativas de los Estados Miembros Relativas al Ejercicio de Actividades de Radiodifusión Televisiva. Boletín Oficial del Estado, 13-07-1994, 166, 22342-22348.

Ley 34/1988, de 11-11-1988, General de Publicidad. Boletín Oficial del Estado, 15-11-1988, 274, 32464-32467.

Ley 34/2002, de 11-07-2002, de Servicios de la Sociedad de la Información y de Comercio Electrónico. Boletín Oficial del Estado, 12-07-2002, 166, 25388-25403.

Ley 7/2010, de 31-03-2010, General de la Comunicación Audiovisual. Boletín Oficial del Estado, 01-04-2010, 79, 30157-30209.

Ley Orgánica 1/2004, de 28-12-2004, de Medidas de Protección Integral contra la Vio-lencia de Género. Boletín Oficial del Estado, 29-12-2004, 313, 42166-42197.

Ley Orgánica 3/2007, de 22-03-207, para la Igualdad Efectiva de Mujeres y Hombres. Boletín Oficial del Estado, 23-03-2007, 71, 12.611-12.645.

Messineo, M. (2008). Does Advertising on Black Entertainment Television Portray more Positive Gender Representations Compared to Broadcast Networks? Sex Roles, 59(9-10), 752–764. (DOI:10.1007/s11199-008-9470-y).

Paek, H., Nelson, M.R. & Vilela, A.M. (2011). Examination of Gender-role Portrayals in Television Advertising across Seven Countries. Sex Roles, 64(3-4), 192-207. (DOI:10.1007/s11199-010-9850-y).

Pérez, J.P. (2009). El ritmo del spot de televisión actual. Narrativa audiovisual y categorías temporales en el palmarés del Festival Cannes Lions 2007. Zer, 14(27), 103-124.

Plakoyiannaki, E. & Zotos, Y. (2009). Female Role Stereotypes in Print Advertising. Identifying Associations with Magazine and Product Categories. European Journal of Marketing, 43(11-12), 1411-1434. (DOI:10.1108/03090560910989966).

Royo, M., Aldás, J., Küster, I. & Vila, N. (2005). Roles de género y sexismo en la publicidad de las revistas españolas: un análisis de las tres últimas décadas del siglo XX. Comunicación y Sociedad, 18(1), 113-152.

Salvador, M. (2008). La imagen de la mujer en los medios. Exigencias del principio de igualdad. Feminismo/s, 12, 185-202.

Sánchez, M.A. (2012). Estudio Infoadex de la inversión publicitaria en España 2012. Madrid: Infoadex.

Tsai, S.W. (2010). Family Man in Advertising? A Content Analysis of Male Domesticity and Fatherhood in Taiwanese Commercials. Asian Journal of Communication, 20(4), 423-439. (DOI:10.1080/01292986.2010.496860).

Zhang, L., Srisupandit, P. T. & Cartwright, D. (2009). A Comparison of Gender Role Portrayals in Magazine Advertising. The United States, China and Thailand. Management Research News, 32(7), 683-700. (DOI:10.1108/01409170910965279).

Zhou, N. & Chen, M.Y.T. (1997). A Content Analysis of Men and Women in Canadian Consumer Magazine Advertising: Today's Portrayal, Yesterday's Image? Journal of Business Ethics, 16(5), 485-495.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/05/13
Accepted on 31/05/13
Submitted on 31/05/13

Volume 21, Issue 1, 2013
DOI: 10.3916/C41-2013-10
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 8
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?